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what does the notation rr mean to geneticists?

Hi, can someone check my answers asap!!? i am on a deadline!!

  1. What doe the notation TT mean to geneticists? (1 point)
    two dominant alleles
    heterozygous alleles
    at least one dominant allele
    one dominant and one recessive allele
  2. An organisms genotype is (1 point)
    its physical appearance
    its combanation of alleles
    the mutations it inherits
    the crossing over that occurs during meiosis
  3. An organisms phenotype is (1 point)
    its physical appearance
    its combanation of alleles
    the mutations it inherits
    the crossing over that occurs during meiosis
  4. What occurs during meiosis that does not occur during mitosis? (1 point)
    chromosomes are passed to offspring
    a cell divides in half
    the chromosomes number is divided in half
    two sex cells combine
  5. What is the probability of two tall pea plants, heterozygous for the tall allele, producing a short pea plant?
    (1 point)
    75%
    50%
    25%
    0%
  6. A plant with dark-purple flowers and a plant with white flowers are crossed. All of the offspring have lavender flowers. The alleles for the flower color in this plant are (1 point)
    both dominant
    both recessive
    codominant
    incompletetely dominant
  7. A plant with dark-red flowers and a plant with white flowers are crossed. All of the offspring have dark red flowers wit white spots. The alleles for the flower color in this plant are (1 point)
    both dominant
    both recessive
    codominant
    incompletetely dominant
  8. Scientists believe that cancer occurs when (1 point)
    cells stop dividing
    DNA is damaged and cells grow out of control
    body cells begin going through meiosis
    cells cannot replicate their DNA
  9. The order of the bases along a gene determines (1 point)
    the structure of a carbohydrate
    the structure of a protein
    how DNA is passed down to offspring
    how chromosomes are arranged in the nucleus
  10. What does messenger RNA do during protein synthesis? (1 point)
    copies the coded message from the DNA and carries it into the cytoplasm
    copies the coded message from the DNA and carries it into the nucleus
    carries amino acids and adds them to the growing protein
    copies the coded message from the protein and carries it into the nucleus
  11. What is a change in the sequence of DNA base pairs called? (1 point)
    an allele
    a mutation
    mitosis
    meiosis
  12. A trait is controlled by multiple genes is called (1 point)
    polygenic
    incompletely dominant
    codominant
    Mendalian
  13. In asexual reproduction, the offspring are (1 point)
    not capable of dividing
    formed by the fusing of sex cells
    genetically identical to their parent
    produced by meiosis

My Answers:
A
B
A
C
A
D
C
B
B
A
B
A
C

help asap!!!

7 0 2,107
asked by TTR+S<3
Jan 16, 2014
nevermind, i got everything right but number 5, it was 25%

1 2
posted by TTR+S<3
Jan 16, 2014
thanks

1 0
posted by kksuderdijq
Oct 28, 2014
thank you do much!!

1 0
posted by Help PLEASE
Jan 27, 2015
Everything is correct except number 5… it is 25%!! I just took the test.

1 0
posted by …..
Apr 23, 2015

We go to the same school

1 0
posted by Mee
Oct 30, 2015
hey thx guyz tis really helped me out:)

1 0
posted by joey
Apr 27, 2016
A
B
A
C
C
D
C
B
B
A
B
A
C

100% gaureenteed

11 0
posted by Yuno Gasai
May 24, 2016
Yuno gasai is 100% good luck students

2 1
posted by Helping you
Oct 13, 2016
100% correct

2 0
posted by Yoyo
Oct 15, 2016

its
a
b
a
c
c
d
c
b
b
a
b
a
c

2 0
posted by alex
Oct 19, 2016
thx so much for the help I got a 100%

0 0
posted by Lucy
Dec 1, 2016
yes, Yuno Gasai is 100 percent correct. I just took the quiz.

1 0
posted by sabbie.pinkie
Dec 6, 2016
thank you alex and yuno gasia i got a 100%

1 0
posted by Anonymous
Dec 21, 2016
This it one 100% for CCA, ON MY LIFE, you will get 100%.
A
B
A
C
C
D
C
B
B
A
B
A
C
Hope this helps!!!!!
100%

4 0
posted by Anonymous
May 12, 2017

r u like TT

0 1
posted by taehyung
Jun 4, 2017
wut

0 1
posted by bts
Jun 4, 2017
thanks 100%

1 0
posted by Anonymous
Oct 23, 2017
Thanks 100%

1 0
posted by Isaac
Dec 1, 2017
10000000000% thnks

1 0
posted by blah
Feb 7, 2018

Hgify97t68a7ivdgsjhfidugskdbhjzfsgvyjhx j,vsioowgivsklsfisvdkbwguhi9qfwYESusioedufieofuhvjcn cjcbhsdhhidhbdsidjbdjjvbidjhuishccdchisk cgdusidcj

0 1
posted by Did you realize you can have up to 100 characters in your name? Well, now you know and I’ve used it.
Feb 12, 2018
YOU BETTER LOVE KPOP OR I’LL PULL YOUR HEART OUT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

0 1
posted by YOOOO I LOVE KPOP TAEHYUNG IS BAE
Mar 27, 2018
I’m like TT!! I love Twice!

0 2
posted by Hannah
May 7, 2018
Thanks person who created this question! You are a risk-taker!(Good thing)

0 0
posted by Helper
May 17, 2018
I have not took it yet but I hope I get it right and I am taking it tomarrow.

0 0
posted by Nun ya Business
Oct 15, 2018

thank you even though it was a FREAKING PRCTICE AND WONT EFFECT MY GRADE I STILL GOT A 100 I WANNA THANK YOU.

0 0
posted by conexus student
Oct 25, 2018
I think its easier to see with the Q’s numbers are on it. 100%:

  1. A
  2. B
  3. A
  4. C
  5. C
  6. D
  7. C
  8. B
  9. B
  10. A
  11. B
  12. A
  13. C 0 0
    posted by HERE U GO
    Oct 28, 2018
    I wanted to check my answers 0 0
    posted by Student
    Oct 29, 2018
    Lol, I’m hoping ur all right cuz ima turn it in right now and I’m a connexus student. 0 0
    posted by Who knows
    Nov 19, 2018
    OMG YASS I GOT 100%!! THANK YOU ALL WHO GAVE THE ANSWERS 0 0
    posted by Who knows
    Nov 19, 2018
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1 Mass Communication, Culture, and Media Literacy

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Learning Objectives Mass communication, mass media, and the culture that shapes us (and that we shape) are inseparable. After studying this chapter, you should be able to

Our experiences of the world are increasingly mass mediated. © Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Define communication, mass communication, mass media, and cu lture. Describe the relationships among communication, mass communihttps://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/chapter01/chapter01.xhtml#lo0100https://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/chapter01/chapter01.xhtml#lo0101

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cation, culture, and those who live in the culture. Evaluate the impact of technology and economics on those relation ships. List the components of media literacy. Identify key skills required for developing media literacy.https://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/chapter01/chapter01.xhtml#lo0101https://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/chapter01/chapter01.xhtml#lo0102https://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/chapter01/chapter01.xhtml#lo0103https://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/chapter01/chapter01.xhtml#lo0104

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YOUR SMARTPHONE’S RADIO ALARM SINGS YOU AWAKE. It’s Sam Smith, the last few bars of “Stay With Me.” The laughing deejay shouts at you that it’s 7:41 and you’d better get going. But before you do, he adds, listen to a few words from your friends at Best Buy electronics, home of fast, friendly, courteous service—“Buyer be happy!”

In the living room, you find your roommate has left the television on. You stop for a moment and listen: The economy is showing stronger signs of rebounding, brightening the employment picture for new college grads; several states are considering providing free high-speed Internet to all students to improve their access to the digital world; democratic chaos continues to sweep across the Middle East; and you deserve a break today at McDonald’s. As you head toward the bathroom, your bare feet slip on some magazines littering the floor—Wired, Rolling Stone, People. You need to talk to your roommate about picking up!

After showering, you quickly pull on your Levi’s, lace up your Nike cross-trainers, and throw on an Under Armour jacket. No time for breakfast; you grab a Nature Valley granola bar and your tablet and head for the bus stop. As the bus rolls up, you can’t help but notice the giant ad on its side: Transformers: Turning Toys Into Gold. Rejecting that as a movie choice for the weekend, you sit down next to a teenager listening to music on his headphones and playing a video game. You bury yourself in your favorite news app on your tablet, scanning the lead stories and the local news and then checking out Doonesbury and Dilbert.

Hopping off the bus at the campus stop, you run into Chris from your computer lab. You walk to class together, talking about last night’s Family Guy episode. It’s not yet 9:00, and already you’re involved in mass communication.

In this chapter we define communication, interpersonal communication, mass communication, media, and culture and explore the relationships among them and how they define us and our world. We investigate how communication works, how it changes when technology is introduced into the process, and how differing views of communication and mass communication can lead to different interpretations of their power. We also discuss the opportunities mass communication and culture offer us and the responsibilities that come with those opportunities. Always crucial, these issues are of particular importance now, when we find ourselves in a period of remarkable development in new communication technologies. This discussion inevitably leads to an examination of media literacy, its importance, and its practice.

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What Is Mass Communication? “Does a fish know it’s wet?” influential cultural and media critic Marshall McLuhan would often ask. The answer, he would say, is “No.” The fish’s existence is so dominated by water that only when water is absent is the fish aware of its condition.

So it is with people and mass media. The media so fully saturate our everyday lives that we are often unconscious of their presence, not to mention their influence. Media inform us, entertain us, delight us, annoy us. They move our emotions, challenge our intellects, insult our intelligence. Media often reduce us to mere commodities for sale to the highest bidder. Media help define us; they shape our realities.

A fundamental theme of this book is that media do none of this alone. They do it with us as well as to us through mass communication, and they do it as a central—many critics and scholars say the central—cultural force in our society.

Communication Defined In its simplest form, communication is the transmission of a message from a source to a receiver. For nearly 70 years now, this view of communication has been identified with the writing of political scientist Harold Lasswell (1948). He said that a convenient way to describe communication is to answer these questions:

Who? Says what?https://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/glossary.xhtml#key-communication

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Expressed in terms of the basic elements of the communication process, communication occurs when

Straightforward enough, but what if the source is a professor who insists on speaking in a technical language far beyond the receiving students’ level of skill? Obviously, communication does not occur. Unlike mere message-sending, communication requires the response of others. Therefore, there must be a sharing (or correspondence) of meaning for communication to take place.

A second problem with this simple model is that it suggests that the receiver passively accepts the source’s message. However, if our imaginary students do not comprehend the professor’s words, they respond with “Huh?” or look confused or yawn. This response, or feedback, is also a message. The receivers (the students) now become a source, sending their own message to the source (the offending professor), who is now a receiver. Hence, communication is a reciprocal and ongoing process with all involved parties more or less engaged in creating shared meaning. Communication, then, is better defined as the process of creating shared meaning.

Communication researcher Wilbur Schramm, using ideas originally developed by psychologist Charles E. Osgood, developed a graphic way to represent the reciprocal nature of communication (Figure 1). This depiction of interpersonal communication— communication between two or a few people—shows that there is no clearly identifiable source or receiver. Rather, because communication is an ongoing and reciprocal process, all the participants, or “interpreters,” are working to create meaning by encoding and decoding messages. A message is first encoded, that is, transformed into an understandable sign and symbol system. Speaking is encoding, as are writing, printing, and filming a television program. Once received, the message is decoded; that is, the signs and symbols are interpreted. Decoding occurs through listening, reading, or watching that television show.

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Through which channel?

To whom? With what effect?https://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/glossary.xhtml#key-feedbackhttps://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/chapter01/chapter01.xhtml#figure0101https://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/glossary.xhtml#key-interpersonal-communicationhttps://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/glossary.xhtml#key-encodinghttps://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/glossary.xhtml#key-decoding

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Figure 1 Osgood and Schramm’s Model of Communication. Source: From The Process and Effects of Mass Communication by Wilbur Lang Schramm, 1954. Reprinted by permission of Mary Schramm Coberly.

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The Osgood–Schramm model demonstrates the ongoing and reciprocal nature of the communication process. There is, therefore, no source, no receiver, and no feedback. The reason is that, as communication is happening, both interpreters are simultaneously source and receiver. There is no feedback because all messages are presumed to be in reciprocation of other messages. Even when your friend starts a conversation with you, for example, it can be argued that it was your look of interest and willingness that communicated to her that she should speak. In this example, it is improper to label either you or your friend as the source—Who really initiated this chat?—and, therefore, it is impossible to identify who is providing feedback to whom.

Not every model can show all aspects of a process as complex as communication. Missing from this representation is noise—anything that interferes with successful communication. Noise is more than screeching or loud music when you are trying to work online. Biases that lead to incorrect decoding, for example, are noise, as is a page torn out of a magazine story you want to read.

Encoded messages are carried by a medium, that is, the means of sending information. Sound waves are the medium that carries our voice to friends across the table; the telephone is the medium that carries our voice to friends across town. When the medium is a technology that carries messages to a large number of people—as newspapers carry the printed word and radio conveys the sound of music and news—we call it a mass medium (the plural of medium is media). The mass media we use regularly include radio, television, books, magazines, newspapers, movies, sound recordings, cell phones, and computer networks. Each medium is the basis of a giant industry, but other related and supporting industries also serve them and us —advertising and public relations, for example. In our culture we use the words media and mass media interchangeably to refer to the communication industries themselves. We say, “The media entertain” or “The mass media are too conservative (or too liberal).”

Mass Communication Defined We speak, too, of mass communication. Mass communication is the process of creating shared meaning between the mass media and their audiences. Schramm recast his and Osgood’s general model of communication to help us visualize the particular aspects of the mass communication process (Figure 2). This model and the original Osgood—Schramm model have much in common—interpreters, encoding, decoding, and messages—but it is their differences that are most significant for our understanding of how mass communication differs from other forms of communication. For example, whereas the original model includes “message,” the mass communication model offers “many identical messages.” In addition, the mass communication model specifies “feedback,” whereas the interpersonal communication model does not. When two or a few people communicate face-to-face, the participants can immediately and clearly recognize the feedback residing in the reciprocal messages (our boring professor can see and hear the students’ disenchantment as they listen to the lecture). Things are not nearly as simple in mass communication.https://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/glossary.xhtml#key-noisehttps://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/glossary.xhtml#key-medium-pl-mediahttps://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/glossary.xhtml#key-mass-mediumhttps://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/glossary.xhtml#key-mass-communicationhttps://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/chapter01/chapter01.xhtml#figure0102

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In Schramm’s mass communication model, feedback is represented by a dotted line labeled delayed inferential feedback. This feedback is indirect rather than direct. Television executives, for example, must wait a day, at the very minimum, and sometimes a week or a month, to discover the ratings for new programs. Even then, the ratings measure only how many sets are tuned in, not whether people liked or disliked the programs. As a result, these executives can only infer what they must do to improve programming; hence the term inferential feedback. Mass communicators are also subject to additional feedback, usually in the form of criticism in other media, such as a television critic writing a column in a newspaper.

The differences between the individual elements of interpersonal and mass communication change the very nature of the communication process. How those alterations influence

Figure 2 Schramm’s Model of Mass Communication. Source: From The Process and Effects of Mass Communication by Wilbur Lang Schramm, 1954. Reprinted by permission of Mary Schramm Coberly.https://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/glossary.xhtml#key-inferential-feedback

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the message itself and how the likelihood of successfully sharing meaning varies are shown in Figure 3. For example, the immediacy and directness of feedback in interpersonal communication free communicators to gamble, to experiment with different approaches. Their knowledge of one another enables them to tailor their messages as narrowly as they wish. As a result, interpersonal communication is often personally relevant and possibly even adventurous and challenging. In contrast, the distance between participants in the mass communication process, imposed by the technology, creates a sort of “communication conservatism.” Feedback comes too late to enable corrections or alterations in communication that fails. The sheer number of people in many mass communication audiences makes personalization and specificity difficult. As a result, mass communication tends to be more constrained, less free. This does not mean, however, that it is less potent than interpersonal communication in shaping our understanding of ourselves and our world.https://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/chapter01/chapter01.xhtml#figure0103

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Figure 3 Elements of Interpersonal Communication and Mass Communication Compared.

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Media theorist James W. Carey (1975) recognized this and offered a cultural definition of communication that has had a profound impact on the way communication scientists and others have viewed the relationship between communication and culture. Carey wrote, “Communication is a symbolic process whereby reality is produced, maintained, repaired and transformed” (p. 10).

Carey’s (1989) definition asserts that communication and reality are linked. Communication is a process embedded in our everyday lives that informs the way we perceive, understand, and construct our view of reality and the world. Communication is the foundation of our culture. Its truest purpose is to maintain ever-evolving, “fragile” cultures; communication is that “sacred ceremony that draws persons together in fellowship and commonality” (p. 43).

What Is Culture?

(left) © Image Source RF; (right) © AF archive/Alamyhttps://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/glossary.xhtml#key-cultural-definition-of-communication

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Culture is the learned behavior of members of a given social group. Many writers and thinkers have offered interesting expansions of this definition. Here are four examples, all from anthropologists. These definitions highlight not only what culture is but also what culture does:

Culture is the learned, socially acquired traditions and lifestyles of the members of a society, including their patterned, repetitive ways of thinking, feeling, and acting. (Harris, 1983, p. 5)https://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/glossary.xhtml#key-culture

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Culture lends significance to human experience by selecting from and organizing it. It refers broadly to the forms through which people make sense of their lives, rather than more narrowly to the opera or art of museums. (Rosaldo, 1989, p. 26)

Culture is the medium evolved by humans to survive. Nothing is free from cultural influences. It is the keystone in civilization’s arch and is the medium through which all of life’s events must flow. We are culture. (Hall, 1976, p. 14)

Culture is an historically transmitted pattern of meanings embodied in symbolic forms by means of which [people] communicate, perpetuate, and develop their knowledge about and attitudes toward life. (Geertz, as cited in Taylor, 1991, p. 91)

Culture as Socially Constructed Shared Meaning Virtually all definitions of culture recognize that culture is learned. Recall the opening vignette. Even if this scenario does not exactly match your early mornings, you probably recognize its elements. Moreover, all of us are familiar with most, if not every, cultural reference in it. Family Guy, Rolling Stone, McDonald’s, Under Armour, Dilbert—all are points of reference, things that have some meaning for all of us. How did this come to be?

Creation and maintenance of a more or less common culture occurs through communication, including mass communication. When we talk to our friends; when a parent raises a child; when religious leaders instruct their followers; when teachers teach; when grandparents pass on recipes; when politicians campaign; when media professionals produce content that we read, listen to, or watch, meaning is being shared and culture is being constructed and maintained.

Functions and Effects of Culture Culture serves a purpose. It helps us categorize and classify our experiences; it helps define us, our world, and our place in it. In doing so, culture can have a number of sometimes conflicting effects.

LIMITING AND LIBERATING EFFECTS OF CULTURE A culture’s learned traditions and values can be seen as patterned, repetitive ways of thinking, feeling, and acting. Culture limits our options and provides useful guidelines for behavior. For example, when conversing, you do not consciously consider, “Now, how far away should I stand? Am I too close?” You simply stand where you stand. After a hearty meal with a friend’s family, you do not engage in mental self-debate, “Should I burp? Yes! No! Arghhhh….” Culture provides information that helps us make meaningful distinctions about right and wrong, appropriate and inappropriate, good and bad, attractive and unattractive, and so on. How does it do this?

Obviously, through communication. Through a lifetime of communication, we have learned just what our culture expects of us. The two examples given here are positive results of culture’s limiting effects. But culture’s limiting effects can be negative, such as when we are unwilling or unable to move past patterned, repetitive ways of thinking, feeling, and acting or when we

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entrust our “learning” to teachers whose interests are selfish, narrow, or otherwise not consistent with our own.

U.S. culture, for example, values thinness and beauty in women. How many women endure weeks of unhealthy diets and succumb to potentially dangerous surgical procedures in search of a body that for most is physically unattainable? How many women are judged by the men and other women around them for not conforming to our culture’s standards of thinness and beauty? Why are 40% to 60% of girls aged 6 to 12 concerned about their weight or about becoming too fat? Why do 42% of girls in first, second, and third grade want to be thinner, and why are 81% of 10-year-olds—girls and boys—afraid of being fat? Why do 57% of adolescent girls go on crash diets, fasts, or engage in self-induced vomiting (National Eating Disorders Association, 2015)? Why did the number of hospitalizations for eating disorders among children under the age of 12 spike 119% between 1999 and 2006, and why do almost 1.3 million adolescent girls in the United States have anorexia (Pai & Schryver, 2015)?

Now consider how this situation may have come about. Our mothers did not bounce us on their knees when we were babies, telling us that thin was good and fat was bad. Think back, though, to the stories you were told and the television shows and movies you watched

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growing up. The heroines (or, more often, the beautiful love interests of the heroes) were invariably tall, beautiful, and thin. The bad guys were usually mean and fat. From Disney’s depictions of Snow White, Cinderella, Belle, Tinker Bell, and Pocahontas to the impossible dimensions of most video-game and comic-book heroines, the message is embedded in the conscious (and unconscious) mind of every girl and boy: You can’t be too thin or too beautiful! Or as one 10-year-old girl explained to Courtney Martin (2007), author of Perfect Girls, Starving Daughters, “It is better to be pretty, which means thin and mean, than to be ugly, which means fat and nice. That’s just how it is.” And it does not help that these messages are reinforced in much advertising, for example Abercrombie & Fitch Kids’ promotions for its Ashley bikinis with padded “push up triangle” tops for girls as young as 8 years old (Williams, 2011).

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These images have meaning for all of us, meaning that is socially constructed through communication in our culture. How many can you recognize? What specific meaning or meanings does each have for you? How did you develop each meaning? How closely do you think your meanings match those of your friends? Of your parents? What value is there—if any—in having shared meaning for these things in our everyday lives? (clockwise from top left) © Fox/Photofest; © McGraw-Hill Education/John Flournoy, photographer; © Gavin Rodgers/Alamy; © Joe Drivas/Getty Images

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This message and millions of others come to us primarily through the media, and although the people who produce these media images are not necessarily selfish or mean, their motives are undeniably financial. Their contribution to our culture’s repetitive ways of thinking, feeling, and acting is most certainly not primary among their concerns when preparing their communication.

Culture need not only limit. That media representations of female beauty often meet with debate and disagreement points up the fact that culture can be liberating as well. This is so because cultural values can be contested.

Especially in a pluralistic, democratic society such as ours, the dominant culture (or mai nstream culture)—the one that seems to hold sway with the majority of people—is often openly challenged. People do meet, find attractive, like, and even love people who do not fit the standard image of beauty. In addition, media sometimes present images that suggest different ideals of beauty and success. Actresses Sofia Vergara, Kat Dennings, and Christina Hendricks; singers, actresses Beyoncé and Jennifer Lopez; and supermodel Kate Upton all represent alternatives to our culture’s idealized standards of beauty, and all have undeniable appeal (and power) on the big and small screens. Liberation from the limitations imposed by culture resides in our ability and willingness to learn and use new patterned, repetitive ways of thinking, feeling, and acting; to challenge existing patterns; and to create our own.

DEFINING, DIFFERENTIATING, DIVIDING, AND UNITING EFFECTS OF CULTURE Have you ever made the mistake of calling a dolphin, porpoise, or even a whale a fish? Maybe you have heard others do it. This error occurs because when we think of fish, we think “lives in the water” and “swims.” Fish are defined by their “aquatic culture.” Because water-residing, swimming dolphins and porpoises share that culture, we sometimes forget that they are mammals, not fish.

We, too, are defined by our culture. We are citizens of the United States; we are Americans. If we travel to other countries, we will hear ourselves labeled “American,” and this label will conjure up stereotypes and expectations in the minds of those who use and hear it. The stereotype, whatever it may be, will probably fit us only incompletely, or perhaps hardly at all— perhaps we are dolphins in a sea full of fish. Nevertheless, being American defines us in innumerable important ways, both to others (more obviously) and to ourselves (less obviously).https://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/glossary.xhtml#key-dominant-culture-mainstream-culture

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What is our culture’s definition of beauty? Adolescence researchers argue that media offer young girls few examples of healthy beauty (Daniels, 2009). They point to the fact that female sports and athletes are woefully underrepresented in American media, appearing in only 1.6% of network television sports coverage (down from 5.6% in 2004; Kelly, 2010). Pictured here is California teen Abby Sunderland, who at 16 years old almost finished an around-the-world sail that would have made her the youngest person ever to complete a nonstop solo circumnavigation. Training from the time she was 13, she was thwarted by a dismasting in an Indian Ocean gale. Have you heard of her? Also pictured is Anna Kournikova, a Russian athlete. This famous tennis player has never won a singles tournament but has been named one of People’s 50 most beautiful, was voted “hottest female athlete” on ESPN, placed first in FHM’s 100 Sexiest Women in the World, and was named one of the “100 hottest women of all time” by Men’s Health. Have you heard of her? Which woman has attracted more attention from our culture? Why? (left) © Richard Hartog/AP Photo; (right) © Jeremy Bembaron/Sygma/Corbis

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Within this large, national culture, however, there are many smaller, bounded cultures (o r co-cultures). For example, we speak comfortably of Italian neighborhoods, fraternity row, the South, and the suburbs. Because of our cultural understanding of these categories, each expression communicates something about our expectations of these places. We think we can predict with a good deal of certainty the types of restaurants and shops we will find in the Italian neighborhood, even the kind of music we will hear escaping from open windows. We can predict the kinds of clothes and cars we will see on fraternity row, the likely behavior of shop

Culture can be contested. The makers of Dove soap challenge the culture’s narrow image of beauty with its “Real Women Have Curves” campaign, placing images like this on billboards and bus stops across the country, running it in national magazines, and making it the focus of its TV commercials. In 2015, the editors of Advertising Age magazine awarded Dove’s Campaign for Real Beauty its prize as the Number 1 ad campaign of the 21st century for being “brave, bold, insightful, transparent, and authentic.” Not only was it successful, they noted, in advocating that women themselves are in control of their own definitions of beauty, but sales of Dove’s products increased from $2.5 to $4 billion over the span of the campaign (“Top Ad,” 2015, p. 16). © Ruby Washington/The New York Times/Reduxhttps://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/glossary.xhtml#key-bounded-cultures-co-cultures

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clerks in the South, and the political orientation of the suburb’s residents. Moreover, the people within these cultures usually identify themselves as members of those bounded cultures. An individual may say, for example, “I am Italian American” or “I’m from the South.” These smaller cultures unite groups of people and enable them to see themselves as different from other groups around them. Thus culture also serves to differentiate us from others.

In the United States, we generally consider this a good thing. We pride ourselves on our pluralism, on our diversity, and on the richness of the cultural heritages represented within our borders. We enjoy moving from one bounded culture to another or from a bounded culture to the dominant national culture and back again.

Problems arise, however, when differentiation leads to division. All Americans are traumatized by horrific events such as the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 and 2013’s Boston Marathon bombing, but those tragedies are compounded for the millions of Muslim Americans whose patriotism is challenged simply because they belong to a particular bounded culture. Not only does the number of cases of violence against Muslims in America remain high, but the Department of Homeland Security reports that Muslim American terrorism continues to be “a miniscule threat to public safety” and cooperation from the Muslim American community has been essential in its efforts to investigate domestic threats (Shane, 2012); still we continue to see examples of overt discrimination. For example, in the wake of a serious increase in hateful online and public commentary following the release of its 2015 film American Sniper, movie studio Warner Bros. felt compelled to issue a statement declaring that it “denounces any violent, anti-Muslim rhetoric, including that which has been attributed to viewers of American Sniper. Hate and bigotry have no place in the important dialogue that this picture has generated about the veteran experience”(Mandell, 2015). For Muslim Americans, their religion, skin color, and maybe even their clothing “communicate” disloyalty to the United States to many other Americans. Just as culture is constructed and maintained through communication, it is also communication (or miscommunication) that turns differentiation into division.

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Pretty Little Liars, Grey’s Anatomy, and The Vampire Diaries—these three television programs are aimed at

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different audiences, yet in each the characters share certain traits that mark them as attractive. Must people in real life look like these performers to be considered attractive? Successful? Good? The people shown are all slender, tall, and young. Yes, they are just make-believe television characters, but the producers of the shows on which they appear chose these people—as opposed to others—for a reason. What do you think it was? How well do you measure up to the cultural standard of beauty and attractiveness represented here? Do you ever wish that you could be just a bit more like these people? Why or why not? (top) © ABC Family/Photofest; (bottom left) © Photos 12/Alamy; (bottom right) © AF archive/Alamy

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Yet, U.S. citizens of all colors, ethnicities, genders and gender preferences, nationalities, places of birth, economic strata, and intelligences often get along; in fact, we can communicate, can prosper, can respect one another’s differences. Culture can divide us, but culture also unites us. Our culture represents our collective experience. We converse easily with strangers because we share the same culture. We speak the same language, automatically understand how far apart to stand, appropriately use titles or first or last names, know how much to say, and know how much to leave unsaid. Through communication with people in our culture, we internalize cultural norms and values—those things that bind our many diverse bounded cultures into a functioning, cohesive society.

DEFINING CULTURE From this discussion of culture comes the definition of culture on which the remainder of this book is based:

Culture is the world made meaningful; it is socially constructed and maintained through communication. It limits as well as liberates us; it differentiates as well as unites us. It defines our realities and thereby shapes the ways we think, feel, and act.

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What is it about Muslim Americans that “communicates disloyalty” to the United States? © lm Otero/AP Photo

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Mass Communication and Culture Because culture can limit and divide or liberate and unite, it offers us infinite opportunities to use communication for good—if we choose to do so. James Carey (1975) wrote,

Because we have looked at each new advance in communication technology as opportunities for politics and economics, we have devoted them, almost exclusively, to government and trade. We have rarely seen them as opportunities to expand [our] powers to learn and exchange ideas and experience. (pp. 20–21)

Who are “we” in this quote? We are everyone involved in creating and maintaining the culture that defines us. We are the people involved in mass media industries and the people who compose their audiences. Together we allow mass communication not only to occur but also to contribute to the creation and maintenance of culture.

Everyone involved has an obligation to participate responsibly. For people working in the media industries, this means professionally and ethically creating and transmitting content. For audience members, it means behaving as critical and thoughtful consumers of that content. Two ways to understand our opportunities and our responsibilities in the mass communication process are to view the mass media as our cultural storytellers and to conceptualize mass communication as a cultural forum.

Mass Media as Cultural Storytellers A culture’s values and beliefs reside in the stories it tells. Who are the good guys? Who are the bad guys? How many of your childhood heroines were chubby? How many good guys dressed

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in black? How many heroines lived happily ever after without marrying Prince Charming? Probably not very many. Our stories help define our realities, shaping the ways we think, feel, and act. “Stories are sites of observations about self and society,” explains media theorist Hanno Hardt (2007). “These fictional accounts are the constitutive material signs of a shared conversation” (p. 476). Therefore, the “storytellers” have a responsibility to tell their stories in as professional and ethical a way as possible.

At the same time, we, the audience for these stories, also have opportunities and responsibilities. We use these stories not only to be entertained but to learn about the world around us, to understand the values, the way things work, and how the pieces fit together. We have a responsibility to question the tellers and their stories, to interpret the stories in ways

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consistent with larger or more important cultural values and truths, to be thoughtful, to reflect on the stories’ meanings and what they say about us and our culture. To do less is to miss an opportunity to construct our own meaning and, thereby, culture.

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In 2013, Procter & Gamble introduced its new floor steamer, the Swiffer, using an ad campaign based on the iconic World War II symbol of female empowerment, Rosie, and her shout of female strength, “We can do it!,” even Tweeting “We can do it! Because cleaning kitchens is women’s work.” Angered by the use of a symbol of female workplace success to sell cleaning products and the sexism inherent in claiming that cleaning kitchens is for women only, people immediately took up the cause and in a cultural conversation on social media, blogs, and traditional media, rejected Procter & Gamble’s simplistic telling of gender in today’s America. New Rosie went into immediate retirement.

Mass Communication as Cultural Forum Imagine a giant courtroom in which we discuss and debate our culture—what it is, and what we want it to be. What do we think about welfare? Single motherhood? Labor unions? Nursing homes? What is the meaning of “successful,” “good,” “loyal,” “moral,” “honest,” “beautiful,” “patriotic”? We have cultural definitions or understandings of all these things and more. Where do they come from? How do they develop, take shape, and mature?

Mass communication has become a primary forum for the debate about our culture. Logically, then, the most powerful voices in the forum have the most power to shape our definitions and understandings. Where should that power reside—with the media industries or with their audiences? If you answer “media industries,” you will want members of these industries to act professionally and ethically. If you answer “audiences,” you will want individual audience members to be thoughtful and critical of the media messages they consume. The forum is only as good, fair, and honest as those who participate in it.

The iconic Rosie. When Procter & Gamble wanted to advertise its dust mop, the Swiffer, it could have chosen from among an infinite number of characters to tell its story. It chose a female hero from World War II, Rosie the Riveter, who, with millions of other American women, helped win the war by taking on jobs long reserved for men. People complained. “We hear you,” answered Procter & Gamble. National Archives and Records Administration

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Scope and Nature of Mass Media No matter how we choose to view the process of mass communication, it is impossible to deny that an enormous portion of our lives is spent interacting with mass media. On a typical Sunday night, about 40 million people in the United States will tune in to a prime-time television show. Television viewing is at an all-time high and accounts for more than half of all the leisure-time activity of Americans 15 years old and over (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2014). Counting traditional television and online and mobile viewing, Americans spend 159 hours watching video of some sort every month (Seth & Morgan, 2014). Ninety-seven percent of all U. S. homes have at least one set, and 42 million connect their TVs directly to the Internet (Walsh, 2014). Seventy percent admit to binge viewing, watching three or more episodes of a series in one sitting (Verini, 2014). And on Facebook alone folks watch 3 billion videos a day (Lunden, 2015). We listen to more than four hours of music every day (Stutz, 2014), and we spend more than $10 billion a year at the movies, buying just under 1.3 billion tickets (“Domestic Movie,” 2015). If Facebook were its own country, its 1.4 billion monthly active users would make it the largest in the world. Facebook alone accounts for 6% of all the time the world’s Internet users spend online (Smith, 2015). Fifty-nine percent of Americans regularly play video games, and over half of all U. S. homes have a game console, averaging two per home (Entertainment Software Association, 2014).

Three billion people across the globe are connected to the Internet, 35% of the planet’s population and a 566% increase since 2000. Eighty-eight percent of North Americans use the Internet, a 39% increase since 2000 (“Internet users,” 2015). Annual global Internethttps://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/glossary.xhtml#key-binge-viewing

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traffic will pass the zettabyte (that’s 1,000 exabytes, which is 1 billion gigabytes) threshold by the end of 2016, and will reach 1.6 zettabytes per year by 2018. Worldwide Internet traffic has increased fivefold over the past five years, and will increase threefold over the next five years. Traffic on the Internet in 2018 will be 64 times greater than it was in 2005. By 2018 nearly a million minutes of video content will cross the Internet every second, and it would take you more than 5 million years to watch all the video that will travel the Net each month (Cisco Systems, 2014). You can see Americans’ media preferences in Figur e 4 and how those preferences have changed over the last several years.

Despite the pervasiveness of mass media in our lives, many of us are dissatisfied with or critical of the media industries’ performance and much of the content provided. For example,

Figure 4 Average Number of Minutes per Day a Typical Adult Spends with Selected Media, 2008 vs. 2014. Source: eMarketer, 2014. Photo Source: © Jim Wehtje/Getty Images RFhttps://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/chapter01/chapter01.xhtml#figure0104

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only 17% of adults feel that entertainment media provide “very good” or “excellent” value (Smith, 2011). People’s evaluations of the news media have become more negative over the last decade. Only 38% of the public holds a positive view of the publishing industry (down 9% from 2011); only 32% think highly of the public relations industry (down 6%); and only 39% have positive views of radio and television (down 3%; Newport, 2011). Their trust in each of the three major news sources—television, newspapers, and the Internet—has fallen to its lowest level since 1994, continuing a “decades-long decline in the share of Americans saying they have ‘a great deal’ or ‘quite a lot’ of confidence” in their media (Dugan, 2014). Their faith in the “media’s ability to report the news fully, accurately, and fairly” has also returned to an historic low of 40% of all Americans (McCarthy, 2014).

Our ambivalence—we criticize, yet we consume—comes in part from our uncertainties about the relationships among the elements of mass communication. What is the role of technology? What is the role of money? And what is our role in the mass communication process?

The Role of Technology To some thinkers, it is machines and their development that drive economic and cultural change. This idea is referred to as technological determinism. Certainly there can be no doubt that movable type contributed to the Protestant Reformation and the decline of the Catholic Church’s power in Europe or that television changed the way members of American families interact. Those who believe in technological determinism would argue that these changes in the cultural landscape were the inevitable result of new technology.https://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/glossary.xhtml#key-technological-determinism

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But others see technology as more neutral and claim that the way people use technology is what gives it significance. This perspective accepts technology as one of many factors that shape economic and cultural change; technology’s influence is ultimately determined by how much power it is given by the people and cultures that use it.

This disagreement about the power of technology is at the heart of the controversy surrounding the new communication technologies. Are we more or less powerless in the wake of advances such as the Internet, the World Wide Web, and instant global audio and visual communication? If we are at the mercy of technology, the culture that surrounds us will not be of our making, and the best we can hope to do is make our way reasonably well in a world outside our control. But if these technologies are indeed neutral and their power resides in how we choose to use them, we can utilize them responsibly and thoughtfully to construct and maintain whatever kind of culture we want. As film director and technophile Steven Spielberg explained, “Technology can be our best friend, and technology can also be the biggest party pooper of our lives. It interrupts our own story, interrupts our ability to have a thought or daydream, to imagine something wonderful because we’re too busy bridging the walk from the cafeteria back to the office on the cell phone” (quoted in Kennedy, 2002, p. 109). Or, as Dr. Ian Malcolm (Jeff Goldblum) said in Spielberg’s 1997 The Lost World: Jurassic Park, “Oooh! Ahhh! That’s how it always starts. Then later there’s running and screaming.”

Technology does have an impact on communication. At the very least it changes the basic elements of communication (see Figure 3). What technology does not do is relieve us of our obligation to use mass communication responsibly and wisely.

The Role of Money Money, too, alters communication. It shifts the balance of power; it tends to make audiences products rather than consumers.

The first newspapers were financially supported by their readers; the money they paid for the paper covered its production and distribution. But in the 1830s a new form of newspaper financing emerged. Publishers began selling their papers for a penny—much less than it cost to produce and distribute them. Because so many more papers were sold at this bargain price, publishers could “sell” advertising space based on their readership. What they were actually selling to advertisers was not space on the page—it was readers. How much they could charge advertisers was directly related to how much product (how many readers) they could produce for them.

This new type of publication changed the nature of mass communication. The goal of the process was no longer for audience and media to create meaning together. Rather, it was to sell those readers to a third participant—advertisers.

Some observers think this was a devastatingly bad development, not only in the history of mass communication but in the history of democracy. It robbed people of their voice, or at least made the voices of the advertisers more powerful. Others think it was a huge advance for both mass communication and democracy because it vastly expanded the media, broadening and deepening communication. Models showing these two different ways of viewing masshttps://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/chapter01/chapter01.xhtml#figure0103

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communication are presented in the box “Audience as Consumer or Audience as Produc t?” Which model makes more sense to you? Which do you think is more accurate? ABC journalist Ted Koppel told the Washington Post, “[Television] is an industry. It’s a business. We exist to make money. We exist to put commercials on the air. The programming that is put on between those commercials is simply the bait we put in the mousetrap” (in “Soundbites,” 2005, p. 2). Do you think Koppel is unnecessarily cynical or is he correct in his analysis of television?

The goals of media professionals will be questioned repeatedly throughout this book. For now, keep in mind that ours is a capitalist economic system and that media industries are businesses. Movie producers must sell tickets, book publishers must sell books, and even public broadcasting has bills to pay.

This does not mean, however, that the media are or must be slaves to profit. Our task is to understand the constraints placed on these industries by their economics and then demand that, within those limits, they perform ethically and responsibly. We can do this only by being thoughtful, critical consumers of the media.

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CULTURAL FORUM Audience as Consumer or Audience as Product?

People base their judgments of media performance and content on the way they see themselves fitting into the economics of the media industry. Businesses operate to serve their consumers and make a profit. The consumer comes first, then, but who is the consumer in our mass media system? This is a much-debated issue among media practitioners and media critics. Consider the following models.

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PRODUCER PRODUCT

Basic U.S. Business Model

A manufacturer . . . produces a product . . .

Basic U.S. Business Model for Cereal: Rice Krispies as Product, Public as Consumer

Kellogg’s . . . produces Rice Krispies . . .

Basic U.S. Business Model for Television (A): Audience as Product, Advertisers as Consumer

NBC . . . produces audiences (using its programming) . .

Basic U.S. Business Model for Television (B): Programming as Product, Audience as Consumer

NBC . . . produces (or distributes) programming . . .

The first three models assume that the consumer buys the product; that is, the consumer is the one with the money and therefore the one who must be satisfied. The last model makes a different assumption. It sees the audience, even though it does not buy anything, as sufficiently important to NBC’s profit- making ability to force NBC to consider its interests above others’ (even those of advertisers). Which model do you think best represents the economics of U.S. mass media?

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Mass Communication, Culture, and Media Literacy Culture and communication are inseparable, and mass communication, as we’ve seen, is a particularly powerful, pervasive, and complex form of communication. Our level of skill in the mass communication process is therefore of utmost importance. This skill is not necessarily a simple one to master (it is much more than booting up the computer, turning on the television set, or flipping the pages of your favorite magazine). But it is, indeed, a learnable skill, one that can be practiced. This skill is media literacy—the ability to effectively and efficiently comprehend and use any form of mediated communication. But let’s start with the first mass medium, books, and the technology that enabled their spread, the printing press.

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As it is impossible to overstate the importance of writing, so too is it impossible to overstate the significance of Johannes Gutenberg’s development of movable metal type. Historian S. H. Steinberg (1959) wrote in Five Hundred Years of Printing:

Neither political, constitutional, ecclesiastical, and economic, nor sociological, philosophical, and literary movements can be fully understood without taking into account the influence the printing press has exerted upon them. (p. 11)

Marshall McLuhan expressed his admiration for Gutenberg’s innovation by calling his 1962 book The Gutenberg Galaxy. In it he argued that the advent of print is the key to our modern consciousness, because although literacy—the ability to effectively and efficiently comprehend and use written symbols—had existed since the development of the first alphabets more than 5,000 years ago, it was reserved for very few, the elites. Gutenberg’s invention was world- changing because it opened literacy to all; that is, it allowed mass communication.

THE PRINTING PRESS Printing and the printing press existed long before Gutenberg perfected his process in or around 1446. The Chinese were using wooden block presses as early as 600 C.E. and had movable clay type by 1000 C.E. A simple movable metal type was even in use in Korea in the 13th century. Gutenberg’s printing press was a significant leap forward, however, for two important reasons.

Gutenberg was a goldsmith and a metallurgist. He hit on the idea of using metal type crafted from lead molds in place of type made from wood or clay. This was an important advance. Not only was movable metal type durable enough to print page after page, but letters could be arranged and rearranged to make any message possible. And Gutenberg was able to produce virtually identical copies.

In addition, Gutenberg’s advance over Korean metal mold printing was one of scope. The Korean press was used to produce books for a very small, royal readership. Gutenberg saw his invention as a way to produce many books for profit. He was, however, a poor businessman. He stressed quality over quantity, in part because of his reverence for the book he was printing, the Bible. He used the highest-quality paper and ink and turned out far fewer volumes than he otherwise could have.

Other printers, however, quickly saw the true economic potential of Gutenberg’s invention. The first Gutenberg Bible appeared in 1456. By the end of that century, 44 years later, printing operations existed in 12 European countries, and the continent was flooded with 20 million volumes of 7,000 titles in 35,000 different editions (Drucker, 1999).

THE IMPACT OF PRINT Although Gutenberg developed his printing press with a limited use in mind, printing Bibles, the cultural effects of mass printing have been profound.

Handwritten or hand-copied materials were expensive to produce, and the cost of an education, in time and money, had made reading an expensive luxury. However, with the spread of printing, written communication was available to a much larger portion of the population, and the need for literacy among the lower and middle classes grew. The ability to read became less of a luxury and more of a necessity; eventually literacy spread, as didhttps://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/glossary.xhtml#key-literacy

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education. Soldiers at the front needed to be able to read the emperor’s orders. Butchers needed to understand the king’s shopping list. So the demand for literacy expanded, and more (and more types of) people learned to read.

Tradespeople, soldiers, clergy, bakers, and musicians all now had business at the printer’s shop. They talked. They learned of things, both in conversation and by reading printed material. As more people learned to read, new ideas germinated and spread and cross- pollination of ideas occurred.

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This page from a Gutenberg Bible shows the exquisite care the printer used in creating his works. The artwork in the margins is handpainted, but the text is mechanically printed. © North Wind Picture Archives/Alamy

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More material from various sources was published, and people were freer to read what they wanted when they wanted. Dominant authorities—the Crown and the Church—were now less able to control communication and, therefore, the people. New ideas about the world appeared; new understandings of the existing world flourished.

In addition, duplication permitted standardization and preservation. Myth and superstition began to make way for standard, verifiable bodies of knowledge. History, economics, physics, and chemistry all became part of the culture’s intellectual life. Literate cultures were now on the road to modernization.

Printed materials were the first mass-produced product, speeding the development and entrenchment of capitalism. We live today in a world built on these changes. Use of the printing press helped fuel the establishment and growth of a large middle class. No longer were societies composed of rulers and subjects; printing sped the rise of democracy. No longer were power and wealth functions of birth; power and wealth could now be created by the industrious. No

Johannes Gutenberg takes the first proof from his printing press. © North Wind Picture Archives

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longer was political discourse limited to accepting the dictates of Crown and Church; printing had given ordinary people a powerful voice.

Tech writer Kevin Kelly connected printing directly to freedom and the rule of law:

When technology shifts, it bends the culture. Once, long ago, culture revolved around the spoken word. The oral skills of memorization, recitation, and rhetoric instilled in societies a reverence for the past, the ambiguous, the ornate, and the subjective. Then, about 500 years ago, orality was overthrown by technology. Gutenberg’s invention of metallic moveable type elevated writing into a central position in the culture. By means of cheap and perfect copies, text became the engine of change and the foundation of stability. From printing came journalism, science and the mathematics of libraries and law. (2008, p. 48)

The Industrial Revolution By the mid-18th century, printing and its libraries of science and mathematics had become one of the engines driving the Industrial Revolution. Print was responsible for building and disseminating bodies of knowledge, leading to scientific and technological developments and the refinement of new machines. In addition, industrialization reduced the time necessary to complete work, and this created something heretofore unknown to most working people— leisure time.

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Industrialization had another effect as well. As workers left their sunrise-to- sunset jobs in agriculture, the crafts, and trades to work in the newly industrialized factories, not only did they have more leisure time but they had more money to spend on their leisure. Farmers, fishermen, and tile makers had to put their profits back into their jobs. But factory workers took their money home; it was spendable. Combine leisure time and expendable cash with the spread of literacy and the result is a large and growing audience for printed information and entertainment. By the mid-19th century a mass audience and the means to reach it existed.

Media Literacy

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Television influences our culture in innumerable ways. One of its effects, according to many people, is that it has encouraged violence in our society. For example, American television viewers overwhelmingly say there is too much violence on television. Yet, almost without exception, the local television news program that has the largest proportion of violence in its nightly newscast is the ratings leader. “If it bleeds, it leads” has become the motto for much of local television news. It leads because people watch.

So, although many of us are quick to condemn improper media performance or to identify and lament its harmful effects, we rarely question our own role in the mass communication process. We overlook it because we participate in mass communication naturally, almost without conscious effort. We possess high-level interpretive and comprehension skills that make even the most sophisticated television show, movie, or magazine story understandable and enjoyable. We are able, through a lifetime of interaction with the media, to read media texts.

Media literacy is a skill we take for granted, but like all skills, it can be improved. And if we consider how important the mass media are in creating and maintaining the culture that helps define us and our lives, it is a skill that must be improved.

Hunter College media professor Stuart Ewen (2000) emphasized this point in comparing media literacy with traditional literacy. “Historically,” he wrote, “links between literacy and democracy are inseparable from the notion of an informed populace, conversant with the issues that touch upon their lives, enabled with tools that allow them to participate actively in public deliberation and social change…. Literacy was about crossing the lines that had historically separated men of ideas from ordinary people, about the enfranchisement of those who had been excluded from the compensations of citizenship” (p. 448). To Ewen, and others committed to media literacy, media literacy represents no less than the means to full participation in the culture.

Elements of Media Literacy Media scholar Art Silverblatt (2008) identifies seven fundamental elements of media literacy. To these we will add an eighth. Media literacy includes these characteristics:

1. A critical thinking skill enabling audience members to develop independent judgments about media content. Thinking critically about the content we consume is the very essence of media literacy. Why do we watch what we watch, read what we read, listen to what we listen to? If we cannot answer these questions, we have taken no responsibility for ourselves or our choices. As such, we have taken no responsibility for the outcome of those choices.

2. An understanding of the process of mass communication. If we know the components of the mass communication process and how they relate to one another, we can form expectations of how they can serve us. How do the

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various media industries operate? What are their obligations to us? What are the obligations of the audience? How do different media limit or enhance messages? Which forms of feedback are most effective, and why?

3. An awareness of the impact of media on the individual and society. Writing and the printing press helped change the world and the people in it. Mass media do the same. If we ignore the impact of media on our lives, we run the risk of being caught up and carried along by that change rather than controlling or leading it.

4. Strategies for analyzing and discussing media messages. To consume media messages thoughtfully, we need a foundation on which to base thought and reflection. If we make

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meaning, we must possess the tools with which to make it (for example, understanding the intent and impact of film and video conventions, such as camera angles and lighting, or the strategy behind the placement of photos on a newspaper page). Otherwise, meaning is made for us; the interpretation of media content will then rest with its creator, not with us.

5. An understanding of media content as a text that provides insight into our culture and our lives. How do we know a culture and its people, attitudes, values, concerns, and myths? We know them through communication. For modern cultures like ours, media messages increasingly dominate that communication, shaping our understanding of and insight into our culture.

6. The ability to enjoy, understand, and appreciate media content. Media literacy does not mean living the life of a grump, liking nothing in the media, or always being suspicious of harmful effects and cultural degradation. We take high school and college classes to enhance our understanding and appreciation of novels; we can do the same for media texts.

Learning to enjoy, understand, and appreciate media content includes the ability to use multiple points of access—to approach media content from a variety of directions and derive from it many levels of meaning. Thus, we control meaning making for our own enjoyment or appreciation. For example, we can enjoy any one of the hit movies from the Hunger Games trilogy as an action-laden adventure full of explosions, danger, and romance, the perfect holiday blockbuster. But as movie buffs we might see it as a David-and-Goliath, underdog-takes-on-the-powerful-villain tale. Or we might read it as an analogy for what’s happening in America’s contemporary economy of growing income inequality and harshness of life for those near the bottom. Maybe it’s a history lesson disguised as dystopian fiction, reminding us that our country was born of revolution against those who would rule us. Or maybe it’s just a cool way to spend a Saturday night, entertained by the same folks who so delighted us with other special-effects extravaganzas, like Constantine, I Am Legend, and Alexander.https://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/glossary.xhtml#key-multiple-points-of-access

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In fact, television programs such as The Middle, The Daily Show, The Simpsons, Game of Thrones, and Family Guy are specifically constructed to take advantage of the media literacy skills of sophisticated viewers while providing entertaining fare for less skilled consumers. The same is true for films such as Birdman, Interstellar, Lucy, The Grand Budapest Hotel, and Blue Jasmine, magazines such as Alarm, and the best of jazz, rap, and rock. The Middle and The Daily Show are produced as television comedies, designed to make people laugh. But they are also intentionally produced to provide more sophisticated, media-literate viewers with opportunities to make personally interesting or relevant meaning. Anyone can laugh while watching these programs, but some people can empathize with the daily travails of a working-class family (The Middle), or they can examine the failings and foibles of contemporary journalism (Daily Show).

7. Development of effective and responsible production skills. Traditional literacy assumes that people who can read can also write. Media literacy also makes this assumption. Our definition of literacy (of either type) calls not only for effective and efficient comprehension of content but for its effective and efficient use. Therefore, media-literate individuals should develop production skills that enable them to create useful media messages. If you have ever tried to make a narrative home video—one that tells a story—you know that producing content is much more difficult than consuming it. Even producing a voicemail message that is not embarrassing is a daunting task for many people.

This element of media literacy may seem relatively unimportant at first glance. After all, if you choose a career in media production, you will get training in school and on the job. If you choose another calling, you may never be in the position of having to produce content. But most professions now employ some form of media to disseminate information: for use in training, to enhance presentations, or to keep in contact with clients and customers. The Internet in particular requires effective production skills of its users—at home, school, and work—because online receivers can and do easily become online creators.

8. An understanding of the ethical and moral obligations of media practitioners. To make informed judgments about the performance of the

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media, we also must be aware of the competing pressures on practitioners as they do their jobs. We must understand the media’s official and unofficial rules of operation. In other words, we must know, respectively, their legal and ethical obligations. Return, for a moment, to the question of televised violence. It is legal for a station to air graphic violence. But is it ethical? If it is unethical, what power, if any, do we have to demand its removal from our screens? Dilemmas such as this are discussed at length in the chapter on media freedom, regulation, and ethics.

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Media Literacy Skills

Family Guy is a cartoon about a typical suburban family. It has all the things you would expect from a television situation comedy—an inept dad, a precocious daughter, a slacker son, a loving wife, and zany situations. Yet it also offers an intellectual, philosopher dog and an evil-genius, scheming baby. Why do you think the producers have gone to the trouble to populate this show with the usual trappings of a sitcom but then add other, bizarre elements? And what’s going on in The Hunger Games? Is it another special-effects, explosion-laden, action-adventure holiday blockbuster? A classic David-and-Goliath movie? An historical allegory? A commentary on growing financial inequality in America? Or maybe it’s just a cool way to spend a Saturday night, entertained by a celebrity-packed action movie. (top) © 20th Century Fox/Courtesy Everett Collection; (bottom) © Photos 12/Alamy

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Consuming media content is simple. Push a button and you have images on a television or music on a radio. Come up with enough cash and you can see a movie or buy a magazine. Media-literate consumption, however, requires a number of specific skills:

1. The ability and willingness to make an effort to understand content, to pay attention, and to filter out noise. As we saw earlier, anything that interferes with successful communication is called noise, and much of the noise in the mass communication process results from our own consumption behavior. When we watch television, often we are also doing other things, such as eating, reading, or chatting on the phone. We drive while we listen to the radio. Obviously, the quality of our meaning making is related to the effort we give it.

2. An understanding of and respect for the power of media messages. The mass media have been around for more than a century and a half. Just about everybody can enjoy them. Their content is either free or relatively inexpensive. Much of the content is banal and a bit silly, so it is easy to dismiss media content as beneath serious consideration or too simple to have any influence.

We also disregard media’s power through the third-person effect—the common attitude that others are influenced by media messages but that we are not. That is, we are media literate enough to understand the influence of mass communication on the attitudes, behaviors, and values of others but not self-aware or honest enough to see its influence on our lives.

3. The ability to distinguish emotional from reasoned reactions when responding to content and to act accordingly. Media content is often designed to touch us at the emotional level. We enjoy losing ourselves in a good song or in a well-crafted movie or television show; this is among our great pleasures. But because we react emotionally to these messages does not mean they don’t have serious meanings and implications for our lives. Television pictures, for example, are intentionally shot and broadcast forhttps://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/glossary.xhtml#key-third-person-effect

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their emotional impact. Reacting emotionally is appropriate and proper. But then what? What do these pictures tell us about the larger issue at hand? We can use our feelings as a point of departure for meaning making. We can ask, “Why does this content make me feel this way?”

4. Development of heightened expectations of media content. We all use media to tune out, waste a little time, and provide background noise. When we decide to watch television, we are more likely to turn on the set and flip channels until we find something passable than we are to read the listings to find a specific program to view. When we search for online video, we often settle for the “10 most shared today.” When we expect little from the content before us, we tend to give meaning making little effort and attention.

5. A knowledge of genre conventions and the ability to recognize when they are being mixed. The term genre refers to the categories of expression within the different media, such as “evening news,” “documentary,” “horror movie,” or “entertainment magazine.” Each genre is characterized by certain distinctive, standardized style elements—the conventions of that genre. The conventions of the evening news, for example, include a short, upbeat introductory theme and one or two good-looking people sitting at a large, curved desk. When we hear and see these style elements, we expect the evening news. We can tell a documentary film from an entertainment movie by its more serious tone and the number of talking heads. We know by their appearance—the use of color, the types of images, and the amount of text on the cover—which magazines offer serious reading and which provide entertainment.

Knowledge of these conventions is important because they cue or direct our meaning making. For example, we know to accept the details in a documentary film about the sinking of the Titanic as more credible than those found in a Hollywood movie about that disaster.

This skill is also important for another reason. Sometimes, in an effort to maximize audiences (and therefore profits) or for creative reasons, media content makers mix genre conventions. Is Clint Eastwood’s American Sniperhttps://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/glossary.xhtml#key-genrehttps://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/glossary.xhtml#key-conventions

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fact or fiction? Is Meredith Vieira a journalist, a talk show host, or a showperson? Extra! and E! News look increasingly like

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Let’s consider two versions of the same movie scene. In the first, a man is driving a car. Cut to a woman lying tied up on a railroad track. What is the relationship between the man and the woman? Where is he going? With no more information than these two shots, you know automatically that he cares for her and is on his way to save her. Now, here is the second

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CNN’s reporting and the CBS Evening News. Reading media texts becomes more difficult as formats are co-opted.

6. The ability to think critically about media messages, no matter how credible their sources. It is crucial that media be credible in a democracy in which the people govern because the media are central to the governing process. This is why the news media are sometimes referred to as the fourth branch of government, complementing the executive, judicial, and legislative branches. This does not mean, however, that we should believe everything they report. But it is often difficult to arrive at the proper balance between wanting to believe and accepting what we see and hear unquestioningly, especially when frequently we are willing to suspend disbelief and are encouraged by the media themselves to see their content as real and credible.

Consider the New York Times motto “All the News That’s Fit to Print” and the title of ABC’s “Eyewitness News.” If it is all there, it must all be real, and who is more credible than an eyewitness? But if we examine these media, we would learn that the Times in actuality prints all the news that fits (in its pages) and that “Eyewitness News” is a very narrowly selective eyewitness.

7. A knowledge of the internal language of various media and the ability to understand its effects, no matter how complex. Just as each media genre has its own distinctive style and conventions, each medium also has its own specific internal language. This language is expressed in production values —the choice of lighting, editing, special effects, music, camera angle, location on the page, and size and placement of headlines. To be able to read a media text, you must understand its language. We learn the grammar of this language automatically from childhood—for example, we know that when the television image goes “all woosielike,” the character is dreaming.https://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/glossary.xhtml#key-production-values

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version. The man is driving the car. Fade to black. Fade back up to the woman on the tracks. Now what is the relationship between the man and the woman? Where is he going? It is less clear that these two people even have anything to do with each other. We construct completely different meanings from exactly the same two pictures because the punctuation (the quick cut/fade) differs.

Media texts tend to be more complicated than these two scenes. The better we can handle their grammar, the more we can understand and appreciate texts. The more we understand texts, the more we can be equal partners with media professionals in meaning making.

This television show offers all the conventions we’d expect from the news—background digital graphics, an anchor behind his desk, a well-known interviewee. But it also contains conventions we’d expect from a comedy program—a satirist as host and an unruly, loud audience. Why does Last Week Tonight with John Oliver mix the conventions of these two very different genres? Does your knowledge of those conventions add to your enjoyment of this hit program? © Eric Liebowitz/HBO/Courtesy Everett Collection

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MEDIA LITERACY CHALLENGE Recognizing Cultural Values

Media-literate people develop an understanding of media content as a text that provides insight into our culture and our lives, and they have an awareness of the impact of media on the individual and society. So, challenge your own media literacy skills. You can do this exercise with a parent or another person older than you, or you can speculate after using the Internet to view movies and television shows from 20 years ago. Compare your childhood heroes and heroines with those of someone older. What differences are there between the generations in what you consider heroic qualities? What are some similarities and differences between the heroic qualities you and people from an earlier generation identify? Are the good qualities of your personal heroes something you can find in today’s movies or TV? Perhaps your hero is even a TV character. Either way, where on TV or in film can you find the qualities you consider heroic? Which cultural values, attitudes, and beliefs, if any, do you think have influenced how heroes and heroines have changed throughout the last few decades? How have the media helped establish the values you identify as important qualities in people?

Resources for Review and Discussion

REVIEW POINTS: TYING CONTENT TO LEARNING OUTCOMES

Define communication, mass communication, mass media, and culture.

□ Communication is the process of creating shared meaning.

□ Mass communication is the process of creating shared meaning between the

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mass media and their audiences.

□ Mass media is the plural of mass medium, a technology that carries messages to a large number of people.

□ Culture is the world made meaningful. It resides all around us; it is socially constructed and maintained through communication. It limits as well as liberates us; it differentiates as well as unites us. It defines our realities and shapes the ways we think, feel, and act.

Describe the relationships among communication, mass communication, culture, and those who live in the culture.

□ Mass media are our culture’s dominant storytellers and the forum in which we debate cultural meaning.

Evaluate the impact of technology and economics on those relationships.

□ Technological determinism argues that technology is the predominant agent of social and cultural change. But it is not technology that drives culture; it is how people use technology.

□ With technology, money, too, shapes mass communication. Audiences can be either the consumer or the product in our mass media system.

List the components of media literacy.

□ Media literacy, the ability to effectively and efficiently comprehend and use any form of mediated communication, consists of several components:

Critical thinking skills enabling the development of independent judgments about media content

An understanding of the process of mass communication

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An awareness of the impact of the media on individuals and society

Strategies for analyzing and discussing media messages

An awareness of media content as a “text” providing insight into contemporary culture

A cultivation of enhanced enjoyment, understanding, and appreciation of media content

The development of effective and responsible production skills

The development of an understanding of the ethical and moral obligations of media practitioners

Identify key skills required for developing media literacy.

□ Media skills include

The ability and willingness to make an effort to understand content, to pay attention, and to filter out noise

An understanding of and respect for the power of media messages

The ability to distinguish emotional from reasoned reactions when responding to content and to act accordingly

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KEY TERMS communication, 3 feedback, 4 interpersonal communication, 4 encoding, 4 decoding, 4 noise, 5 medium (pl. media), 5 mass medium, 5 mass communication, 5 inferential feedback, 5 cultural definition of communication, 6 culture, 6 dominant culture (mainstream culture), 10 bounded culture (co-culture), 11 binge viewing, 14 technological determinism, 15 media literacy, 17 literacy, 18 multiple points of access, 21

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The development of heightened expectations of media content

A knowledge of genre conventions and the recognition of their mixing

The ability to think critically about media messages

A knowledge of the internal language of various media and the ability to understand its effectshttps://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/glossary.xhtml#key-communicationhttps://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/glossary.xhtml#key-feedbackhttps://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/glossary.xhtml#key-interpersonal-communicationhttps://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/glossary.xhtml#key-encodinghttps://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/glossary.xhtml#key-decodinghttps://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/glossary.xhtml#key-noisehttps://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/glossary.xhtml#key-medium-pl-mediahttps://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/glossary.xhtml#key-mass-mediumhttps://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/glossary.xhtml#key-mass-communicationhttps://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/glossary.xhtml#key-inferential-feedbackhttps://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/glossary.xhtml#key-cultural-definition-of-communicationhttps://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/glossary.xhtml#key-culturehttps://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/glossary.xhtml#key-dominant-culture-mainstream-culturehttps://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/glossary.xhtml#key-bounded-cultures-co-cultureshttps://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/glossary.xhtml#key-binge-viewinghttps://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/glossary.xhtml#key-technological-determinismhttps://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/glossary.xhtml#key-media-literacyhttps://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/glossary.xhtml#key-literacyhttps://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/glossary.xhtml#key-multiple-points-of-access

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third-person effect, 23 genre, 23 conventions, 23 production values, 24

QUESTIONS FOR REVIEW

QUESTIONS FOR CRITICAL THINKING AND DISCUSSION

1. What is culture? How does culture define people?

2. What is communication? What is mass communication?

3. What are encoding and decoding? How do they differ when technology enters the communication process?

4. What does it mean to say that communication is a reciprocal process?

5. What is James Carey’s cultural definition of communication? How does it differ from other definitions of that process?

6. What do we mean by mass media as cultural storyteller?

7. What do we mean by mass communication as cultural forum?

8. What is media literacy? What are its components?

9. What are some specific media literacy skills?

10. What is the difference between genres and production conventions? What do these have to do with media literacy?

To maximize your study time, check out CONNECT to access the SmartBook study module for this chapter, watch videos, and explore other resources.

1. Who were your childhood heroes and heroines? Why did you choose them? What cultural lessons did you learn from them?

2. The arrival of the printing press dramatically changed history. Traditionalhttps://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/glossary.xhtml#key-third-person-effecthttps://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/glossary.xhtml#key-genrehttps://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/glossary.xhtml#key-conventionshttps://jigsaw.vitalsource.com/books/1260406946/epub/OPS/s9ml/glossary.xhtml#key-production-values

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REFERENCES

seats of power lost influence, science flourished, and the seeds were planted for capitalism and the growth of a middle class. What effects will the Internet have on our future? Will its impact be less than, equal to, or greater than the impact wrought by the printing press? Defend your answer.

3. How media literate do you think you are? What about those around you— your parents, for example, or your best friend? What are your weaknesses as a media-literate person?

1. Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2014, June 18). American time use survey summary. Online: http://www.bls.gov/news.release/atus.nr0.htm

2. Carey, J. W. (1975). A cultural approach to communication. Communication, 2, 1-22.

3. Carey, J. W. (1989). Communication as culture. Boston: Unwin Hyman.

4. Cisco Systems. (2014, June 2014). The zettabyte era: Trends and analysis. Cis co.com. Online: http://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/solutions/collateral /service-provider/visual-networking-index-vni/VNI_Hyperconnec tivity_WP.html

5. “Domestic movie theatrical market summary 1995 to 2015.” (2015, February 5). The Numbers. Online: http://www.the-numbers.com/market/

6. Drucker, P. E. (1999, October). Beyond the information revolution. Atlantic Monthly, pp. 47-57.

7. Dugan, A. (2014, June 19). Americans’ confidence in news media remains low. Gallup.com. Online: http://www.gallup.com/poll/171740/ameri cans-confidence-news-media-remains-low.aspx

8. eMarketer. (2014, December 29). Time spent using media. Advertising Age Marketing Fact Pack 2015, p. 17.http://www.bls.gov/news.release/atus.nr0.htmhttp://cisco.com/http://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/solutions/collateral/service-provider/visual-networking-index-vni/VNI_Hyperconnectivity_WP.htmlhttp://www.the-numbers.com/market/http://gallup.com/http://www.gallup.com/poll/171740/americans-confidence-news-media-remains-low.aspx

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Page 27

9. PRINTED BY: apcampbell@email.phoenix.edu. Printing is for personal, private use only. No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted without publisher’s prior permission. Violators will be prosecuted.

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which of the following describes loyalists

Okay so i have the answers but i would like to know if i have them right. may someone tell me which ones are right and wrong ?

Which of the following describes Loyalists? (1 point)
A. They decided to fight against the British.
B. They supported British taxation.
C. They thought Patriots were too radical.
D. They wanted to return to Britain.

  1. According to the Declaration of Independence, where does a government’s power come from? (1 point)
    A. the Creator
    B. the consent of the governed
    C. the self-evident rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness
    D. the right of the people to institute a new government
  2. As a result of the Revolution, women in America (1 point)
    A. were granted the right to sign a contract.
    B. earned the right to own property.
    C. gained respect.
    D. suffered abuse.
  3. In what way did the American Revolution affect other countries? (1 point)
    A. The practice of slavery spread throughout Europe.
    B. Foreign governments attempted to punish Patriot leaders.
    C. Countries tried to avoid the devastation of war.
    D. Other republican groups fought to overthrow aristocratic governments.
  4. Which political theory defines the different responsibilities for each branch of government? (1 point)
    A. popular sovereignty
    B. Limited government
    C. separation of powers
    D. Federalism
  5. Which of the following describes Federalism? (1 point)
    A. State governments dominate a weak national legislature.
    B. State and national governments share power.
    C. A strong executive directs national policy for dependent states.
    D. A strong national legislature gives equal voice to all citizens.
  6. Why did Northern industrialists favor protective tariffs? (1 point)
    A. Tariffs raised the cost of European goods so that more people would buy American goods.
    B. Labor unions demanded tariffs because they raised factory workers’ wages.
    C. Investors used money from tariffs to reduce production costs.
    D. Higher prices meant that companies earned higher profits.
  7. Which of the following drew a line north of which any new states would be free states and south of which any new states would be slave states? (1 point)
    A. Missouri Compromise
    B. Marbury v. Madison
    C. American System
    D. Monroe Doctrine
  8. In which direction would the people in this illustration have likely been traveling? (1 point)
    A. north to south
    B. south to north
    C. east to west
    D. west to east
  9. The Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 angered Northerners because (1 point)
    A. it prioritized states’ rights over the rights of the federal government.
    B. it contradicted the Missouri Compromise.
    C. it contradicted the Wilmot Proviso.
    D. it increased federal intervention in the affairs of independent states.
  10. The term “Bleeding Kansas” can be attributed to (1 point)
    A. the competition between farmers trying to settle the land.
    B. the blistering speech of Charles Sumner on the Senate floor.
    C. the competition of opposing political groups.
    D. Preston Brooks’s attack on Ft. Sumner.
  11. Why did South Carolina secede from the Union? (1 point)
    A. Lincoln stated that he wanted to support slavery.
    B. The North no longer wanted it in the Union.
    C. The Crittenden Compromise failed.
    D. They believed that Lincoln was hostile to slavery.
  12. What happened to the South’s economy during the Civil War? (1 point)
    A. It improved.
    B. It remained stable.
    C. It deteriorated.
    D. It declined and then grew.
  13. Vicksburg is located on which major river? (1 point)
    A. Hudson
    B. Susquehanna
    C. Mississippi
    D. Colorado
  14. Some abolitionists criticized Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation because (1 point)
    A. they knew it did not specifically free all enslaved people.
    B. they wanted it sent to European countries.
    C. they wanted it to give enslaved people full rights of citizenship.
    D. they wanted it to bring an end to the Civil War.
  15. Why was a plan for Reconstruction of the South needed? (1 point)
    A. The Lincoln administration did not want to readmit the Confederate states to the Union.
    B. Many new citizens had joined the nation during the war.
    C. The Constitution provided no guidance on secession or readmission of states.
    D. The Southern economy had grown, and Northern states wanted to share the prosperity.
  16. The Republican Party became strong in the South, in part because (1 point)
    A. millions of Southern African American men became voters.
    B. the party did not require a loyalty oath in order to vote.
    C. many white Southerners attended the state constitutional conventions.
    D. all of the former Confederate states had met the requirements to rejoin the Union.

my answers are: B,B,B,D,c,d,a,a,a,c,a,c,c,a,b,a.

0 0 649
asked by day
Oct 17, 2012
you missed 1,3,6,9,10,11,12,14,15,16,17

The correct answers are C,C,B,B,C,D,A,C,A 100%

0 0
posted by SafariaBell
Oct 18, 2013
are those correct?

1 0
posted by ron
Sep 8, 2014
Why did slavery continue after the Revolution?

0 0
posted by Katie
Sep 22, 2014
In which state was the Battle of Trenton fought?

0 0
posted by kk
Jan 28, 2015

C,B,C,D,C,B,A,A,B,C,D,A,C,C,A this is for 1-15

0 0
posted by Tanya
Sep 2, 2015
Real answers:
C,B,C,D,C,B,A,A,B,D,C,D,C,C,A,C
100% correct I garentee!!!! Tanya is wrong!

0 0
posted by Evangeline
Sep 12, 2016
thanks evangeline!

0 0
posted by o
Sep 13, 2016
you da best Evangeline!!!!!!!

0 0
posted by nice guy
Sep 29, 2017
100%?

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posted by is evengeline right
Oct 2, 2017

Thanks!

0 0
posted by Amanda
Oct 5, 2017
Evangeline is indeed right!

0 0
posted by big potato
Nov 27, 2017
Thank you Evangeline, all were correct

0 0
posted by Personification Personified
Sep 7, 2018
THANK YOU EVANGELINE!!

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Oct 3, 2018

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the cinematographer works with what other professional to plan

The cinematographer works with what other professional to plan how each scene will be filmed and lit?

1 0 2,973
asked by No clue
Feb 11, 2019
The cinematographer works with the director. So B would be your answer.

2 0
posted by XxgraceeeXx
Feb 11, 2019
answers are:
1)B
2)D
3)C
4)C

54 0
posted by hehe
Feb 22, 2019
Hehe answers are correct i got 100% !!!! Thank you so much your awsome.

4 0
posted by PIZZAAA
Feb 22, 2019
thxs hehe

4 0
posted by Barry aka the flash
Feb 25, 2019

Why thank you “hehe” I give you a free ticket to go to the DIMMADOME home of Doug Dimmadone owner of the DIMMADOME loved by the citizens of DIMMAVILLE!

3 1
posted by Doug Dimmadone
Feb 26, 2019
Thank you😁

0 0
posted by Cynthia
Feb 26, 2019
IT WRONG I DID IT AND I GOT 2/4

0 3
posted by Geoffrey Coleman
Mar 5, 2019
edit:oh wait nvm i just acc press the last two b

0 2
posted by Geoffrey Coleman
Mar 5, 2019
B
D
C
C
Is correct
Don’t miss click

2 0
posted by Deadshot
Mar 7, 2019

yeeter skeeter
B
D
C
C

lol still correct in 2019

1 0
posted by 2019
Mar 21, 2019
oh it was made in 2019 XD

0 0
posted by 2019
Mar 21, 2019
THX

1 0
posted by HEHE is right
Mar 25, 2019
Thx HEHE

0 0
posted by Katie
Mar 26, 2019
1-B
2-D
3-C
4-C
Listen if you’re going to cheat cheat write .2019 answers

0 0
posted by -_- life
Mar 28, 2019

*right

0 0
posted by -_- life
Mar 28, 2019
It’s B

0 0
posted by Ih8love
Apr 1, 2019
still correct. (i know it was made in 2019 just wanted to say it was…)

0 0
posted by Anon
today at 2:19am

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find the sum of the interior angles of a nonagon


  1. Find the sum of the interior angles of a nonagon. (1 point)

140°
1,620°
1,260°
1,450°


  1. Find the measure of each interior angle of a polygon with 12 sides. (1 point)

1,800°
150°
180°
145°


  1. Four of the angles of a pentagon measure 85°, 110°, 135°, and 95°. Find the measure of the missing angle. (1 point)

115°
95°
135°
85°

My answers:

  1. 1,260°
  2. 150°
  3. 115° 1 0 2,386
    asked by Delilah
    Feb 5, 2013
    All are right. 1 0
    👩‍🏫
    Ms. Sue
    Feb 5, 2013
    2.
    Find the sum of the interior angles of a nonagon. (1 point)

140°
1,620°
1,260°
1,450°

When you walk all the way around a figure with straight sides clockwise you turn 360 degrees. Ech of your right turns is 180 – interior angle there

in this case 9 * right turn angle = 360
right turn angle = 40
so each interior angle is 180 – 40 = 140
9* 140 = 1260

4.
Same deal for the next one
360/ 12 = 30
180 – 30 = 150 = interior angle

5.
each exterior angle = 180 – angle
180 – 85 = 95
180 – 110 = 70
180 – 135 = 45
180 – 45 = 85
then we have (180-x)
95+70+45+85 +180 – x = 360
475 – x = 360
x = 115

1 1
posted by Damon
Feb 5, 2013
Those answer are all correct, good job.

0 0
posted by Ms. Smart
Feb 10, 2017
Connexus answers

  1. B
  2. C
  3. A
  4. B
  5. A
  6. C
  7. D
  8. C
  9. B
  10. D
  11. C
  12. You have to do that one yourself it’s a writen answer. 8 1
    posted by Allison
    Feb 3, 2019

Thank you Allison

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posted by UnaLoca
Feb 4, 2019
Nice job Allison! Those answers are 100%

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posted by MarineCat6
Feb 12, 2019

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PSY 100 – Psychology of Adjustment

© 2014 Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University Confidential and Proprietary information and may not be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University.

PSY 100 Student Version 1148 (1263 10-28-2014) Final Page 1 of 12

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course emphasizes how psychological concepts can be applied to everyday life. It covers prominent theories in major areas of psychology and discusses their relevance to one’s life. The course discusses strategies for improving coping skills, handling stress, building self-esteem, enhancing interpersonal communication, and understanding relationships. Workplace issues, human sexuality, mental health, and physical health are also covered.

INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS

Required Resources

Santrock, J. (2006). Human adjustment: 2007 custom edition. Boston, MA: McGraw-Hill.

Supplemental Resources

American Psychological Association (APA) Style Guide. http://www.apastyle.org/ Purdue Online Writing Lab. (2011). General format. Retrieved from

http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES

1. Define psychology and psychological adjustment.

2. Identify contextual variables (e.g., culture) that impact psychological adjustment.

3. Describe self-concept, self-esteem, and identity.

4. Define stress, stressors, and coping strategies, and contemplate their relationship to health and wellness.

5. Identify and describe social psychological phenomena.

6. Describe adult relationships, lifestyles, and issues of parenting and longevity.

7. Identify gender differences and explore gender role stereotypes.

8. Identify and describe the various psychological disorders.

9. Evaluate the multiple approaches to therapy.

10. Use critical thinking skills to reflect on personal experiences with adjustment and identify new strategies for personal growth.

11. Use technology and information resources to support learning issues of psychology adjustment.

12. Write clearly and concisely about psychological adjustment using proper writing mechanics.http://www.apastyle.org/http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/

PSY 100 – Psychology of Adjustment

© 2014 Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University Confidential and Proprietary information and may not be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University.

PSY 100 Student Version 1148 (1263 10-28-2014) Final Page 2 of 12

WEEKLY COURSE SCHEDULE

The standard requirement for a 4.5 credit hour course is for students to spend 13.5 hours in weekly work. This includes preparation, activities, and evaluation regardless of delivery mode.

Week Preparation, Activities, and Evaluation Points

1 Preparation

 Reading(s)

o Chapter 1: Adjusting to Life

 e-Activity

o Read the article titled, “Ecological Systems Theory: You and Your Environment,” located at https://explorable.com/ecological-systems- theory. Be prepared to discuss.

Activities

 Discussion

Evaluation

 None

20

2 Preparation

 Reading(s)

o Chapter 3: The Self, Identity, and Values

 e-Activity

o Read the article titled, “Six Strategies for Building Your Self- Confidence,” located at http://sourcesofinsight.com/six-guiding- strategies-to-build-up-your-self-confidence/. Be prepared to discuss.

Activities

 Discussion

Evaluation

 Quiz 1: Chapter 1

20

20

3 Preparation

 Reading(s)

o Chapter 4: Stress

 e-Activity

o Read the article titled “Stress Management: How to Reduce, Prevent, and Cope with Stress,” located at http://www.helpguide.org/mental/stress_management_relief_coping .htm. Be prepared to discuss.

Activities

 Discussion

Evaluation

 Quiz 2: Chapter 3

20

20

4 Preparation

 Reading(s)

o Chapter 5: Copinghttps://explorable.com/ecological-systems-theoryhttps://explorable.com/ecological-systems-theoryhttp://sourcesofinsight.com/six-guiding-strategies-to-build-up-your-self-confidence/http://sourcesofinsight.com/six-guiding-strategies-to-build-up-your-self-confidence/http://www.helpguide.org/mental/stress_management_relief_coping.htmhttp://www.helpguide.org/mental/stress_management_relief_coping.htm

PSY 100 – Psychology of Adjustment

© 2014 Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University Confidential and Proprietary information and may not be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University.

PSY 100 Student Version 1148 (1263 10-28-2014) Final Page 3 of 12

 e-Activity

o Read the article titled “How Do You Cope?” located at http://www.semel.ucla.edu/dual-diagnosis- program/News_and_Resources/How_Do_You_Cope. Be prepared to discuss.

Activities

 Discussion

Evaluation

 Quiz 3: Chapter 4

 Assignment 1: Personal Reflection Journal Entry

20

20

175

5 Preparation

 Reading(s)

o Chapter 6: Social Thinking, Influence, and Intergroup Relations

Activities

 Discussion

Evaluation

 Quiz 4: Chapter 5

20

20

6 Preparation

 Reading(s)

o Chapter 9: Adult Lifestyles

Activities

 Discussion

Evaluation

 Quiz 5: Chapter 6

20

20

7 Preparation

 Reading(s)

o Chapter 11: Emerging Adulthood, Adult Development, and Aging

 Self-Assessment: “Can I Live to be 100?” (located in textbook)

 e-Activity

o Watch the video titled, “Nun Study.” (4 min 05 s). Be prepared to discuss. Video source: Etan Rozin (2006, December 28). Nun Study [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nw2lafKIEio. This video can be reviewed from within your online course shell.

Activities

 Discussion

Evaluation

 Quiz 6: Chapter 9

20

20

8 Preparation

 Reading(s)

o Chapter 12: Gender

 e-Activity

o Watch the video titled “Top 10 Most Sexist Commercials of Allhttp://www.semel.ucla.edu/dual-diagnosis-program/News_and_Resources/How_Do_You_Copehttp://www.semel.ucla.edu/dual-diagnosis-program/News_and_Resources/How_Do_You_Copehttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nw2lafKIEio

PSY 100 – Psychology of Adjustment

© 2014 Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University Confidential and Proprietary information and may not be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University.

PSY 100 Student Version 1148 (1263 10-28-2014) Final Page 4 of 12

Time!” (3 min 39 s). Be prepared to discuss. Video Source: Beryl Shereshewsky and Jonathan Tortora. (2012, October 25). Top 10 Most Sexist Commercials of All Time! [Video file]. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ibugG89odt0.

Activities

 Discussion

Evaluation

 Quiz 7: Chapter 11

 Assignment 2: Adjustment Case Study

20

20

230

9 Preparation

 Reading(s)

o Chapter 14: Psychological Disorders

 e-Activity

o Watch the video titled “The Gestalt Project: Stop the Stigma” (4 min 09 s). Be prepared to discuss. Video Source: Kian Madjedi. (2012, April 10). The Gestalt Project: Stop the Stigma [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QficvVNIxTI. This video can be reviewed from within your online course shell.

Activities

 Discussion

Evaluation

 Quiz 8: Chapter 12

20

20

10 Preparation

 Reading(s)

o Chapter 15: Therapies

Activities

 Discussion

Evaluation

 Quiz 9: Chapter 14

20

20

11 Preparation

 Reading(s): None

Activities

 Discussion

Evaluation

 Quiz 10: Chapter 15

20

20

GRADING SCALE – UNDERGRADUATE

Assignment Total Points % of

Grade

Quizzes (open book with a 1-hour time limit per chapter)

(10 quizzes, covering 10 chapters, 10 questions each chapter, worth 2

200

24%http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ibugG89odt0https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QficvVNIxTI

PSY 100 – Psychology of Adjustment

© 2014 Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University Confidential and Proprietary information and may not be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University.

PSY 100 Student Version 1148 (1263 10-28-2014) Final Page 5 of 12

points apiece)

Assignment 1: Personal Reflection Journal Entry 175 21%

Assignment 2: Adjustment Case Study 230 28%

Participation (11 discussions worth 20 points apiece) 220 27%

Total 825 100%

Points Percentage Grade

743 – 825 90% – 100% A

660 – 742 80% – 89% B

578 – 659 70% – 79% C

495 – 577 60% – 69% D

Below 495 Below 60% F

PSY 100 – Assignments and Rubrics

© 2014 Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University Confidential and Proprietary information and may not be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University.

PSY 100 Student Version 1148 (1263 10-28-2014) Final Page 6 of 12

Assignment 1: Personal Reflection Journal Entry

Due in Week 4 and worth 175 points

In this assignment, you will review your current level of adjustment.

Write a one to two (1-2) page paper in which you:

1. Reflect on how well you are:

a. adjusting to your life in terms of subjective well-being, diversity, contexts, and / or thinking critically.

b. balancing your priorities, specifically with home, work, school, recreation, and / or family.

c. developing your identity, specifically self-esteem, self-concept, ethnicity, and / or gender.

d. coping with stress, specifically social support, multiple coping strategies, and / or self- control.

Your assignment must follow these formatting requirements:

 Be typed, double-spaced, using Times New Roman font (size 12), with one-inch margins on all sides; Since the only resources you will be using for this assignment are the article and your textbook, you need not include a reference page. Check with your professor for any additional instructions.

 Include a cover page containing the title of the assignment, the student’s name, the professor’s name, the course title, and the date. The cover page is not included in the required assignment page length.

The specific course learning outcomes associated with this assignment are:

 Define psychology and psychological adjustment.

 Identify contextual variables (e.g., culture) that impact psychological adjustment.

 Describe self-concept, self-esteem, and identity.

 Define stress, stressors, and coping strategies, and contemplate their relationship to health and wellness.

 Use critical thinking skills to reflect on personal experiences with adjustment and identify new strategies for personal growth.

 Use technology and information resources to research issues in psychology.

 Write clearly and concisely about psychology using proper writing mechanics.

Grading for this assignment will be based on answer quality, logic / organization of the paper, and language and writing skills, using the following rubric.

Points: 175

Assignment 1: Personal Reflection Journal Entry

Criteria

Exemplary 90%-100%

Proficient 80%-89%

Fair

70%-79%

Meets Minimum

Expectations 60%-69% D

Unacceptable Below 60% F

1. Reflect on how well you are adjusting to your life in terms of

Thoroughly reflected on how well you are adjusting to your life in

Satisfactorily reflected on how well you are adjusting to your life in terms of

Partially reflected on how well you are adjusting to your life in terms of subjective well-

Insufficiently reflected on how well you are adjusting to your life in terms of

Did not reflect or incompletely reflected how well you are adjusting to your life in terms of

PSY 100 – Assignments and Rubrics

© 2014 Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University Confidential and Proprietary information and may not be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University.

PSY 100 Student Version 1148 (1263 10-28-2014) Final Page 7 of 12

subjective well- being, diversity, contexts, and/or thinking critically.

Weight: 20%

terms of subjective well- being, diversity, contexts, and/or thinking critically.

subjective well- being, diversity, contexts, and/or thinking critically.

being, diversity, contexts, and/or thinking critically.

subjective well- being, diversity, contexts, and/or thinking critically.

subjective well- being, diversity, contexts, and/or thinking critically.

2. Reflect on how well you are balancing your priorities, specifically home, work, school, family, and/or recreation.

Weight: 20%

Thoroughly reflected on how well you are balancing your priorities, specifically home, work, school, family, and/or recreation.

Satisfactorily reflected on how well you are balancing your priorities, specifically home, work, school, family, and/or recreation.

Partially reflected on how well you are balancing your priorities, specifically home, work, school, family, and/or recreation.

Insufficiently reflected on how well you are balancing your priorities, specifically home, work, school, family, and/or recreation.

Did not reflect or incompletely reflected balancing priorities specifically home, work, school, family, and/or recreation.

3. Reflect on how well you are developing your identity, specifically self-esteem, self-concept, ethnicity, and/or gender.

Weight: 20%

Thoroughly reflected on how well you are developing your identity, specifically regarding self- esteem, self- concept, ethnicity, and/or gender.

Satisfactorily reflected on how well you are developing your identity, specifically regarding self- esteem, self- concept, ethnicity, and/or gender.

Partially reflected on how well you are developing your identity, specifically regarding self- esteem, self- concept, ethnicity, and/or gender.

Insufficiently reflected on how well you are developing your identity, specifically regarding self- esteem, self- concept, ethnicity, and/or gender.

Did not reflect or incompletely reflected on how well you are developing your identity, specifically regarding self- esteem, self- concept, ethnicity, and/or gender.

4. Reflect on how well you are coping with stress, specifically social support, multiple coping strategies, and/or self- control

Weight: 20%

Thoroughly reflected on how well you are coping with stress, specifically social support, multiple coping strategies, and/or self- control.

Satisfactorily reflected on how well you are coping with stress, specifically social support, multiple coping strategies, and/or self-control.

Partially reflected on how well you are coping with stress, specifically social support, multiple coping strategies, and/or self-control.

Insufficiently reflected on how well you are coping with stress, specifically social support, multiple coping strategies, and/or self-control.

Did not reflect or incompletely reflected on how well you are coping with stress, specifically social support, multiple coping strategies, and/or self-control.

5. Writing / Support for ideas

Weight: 10%

Consistently uses explanations, examples, and evidence that logically support ideas.

Mostly uses explanations, examples, and evidence that logically support ideas.

Partially uses explanations, examples, and evidence that logically support ideas.

Rarely uses explanations, examples, and evidence that logically support ideas.

Never uses explanations, examples, and evidence that logically support ideas.

6. Writing / Grammar and mechanics Weight: 10%

Free of errors in grammar, spelling, and punctuation.

Mostly free of errors in grammar, spelling, and punctuation.

Partially free of errors in grammar, spelling, and punctuation.

Numerous errors in grammar, spelling, and punctuation.

Serious and persistent errors in grammar, spelling, and punctuation.

PSY 100 – Assignments and Rubrics

© 2014 Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University Confidential and Proprietary information and may not be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University.

PSY 100 Student Version 1148 (1263 10-28-2014) Final Page 8 of 12

Assignment 2: Adjustment Case Study

Due in Week 8 and worth 230 points

Go to NPR’s StoryCorps Website, located at http://www.npr.org/series/4516989/storycorps. Read two (2) articles that were published within the last two (2) months that focus on individuals with major adjustment issues.

Next, use the textbook and / or Strayer Library to research evidence-based strategies to help with adjustment. Consider strategies that relate to stress and coping, gender, stages of life, cultural and social issues, and health.

When referencing the selected stories, please use this format:

 Standard Format:

o Title of the story [Audio file]. (Year, Month Day). Retrieved from website url.

 Example:

A homeless teen finds solace in a teacher and a recording [Audio file]. (2014, March 7). Retrieved from http://www.npr.org/2014/03/07/286921391/a-homeless-teen-finds- solace-in-a-teacher-and-a-recording.

 In-Text Citation Format:

o The in-text citation for a selected story is an abbreviated version of the title and the year of publication. The abbreviation contains the first three words of the title.

 Example:

(“A homeless teen,” 2014).

 Textbook Citation Format:

o Author’s Name. (Date of publication). Title of the resource. Publisher information.

 Example:

Santrock, J. (2006). Human adjustment: 2007 custom edition. Boston, MA: McGraw- Hill.

Write a three to six (3-6) page paper in which you:

1. Summarize the two (2) articles you selected from the NPR Website.

2. Describe the major adjustment issues discussed in each story.

3. Examine at least three (3) evidence-based strategies from the selected articles that could help the individuals enhance their adjustment skills.

4. Recommend the evidence-based strategy that is best suited for the people in the selected articles. Provide a rationale for your response.

5. Use at least four (4) quality academic resources in this assignment. Note: Wikipedia and other similar websites do not qualify as academic resources.

Your assignment must follow these formatting requirements:

 Be typed, double-spaced, using Times New Roman font (size 12), with one-inch margins on all sides; Since the only resources you will be using for this assignment are the article and yourhttp://www.npr.org/series/4516989/storycorpshttp://www.npr.org/2014/03/07/286921391/a-homeless-teen-finds-solace-in-a-teacher-and-a-recordinghttp://www.npr.org/2014/03/07/286921391/a-homeless-teen-finds-solace-in-a-teacher-and-a-recording

PSY 100 – Assignments and Rubrics

© 2014 Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University Confidential and Proprietary information and may not be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University.

PSY 100 Student Version 1148 (1263 10-28-2014) Final Page 9 of 12

textbook, you need not include a reference page. Check with your professor for any additional instructions.

 Include a cover page containing the title of the assignment, the student’s name, the professor’s name, the course title, and the date. The cover page is not included in the required assignment page length.

The specific course learning outcomes associated with this assignment are:

 Identify contextual variables (e.g., culture) that impact psychological adjustment.

 Define stress, stressors, and coping strategies, and contemplate their relationship to health and wellness.

 Identify and describe social psychological phenomena.

 Describe adult relationships, lifestyles, and issues of parenting and longevity.

 Identify gender differences and explore gender role stereotypes.

 Use technology and information resources to research issues in psychology.

 Write clearly and concisely about psychology using proper writing mechanics.

Grading for this assignment will be based on answer quality, logic / organization of the presentation, and language and writing skills, using the following rubric.

Points: 230

Assignment 2: Adjustment Case Study

Criteria

Exemplary 90%-100%

Proficient 80%-89%

Fair

70%-79%

Meets Minimum

Expectations 60%-69% D

Unacceptable Below 60% F

1. Summarize the two (2) articles you selected from the NPR Website.

Weight: 20%

Thoroughly summarized two (2) articles selected from the NPR Website.

Satisfactorily summarized two (2) articles selected from the NPR Website.

Partially summarized two (2) articles selected from the NPR Website.

Insufficiently summarized two (2) articles selected from the NPR Website.

Did not identify and/or summarize two (2) articles selected from the NPR Website.

2. Describe the major adjustment issues discussed in each story. Weight: 20%

Thoroughly described the major adjustment issues discussed in their story selection.

Satisfactorily described the major adjustment issues discussed in their story selection.

Partially described the major adjustment issues discussed in their story selection.

Insufficiently described the major adjustment issues discussed in their story selection.

Did not describe the major adjustment issues discussed in their story selection.

3. Examine at least three (3) evidence-based strategies from the selected articles that could help the individuals enhance their adjustment skills.

Weight: 20%

Thoroughly examined at least three (3) evidence-based strategies from the selected articles that could help the individuals enhance their adjustment skills.

Satisfactorily examined at least three (3) evidence-based strategies from the selected articles that could help the individuals enhance their adjustment skills.

Partially examined at least three (3) evidence-based strategies from the selected articles that could help the individuals enhance their adjustment skills.

Insufficiently examined at least three (3) evidence-based strategies from the selected articles that could help the individuals enhance their adjustment skills.

Incompletely examined at least three (3) evidence-based strategies from the selected articles that could help the individuals enhance their adjustment skills.

PSY 100 – Assignments and Rubrics

© 2014 Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University Confidential and Proprietary information and may not be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University.

PSY 100 Student Version 1148 (1263 10-28-2014) Final Page 10 of 12

4. Recommend the evidence- based strategy that is best suited for the people in the selected articles. Provide a rationale for your response.

Weight: 20%

Thoroughly recommended the evidence- based strategy that is best suited for the people in the selected articles. Provide a rationale for your response.

Satisfactorily recommended the evidence- based strategy that is best suited for the people in the selected articles. Provide a rationale for your response.

Partially recommended the evidence- based strategy that is best suited for the people in the selected articles. Provide a rationale for your response.

Insufficiently recommended the evidence- based strategy that is best suited for the people in the selected articles. Provide a rationale for your response.

Incompletely recommended the evidence- based strategy that is best suited for the people in the selected articles. Provide a rationale for your response.

5. Writing / Support for ideas

Weight: 5%

Consistently uses explanations, examples, and evidence that logically support ideas.

Mostly uses explanations, examples, and evidence that logically support ideas.

Partially uses explanations, examples, and evidence that logically support ideas.

Rarely uses explanations, examples, and evidence that logically support ideas.

Never uses explanations, examples, and evidence that logically support ideas.

6. Writing / Grammar and mechanics Weight: 5%

Free of errors in grammar, spelling, and punctuation.

Mostly free of errors in grammar, spelling, and punctuation.

Partially free of errors in grammar, spelling, and punctuation.

Numerous errors in grammar, spelling, and punctuation.

Serious and persistent errors in grammar, spelling, and punctuation.

7. Information Literacy / Crediting Sources in APA Weight: 5%

Consistently shows correct use of In-text citations with matching references using APA format.

Mostly shows correct use of in- text citations with matching references using APA format.

Partially shows correct (or approximately correct) use of in-text citations, with matching references using APA format.

In-text citations and references are given, but not in APA format.

Lack of citations and / or lack of reference section and / or citations don’t correspond to listed references.

8. Information Literacy / Research Weight: 5%

Four (4) or more sources are used and the quality of sources is good.

Three (3) sources are used and the quality of sources is mostly good.

Two (2) sources are used and / or the quality of sources is questionable.

One (1) source is used and / or references are of poor quality.

No sources are used and / or quality of sources are unacceptable.

PSY 100 – Student Notes

© 2014 Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University Confidential and Proprietary information and may not be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University.

PSY 100 Student Version 1148 (1263 10-28-2014) Final Page 11 of 12

Weekly Course Schedule

The purpose of the course schedule is to give you, at a glance, the required preparation, activities, and evaluation components of your course. For more information about your course, whether on-ground or online, access your online course shell.

The expectations for a 4.5 credit hour course are for students to spend 13.5 hours in weekly work. This time estimate includes preparation, activities, and evaluation regardless of the delivery mode.

Instructional Materials

In order to be fully prepared, obtain a copy of the required textbooks and other instructional materials prior to the first day of class. When available, Strayer University provides a link to the first three (3) chapters of your textbook(s) in eBook format. Check your online course shell for availability.

Review the online course shell or check with your professor to determine whether Internet-based assignments and activities are used in this course.

Strayer students are encouraged to purchase their course materials through the Strayer Bookstore. http://www.strayerbookstore.com. If a lab is required for the course, the Strayer Bookstore is the only vendor that sells the correct registration code so that Strayer students may access labs successfully.

Discussions

To earn full credit in an online threaded discussion, students must have one original post and a minimum of one other post per discussion thread.

Please note: Material in the online class will be made available three weeks at a time to allow students to work ahead, however, faculty will be focused on and responding only to the current calendar week. As it is always possible that students could lose their work due to unforeseen circumstances, it is a best practice to routinely save a working draft in a separate file before posting in the course discussion area. Professors hold discussions during class time for on-ground students. Check with your professor if any additional discussion participation is required in the online course shell outside of class hours.

Tests

Tests (quizzes, midterm and final exams, essay exams, lab tests, etc.) are available for student access and completion through the online course shell. Check the online course shell to determine how students are expected to take the tests. Do not change these questions or their point values in any way. This disrupts the automated grade book preset in the online course shell.

 Online students are to complete the test by Monday 9:00 a.m. Details regarding due dates are posted in the Blackboard Calendar tool.

 On-ground students are to complete the tests after the material is covered and before the next class session.

Assignments

A standardized performance grading rubric is a tool your professor will use to evaluate your written assignments. Review the rubric before submitting assignments that have grading rubrics associated with them to ensure you have met the performance criteria stated on the rubric.

Grades are based on individual effort. There is no group grading; however, working in groups in the online or on-ground classroom is acceptable.http://www.strayerbookstore.com/

PSY 100 – Student Notes

© 2014 Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University Confidential and Proprietary information and may not be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University.

PSY 100 Student Version 1148 (1263 10-28-2014) Final Page 12 of 12

Assignments for online students are always submitted through the online course shell. On-ground professors will inform students on how to submit assignments, whether in paper format or through the online course shell.

Resources

The Resource Center navigation button in the online course shell contains helpful links. Strayer University Library Resources are available here as well as other important information. You should review this area to find resources and answers to common questions.

Technical support is available for the following:

 For technical questions, please contact Strayer Online Technical Support by logging in to your

iCampus account at https://icampus.strayer.edu/login and submitting a case under “Student

Center,” then “Submit Help Ticket.” If you are unable to log in to your iCampus account, please

contact Technical Support via phone at (877) 642-2999.

 For concerns with your class, please access the Solution Center by logging in to your iCampus

account at https://icampus.strayer.edu/login and submitting a case under “Student Center,” then

“Submit Help Ticket.” If you are unable to log in to your iCampus account, please contact the IT

Help Desk at (866) 610-8123 or at mailto:IThelpdesk@Strayer.edu.

TurnItIn.com is an optional online tool to assess the originality of student written work. Check with your professor for access and use instructions.

The Strayer Policies link on the navigation bar in the online course shell contains academic policies. It is important that students be aware of these policies.

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pre writing graphic organizer

I need help with the highlighted portion

Pre-writing Graphic Organizer

Topic: Narrate a scene where Macbeth and Lady Macbeth prepare for Banquo’s funeral and tell the story of their interaction.

Generating Ideas: Lady Macbeth and the death of Banquo. How everyone reacts to his death. The way everyone sees him. The weird sisters talking to Macduff after everything happened.

Who‭?‬ List and describe the characters involved in the narrative you are creating.‭
Character Name: Macbeth

How would you describe this character‭?
Why‭?‬                       

Physical Appearance
Brave and loyal to king Duncan, and Duncan thought greatly of him.
Because he needs to be loyal to everyone.

Feelings
 Having feelings of guilt, after he killed him he was almost in shock.
 Because he killed someone and he didn’t know it was going to be that way.

Attitude
 He has a worried type of attitude in the beginning but at the play goes on it changes and he’s more confident.
 Because he doesn’t want anyone to find out what he has done so he is very worried. 

Character Name: Lady Macbeth

How would you describe this character‭?
Why‭?‬                       

Physical Appearance
 ambitious, manipulative, cruel and unstable
 She thinks of her husband as a man who desires power, but too weak to achieve his goals, so she takes matters in her hands.

Feelings
 Guilty
 Lady Macbeth feels guilty for her involvement in King Duncan’s murder.

Attitude

Greedy,
 Lady Macbeth thinks what best for Macbeth and that is power.

Character Name: King Duncan

How would you describe this character‭?
Why‭?‬                       

Physical Appearance
 crafted as a sensitive, insightful, and generous father-figure, generous, benevolent, and just a little weepier
 Because he is the king, and he has to be like this.

Feelings

 His feelings, don’t really change because he is only in the play for half of it. He’s a very positive guy who should not have died.
 Because he’s a very good king. And he believes that he is doing a good job.

Attitude

 His attitude is very good. He thinks he has everything under control, but in reality he doesn’t.
 Because he’s a strong guy who didn’t deserve to die.

What‭?‬ ‭ ‬Conflict

Characters
Conflict Experienced
How do they respond‭?

 Where‭?
‬Write some words or phrases that will help you describe the setting of your story.‭ ‬Where do the events take place‭? ‬What does it look like there‭? ‬What does it feel like there‭?

‭In a castle, at a banquet hall.


Organization‭

When‭?
‬Plan the course of events in your narrative.‭

Exposition
Rising Action
Climax
Falling Action
Resolution


Voice‭

‬How‭?
‬Think of the overall effect you would like your narrative to have on the reader.‭ ‬How will you create that effect‭? ‬Brainstorm ways to establish voice.

Point of View:

Tone—What is the attitude of your story‭?
Pace—How fast is your story going to move‭?

Words to describe the tone:

How will you communicate that tone‭?

How do you want readers to feel after they read your story‭?

What pace fits your narrative:

Why‭?

How will you create that pace‭?

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which statement best describes the relationship between science and technology

  1. Which statement best describes the relationship between science and technology?

A. The goal of science is to gain an understanding of the natural world, while the goal of technology is to use that understanding to improve people’s lives.<<
B. The goal of science is to create solutions that improve people’s lives by mimicking the natural world, while the goal of technology is to build machines.
C. The goal of science is to use technology, while the goal of technology is use science.
D. The study of science does not rely on technology, while technology could not exist without science.

  1. In the 1900s, many farmers replaced their horse-drawn plows with tractors. Which of the following describes a cost of this new technology?
    A. Farmers needed a lot more horses and had to pay more in horse feed.

B. Farmers could grow more crops because they could plow more land with the tractor than with a horse-drawn plow.<<
C. Farmers with tractors needed fewer workers, so many people lost their jobs.
D. Tractors increased the amount of work a farmer could do in the same amount of time.

  1. Which factor is most helpful in helping technology to progress?
    A. Unintended consequences

B. A better understanding of the natural world.
C. Risk-Benefit Analysis
D. Obsolete technologies

  1. An oven is a technological system. Which of the following describes an input into the system?

A. Setting the temperature.<<
B. Burning gas releases heat.
C. A thermostat monitors the temperature and increases the gas flow when the temperature falls to low.
D. A cake is baked.

  1. Which of the following describes feedback in an oven?
    A. Setting the temperature.

B. Burning gas releases heat.<<
C. A thermostat monitors the temperature and increases the gas flow when the temperature falls to low.
D. A cake is baked.

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phosphoric acid is a triprotic acid with the following pka values

Phosphoric acid is a triprotic acid with the following pKa values:

pka1: 2.148 pka2: 7.198 pka3: 12.375

You wish to prepare 1.000 L of a 0.0100 M phosphate buffer at pH 7.45. To do this, you choose to use mix the two salt forms involved in the second ionization, NaH2PO4 and Na2HPO4, in a 1.000 L volumetric flask and add water to the mark. What mass of each salt will you add to the mixture?

?? grams NaH2PO4
?? grams Na2HPO4

Hint: Use the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation to get the molar ratio of Na2HPO4 to NaH2PO4 required, then the fraction of each form from the ratio. The total moles needed will be 1.000 L × 0.0100 M = 0.0100 moles. Use the formula mass to calculate the mass needed. (FM NaH2PO4 = 119.98; FM Na2HPO4 = 141.96).

I am completely lost on how to solve this problem.

0 0 413
asked by Sam
Feb 22, 2013
pH=pka+log({A-]/[HA])

pH=7.45
pka=12.375

Solve for ratio:

10^(7.45-12.375)={A-]/[HA]=1.19×10^-5

Since you have a total of 0.01 moles,

1.19×10^-5*(0.01moles)= moles of Na2HPO4

0.01 moles-moles of Na2HPO4= moles of NaH2PO4

Use the formula weights to solve for the number for each that Dr. Bob222 gave you.

**** Not sure about that pKa value that I chose.

0 0
posted by Devron
Feb 22, 2013
The correct pKa value to choose is pK2.

Use the HH equation to solve for the ratio base/acid.
One equation you need is base/acid.
The other equation you need is
base + acid = 0.01
That two equations in two unknowns; solve for acid concn and base concn and convert to grams. Post your work if you gets stuck.

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posted by DrBob222
Feb 22, 2013
Setup is correct, but substitute 7.198. That should change 1.19×10^-5 to 1.78 and do what Dr.Bob222 told you to do.

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posted by Devron
Feb 22, 2013
if you use the pk2 wouldnt you get a negative value for nah2po4?

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posted by scott
Oct 27, 2014

After you get the ratio. From the
0.01 moles-moles of Na2HPO4= moles of NaH2PO4
=> (0.01 – Na2HPO4)/(Na2HPO4) = (ratio of pka2 from hasselbalch)
unit will be mol, convert to g

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posted by Shiro
Oct 26, 2016

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nach3co2

chemistry

Calculate the pH of a 0.800 M NaCH3CO2 solution. Ka for acetic acid, CH3CO2H, is

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complete this table of initial and final concentrations.

Complete this table of initial and final concentrations HF(aq) KOH(aq) <-> KF(aq) H20(l) Initial concentrations: HF-2.0M KOH-1.0M KF-0M Final Concentrations?
34,046 results
Chemistry
Complete this table of initial and final concentrations HF(aq) + KOH(aq) KF(aq) + H20(l) Initial concentrations: HF-2.0M KOH-1.0M KF-0M Final Concentrations? how do I set this up to figure out the final concentrations? How can I tell which of the following

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Chemistry
Question : ka1 and ka2 values of H2X is given 1(10)^-5 M and 1(10)^-9 M.50cm^3 of 0.2 M KOH and 50 cm^3 of H2X of unknown concentration is mixed together and the pH of the final solution is given as 7. 1)Find the concentration of H2X 2)Find the pH of the

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chemistry
Question : ka1 and ka2 values of H2X is given 1(10)^-5 M and 1(10)^-9 M.50cm^3 of 0.2 M KOH and 50 cm^3 of H2X of unknown concentration is mixed together and the pH of the final solution is given as 7. 1)Find the concentration of H2X 2)Find the pH of the

asked by To Aanya on May 21, 2017
chemistry 12
Equilibrium concentrations (a)(mol/L)// (b)(mol/L)// (c)(mol/L) 0.040 // 0.066 // 1.72×10^-2 0.080 // 0.017 // 8.8×10^-3 0.030 // 0.024 // 4.7×10^-3 My data was collected at 25○C for the reaction A(g) + B(g) = C(g) What i have to do now is involving

asked by Robyn on September 26, 2011
Chemistry(Please check, thank you!)
I completed a lab to find the determination of Kc. I have to find the concentrations of reactants at equilibrium using an ICE table. The equation that were are using is Fe^3+(aq) + SCN^-(aq) -> Fe(SCN)^2+(aq) I have to create 5 ICE tables because we used 5

asked by Hannah on March 4, 2012

Chemistry(Urgent, please check)
I completed a lab to find the determination of Kc. I have to find the concentrations of reactants at equilibrium using an ICE table. The equation that were are using is Fe^3+(aq) + SCN^-(aq) -> Fe(SCN)^2+(aq) I have to create 5 ICE tables because we used 5

asked by Hannah on March 4, 2012
chemistry
For the reaction H2(g) + I2(g) ↔ 2 HI(g), you have the initial concentrations [H2] = 0.15 and [I2] = 0.05. Keq for the reaction at this temperature is 4.5 x 10-6. Make a reaction table. Include rows for initial concentration, change in concentration, and

asked by Anonymous on April 24, 2012
chemistry
For the reaction H2(g) + I2(g) ¡ê 2 HI(g), you have the initial concentrations [H2] = 0.15 and [I2] = 0.05. Keq for the reaction at this temperature is 4.5 x 10-6. Make a reaction table. Include rows for initial concentration, change in concentration,

asked by Anonymous on May 4, 2012
chemistry
For the reaction H2(g) + I2(g) ↔ 2 HI(g), you have the initial concentrations [H2] = 0.15 and [I2] = 0.05. Keq for the reaction at this temperature is 4.5 x 10-6. Make a reaction table. Include rows for initial concentration, change in concentration, and

asked by Anonymous on April 23, 2012
Chemistry
The reaction X + Y –> products was studied using the method of initial rates. The initial rate of consumption of X was measured in three different experiments. What is the value of the rate constant, k? *concentrations are in mol/L and initial rates are

asked by Jamie on February 23, 2011
Chemistry(Please check)
I completed a lab to find the determination of Kc. I have to find the concentrations of reactants at equilibrium using an ICE table. The equation that were are using is Fe^3+(aq) + SCN^-(aq) -> Fe(SCN)^2+(aq) I have to create 5 ICE tables because we used 5

asked by Hannah on March 5, 2012
science
The equilibrium constant for the gas phase reaction N2O4 ⇀↽ 2 NO2 at a certain temperature is K = 0.0466. If the initial concentrations are [N2O4] = 1.0 M, [NO2] = 0.0 M, what are the final concentrations of [N2O4] and [NO2], respectively? 1. 1.0 M ;

asked by cora on February 1, 2016
augusta state
What is the final concentration of d at equilibrium if the initial concentrations are a = 1.00 and b = 2.00 ?

asked by e on March 2, 2013
Chemistry12
For the reaction NO2 + NO = N2O3 If at a particular temperature, K was 575 and the equilibrium concentration of N2O3 was 2.5M, calculate the equilibrium concentrations of NO2 and NO if they both had the same initial concentrations. I have this information

asked by Moriah on May 31, 2011
AP Chem
At a particular temperature, K = 3.75 for the following reaction. SO2(g) + NO2(g) SO3(g) + NO(g) If all four gases had initial concentrations of 0.580 M, calculate the equilibrium concentrations of the gases.

asked by Bill on January 8, 2012

Chemistry
At a particular temperature, K = 3.75 for the following reaction. SO2(g) + NO2(g) SO3(g) + NO(g) If all four gases had initial concentrations of 0.520 M, calculate the equilibrium concentrations of the gases

asked by Erin on May 5, 2010
Chemistry
At a particular temperature, K = 3.75 for the following reaction. SO2(g) + NO2(g) SO3(g) + NO(g)\ If all four gases had initial concentrations of 0.550 M, calculate the equilibrium concentrations of the gases.

asked by Amber on March 27, 2011
tommy
At a particular temperature, K = 3.75 for the following reaction. SO2(g) + NO2(g) SO3(g) + NO(g) If all four gases had initial concentrations of 0.870 M, calculate the equilibrium concentrations of the gases.

asked by CHEMISTRY on January 8, 2012
chemistry
At a particular temperature, K = 3.75 for the following reaction. SO2(g) + NO2(g)= SO3(g) + NO(g) If all four gases had initial concentrations of 0.840 M, calculate the equilibrium concentrations of the gases.

asked by Enrique on January 15, 2009
Chemistry
HA(aq) H+(aq) + A-(aq) K = 5.0 x 10 -9 The initial concentration of HA is 0.30 M What is the final equilibrium concentrations of HA, H+, A-? Show work, solve if you can

asked by Kay on April 12, 2018
Chemistry
The following table contains data for the equilibrium reaction CH3COOH(g)+ C2H5OH(g)↔ CH3COOC2H5(g)+ H2O(g) T = 100oC. Each row in the table represents a different experiment (diffferent intial concentrations). Initial concentration Equilibrium

asked by Ava on September 24, 2009
Chemistry
For the reaction NO2(g) + NO(g) = N2O3(g) If at particular temperature, K was 575 and equilibrium concentration of N2O3(g) was 2.5 M, calculate the equilibrium concentrations of NO2(g) and NO(g) if they both had the same initial concentrations. i have my

asked by Sara on September 25, 2011
Chemistry
I have a question about buffers. Part A So it starts with 20ml 0.1 sodium acetate and 25ml 0.1 acetic acid. Calculate ph of buffer is 4.74 because the acid and conjugate base have the same molarity correct? So the Ph is just pKa (1.8e-5)? Part B So the

asked by Rio on March 31, 2010
Chemistry
At a particular temperature, K=3.75 for the following reaction. SO2(g) + NO2(g) (reversible arrows) SO3(g) + NO(g) If all four gases had initial concentrations of 0.500 M, calculate the equilibrium concentrations of the gases. K=(.5+x)^2/(.5-x^2) solve for

asked by Taasha on July 30, 2007
Chemistry
The following table shows how the initial rate of this reaction depends on the concentrations of the two reactants [NO] [O2] Initial rate 0.0050 0.0050 0.02 0.0050 0.0075 0.03 0.010 0.0075 0.12 Use the data to determine the order of reaction with respect

asked by Autumn on March 31, 2019

Physics
An ideal gas is contained within closed box behind a removable wall. The walls of the container are insulated, so that no heat may be transferred from the system. Initially, the gas has an initial pressure P and an initial temperature T. The gas is then

asked by Sam on July 20, 2014
chemistry
I have gotten the equilibrium concentrations of N202 to be 2M and N02 to be 2M also. After equilibirum is reached, a pistons is used to decrease the flask volume to 3L. Once equilibrium is established find the concentration and moles of each gas. K = 2 How

asked by A on October 9, 2008
College Chemistry 104
A voltaic cell consists of a Pb/Pb2+ half-cell and a Cu/Cu2+ half-cell at 25 C. The initial concentrations of Pb+2 and Cu+2 are 0.0500 M and 1.50 M, respectively. A. What is the initial cell potential? B. What is the cell potential when the concentration

asked by Samm on May 7, 2013
Chemistry
A voltaic cell consists of a Pb/Pb2+ half-cell and a Cu/Cu2+ half-cell at 25 C. The initial concentrations of Pb+2 and Cu+2 are 0.0500 M and 1.50 M, respectively. A. What is the initial cell potential? B. What is the cell potential when the concentration

asked by Samm on May 7, 2013
Physics
A car is traveling at 7.0 m/s when the driver applies the brakes. The car moves 1.5 m before it comes to a complete stop. If the car had been moving at 14 m/s, how far would it have continued to move after the brakes were applied? Assume the braking force

asked by Kayla on November 12, 2016
Chemistry
Experiment 1: A has .20 M, B has .20 M and the initial rate is 2.010^-4M/min Experiment 2: A has .20 M, B has .40 M, and the initial rate is 8.010^-4M/min Experiment 3: A has .40 M, B has .40 M, and the initial rate is 1.6*10^-3M/min Using the data

asked by Finn on August 20, 2015
Chemistry
Voltaic cell. The initial concentrations of Ni2+ and Zn2+ are 1.50 M and 0.100 M. Initial cell potential=.56 V. What are the concentrations of Ni2+ and Zn2+ when the cell potential falls to 0.45 V?

asked by Danielle on July 30, 2010
Chemistry(Please check)
For the reaction, 2 SO2(g) + O2(g) == 2 SO3(g), at 450.0 K (Kelvin) the equilibrium constant, Kc, has a value of 4.62. A system was charged to give these initial concentrations, (SO3) = 0.254 M and (O2) = 0.00855 M, and (SO2) = 0.500 M. In which direction

asked by Hannah on March 3, 2012
College Chemistry
What are the concentrations of Pb2+ and Cu2+ when the cell potential falls to 0.370 V? Given: A voltaic cell consists of a Pb/Pb2+ half-cell and a Cu/Cu2+ half-cell at 25degrees C . The initial concentrations of Pb2+ and Cu2+ are 5.30×10−2 M and 1.60 M,

asked by Maria on June 23, 2012
Chemistry, equilibrium molarity
At a particular temperature, K=3.75 for the following reaction. SO2(g) + NO2(g) (reversible arrows) SO3(g) + NO(g) If all four gases had initial concentrations of 0.500 M, calculate the equilibrium concentrations of the gases. This is what I’ve done so

asked by Taasha on July 31, 2007

Chemistry
H2 (g) + I2 (g) 2 HI (g) If the initial concentrations of H2 and I2 are 1.0 M and the initial concentration of HI is 0.5 M (Kc = 54.3 at 430oC). (a) Is the reaction at equilibrium? (b) If not, which way will the reaction proceed?

asked by Troy on May 4, 2014
rate of reaction
What is the initial rate of appearance of SO3(g)? a reaction and table are given: reaction: 2S02(g)+O2 ——-> 2 SO3(g) Table note: i= initial, IRD= initial rate of disappearance; concentrations given in molarity (M) IRD given in M/s. Experiment [SO2]i

asked by j on July 20, 2011
College Chemistry
Determine the concentrations of MgCl2, Mg2+, and Cl- in a solution prepared by dissolving 2.39 x 10^-4g MgCl2 in 2.50L of water. Express all three concentrations in molarity. Also display the concentrations of ionic species in part per million (ppm).

asked by Bailey on September 20, 2016
Chemistry
X2 + Y2 2XY 0.50 mole each of X2 and Y2 are placed in a 1.0 litre vessel and allowed to reach equilibrium at a given temperature. The equilibrium concentrations of XY is found to be 0.025 mol/L. What is the equilibrium cosntant for this reaction? Do I just

asked by Janna on May 15, 2007
Chemistry
2 ml of 1M HCl 0 ml of H2O 3ml of .3M Na2S2O3 How do I find the initial and final concentrations of both HCl and Na2S2O3?

asked by Nicole on January 7, 2013
Chemistry
2A(aq)-> B(aq) +C(aq) Initial concentration of A and B is 1.00 M, with no C. Kc = 0.200 find equilibrium concentrations

asked by Jordan on March 15, 2013
Chemistry
If Kc = 0.143 at 25°C for this reaction, find the equilibrium concentrations of C6H12 and CH3C5H9 if the initial concentrations are 0.200 M and 0.075 M, respectively. a. [C6H12] = 0.041 M, [CH3C5H9] = 0.041 M b. [C6H12] = 0.159 M, [CH3C5H9] = 0.116 M c.

asked by bob on January 30, 2011
Chemistry
Consider the equilibrium 2NOCl (g) 2NO (g) + Cl2 (g). In a 1 L container @ equilibrium there are 1.0 mol NOCL, 0.70 mol NO, and 0.40 mol Cl2. @ constant temperature and volume, 0.10 mol NaCl is added. What are the concentrations in the “new” equilibrium in

asked by Anna on April 13, 2013
chm
The equilibrium constant for the equation 2 H2(g) + CO(g) CH3OH(g) Is 19 at a certain temperature. If there are 3.11 x 10-2 moles of H2 and 5.79 x 10-3 moles of CH3OH at equilibrium in a 6.75 L flask. What is the concentration of CO? At 1280 °C the

asked by vikki on March 16, 2015
Chem
The apparent equilibrium constant for the reaction A + B 2C is Kc= 4.11 at 298.2 K. Given that the initial concentrations of A, B, and C are .10M, .10M, and zero, respectively, find the equilibrium concentrations of A, B, and C. I had this long, drawn out

asked by Chris on April 16, 2007

Chemistry
Kc=1. The initial concentrations are A = 0M, B = 0M, C=10M. A+B –> C calculate the reaction quotient. (c)/(a)(b) = 10/0 .. is the answer zero?

asked by Jenny on February 9, 2011
chemistry
Complete the folling reactions by writing the structures of the expected products & by naming the reactants & products HCl a) CH3COOCH3 + H20 —> ? NaOH b) CH3CH2CH2COOCH2CH2CH3 + H20 —> ? KOH C) HCOOCH2CH3 + H20 —> ?

asked by sarah on May 30, 2010
Chemistry/- Dr.Bob222
A voltaic cell consists of a Zn/Zn2+ half-cell and a Ni/Ni2+ half-cell at 25 C. The initial concentrations of Ni2+ and Zn2+ are 1.50 M and 0.10 M, respectively. a. What is the initial cell potential? My answer: 0.56 B b. What is the cell potential when the

asked by Nevaeh on June 2, 2016
Chemistry
Sulfur dioxide reacts with chlorine at 227 oC: SO2(g) +Cl2(g) ↔ SO2Cl2(g) Kp for this reaction is 5.1 x 10-2 atm-1. Initially, 1.00 g each of SO2 and Cl2 are placed in a 1.00 L reaction vessel. After 15 minutes, the concentration of SO2Cl2 is 45.5

asked by JOhn Boku on February 22, 2015
Physical Science
why does the maximum initial reaction rate cannot be reached at low substrate concentrations.

asked by Ron on August 1, 2011
Chemistry
If the initial concentration of is 0.250 , and the reaction mixture initially contains no products, what are the concentrations of and after 80 ?

asked by Anonymous on February 28, 2010
Chemistry
A battery is constructed based on the oxidation of magnesium and the reduction of Cu^2+. The initial concentrations of Mg^2+ and Cu^2+ are 1.2*10^-4M and 1.5M, respectively, in 1.0-L half-cells. The initial voltage of the battery is 2.83V with the standard

asked by Emma on May 2, 2010
Chemistry
1.984 g of a hydrate of K2CO3 is dissolved in 250. mLs of H2O. 10.0 mLs of this solution is tirade against 0.100 M HCl, producing the following results. Flask 1 – Initial 0, final 9.2 Flask 2 – Initial 9.2, final 18.3 Flask 3 – initial 18.3, final 27.8

asked by Candice on January 12, 2015
Chemistry Problem
At 25 oC, Kc = 0.145 for the following reaction in the solvent CCl4. 2BrCl Br2 + Cl2 A solution was prepared with the following initial concentrations: [BrCl] = 0.0482 M, [Br2]= 0.0307 M, and [Cl2]= 0.0277 M. What will their equilibrium concentrations be?

asked by Peter on March 8, 2013
AP Chem
At 25 oC, Kc = 0.145 for the following reaction in the solvent CCl4. 2BrCl Br2 + Cl2 A solution was prepared with the following initial concentrations: [BrCl] = 0.0482 M, [Br2]= 0.0307 M, and [Cl2]= 0.0277 M. What will their equilibrium concentrations be?

asked by Peter on March 8, 2013

Chem
Hi! I need help with this question: Sulfur dioxide reacts with chlorine at 227 oC: SO2(g) +Cl2(g) ↔ SO2Cl2(g) Kp for this reaction is 5.1 x 10-2 atm-1. Initially, 1.00 g each of SO2 and Cl2 are placed in a 1.00 L reaction vessel. After 15 minutes, the

asked by Anonymous on February 20, 2013
Chemistry
The reaction between NO (nitric oxide) and oxygen is a key step in the formation of acid rain. O2(g) + 2NO(g) → 2NO2(g) A series of experiments were run, each of which starts with a different set of reactant concentrations. From each experiment an

asked by Roman on March 27, 2012
chemistry
If the initial concentration of AB is .250 M, and the reaction mixture initially contains no products, what are the concentrations of A and B after 75s?of XY after 5.0 X10^1s?

asked by Ashton on February 21, 2010
college
1) You are given solutions of HCl and NaOH and must determine their concentrations. You use 37.0mL of NaOH to titrate 100mL of HCl and 13.6 mL of NaOH to titrate 50.0mL of 0.0782 M H2SO4. Find the unknown concentrations. Molarity of NaOH and molarity of

asked by Ashley on October 4, 2010
Chemistry
1) You are given solutions of HCl and NaOH and must determine their concentrations. You use 37.0mL of NaOH to titrate 100mL of HCl and 13.6 mL of NaOH to titrate 50.0mL of 0.0782 M H2SO4. Find the unknown concentrations. Molarity of NaOH and molarity of

asked by Ashley on October 4, 2010
chemistry
For each of the following solutions, calculate the initial pH and the final pH after adding 0.010 mol of HCℓ. a) 500.0 mL of pure water i’m not sure how to do this question.. would the equation be h20+h30 equilibrium arrows h30+h20

asked by help on December 1, 2010
Chemistry
I’m having trouble with the following question, any help would be greatly appreciated. A voltaic cell consists of a Zn/Zn^2+ half-cell and a Ni/Ni^2+ half-cell at 25 C . The initial concentrations of Ni^2+ and Zn^2+ are 1.30 M and 0.100 M , respectively.

asked by Rick on April 17, 2011
chem 12
1.00 mol of N2O4 and 1.00 mol of NO2 are placed in an 800 mL container. Calculate the initial concentrations of each gas. N2O4= 1.25 mol/L NO2=1.25 mol/L When equilibrium is reached, the concentration of NO2 increases by 0.50mol/L. Calculate the

asked by George on February 6, 2016
Chemistry
A mixture of .10 mol of NO, .050 mol of H2 and .10 mol of H20 is placed in a 1 liter vessel at 300 K. The following equilibrium is established. 2 NO + 2 H2 N2 + 2 H20 At equilibrium (N0) = .062 M. What are the equilibrium concentrations of H2 N2 and H20

asked by Thomas on March 29, 2010
Chemistry
A mixture of .10 mol of NO, .050 mol of H2 and .10 mol of H20 is placed in a 1 liter vessel at 300 K. The following equilibrium is established. 2 NO + 2 H2 N2 + 2 H20 At equilibrium (N0) = .062 M. What are the equilibrium concentrations of H2 N2 and H20

asked by Thomas on March 29, 2010

Chemistry
I need to find the rate law of a reaction but ive only done so when factors cancel out, this one has all different numbers and im not quite sure what to do with it. It has time taken every second (which im assuming are the different trials) and different

asked by Amanda on March 19, 2014
CHEMISTRY
I need to find the rate law of a reaction but ive only done so when factors cancel out, this one has all different numbers and im not quite sure what to do with it. It has time taken every second (which im assuming are the different trials) and different

asked by Amanda on March 19, 2014
Chemistry
I need to find the rate law of a reaction but ive only done so when factors cancel out, this one has all different numbers and im not quite sure what to do with it. It has time taken every second (which im assuming are the different trials) and different

asked by Amanda on March 19, 2014
Chemistry
I need to find the rate law of a reaction but ive only done so when factors cancel out, this one has all different numbers and im not quite sure what to do with it. It has time taken every second (which im assuming are the different trials) and different

asked by Nicole on March 19, 2014
CHEMISTRY
I need to find the rate law of a reaction but ive only done so when factors cancel out, this one has all different numbers and im not quite sure what to do with it. It has time taken every second (which im assuming are the different trials) and different

asked by Amanda on March 20, 2014
Rate Law – Chemistry
I need to find the rate law of a reaction but ive only done so when factors cancel out, this one has all different numbers and im not quite sure what to do with it. It has time taken every second (which im assuming are the different trials) and different

asked by Amanda on March 19, 2014
Chemistry II
At a certain temperature, Kc = 33 for the reaction: H2(g) + I2(g) 2HI(g) Assume that the initial concentrations of both H2 and I2 are 6.00 x 10-3 mol/L. Find the concentration of each reactant and product at equilibrium.

asked by Tiffany on February 22, 2011
Chemistry 112
4Nh3(g) +3O2(g)=2N2(g)+6H2O(g) has kp=2.1×10^6 atm. Initial concentration of NH3=2.00 atm, and N2=1.00 atm, with all other concentrations being zero. Compute final concentration of NH3.

asked by Dominique on September 19, 2011
Chemistry
To determine v max and km of Beta-galactosidase for lactose, the same amount of enzyme (1 ug per tube) was incubated with a series of lactose concentrations under conditions where product concentrations remained negligible. At each lactose concentration,

asked by Ahmad M. on September 15, 2013
Science
To determine v max and km of Beta-galactosidase for lactose, the same amount of enzyme (1 ug per tube) was incubated with a series of lactose concentrations under conditions where product concentrations remained negligible. At each lactose concentration,

asked by Ahmad M. on September 15, 2013

Chemistry
To determine v max and km of Beta-galactosidase for lactose, the same amount of enzyme (1 ug per tube) was incubated with a series of lactose concentrations under conditions where product concentrations remained negligible. At each lactose concentration,

asked by Ahmad M. on September 15, 2013
chemistry
In a certain trial, the initial concentrations of Fe3+ and SCN- are both 1.00×10^-3 M and the initial concentration of FeSCN2+ is zero. Suppose that after the reation reaches equilibrium, the concentration of FeSCN2+ was found to be 1.19×10^-4 M. Use this

asked by Elly on June 20, 2011
Chemistry
What volume of 0.01 M NaOH should be required to raise the pH of a litre of 25 mM H2SO4 to 4.0? I started out by attempting to find the initial pH of H2SO4 and determined I need 2.57 units of pH to raise it to 4. I know that somewhere I use the HH

asked by Sara on September 22, 2013
Chemistry
How do I start an ICE table from the following information: BrCl3(g)+ Cl2(l) -> BrCl5(g) where Kp=7.8*10^-6 and there is originally 0.215 atm BrCl3, 725g Cl2, 0.115 atm BrCl5 – Can pressures be used as initial concentrations?

asked by Ken on October 2, 2012
Any chemistry lovers?
A voltaic cell consists of Mn/Mn2+ and Cd/Cd2+ half-cells with the following initial concentrations: [Mn2+] = 0.090 M; [Cd2+] = 0.060 M. A)What is the intital Ecell? B)What is Ecell when [Cd2+} reaches .050M. C) What is [Mn2+] when Ecell reaches 0.055V? D)

asked by stumped on May 4, 2008
CHEMISTRY
Ion Concentrations 1.) A solution is prepared by dissolving 5.00 g of stannic nitrate in enough water to make 250.0 mL of stock solution. A 15.0 mL aliquot (portion) of this stock solution is then removed and added to 75.0 mL of water. Calculate the

asked by Anonymous on October 25, 2013
Science (Chemistry)

  1. A Beer’s Law plot was prepared for the reaction A(aq) + B(aq) AB(aq), plotting absorption over AB(aq) concentration. The linear equation for this plot was y = 78.3x. A solution was prepared by mixing 10.0mL of 0.100M A with 5.00mL of 0.100M B and

asked by Niharika on June 16, 2014
physiology (nernst equation)
If cell depolarises at +50mV, what are the concentrations of K+? I am really confused how to use the nernst equation to get the concentrations. If I set up 58 [Kout]/[Kin] = 50, will that be right? I am not sure how to start this problem.

asked by Anna on March 6, 2007
Physics
A model airplane is flying in a horizontal circle with a constant speed. The initial radius of the circle is R. The boy holding the cord to which the airplane is attached, then decides to increase the length of the cord so that the radius of the circle

asked by Sam on June 8, 2014
Physics
A model airplane is flying in a horizontal circle with a constant speed. The initial radius of the circle is R. The boy holding the cord to which the airplane is attached, then decides to increase the length of the cord so that the radius of the circle

asked by Sam on June 8, 2014

physics
A projectile is fired through the air. It is launched from the ground, and travels without interference from wind or air resistance, landing on a raised platform above the field. Compare the following values: 1-Initial speed vs. final speed: 2-Initial

asked by Din123 on June 23, 2013
general chemistry
Determine the concentrations of Na2CO3, Na , and CO32– in a solution prepared by dissolving 2.57 × 10–4 g Na2CO3 in 1.50 L of water. Express all three concentrations in molarity. Additionally, express the concentrations of the ionic species in parts

asked by Anonymous on November 17, 2015
CHEMISTRY
Determine the concentrations of Na2CO3, Na , and CO32– in a solution prepared by dissolving 2.22 × 10–4 g Na2CO3 in 2.25 L of water. Express all three concentrations in molarity. Additionally, express the concentrations of the ionic species in parts

asked by Hannah on February 26, 2017
Chem
Determine the concentrations of K2SO4, K , and SO42– in a solution prepared by dissolving 2.84 × 10–4 g K2SO4 in 2.25 L of water. Express all three concentrations in molarity. Additionally, express the concentrations of the ionic species in parts per

asked by Jhanvi on February 19, 2013
CHEM
How can I calculate a pH of hypochlorite buffer into LiCLO with only initial concentrations and no Ka value? [CLO-]=.1M [LiCLO]=.1M

asked by Martin on April 13, 2013
ap chem
NH3 + H20 NH4+ + OH- this is aqueous solution. In 0.0180 M nH3, THE [OH-] is 5.60 X 10^-4 M. it is assumed that the volumes are additive. Determine the value of the base ionization constant, kb, for NH3. i am not sure how to approach this problem. i don’t

asked by rav on May 2, 2010
physics
I need help understanding these, please. Thanks! 1. A 2 kg body moves with constant velocity when a force of 10 N is applied. What is the coefficient of kinetic friction between the table and the body? (Would I use F=m*g for this??) 2. Which of the

asked by Ellie on October 4, 2015
Chemistry
Suppose that 30.0 mL of 0.20 M C6H5COOH(aq) is titrated with 0.30 M KOH(aq). Refer to table 1 and table 2. (a) What is the initial pH of the 0.20 M C6H5COOH(aq)? Using ICE i found to be 2.46 The rest I do not know how to set up or solve… (b) What is the

asked by Val on March 12, 2010
Chemistry
Use the concentrations and volumes of hydrogen peroxide and KI before mixing (Table 1), calculate the post-mixing concentrations. Before mixing: [H2O2] = 0.88M [KI] = 0.500M Table 1: before mixing 1. Vol H2O2 = 4.0 mL, [H2O2] = 0.88M 2. Vol KI = 1.0 mL,

asked by Amanda on February 28, 2017
Chemistry
The reaction 2H2S(g)⇌2H2(g)+S2(g) Kc=1.67×10−7 at 800∘C is carried out with the following initial concentrations: [H2S] = 0.300 M , [H2] =0.300 M , and [S2] = 0.00 M. Find the equilibrium concentration of [S2].

asked by hoooo on November 22, 2015

SCIENCE
THE VALUE OF KC=6.2 AT 750K FOR THE REACTION CO+H20 CO2.IF INITIALLY THE QUANTITIES OF CO AND H2O ARE 2 MOLES IN 1L.WHAT COULD BE THE EQUILIBRIUM CONCENTRATIONS FOR ALL CHEMICALS?

asked by NISHANT on February 25, 2013
chemistry
A solution of 0.178 M KOH(28.3 ml) is mixed with 28.9ml of 0.133 M HCl. Assuming that the final solution is the sum of the initial volumes, caculate: a)the molarity of the K+ cation b)the molatiry of the Cl- anion c)the pH of the final solution d)the pOH

asked by helen on February 8, 2012
chemistry 2
Calculate the relative concentrations of o-ethylbenzoic acid (pKa 3.79) and potassium o-ethylbenzoate that are needed to prepare a pH 4.0 buffer I know to set up hassle equation but when i get .21=log[a-/ha] i get lost because i was not given

asked by amber on July 28, 2013
Chemisrty
Assuming equal concentrations, rank these solutions by pH: hclo4 caoh2 NH3 koh hbro

asked by Carlos on March 5, 2016
college chemistry
For the following reaction: PCl5(g) PCl3(g) + Cl2(g) Kc=.058 If the initial concentration of PCl5(g) is .160M, calculate the equilibrium concentrations of all the components. (use quadratic)

asked by Jerrett on March 24, 2010

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n2h2 lewis structure

Physics
Draw the Lewis structure for N2H2, a neutral molecule.\
9,752 results
Science
Draw the Lewis structure for N2H2, a neutral molecule.

asked by Casey on September 7, 2009
Chem
1) Draw the Lewis structure for CH3NCO, a neutral molecule. 2) Draw the best Lewis structure for NCCH2COCH2CHO, a neutral molecule.

asked by Glow on September 7, 2009
Lewis Dot Structure?
I need to draw a Lewis Dot Structure for each ion or molecule: PO4-3 CN- SO3-2 ClO2- N2H2 N2H4 C2H2 C2H4

asked by Amy on December 3, 2012
Chemistry
Draw the best Lewis structure for NCCH2C(O)CH2CHO, a neutral molecule. Show all atoms, bonds, lone pairs, and formal charges.

asked by Cathy on September 11, 2009
chemistry
Draw the Lewis structure of NO2- Assign formal charges to each atom in the O3 molecule shown below. Be sure to click the +/- button below (it will turn yellow when activated) before clicking on the molecule. .. .. .. :O–O==O .. .. Based on formal charges,

asked by mandy on November 14, 2008

Chemistry
Identify the true statement about Lewis structures. Select all the correct answers. 1. Hydrogen is usually surrounded by 4 electrons in a valid Lewis structure. 2. A single bond in a Lewis structure represents 2 electrons. 3. A double bond in a Lewis

asked by will.i.am on February 26, 2013
ap chem
There are several oxides of nitrogen; among the most common are N2O, NO, and NO2. 1.Write the Lewis structures for each of these molecules. In each case the oxygens are terminal atoms. 2. Which of these molecules “violate” the octet rule? 3. Draw resonance

asked by Justyna on January 9, 2007
Chemistry
Use the MO model to predict the structure of ketene (H2CCO). Draw a Lewis structure of the molecule that shows the positions of the orbitals and the atoms in three-dimensional perspective.

asked by Amy on September 12, 2012
Chemistry
Use the MO model to predict the structure of ketene (H2CCO). Draw a Lewis structure of the molecule that shows the positions of the orbitals and the atoms in three-dimensional perspective.

asked by Amy on September 12, 2012
chemistry
hpw would i draw a lewis structure for a molecule with 3.5 bonds for example NO2???

asked by lyne on April 20, 2009
chemistry
draw a diagram of the water molecule. then draw where the electrons are to show it’s covalent. so does that mean its lewis structure, which would be: .. H- O -H .. but where would the electrons go? Many pictures of H2O here:

asked by maurice on June 10, 2007
Chemistry
For a lab experiment we have to draw the lewis structures of hydrides. 1) Carbon It asks for the formula of hydride. Total # of valence electrons and the lewis structure. Total electrons would be four. I am not sure what the formula would be or how to find

asked by Hannah on November 16, 2011
chemistry
Draw a complete Lewis Structure (showing all bonds and lone pairs) for a molecule with the general formula AX4, if A was from group 4A and X was from group 7A

asked by DEAR GOD SOMEONE HELP ME PLEASE on April 22, 2017
chemistry
Using electron bookkeeping draw a Lewis dot diagram for NF2H and N2H2 determine how many electrons each atom should be assigned. Thanks Guys I really appreciate it, my assignment is due tonight and the test is tomorrow, could you explain it,thanks

asked by Will J on December 1, 2011
HELP!! Chemistry
Draw a Lewis structure for SO(subscript 2) in which all atoms obey the octet rule. Show formal charges. Draw a Lewis structure for SO(subscript 2) in which all the atoms have a formal charge of zero. Explicitly showing zero charges is optional.

asked by anonymous on April 8, 2013

Chemistry..
For the lewis structure of BCl3, does it have a total of 24 valence electrons? Also does it have a total of 4 bonds? If possible can you draw the lewis structure?

asked by Anonymous on November 23, 2012
ap chem
The allene molecule has the following Lewis structure: H2C=C=CH2. Are all four hydrogen atoms in the same plane? The allene molecule has the following Lewis structure: H2C=C=CH2. Are all four hydrogen atoms in the same plane? If not, what is the spatial

asked by mary on December 28, 2012
chemistry
Most organic acids can be represented as RCOOH, where COOH is the carboxyl group and R is the rest of the molecule. (For example, R is CH3 in acetic acid, CH3COOH). (a) Draw a Lewis structure for the carboxyl group. (b) Upon ionization, the carboxyl group

asked by Amber on September 26, 2011
CHEMISTRY
Given assumed valencies: H=1, N=3, & C=4 i am now required to draw the structural formulae of HYDROGEN CYANIDE and CYANOGEN. H:C:::N is the Lewis electron dot structure. If you want to use “sticks” as a bond instead of two electrons, one stick stands for

asked by MARK on February 7, 2007
Chemisty Please Help
The instructions are, Write Lewis structures that obey the octet rule for the following species. (Assign atomic charges where appropriate.) 1) XeO4 2) CIO^-4 3) PO4^-3 Would I just draw them in a different way or just the regular Lewis Structure?

asked by Mary on July 3, 2013
Chemistry pretty urgent!!!!!!!
Chemical bonding question! The partial Lewis structure that follows (Figure 1) is for a hydrocarbon molecule. In the full Lewis structure, each carbon atom satisfies the octet rule, and there are no unshared electron pairs in the molecule. The

asked by G-Dogg on November 4, 2014
Chemistry
To draw the lewis dot structure of H3COH3, Do I need to rearrange the formula as CH3OCH3? If not, On paper I have O H H C O C H H H I am not sure if this is the right structure.

asked by My name is Earl on April 24, 2016
chemsitry
What is the formal charge on each of the atoms in the Lewis structure of the PO4 (-3) charge? Draw another possible Lewis structure of the phosphate ion below. Formal charge on P is ? -how do I do this problem.

asked by Sarah on November 13, 2010
science
Draw the Lewis structure of [NH2]– Draw the Lewis structure of [(CH3)3O]+ Label(or unlabel) the sp-hybridized atoms, sp2-hybridized atoms and sp3-hybridized atoms. Basically I need help determining which of those atoms are the sp, sp2, sp3 hybridized

asked by Anabelle on September 7, 2009
chemistry
At 850 K, the value of the equilibrium constant Kp for the ammonia synthesis reaction N2(g) + H2(g) N2H2(g) is 0.1690. If a vessel contains an initial reaction mixture in which [N2]=0.0150 M, [H2]=0.0200 M, and [N2H2]=0.000250 M, what will the [N2H2] be

asked by Victoria on November 5, 2012

ap chem
consider the molecules PF3 and PF5. b]is the PF3 molecule polar or is it nonpolar. explain C] on the basis of bonding principles, predict whether each of the following compounds exists. In each case explain your prediction. (i) NF5 (ii) AsF5 2. explain why

asked by Emily on January 23, 2007
Chemistry
What is the Lewis dot structure for Carbon tetrabromide and what is the geometric shape of the molecule?

asked by Jill on October 9, 2011
chemistry
How do I draw Lewis Structure for BN and CN-

asked by San on August 18, 2011
Chemistry
Draw the most important Lewis structure for the H 3 CNCO molecule. (Note: The atoms are bonded in the order CNCO, with the three H atoms bonded to the first carbon atom.) After you have identified the most important Lewis structure, answer the following

asked by Anonymous on April 5, 2016
11th grade Chemistry
How to draw a Lewis dot structure….

asked by Shay on October 27, 2010
11th grade Chemistry
How to draw a Lewis dot structure….

asked by Shay on October 27, 2010
Chemistry
Draw the Lewis structure for SiCl2Br2.

asked by Gina Mitcell on November 16, 2009
chem
how do you draw the lewis structure for PBr3?

asked by madison on September 27, 2007
chemistry lewis structure
please help me i don’t know how to do this! Draw the lewis structure for: SiO3 -2

asked by sari on November 4, 2011
Chemistry
how do you draw a Lewis structure for lithium chlorine

asked by Anonymous on July 22, 2013

Chemistry
How can I draw a lewis dot structure of XeF2O?

asked by Joseoh on October 30, 2016
Chemistry
How do you draw a lewis dot structure of s3o

asked by Chem on February 22, 2012
Chemistry
Draw the lewis dot structure showing what happens during the reaction Lithium and Chlorine produce Lithium Chloride. how do you draw this, please help .

asked by Tina on February 13, 2011
chemistry
How do I draw the lewis structure for [PF5Cl]- i’m getting confused on this one!! Please explain answer Thanks =))

asked by Stacy on December 1, 2010
chemistry
Draw the lewis structure for: SiO3 -2 CNO- TeO4 -2 F2PPCl2 thanks!

asked by patricio on November 4, 2011
11th grade
How do you draw the Lewis Structure for SO4,SF6,NH3 and H2S

asked by Shannon on December 15, 2009
Chemistry
I need some help to draw a Lewis structure for hydrogen cyanide + what is the noble gas?

asked by Dave B on December 18, 2009
CHEMISTRY
DRAW LEWIS, KEKULE AND SKELETAL STRUCTURE OF: (CH3)2NCH2CH3

asked by JEFF on January 25, 2012
CHEM
draw the lewis structure of CP. include ions pairs and charges.

asked by RQ on September 17, 2014
Chemistry
Can someone help draw/explain the Lewis Dot Structure for OPBr3. I’ve tried different things, but none of them seem to work.

asked by M on November 19, 2012

Chemistry-1
How do we find the molar mass of a gas produced? Example if 1.00 kg of N2H2 reacts with 1.00kg of H202. How many moles of N2 could be formed? THe equation is N2H2+2H202 > N2 + 4H20

asked by Hero on April 9, 2012
Chemistry
Draw the Lewis structure for each of these molecules. 1. PH3 2. H2S 3. HCl 4. CCl4 5. SiH4

asked by Zach on January 28, 2015
chemistry
Given that S is the central atom, draw a Lewis structure of OSF4 in which the formal charges of all atoms are zero

asked by defferan on November 15, 2008
chmistry
Given that \rm S is the central atom, draw a Lewis structure of \rm OSF_4 in which the formal charges of all atoms are zero.

asked by Papayu Domu on May 14, 2013
Chem 1
Why is this phrase, “Lewis Structure” a misnomer? I’ve googled it… and I can’t seem to find an answer. Any suggestions as to where I can read some info on that? Lewis implies ionic bond, structure implies fixed covalent bonds. Screw you, that’s

asked by Rossi on October 25, 2006
Chemistry – oxidation numbers
How do you use a Lewis Structure to find the oxidation state of an element. I have this question using the oxidation rule i got +2, however how do i use it with Lewis structure. QUESTION Use the Lewis structure of a thiosulfate ion to find the oxidation

asked by Farah on May 1, 2011
CHEM
the number of nonbonding electrons exceeds the number of bonding electrons in the lewis structure of which of the following molecules? I am having a problem with the Lewis structures. HCN NH3 H2O please explain the structure thank you so much

asked by layla on February 25, 2014
Organic chem
Classify each as a lewis acid or lewis base… A)H20 B)O2- C)Cu2+ D)SO3 E)AlCl3 Lewis acids are electron pair acceptors. Lewis bases are electron pair donors. Look at H2O, for example. .. H:O: .. H This molecule has no “holes” to accept an electron. Would

asked by Adam on October 15, 2010
chemistry
Draw the dominant Lewis structure for NO2+. Note, that this ion is isoelectronic with CO2. How many double bonds does this resonance structures have?

asked by john on November 4, 2014
chemistry
draw a lewis structure for a resonance form of ClO2- showing the lowest possible formal charges and give the oxidation numbers of the atoms

asked by Missy on September 20, 2010

Chemistry terms
Match the terms with the correct definitions. 1. ligand 2. coordination compound 3. Lewis base 4. complex ion 5. bidentate ligand 6. octahedral complex a) a ligand that can form two bonds (donate two electron pairs) to a metal ion. b) a neutral compound

asked by Adam on April 17, 2008
chemistry, polar or nonpolar
Why is NO3 nonpolar but CIF3 is polar? I looked at the lewis structures, they look similar, but why is one opposite. also, when something is polar or non polar, my teacher said I should see which atom is more electronegativity is higher and draw arrows

asked by Anonymous on January 25, 2009
Organic Chemistry
An expanded structural formula shows all the atoms of the molecule and all the bonds between the atoms in the molecule. Draw the expanded structural formula for 1,3-dichlorocyclopentane. Draw the structure by placing atoms on the grid and connecting them

asked by Brittany on October 30, 2012
Chemistry
When it says, ” Draw a Lewis diagram for each of the following. ” a)One atom of each of the elements in the second period. Is it asking me to draw a Lewis diagram for Lithium and Beryllium?

asked by Derrick on July 8, 2010
Chemistry
I have a homework question that says: “Three resonance structures of the following anion are possible. One is given below, but it is incomplete. Complete the given structure by adding non-bonding electrons and formal charges. Draw the two remaining

asked by Anne on September 8, 2016
Chemistry
Comment on the solubility of the following liquids. State whether at room temperature you expect the components to be highly soluble or almost insoluble, and choose the appropriate reasons why. HINT: It may behoove you to draw the Lewis structure for each

asked by Samboni on December 22, 2014
chemestry
draw the Lewis structure for the following compounds,and predict the molecular shapes. a) water,H2O b)Oxygen gas,O2 c)Ammonia, NH3 d)Ammonium ion,NH4

asked by irfan on June 3, 2013
Chemistry
Draw Lewis Structure for BrO3^- The textbook answer involves a central Br atom with one lone electron pair and five shared pairs (two double bonds and one single bonds). This gives Br twelve electrons rather than the typical eight. I understand that some

asked by Parker on August 6, 2012
Chem
Draw a Structural Formulae for Hydrogen Cyanide (HCN) and Cyanogen (C2N2 or CN2) Hydrogen = 1 Valency Nitrogen = 3 Valencies Carbon = 4 Valencies H-C(triple bond)N N(triple bond)C-C(triple bond)N Thank you And for a Lewis Structure they would be H:C:::N:

asked by Anthony on March 12, 2007
Chemistry
Hope you don’t mind I have 3 more that I don’t understand 1)Draw the structure of the reaction product of 2-methyl-1pentene with H2 in the presence od platinum catalyst 2)Draw the structure of 4-methylcyclohexanol 3)Draw the structure of 2,3-dibromotoluene

asked by Kellie on March 30, 2007

Chemistry
Draw the Lewis Structure of CH3NCS including all resonance forms. Assign formal charges. Do not include resonance arrows.

asked by Raeann on December 11, 2016
Chemistry
Give the molecular orbital description [e.g. sigma(sp3-sp3)] for each unique bond in the following structure. CH3NCHCCH I know how to draw the lewis structure and what a sigma and pi bond is, but I don’t understand what the (sp3-sp3) part after the bond

asked by ramire2 on September 8, 2013
chemistry
Draw a lewis structure for BrO4- in which all atoms have the lowest formal changes. Indicate the values of nonzero formal charges and include lonepair electrons.

asked by Jack on January 19, 2009
Chemistry
A compound contains 25.19% S and 74.81% F. Its density is 10.05 g/L at 35 degrees C and 1.00 atm. Draw the Lewis structure for this compound. Determine its shape, polarity, hybridization and any nonzero formal charges.

asked by Ceamus Angelina on April 25, 2018
chemistry
Draw one of the Lewis structure of the N2O5. In each case one oxygen bridges the nitrogens (N-O-N single bond) and 2 other oxygens are bonded to each N. How many equivalent resonance structures are there that satisfy the octet rule and where O makes at

asked by K on November 6, 2014
chemistry
Draw one of the Lewis structure of the N2O5. In each case one oxygen bridges the nitrogens (N-O-N single bond) and 2 other oxygens are bonded to each N. How many equivalent resonance structures are there that satisfy the octet rule and where O makes at

asked by john on November 4, 2014
CHEMISTRY
What is the Lewis dot structure for the HYDRIDE ion? A)H:- B)H+ C)H’ D)H3O+ E)none It’s hard for me to read the dots but I THINK answer a) looks like this? H:- If so that is the Lewis dot structure for the hydride ion

asked by CHEMgurl on April 21, 2007
lewis structure for molecules
HELLO, I AM LOOKING FOR ONLINE EXERCISES/WORSHEETS TAT I CAN USE TO PRACTISE HOW TO DRAW lewis structure for molecules. I AM LOOKING FOR RELABLE SOURCES, I DON’T WANT TO USE JUST ANY WEBSITE BECAUSE I’M AFRAID THEY WILL CONTAIN ERRORS? COULD SOME ONE

asked by ME on June 20, 2009
Gen chem 2
D-Glucose, C6H12O6, is an aldohexose sugar which occurs commonly in nature. In a text or reference book look up “-D-(+)-Glucose and write its correct, complete Lewis structure. Then “parcel” e’s to determine the correct (O) no. for each C atom in

asked by Elisa on July 7, 2008
chemistry(check my answer)
how do resonance structure related to its real structure? resonance structure is just another way to write the lewis dot with different formal charges and bond order

asked by phys on April 8, 2010

integrated chemistry and physics
In a water molecule, two hydrogen atoms bind to one oxygen atom. How many lone pairs of electrons will be shown around each hydrogen atom in the Lewis structure of water?

asked by tms on February 6, 2015
Organic Chemistry
Hi, I’m trying to fix an incorrect IUPAC name of a molecule. It is given as trisecbutylmethane, and I have to draw it out to correct it. Here’s the thing: how do I draw incorrect IUPAC name? I can’t wrap my mind around it. What I have drawn out is a

asked by Justin on September 29, 2016
Chemistry
Give the formal charge on the sulfur atom in a Lewis structure for the sulfate ion in which every atom satisfies the octet rule. Based off my lewis structure, I think the formal charge of the the sulfur atom would be +2. Is that correct?

asked by Anonymous on May 2, 2017
chemistry
what is the lewis dot structure for SO4 -2 and the ideal bonds, mollecular structure and hybrid orbitals?

asked by Raj on January 15, 2009
chemistry
how do u draw the lewis structure for something like CO -2 over 3. do u add 2 electrons on to the oxygen when yur finding the number of valence electrons cuz that’s wat i thought u did but then i got all those questions wrong so wat do u do

asked by michelle on October 4, 2007
chem
A molecular compound is composed of 58.8% Xe, 7.2% O, and 34.0% F, by mass. If the molecular weight is 223 g/mol, what is the molecular formula? Draw the correct Lewis structure. Predict the molecular geometry using the VSEPR model.

asked by chemistry on December 13, 2010
Biology
I am given the structual formula for lactose howere i have to write out the equation for the hydrolosis of lactose is the following what is required C12H22O11 +H2O>>> C6H12O6 +C6H12O6 all the numbers are subscript, would appreciate if someone would guide

asked by Bex on April 4, 2007
Chemistry
Can you please answer this question: Both water and carbon dioxide are triatomic molecules. Explain why one of these molecules is polar and the other is nonpolar? Carbon dioxide is linear :C::O::C: and therefore has no net electrical dipole. Water is a

asked by Beautiful on December 16, 2006
chemistry,
,I NEED TO DRAW A LEWIS STRUCTURE for C2n2,cyanogen,and to state the noble gas,i know the answer is neon,but i have far to many electrons and am getting the gas argon,please help :N:::C:C:::N: please where do u think i am going wrong I don’t know. You

asked by jane on March 3, 2007
CHEM
One other question that I am really not 100% sure on: how do I draw the electron-dot structure for: CHClO. I “think” that CHClO is a trigonal planar molecule, with the central atom being carbon. Is this correct?

asked by K on November 26, 2007

Chemistry
How do you find the number of valence electrons in a molecule? Do I need to use the Lewis structure diagram to find out? Please help! I need to the total number of valence electrons for SiH4, H2SO4, CCl4, BF3 and I don’t know how!

asked by Anonymous on February 10, 2010
chemistry
i do not understand how to do these and i have a question on my test tomorrow on this stuff can someone explain to me how to do this? for each of the following molecules draw the lewis structure, determine the shape, determine the polarity, and determine

asked by brittney on May 18, 2011
Chemistry
I have one more question DrBob, I have draw a structure of this polymer CH2=CH-CH-OH ‘ CH3 and identify the monomer units. Would the mononer unit be this: CH2-CH-CH-O ‘ CH3 AND WOULD THIS POLYMERIZATION BE A CONDENSATION TYPE? Paula–I am not an organic

asked by Paula on February 20, 2007
chem
(CH3)N2H2(l) + 2N204(g) = 3N2(g) + 4H2O(l) + 2CO2(g). consider the reaction b2n 150g of liquid (CH3)N2H2 & 80L of N2O4 at 27 degree celcius & a pressure of 2 atm. The gases produced are collected at 27 degree celsius in an evacuated 250L. Calculate: a)

asked by alia on September 8, 2011
Chemistry
SO2 can be drawn as a molecule which satisfies the octet rule (using one double bond and a single bond) or as an expanded octet (using two double bonds). A measurement of the S-O bond distance demonstrates that the two bond lengths are identical. Does this

asked by Adam on October 25, 2009
Chemistry
I am really confused about polar and non polar molecules. I really don’t understand how to know if something is polar or not. Or about bond polarity vs. molecular polarity (net dipole moment). Also, if it has a lone pair when you draw a lewis structure

asked by Gabriela on April 27, 2007
Chemistry
I was asked this question for homework but I don’t even know where to begin. It has 3 parts to answer. 1) add all lone pairs and make multiple bonds with the framework shown to satisfy the octets and make the best Lewis structure. 2) For the C-N bond(s) in

asked by George on September 14, 2013
Chemistry
Consider the Lewis structure for the major resonance form of PCS–. (Note that carbon is the central atom.) The structure shows: a. A phosphorus-carbon triple bond and a carbon-sulfur single bond. b. A phosphorus-carbon double bond and a carbon-sulfur

asked by Mary on April 26, 2010
chemistry
what is the molecular geometry of trans-difluroethylene: trans-C2H2F2? I know how to draw the lewis structure but I’m not sure how to find the molecular geometry. I think it’s a tetrahedral

asked by Cabel on May 24, 2008
Biology Help
how does the structure of a cellulose molecule relates to the molecule’s function?

asked by Sara on October 16, 2014

Chemistry – Lewis Dots
Draw the molecule by placing atoms on the grid and connecting them with bonds. Do not identify the charge on each of these species. Include all lone pairs of electrons. H3COCH3 Draw the ion by placing atoms on the grid and connecting them with bonds. Do

asked by Amy on December 4, 2012
Chemistry
Draw Lewis dot structures, including appropriate resonance forms, and assign formal charges to each of those structures, for the molecule urea, with chemical formula NH2CONH2. You should find at least 3 such structures, some of which will have formal

asked by Emma on October 25, 2009
biology
Draw a picture of the structure of a water molecule that includes all of the following: hydrogen, oxygen, partial positive charge(s), partial negative charge(s)

asked by anonymous on November 20, 2013
repost chemistry
A student adds 1.00×10^-8 moles HCl to a liter of soln. The resulting soln will be acid, basic, neutral, or impossible to determine? I believe that it is impossible to determine, because it does specify that the temperature was at 25*C. I know that a

asked by Anonymous on February 12, 2009
Chemistry
Hi. Is PO4(3-) polar or non-polar? Why or why not? Thanks! Look up the electronegativity of P and O. I think I remember that O is about 3.5 and P is about 2.1; therefore, each P-O bond is somewhat polar. Thus, the ion will be polar unless the Lewis

asked by Sally on November 23, 2006

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how far from the finish line is the slower runner when the faster runner finishes the race?

In a 5.00km race, one runner runs at a steady 11.6km/h and another runs at 15.0km/h. How long does the faster runner have to wait at the finish line to see the slower runner cross?

0 0 333
asked by Tommy
Jun 12, 2015
15t = 5
t = 0.333h = 20 min.

11.6t = 5
t = 0.431h = 26 min.

T = 26 – 20 = 6 min. waiting time.

0 0
posted by Henry
Jun 14, 2015

Categories
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what is a metaphor math worksheet

math riddle algebra pizzaz what is a metaphor
6,588 results
Math-Algebra 1
I need help with a pizzaz work sheet ASAP if i don’t get this done i am on the verge of failing math and repeating 9th grade. its Pizzaz 11.10 thanks

asked by Brandon S. on June 12, 2011
Math
I need help with the riddle in pizzaz, “what should you say when you meet an angel?” Anyone know?

asked by lilly on February 2, 2012
math
whats the answer to pizzaz workseet 54, Did you hear about riddle?

asked by misty on November 11, 2008
alegebra
im in 7 th grade but doing alegebra pizzaz riddle why do girls like guys who ear shirts with eight buttons

asked by john on September 14, 2010
Algebra I
What is the answer to Algebra with pizzaz p.93 How Can Fisherman Save Gas?

asked by Chris on March 2, 2009

math
what is the answer to the famous farming exression, from creative publications pre-algebra with pizzaz

asked by Mia on December 2, 2014
Math/Algebra
I need help on a Middle School Math With Pizzaz worksheet. It is titled, Vive la France!

asked by Mateus on May 4, 2017
math
yeah :/ anyone know algebra with “pizzaz” (yeah right,) pg 6? i know its “the ninja torttles chi squre test” ……idk but why? it wants us to show our work.

asked by nessie on September 29, 2010
Algebra
I am getting ready to start an Algebra class for the first time and I was wondering what challenges people have with learning and using algebra concepts. Also what are the best ways to over come math anxiety? The best way? Learn the language of algebra.

asked by jeff on March 20, 2007
Algebra
“What might you have if you don’t feel well?” That’s a math riddle actually… The letters are E,G,O,S,O,N,V,L. It has A LOT to do with math actually!

asked by Chantrice on November 2, 2009
Math
Algebra Riddle with PIZZAZZ “Did you hear about…”

asked by JC on October 26, 2008
ALGEBRA 2
WHAT IS THE RIDDLE TO ALGEBRA WITH PIZZAZZ WORK SHEET 56??

asked by ANGELO on October 13, 2011
Algebra
What is the riddle to Algebra with Pizzazz worksheet number7?

asked by Anonymous on November 17, 2013
Math repost for jalyiah
Posted by jalyiah on Sunday, September 16, 2007 at 6:55pm in response to math. math riddle someone anser.i have four sides .all oppisite sider are parallel .i have no right angels

asked by Ms. Sue on September 16, 2007
Algebra
Algebra with Pizzazz need help with the riddle When Do Sky Drivers Use Decimals I have in a tent is satuasion?????

asked by Rayne on August 22, 2010

Health
When people make Grilled Chicken do they take the skin out from the chicken? Comments: Please solve my riddle. Look where it says: Name:Sanjana Subject:RIDDLE There you will find my riddle! Some do. Some don’t. I do.

asked by Sanjana on December 24, 2006
math
Can someone correct this for me please or help me out…. Why are variables useful in algebra? My answer: Variables are useful in algebra because they detemine an answer that anyone is trying to get to. Variables can represent a single number or a whole

asked by jasmine20 on January 1, 2007
TO TEACHERS AND WRITEACHER
TO TEACHERS AND WRITEACHER HELLO, I AM NEW TO THIS WEBSITE. THIS IS MY SECOND DAY IN THIS WEBSITE. THERE IS A RIDDLE FORUM ON THIS WEBSITE. I POSTED A RIDDLE ON THE RIDDLE FORUM.BUT LATER WHEN I WENT TO CHECK IF SOMEONE ANSWERED MY RIDDLE IN THE RIDDLE

asked by Chandni on December 26, 2006
Algebra
I need the answers to pre algebra pizzazz pg 50 How did the angel lose his job I have the riddle I need the work!! Plz help me!!

asked by Chloe on March 16, 2017
8th grade
its in Algebra 1 ! the riddle is whom should you see at the bank if you need to borrow money. its 15 letters. a teller doesnt fit. i don’t know ! i need help ! PLEASE

asked by beba melendez on November 11, 2009
math 098
I made 3 f’s on my tests in math 098, do you think i need to withdraw and take math 090 instead. this is my first semester and i really want to do my best please help. math 098 is algebra math 090 is basic for college. the score were equations–52,distance

asked by %%%Rena%%% on July 6, 2012
reading
is the word penguin a metaphor?? please answer bye. It could be, depending on how it is used. Metaphors are totally dependent on usage and how they are compared. The men were penguins for the dinner, waddling to and fro. ya but could i use it as a metaphor

asked by brittany on January 4, 2007
7th grade
can you just give me a math riddle that’s understandable to 7 th grade

asked by whatever on October 27, 2008
Math
I lost my paper for the Math Riddle Pizazz page 167 about solving systems of equations and I no longer have the problems. (It is the “did you hear about the farmer who gave birdseed to his cows…” page) What are the math problems for it?

asked by Caroline on February 28, 2011
math, Please Helppp!!!!!!!! Lost paper!
I lost my paper for the Math Riddle Pizazz page 167 about solving systems of equations and I no longer have the problems. (It is the “did you hear about the farmer who fed his cows birdseed..” page) What are the math problems for it?!?

asked by Caroline on March 1, 2011

7th grade
what makes a piano laugh? itsa math riddle

asked by Anonymous on December 3, 2010
Math
Whats a consisnent. like suppose 2,3,6,9,8 Can someone help please? Can someone help please: What are conssitent numbers in math? i need help on my math its algebra

asked by Paris on December 5, 2006
Math
Math riddle worksheet “did you hear about” 20 boxes Answer ASAP

asked by Jared on February 7, 2012
Walquist
Geometry question. a Math riddle. What does a cat need to play baseball?

asked by Jim on December 8, 2008
How to get quick responses to your math questions
Math is a wide subject, ranging from K to 11, college and university. Then there is algebra, trigonometry, geometry, arithmetic, calculus, number theory, … etc. Not all teachers answer all math questions (many do). If you would give a little more detail

asked by MathMate on May 25, 2013
senior courses
So far in high school i have taken geometry, algebra 2, and trigonometry. one of my friends is taking calculus and she says its way too difficult. and since i have alot of trouble in algebra and trig myself i don’t think calculus would be the right choice

asked by y912f on April 28, 2009
band
please help me solve this riddle. “you’ve heard me before, yet you hear me again. Then I die, Til’ you call me again.” Who wrote this riddle?

asked by kali on November 5, 2007
SS
A_ +_ +LE E + = O__ put this riddle on the Riddle section. http://www.jiskha.com/net_riddle/

asked by Steve on June 7, 2007
English
It is a riddle: We see it every morning, it has very many colours. At one point we all have in our lives Please help me solve this riddle and an explanation of it.

asked by Mark on November 8, 2016
riddles
what do you call the golden gate bridge at 5.pm put this riddle on the Riddle section. http://www.jiskha.com/net_riddle/

asked by me on June 7, 2007

Riddles
I would just like to know that say I need help on a riddle urgently, would i post it on Net Riddle to receive help?

asked by Alice on October 17, 2009
8th grade
i have to write a riddle about variables how am i supposed to do that with out ever writing a riddle before?

asked by caleb on September 17, 2008
algebra honors
I was placed into algebra honors instead of advanced math.. I am in 7th grade.. I have to maintain an 80% for the entire year or go to virtual school all summer.. My question is: Is there a special technique, formula, or very useful site that might help me

asked by Jarrad on October 5, 2010
Math
Winnie write the following riddle.I am a number between 60 and 100.My ones digit is two less than my tens digit.I am a prime number.Winnie’s friend Marci guessed that her riddle was about the number 79.Why can’t 79 be the answer to Winnie’s riddle?

asked by Anonymous on February 16, 2016
math
the sum of a number and 3 times that number is 76. what is that number? PLEASE HELP ME I DON’T GET IT!!!!!!!! Mathematics is a language, so translate the English into “math” let the number be x “the sum of a number and 3 times that number is 76”, …. what

asked by Rebekka on April 18, 2007
Algebra
In an interview of 50 math majors, 12 liked calculus and geometry 18 liked calculus but not algebra 4 liked calculus, algebra and geometry 25 liked calculus 15 liked geometry 10 liked algebra but neither calculus nor geometry 2 liked geometry and algebra

asked by Anita on January 11, 2010
math

  1. In an interview of 50 math majors, 12 liked calculus and geometry 18 liked calculus but not algebra 4 liked calculus, algebra, and geometry 25 liked calculus 15 liked geometry 10 liked algebra but neither calculus nor geometry 2 liked geometry and

asked by poo on November 30, 2009
algebra 1 help
fin the complement and the supplemnt of the angel measure 1) 130 complement-40 suplement-50 or vice versa if anyone can help me with some algebra work it would be greatly appreciated i am im algebra 1 and still on the second quarter and have until november

asked by cristina on August 20, 2005
English
Metaphor for confusion The math problem was a maze at trying to solve.

asked by Anonymous on April 1, 2014
math, algebra
what are some challenges about working with rational expressions? Math is a language. Getting it precisely right is a lot easier than describing it in a vague statement in English such as you ask. Is there a chance you can change teachers? If so, I

asked by jas20 on March 6, 2007

Math
Math Riddle: Move only one number so 102=100. You may not eliminate or add a number.

asked by Kacy on November 19, 2007
English
“.. so this bell calls all; but how much more me, who am brought so near the door by this sickness.” Which of these is the best interpretation of this phrase from John Donne’s Meditation 17? A. The tolling bell is a metaphor for Heaven. B. The tolling bell

asked by Steve on October 28, 2017
math
this is a math riddle that i can’t do so please help i am a fraction eguivalent to 2/4 the sum of my numerator and my denominator is 21 what fraction am i here it is help me please’s

asked by 5 grade on November 29, 2011
Algebra
I need help with a riddle my Algebra teacher gave us? Why did the square root of 9 refuse to discuss anything with his brothers cubed root of 9, 1 ninth and the square root of negative 9?

asked by Mary on February 5, 2012
Math
Does anyone know the answer to the math riddle “Did you hear about…” the answer is 12 words and it’s pg 167.

asked by Maddie on December 6, 2011
check my answers? language arts

  1. The fire’s angder could no be contained. A). personification *** B.) simile C.) metaphor 2. The flames ran along the deliberate rows of vines, like long curved fingers reaching for the horizon, lighting the night sky. A). personification B). simile C).

asked by Sofet on April 23, 2017
To Ms.Sue And All Teachers
I am new in this website. Please help me with my math homework. How do you subtract fractions? How do you subtract 7 and 2/5 AND 4 and 5/10? (7 and 2/5 – 4 and 5/10) How do you subtract 6/10 and 6/20? Thank you! Please visit the following site for a super

asked by Kaveri on December 30, 2006
Math
Winnies friend marco guessed that her riddle was about the number 79 Why can’t 79 be the answer to Winnies riddle

asked by Jamaya on March 12, 2017
TO Helper
Helper could you please look through my other Algebra Math posts, I really need help, please and thank you.

asked by Anonymous on January 19, 2011
MATH
MAKE R the subject of the formulaq…….. I =(mne) devide by (mR+nr)………..Its N2 math can u help? It’s not at all clear to me what your question is, what does this mean? “MAKE R the subject of the formulaq……..” In this part, are we to take

asked by MICHELLE on September 26, 2006

Algebra
I am going to take an Accuplacer math placement test later this week. It is to determine what math course I need to take in college. The school would like me to place in statistics.This will be my second time taking the test. The first time I placed in

asked by Christian on April 1, 2008
essay
During my four years in high school, I have taken a lots of classes to prepare for college. As I took ELD classes ( English Language Development ) during my freshman and sophomore year, I realized that I could not meet the college’s requirement. So in my

asked by JJ on November 30, 2006
math
Pizzaz pg.103 Did you hear about…

asked by John on January 8, 2012
8th grade
Math Algebra With Pizzazz (in music, What Does “Allegro” Mean?

asked by riley159 on February 1, 2010
Math
Has anyone taken the leap practice math pre-algebra (8/6/GT)??

asked by Reeses on May 25, 2017
Math
Can somebody help me out here. I want to know why I am good with math problems but I don’t get word problems until it is made out of a equation. The reason is that you have learned math as procedures and facts…math as a form of thinking, or analysis,

asked by Miss Strawberry on August 29, 2005
ELA
Correct these sentences. 1. my littl brothers bestest riddle is what kind of house ways the least Is this how you would fix it?: My little brothers best riddle is; “What kind of house weighs the least?” Or would you do: My little brothers best riddle is

asked by Lily on May 23, 2016
math
What kind of math classes must you take to become a Biologist? What kind of math classes must you take to become a Geneticist? I’m not a biologist, but I do know a little about math. I know there’s a specialty in math called bio-stastics. I think that

asked by Ande on September 10, 2006
Math
You are a letter and now your in a math problem explain to the numbers what your purpose is, how you are a friend, and how you solve algebra problems. Create a math problem and solve it. Use the letter and the number as the characters. Please tell me that

asked by Jordan on May 2, 2007
Math
WHAT 3,000 MULTIPLY BY 583? PLEASE SOLVE MY RIDDLE! IT IS MIDDLE OF THE HOMEWORK HELP PAGE! NAME:SANJANA SUBJECT:RIDDLE 3000 multiplied by 583 is 1,749,000.

asked by Sanjana on December 24, 2006

Conflict Management Communications
Think of a recent conflict, and now create a metaphor or figure of speech (simile) that summarizes the experience of it. What aspects of the experience does the metaphor emphasize? Does it focus on constructive or destructive aspects of the event or

asked by Crystal on January 24, 2010
Social Studies
how do you make a riddle? Thank you for using the Jiskha Homework Help Forum. There actually is a Website for how to make a riddle: 1. http://www.catb.org/~esr/riddle-poems.html This is an answer from Jiskha earlier: 2.

asked by Anonymous on March 21, 2007
james madison high school algebra
Can anyone help me with Ashworth high algebra 1 part 2 I really need some help I’m not good with math

asked by val on May 23, 2014
senior year
does anyone know what consumer math is? i’m trying to take it for my senior year, but i’m not sure what it’s about. or if i can take it after trig and algebra.

asked by y912f on May 17, 2009
English
I need help trying to construct an Extended metaphor. The topic being People who use cell phones while a movie is going on. Please help thanks . Thank you for using the Jiskha Homework Help Forum. The first thing to understand is the definition of an

asked by chris on August 23, 2006
math To MS.SUE
Ms sue i really want a hundred percent on one algebra test im in algebra and im so smart and good at math but the thing is in my class we tooken 4 tests and on all of then i only got one wrong whit the most minor common mistake i don’t understand just one

asked by jj on December 16, 2012
Math
I am doing a worksheet that says to solve all problems to get the answer to “which Arctic animals love math?” I did not get the riddle. Does anyone know the answer? I would love if someone got back to me on this one. Thanks, Ishaan.

asked by IshaaN on November 16, 2016
Math
Does anyone know the answer to THIS PIZZAZ WORKSHEET? What happens when joggers get mad?

asked by misty on November 13, 2008
math
hi. im doing a PIZZAZ! sheet if your familar with it? anyway one of the questions reads,what is 7/12 – 1/3=? please HELP

asked by ??? on April 7, 2010
language arts
a metaphor for macaroni salad http://www.tnellen.com/cybereng/lit_terms/terms/2terms.html#Metaphor http://www.tnellen.com/cybereng/lit_terms/metaphor.html http://web.cn.edu/kwheeler/lit_terms_M.html (Scroll down.) Read the definitions and examples. Then

asked by ali on October 11, 2006

math
Can somebody PLEASE help me understand how to find the domain of a function. I have an F in algebra 3 and just got a 50% on my math quiz. I’m desperate!

asked by Jennifer on March 9, 2010
English
Read the following passage by Picoult and identify the metaphor. Quote the metaphor in your response and explain what makes it fit the definition of metaphor. “My mother moves so fast I do not even see it coming. But she slaps my face hard enough to make

asked by Riley on February 25, 2012
riddles
what’s the answer to this riddle. “There are 3 words in the English language that end in -gry.ONE is angry and the other is hungry. EVeryONE knows what the third ONE is means and what it stands for. EveryONE uses them everyday, and if you listened very

asked by Jasmin on June 20, 2007
Algebra 1A
describe what the graph of interval -4, 10 looks like? This is for math 166 algebra 1A I don’t understand how to answer this question, please help me!

asked by Julissa on November 29, 2008
Algebra
What are intersections and unions (in algebra). Also, what are complements? And what does MATH stand for in terms of sets? Please answer quickly. Thanks!

asked by Jena on September 21, 2011
english
a metaphor that continues over several lines or throughout an entire poem is called extended metaphor is this correct?

asked by y912f on May 27, 2009
Figurative Language
Question : Music is the salve that soothes us – Answer: Metaphor? – Clues: Metaphor, Simile or Personification?

asked by Cameron on November 17, 2015
english
This is an example of a metaphor. Once more in her bed beside the warm cocoon of her sister. What kind of reaction or feeling does this give when you first read it and what is this metaphor saying. Thank you

asked by heather on October 17, 2010
4th grade Language Arts
I need to know an example of a metaphor. We need to make a metaphor out of this sentence “Pablo sniffed the air.”

asked by Megan on October 14, 2008
math
i have a math competition next saturday can some please give me advice on how to study. some sites snd stuff i really need help for algebra thank you in advance

asked by lily on January 5, 2011

math
i have a math competition next saturday can some please give me advice on how to study. some sites snd stuff i really need help for algebra thank you in advance

asked by lily on January 5, 2011
english
can you please give me a metaphor for largeness. for smallness the metaphor i have is She was a spider, unnoticed by all, spinning her web among the endless, towering redwoods.

asked by elina on June 7, 2009
Literature

  1. The form of figurative language that uses LIKE, AS, THAN, or RESEMBLES to compare two dissimilar thing is a. a simile b. a direct metaphor c. an implied metaphor d. personification A Thanks -MC

asked by mysterychicken on November 18, 2009
one quick question? ~metaphors & similes~
is the phrase, “sway like a boat” a metaphor or a simile? i think its a metaphor

asked by zumai on June 2, 2014
Algebra
I need help on doing a math problem for my algebra class so if u could help i would be really grateful any way please explain. : Find two consecutive negative integers with the product of 110

asked by Please help on March 24, 2010
Academic 4-year plan: Zoology
I want to work in the field of zoology when I get older, and I’m filling out an “academic 4-year plan” our counselors gave to my class to complete and turn in on Monday. The science and math I’m taking this year are physics and geometry. Can you take

asked by Emily on December 1, 2007
Language Arts
I have to find a metaphor in the book- A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens. The only metaphors I have found are ‘darkness is cheap’ and ‘woe is me.’ Which one makes the most sense (to be a metaphor)?

asked by Anonymous on January 23, 2011
math
for math homework it is algebra and we have to use a ti-83 plus calculator to convert things, that’s the one our teacher told us. but i do not have one. so i was wondering if anybody knew of a website that i could use a free calcutar online?

asked by Natalie on June 1, 2011
algebra
the population P(t) of a new residential development t years after 2010 is P(t)=8000(1-e^-0.3t). What is the population for 2015? * algebra – Reiny, Sunday, December 5, 2010 at 6:19pm replace t with 5 and evaluate using your calculator (I got 6215) I was

asked by math help on December 5, 2010
Math
Could someone simplify this? (3a)(3a)^3 The “^” is an exponent, so it means “cubed” or “to the third power” in this case. its means to the third power I know that. -_- I need to simplify that monomial. (3a)(3a)^3 (3a)(3a)^3 = (3a)^4 = (3^4)*(a)^4 = 81a^4

asked by Elton on November 15, 2006

english
That, like dumb mouths, do ope their ruby lips To beg the voice and utterance of my tongue is this a simile? how? Yes. It’s a simile. It compares whatever “That” refers to to mouths. It also uses the word “like,” making it a simile, not a metaphor. An easy

asked by irv on May 15, 2007
Math
Whole Number Math Riddle Clue 1: Double my tens digit and get my ones digit. Clue 2: Double me and I am less than 50

asked by Savannah on April 4, 2011
computer keyboard
What does this ^ symbol mean in algebra or basic math. It means an exponent follows: 2^3 means two cubed, or 222 or 8. Thankyou Bobpursley

asked by Tammy Evert on July 26, 2006
Self-Taught Mathematicians
Those of us who love math certainly know two basic facts about Mr. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz: (1) He and Newton (our calculus guy) did not get along AND (2) Mr. Leibniz was a self-taught mathematician My question is for all tutors here who love math. What

asked by Guido on February 22, 2008
physical science
im sorry but im notiing others are gettin help before me with math, algebra, and i honestly think its being done on purpose..just because i keep asking.im justy worried about my test that is coming up..i honestly need help

asked by 45843 on July 19, 2011

Categories
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using general trends, predict the stability of the following nuclei.

A magic number is the name given to certain numbers of protons or neutrons that have a high correlation to stability in nuclei.

Magic # of protons: 2,8,20,28,50,82
Magic # of neutrons: 2,8,20,38,50,82,126, 184

Using general trends, predict the stability of the following nuclei.
Either STABLE or RADIOACTIVE

A)arsenic-82
B)calcium-40
C)radium-233
D)potassium-44
E)zinc-64

(I figured B would be stable because it falls under the magic numbers list. Also I think C would be radioactive because it does not seem to fit with the others)

0 0 318
asked by michelle
Dec 4, 2012
just a guess but would all but C be stable?

0 0
posted by michelle
Dec 4, 2012

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what are powers of the us government that are named and listed in the constitution called

What are powers of the U.S. government that are named and listed in the Constitution called?

A.expressed powers

B.implied powers

C.inherent powers

D.prohibited powers

0 0 655
asked by Kidthelearner
Aug 25, 2016
http://www.ushistory.org/gov/3a.asp

0 0
👩‍🏫
Ms. Sue
Aug 25, 2016
thanks!

0 0
posted by Kidthelearner
Aug 25, 2016
You’re welcome.

1 0
👩‍🏫
Ms. Sue
Aug 25, 2016
so B?

1 0
posted by Kidthelearner
Aug 25, 2016

No,

0 0
👩‍🏫
Ms. Sue
Aug 25, 2016
ok…

0 0
posted by Kidthelearner
Aug 25, 2016
Is the answer c?

0 0
posted by Jordan
Sep 6, 2016
A is the correct answer

0 0
posted by Miss I Love You
Sep 14, 2016
Just took it.
1.A 2.A 3.C 4.B

!@#$%^&soutforharambe

2 0
posted by yesman
Sep 21, 2016

^^^ IS correct 100%^^^^

0 0
posted by Yesman
Sep 21, 2016
Thank you for the right answers yesman.

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posted by Thanks!
Sep 23, 2016
Thanks for them answers☺️☺️☺️

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posted by Happy
Sep 26, 2016
yesman is 100% right

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posted by BS
Oct 2, 2016
Thanks yesman!

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posted by Lol smiley face
Oct 5, 2016

yesman is actually a king TYSM

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posted by Anonymous
Oct 10, 2016
yesman is right

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posted by amy
Nov 30, 2016
all are right 100%

0 0
posted by mona
Feb 3, 2017
YESMAN is the fu**ing man

1 0
posted by Jorge
Apr 5, 2017
A
A
C
B
Thank me later

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posted by Richard
Aug 28, 2017

Richard is 100% correct

0 0
posted by DessBlicky
Sep 15, 2017
They’re both right. Thanks.

0 0
posted by Padawan
Sep 21, 2017

  1. A
  2. A
  3. C
  4. B

i just took it

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posted by yoongi
Sep 22, 2017
yoongi is right

0 0
posted by bbygrl
Sep 22, 2017
1.) A
2.) A
3.) C
4.) B

100% For connexus! 😛

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posted by Fox Girl
Sep 26, 2017

I’ll read first

0 0
posted by SonikkuTheNerd
Sep 26, 2017
Thanks I got 100%

0 0
posted by SonikkuTheNerd
Sep 26, 2017
a
a
c
b
is correct

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posted by bleh
Oct 20, 2017

  1. expressed powers
  2. Both national and state … share power
  3. tariff laws
  4. supremacy clause 0 0
    posted by Trinity
    Jan 19, 2018
    trinity is right, I got a 100% 0 0
    posted by seulgi
    Sep 7, 2018

All 100% correct, thank you!

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posted by Odious
Sep 26, 2018

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nahco3(s)⇌naoh(s)+co2(g) calculate the value of the equilibrium constant.

Estimate the value of the equilibrium constant at 550 K for each of the following reactions.

1) 2CO(g) + O2(g) <==> 2CO2(g)

2) 2H2S(g) <==> 2H2(g) + S2(g)

Thanks in advance!

0 0 1,108
asked by Miguel
Jul 18, 2010
Calculate (from tables) delta Go for each reaction, then delta Go = -RT*lnK.

0 0
posted by DrBob222
Jul 18, 2010
Tried that…not right

0 0
posted by Miguel
Jul 18, 2010
If you didn’t use 8.314 for R, post your work.

0 0
posted by DrBob222
Jul 18, 2010
It’s apparently a different formula since the temperature is not the standard 298 K

Work for the first:

delta G is equal to -514.4 kJ

lnK = 514.4/(0.008314)(550)

lnK = 112.5

e^112.5 = 7.17*10^48 = k

  • which Mastering Chemistry says is wrong 0 0
    posted by Miguel
    Jul 18, 2010

I figured it out…

You use the formula

ln(k2/k1) = (delta H)/R * [(1/T1)-(1/T2)]

1) 5.24 * 10^44

2) 8.86 * 10^-13

0 1
posted by Miguel
Jul 18, 2010
Could you try and answer my other question?

(ht tp: //ww w. jiskha. com/ display. cgi?id= 1279495858)

take spaces out

0 0
posted by Miguel
Jul 18, 2010
I don’t see anything wrong with what you have done.

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posted by DrBob222
Jul 18, 2010
where do you get the K1 from?

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posted by kaylan
Nov 17, 2014
can you answer it for 545 K

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Nov 17, 2014

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what does it mean to say that two variables are negatively correlated

1.)what does it mean to say that two variables are negatively correlated

A.)When one variable increases, the other decreases.

B.)When variable increases, the other also
C.)When one variable decreases, the other also decfreases
D.)Both variables changes at the same rate

I choosed “B” but my mom is saying no im wrong its “D” who’s correct?!

0 1 4,497
asked by YRN DJ
Nov 11, 2015
If it’s negative correlation, what does “negative” mean? B and D are wrong.

0 1
posted by Reed
Nov 11, 2015
So would it be c?

0 2
posted by Hi
Nov 16, 2015
No its a

3 0
posted by Hi
Nov 16, 2015
The answer is A

3 0
posted by 🙂
Jan 26, 2016

a
b
d
c
a

32 0
posted by Anonymous
Nov 8, 2016
Scatter Plots: Comparing Variables

Responses saved. The final score is 5/5 (100%).

Multiple Choice

  1. What does it mean to say that two variables are negatively correlated? (1 point)
    Correct answer (1 pt) When one variable increases, the other decreases.
    Unselected answer (0 pts) When one variable increases, the other also increases.
    Unselected answer (0 pts) When one variable decreases, the other also decreases.
    Unselected answer (0 pts) Both variables change at the same rate.
    1 /1 point
    Examine the data table below, which shows a list of employees at a company, how many years of higher education they have, and their current salary. Use this table to answer the following three questions.

Employee Name Years of Higher Education Current Salary
Joslyn Smith 6 $81,500
Heather Miller 2 $38,000
Marie Coolidge

  1. Complete the missing data in the table above using the following information.

Marie Coolidge is a new employee. She has five years of experience in a similar job, where she was paid $45,000–$65,000. She has four years of higher education. Her current salary will be $55,000. (1 point)
Unselected answer (0 pts) 4, $45,000
Correct answer (1 pt) 4, $55,000
Unselected answer (0 pts) 5, $50,000
Unselected answer (0 pts) 5, $65,000
1 /1 point

  1. Assuming that the data for all employees follows the same pattern, which kind of relationship is there between years of higher education and current salary? (1 point)
    Unselected answer (0 pts) a clustered relationship
    Unselected answer (0 pts) There is no relationship.
    Unselected answer (0 pts) a negative correlation
    Correct answer (1 pt) a positive correlation
    1 /1 point
  2. Which of the following is a variable in the data table above? (1 point)
    Unselected answer (0 pts) previous salary
    Unselected answer (0 pts) years of experience
    Correct answer (1 pt) years of higher education
    Unselected answer (0 pts) average salary
    1 /1 point
  3. Which kind of relationship is shown in the following scatter plot?

A graph with a x -axis and y-axis is shown. 5 black dots ranging from left-parenthesis 1 comma 9.8 right-parenthesis to left-parenthesis 9 comma 1.3 right-parenthesis in a downward slope. (1 point)
Correct answer (1 pt) negative correlation
Unselected answer (0 pts) positive correlation
Unselected answer (0 pts) a direct relationship
Unselected answer (0 pts) no trend
1 /1 point

The final score is 5/5 (100%).

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posted by Awesome Kid
Nov 14, 2016
Thanks! your the best <3

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Nov 15, 2016
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Nov 24, 2016
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Dec 1, 2016

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Dec 8, 2016
yep they r right ABDCA

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posted by Rebel teen
Dec 21, 2016

  1. A
  2. B
  3. D
  4. C
  5. A 9 0
    posted by nibba
    Jun 5, 2017
    nibba right 0 0
    posted by poor
    Oct 4, 2017
    Those answers are right! 0 0
    posted by Get Grammarly
    Oct 13, 2017

I got a 100% with these:
A
B
D
C
A
They are right.

2 0
posted by Anonymous
Oct 26, 2017
Awsome Kid was correct 100% thank you!!

  1. A – When one variable increases, the other decreases.
  2. B – 4, $55,000
  3. D – a positive correlation
  4. C – years of higher education
  5. A – negative correlation 2 0
    posted by Keith
    Mar 2, 2018
    1.A
    2.B
    3.D
    4.C
    5.A

Full Credit Goes to Awesome Kid! (100% Correct Answers)

2 0
posted by Anonymous
Mar 17, 2018
ABDCA!

2 0
posted by girl
Apr 26, 2018
Awesome Kid, Anonymus(The anonymous near the top of comments), and Nibba. Are all correct If you are in connections academy Lesson 2 Unit 4 Ed Tech, Then the quick check answers are

  1. A
  2. B
  3. D
  4. C
  5. A 1 0
    posted by ThatOneGirl
    Nov 1, 2018
  6. A
  7. B
  8. D
  9. C
  10. A 1 0
    posted by Hal
    Nov 4, 2018
    Thanks my nibba 0 0
    posted by frog
    Mar 13, 2019
Categories
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ru2+ electron configuration

Write electron configurations for the following ions, and determine which have noble-gas configurations. (Type your answer using the format [Ar] 4s2 3d10 4p2 for [Ar]4s23d104p2.) Ru2 thanks
123,593 results
chemistry
Write electron configurations for the following ions, and determine which have noble-gas configurations. (Type your answer using the format [Ar] 4s2 3d10 4p2 for [Ar]4s23d104p2.) Ru2+ thanks

asked by rebekah on January 20, 2011
chem
Write electron configurations for the following ions, and determine which have noble-gas configurations Tl+ As3- I –

asked by person on January 20, 2011
Chemistry
Write the ground state electron configurations of the following ions. (Type your answer using the format [Ar] 4s2 3d10 4p2 for [Ar]4s23d104p2. If the configuration is a noble gas, enter the noble gas in brackets, for example [Ne] for F -.) Pb2+ Au+ Mn2+

asked by jamie on October 6, 2008
Chem Please Help
I know how to write elctron configurations but I am having problems with electron config. of main group ions. Problem: Using condensed electron configurations, write reactions for the formation of the common ions of the following element: Iodine (Z=53)

asked by Sami on November 24, 2007
CHEM
Consider the following neutral electron configurations in which ‘n’ has a constant value. Which configuration would belong to the element with the most negative electron affinity, E-ea? a) ns^2 b) ns^2 np^2 c) ns^2 np^5 d) ns^2 np^6 would the answer be

asked by K on November 13, 2007

Chemistry
Determine which ions have noble-gas configurations: Cd2+ Ru3+ P3− As3− Ag+ Zr4+ Thanks for any help. (I tried As3- and Zr4+, but that was wrong, so maybe i’m just missing one.

asked by G-Dogg on November 5, 2014
Physics
So a quick question. If im representing a quantum gas with diagrams of the allowed configurations of the gas. When it comes to indistinguishable I have 7 configurations. But if we then compare to a gas made up of distinguishable particles. Would there be

asked by Anon on May 9, 2018
chemistry
write out the electron configurations for each of the metallic ions: 1. Ba^2+ 2. Cu^2+ 3. Li^+ 4. K^+ 5. Sr^2+ 6. Ca^2+ 7. Na^+

asked by jay on October 18, 2009
physics
write out the electron configurations for each of the metallic ions: 1. Ba^2+ 2. Cu^2+ 3. Li^+ 4. K^+ 5. Sr^2+ 6. Ca^2+ 7. Na^+

asked by may on October 18, 2009
Chemistry (electron config)
Write electron configurations for the following ions. Tl^+ [Xe]4f^145d^8 is that correct?

asked by Don on October 26, 2010
Chemistry
what are the electron configurations for bromine, iodine, and chlorine? and what are the similarities for the configurations?

asked by Anonymous on April 6, 2018
chemistry
state noble gas whose electron configuration is attained in a lewis structure for hydrogen cyanide and noble gas attained in lewis structure for cyanogen? I have answered this several times but at times it really wasn’t an answer. I am not familiar with

asked by Pedro on March 7, 2007
science(chemistry)
Using condensed electron configurations and Lewis electron-dot symbols to depict the monatomic ions formed from each of the following reactants, predict the formula of the compound the ions produce. 1) K and P

asked by mona on November 13, 2009
chem
Use the periodic table to write electron configurations for each of the following elements. (Type your answer using the format [Ar] 4s2 3d10 4p2 for [Ar]4s23d104p2.) 1. Pd thanks

asked by hannah on January 13, 2011
Chem
Draw a Structural Formulae for Hydrogen Cyanide (HCN) and Cyanogen (C2N2 or CN2) Hydrogen = 1 Valency Nitrogen = 3 Valencies Carbon = 4 Valencies H-C(triple bond)N N(triple bond)C-C(triple bond)N Thank you And for a Lewis Structure they would be H:C:::N:

asked by Anthony on March 12, 2007

Chemistry
Which of the following electron configurations of neutral atoms represent excited states? [Xe]6s^2 4f^1 [Ar]4s^2 3d^3 1s^2 2s^2 2p^6 3s^2 3p^6 3d^2 [Kr]5s^1 4d^5 2s^2 Which neutral atoms have the following electron configurations? Enter the name or symbol.

asked by Anonymous on March 24, 2013
Physics
Getting my head twisted around by the wording of these two questions, any help would be appreciated. My answers/ideas are below each question. 1) Briefly explain whether there would there be more or fewer configurations available for the gas if the

asked by Anon on May 6, 2018
Chem
How do you figure out the Noble Gas Configuration? Also, why do you not put in the “p” level and when do you( if you even do) put it in? You need to be more specific about your question. Elements that lose electrons (Na, Ca, Al, etc) gain the noble gas

asked by Ty on March 20, 2007
Chemistry
The solutions of both Ag+ and Zn2+ ions have no color. What does this suggest about their electron configurations?

asked by Jessoca on December 5, 2014
Chemistry
Fill in the Blanks When atoms share electrons to gain the_____ configuration of a noble gas, the bonds formed are______. Atoms lose and gain electrons to form electron configurations like a noble gas (octet in the outer shell). Atoms share electrons to

asked by Bryan on December 15, 2006
Chemistry
if Ca and F atoms are allowed to react what will be the electron configurations and lewis structures of the resultant ions?

asked by Maci on April 4, 2012
Chemistry PLZ HELP!!!!!
if Ca and F atoms are allowed to react what will be the electron configurations and lewis structures of the resultant ions?

asked by Maci on April 4, 2012
science
i cant unscramble this 1.when element bond to form ( scunpoodm) both their ( troppsiree ) and their (loorc). 2. All stable electton configurations are the same as the ( steaner ) noble gases. 3. Only (route ) electron are invole in bonding

asked by kk on April 21, 2011
AP Chemistry
Which of the following electron configurations correspond to an excited state? Identify the atoms and write the ground-state electron configuration where appropriate. If the configuration is a noble gas, enter the noble gas in brackets, for example [Ne]

asked by Ferdinand on October 30, 2011
Chemistry
What would be concept in which you would have to use electron configurations in order to solve? and how would you determine the answer? One uses the electron configuration to solve the bonding preferences and energies.

asked by Danni on March 29, 2007

chemistry
Predict whether nitrate salt solutions containing metal ions with the following outer shell electron configurations will be colored or colorless: [Ar] 3d^2 and [Kr] 4d^10

asked by Dani on November 7, 2011
Chemistry
predict whether nitrate salt solutions containing metal ions with the following outer shell electron configurations will be colored or colorless: [Ar] 3d2 and [Kr] 4d10

asked by Colby on November 17, 2011
Chemistry
Choose from the list the correct electron configurations for the following ions. A B C D E F G H I J K+ A B C D E F G H I J In+ A B C D E F G H I J Li+ A B C D E F G H I J Na+ A. 1s22s22p63s23p6 B. 1s22s22p63s23p64s23d104p64d105s25p1 C.

asked by sara on October 20, 2013
Chem.
Using condensed electron configurations, give reactions showing the formation of the common ions of the following elements. (Type your answers in the following order. In the first box enter your answer using the format [Ar] 4s2 3d10 4p2 for [Ar]4s23d104p2.

asked by Lucas on October 10, 2010
Chem -Bob Pursley Please Help!
So I would like to check some of my answers. I really appreciate any help 1. Which of the following atoms or ions is diamagnetic; Cr Br Mn2+ B C4+ – I said C4+ 2. Which of the following atoms or ions is paramagnetic? C4- S^4+ V^4+ Se2- Ge4+I said V^4+

asked by Josh on November 12, 2017
chem
Write the condensed electron configurations for the following atoms and indicate how many unpaired electrons each has. for Ca and Y for Ca i got [Ar] 4s2 but it got cuonted wrong

asked by Samantha on November 18, 2012
Chem
Elements with similar properties Answer occupy the same period of the periodic table have similar electron configurations have the same number of neutrons in their nuclei exist in the same physical state (solid, liquid, or gas)

asked by Anonymous on February 9, 2013
chemistry
whats the difference between abbreviated eleectron configurations and complete eleectron configurations? if you can, please give an example, because i don’t really get it.

asked by Anonymous on January 28, 2010
Chem Electron Config
S2- Cu+ Sn2+ O2- A 1s22s22p63s23p63d10 B. 2s2 C. 1s22s22p63s23p4 D. 1s22s22p63s23p63d104s1 E. 1s2 F. 1s22s22p63s23p64s23d104p65s24d10 G. 1s22s22p63s23p64s23d104p64d105s25p2 H. 1s22s22p4 I. 1s22s22p6 J. none of the above Choose from the list the correct

asked by Shay on October 18, 2012
Chem
Using condensed electron configurations, give reactions showing the formation of the common ions of the following elements. (Type your answers in the following order. In the first box enter your answer using the format [Ar] 4s2 3d10 4p2 for [Ar]4s23d104p2.

asked by Lucas on October 10, 2010

Chemistry
Nitrate salts containing metal ions with the following electron configurations are added to water to make a solution. Predict whether the salt solution will be colored or colorless and explain the reasoning. a. [Kr]4d10 b. [Ar]3d3

asked by Anonymous on November 19, 2013
CHEM
What is the abbreviated electron configurations of : a) MO 4+ b) As 3- c) S 2- D) NI 2+

asked by MAX on October 30, 2010
Chemistry
Please help. I just want to make sure I’m doing this right. I have to write the abbreviated ground state electron configurations for the following: nitrogen 2s^22p^3 chlorine 3s^23p^5 iron 3d^104s^2 Thanks. If there wrong I’ll start over, I think I know

asked by Sue on November 10, 2008
Chemistry
What relationship exists between the electron structure of a Group A ion and the electron structure of the nearest noble gas? Why do boron, carbon and silicon not form simple ions? How do they satisfy their electron requirements?

asked by Anon on September 7, 2015
Chem
How do you find the ground state electron configurations of molecules like NO

asked by Austin on February 20, 2018
Quantum/inorganic chemistry
c. Which of these electron configurations has the 4F term symbol for its ground state? p3 d3 d4 f2 f3

asked by Adam on April 14, 2013
chem

  1. What is wrong with the following electron configurations for atoms in their ground states? a) 1s^2 2s^2 3s^1 b) (Ne) 2s^2 2p^3 c) (Ne) 3s^2 3d^5

asked by tra on May 14, 2013
Chemistry
1) The letter “p” in the symbol 4p^3 indicates the _. A) spin of an electron B) orbital shape*** C) principal energy level D) speed of an electron 2) If the spin of one electron in an orbital is clockwise, what is the spin of the other electron in that

asked by Mary on October 10, 2016
Chemistry
The following electron configurations correspond to the ground states of certain elements. Name each element. a) [Ar]3d^10 4s^2 4p^4 b) [Ne]3s^2 3p^3 c) [Ar]3d^2 4s^2 d) [Kr]4d^1 5s^2 e) [Xe]4f^13 6s^2

asked by Chironjit on November 26, 2012
Chemistry
Which of the following electron configurations is not consistent with Hund’s rule? 1) 1s^2 2s^2 2p^2 3s^1 2) 1s^2 2s^2 2p^6 3s^2 3p^5 3) 1s^2 2s^2 2p^6 3s^3 3p^6 4) 1s^2 2s^2 2px^2 2py^1

asked by David on November 29, 2010

Chemistry
Which of the following electron configurations is not consistent with Hund’s rule? 1) 1s^2 2s^2 2p^2 3s^1 2) 1s^2 2s^2 2p^6 3s^2 3p^5 3) 1s^2 2s^2 2p^6 3s^3 3p^6 4) 1s^2 2s^2 2px^2 2py^1

asked by David on November 29, 2010
Chemistry
What is the common characteristic of the electron configurations of the elements Ne and Ar? Both have eight electrons in the outside shell.

asked by Dirk on November 12, 2006
Chemistry
Two electron configuration: Mg(Ne)3s^2 Zn(Ar)4s^2 3d^10 Using the configurations, explain the difference in relative reactivity of the 2 metals ( which are Mg and Zn)

asked by Rose on April 19, 2016
Chemistry
Given the following three electron configurations: 1s2 2s2 2p5 How many core electrons does this element have? A. 4 B. 5 C. 9 D. 2

asked by Megan on July 10, 2016
Chemistry
Two electron configuration: Mg(Ne)3s^2 Zn(Ar)4s^2 3d^10 Using the configurations, explain the difference in relative reactivity of the 2 metals ( which are Mg and Zn)

asked by Rose on April 19, 2016
chemistry
How many of the following electron configurations are allowed? 1s22s22p7 1s22s22p62d1 [Ne]4s24p4 [Ar]3d64s2 1s22s22p83s23p4

asked by adex on February 25, 2013
chemistry
how are the ionization energies evidence for the structure of the atom especially the electron configurations for atoms ?

asked by jack on October 23, 2012
Chemistry
Two electron configuration: Mg(Ne)3s^2 Zn(Ar)4s^2 3d^10 Using the configurations, explain the difference in relative reactivity of the 2 metals ( which are Mg and Zn)

asked by Rose on April 19, 2016
Chemistry
Which of the following sets of quantum numbers could possibly describe an electron in the ground-state configurations of beryllium. Choose all that apply (e.g. AB, ABC, ABDF). A) n=1 l=0 ml=0 ms=1/2 B) n=3 l=1 ml=-1 ms=1/2 C) n=2 l=0 ml=0 ms=-1/2 D) n=2

asked by Kales on November 19, 2014
Chemistry
A) n=1 l=0 ml=0 ms=1/2 B) n=3 l=1 ml=-1 ms=1/2 C) n=2 l=0 ml=0 ms=-1/2 D) n=2 l=1 ml=0 ms=1/2 E) n=3 l=2 ml=0 ms=1/2 F) n=2 l=1 ml=1 ms=-1/2 Which of the above sets of quantum numbers could possibly describe an electron in the ground-state configurations

asked by Harold on November 13, 2014

Chemistry HELP ASAP
A Gouy balance is used to determine the magnetic susceptibility of a substance. A strong electromagnet is placed next to the sample, which is on a balance. If the sample is paramagnetic, the mass reading of the balance will increase when the field is

asked by Anonymous on November 5, 2012
Chemistry
Which of the following electron configurations belongs to an atom that is most likely to be involved in a covalent bond? a. 1s22s22p63s2 b. 1s22s22p6 c. 1s22s22p63s23p3 d. 1s22s22p63s23p6

asked by Anonymous on June 5, 2013
Lauren
Use Lewis symbols to represent the electron transfer between the following atoms to give ions with noble gas configuations: A. Mg and S B. Ba and I

asked by Chemistry on November 14, 2007
Chemistry
Metals lose electrons under certain conditions to attain a noble-gas electron configuration. How many electrons must be lost by the element Ca? Is it 2 e^-? Which noble-gas electron configuration is attained in this process? argon radon krypton xenon

asked by Bill on October 28, 2012
chemistry
using only the periodic table, write the expected ground-state electron configurations for: a. element number 116 b. an element with three unpaired 5d electrons c. the halogen with electrons in the 6p atomic orbitals

asked by aaloy on April 14, 2008
Chemistry
Which of the following electron configurations of neutral atoms represent excited states? ( ) [Xe]6s24f1 ( ) 2s2 ( ) 1s22s22p63s23p63d2 ( ) [Ar]4s23d3 ( ) [Kr]5s14d5

asked by Garcia on November 11, 2012
Chemistry
Which of the following electron configurations represent an excited state? 1s22s22p1 1s22s22p63s2 1s1 1s22s12p63s1 1s12s22p63p3 1s22s22p23d1 1s22s22p64s1

asked by Megan on April 1, 2010
chemistry

  1. Write the electron configuration for each atom or ion. Then explain the distribution of electrons among energy levels. Ca, Be2+, and Br- I already found the electron configurations but I don’t understand the second part of the question.(Then explain the

asked by Morgan on February 3, 2015
Chemistry
Count the electrons. HCN I see 10. NCCN I see 18. What noble gas has an atomic number of 10? of 18? State the noble gas whose electron configuration is attained in the following Lewis structures. a) H:C:::N: (cyanide) b) :N:::C:C:::N: (cyanogen)

asked by DrBob222 on February 6, 2007
Chemistry
I have to list two similarities for these electron configurations: Bromine: [Ar] 3d10 4s2 4p5 Iodine: [Kr] 4d10 5s2 5p5 Chlorine: [Ne] 3s2 3p5 but I’m not sure what to look for, can someone help?

asked by Anonymous on April 6, 2018

General Chemistry
The four quantum numbers for the last electron placed in the orbitals of a certain element are: n=3 l=2 m of l=0 and m of s=-1/2. What is the element? I need help with this part of chemistry I have NEVER understood this ever. I know how to do the

asked by Brittany on December 14, 2010
Physics
So I have worked out the ‘allowed’ configurations for four particles which can occupy 5 different energy levels (1, 3, 5, 7, 9) and now I need to work out the average number of particles in a particular energy level (i.e 3). 1) 9,5,1,1 2) 9,3,3,1 3)

asked by Anon on May 6, 2018
Probability
Roll two fair dice. what is the probability that you get a 2 and a 5 without regard to which is on which die? What is the probability of at least one 2 or one 5? What is the probability of a sum of 7? “what is the probability that you get a 2 and a 5

asked by Pam on December 3, 2006
Chemistry Periodic Trends
The electron affinities of the elements from aluminum to chlorine are -44, -120, -74, -200.4, and -384.7 kJ/mol respectively. Rationalize the trend in these values. Electron affinity is the energy absorbed (endothermic) or emitted (exothermic) by the

asked by Will on February 11, 2007
College Chemistry
Write the electron configuration for Se using the noble gas core format.

asked by KELLY on October 16, 2010
Chem- quantum question
Hi. My teacher is giving us a test tomorrow on quantum numbers and Iunderstand it except for Noble gas configuration. I saw the question below on it but it’s not really what I need to know so any help would be great. 🙂 Question: My teacher said he’ll give

asked by Amy on March 20, 2007
Chemistry
Without referring to a periodic table, pick the electron configuration of elements with the following atomic numbers and classify the elements. (Type your answer in noble gas notation using the format [Ar] 4s2 3d10 4p2 for [Ar]4s23d104p2.) (a) 17 (b) 20

asked by jamie on October 6, 2008
chemistry
Which neutral atoms have the following electron configurations in either a ground state or excited state? Enter the name or symbol. [Ar]4s23d3 – I know that this is Vanadium [Xe]6s24f1 – I thought that this was Lu but it counts it wrong each time! Help

asked by Jordan on November 4, 2016
Chemistry…Help!!
I don’t even know how to start this…The valence electron configurations of several atoms are shown below. How many bonds can each atom make without hybridization? 1. Si 3S2 3P2 2. P 3S2 3P3 3. F 2S2 2P5

asked by Stacy on November 6, 2010
Chemistry
Give the electron configurations of 22Ti+2 Do you know how to do this? Here is a site that will help you. Repost with specific questions about the points you don’t understand.

asked by Justyna on October 29, 2006

Chemistry
A Gouy balance is used to determine the magnetic susceptibility of a substance. A strong electromagnet is placed next to the sample, which is on a balance. If the sample is paramagnetic, the mass reading of the balance will increase when the field is

asked by Anonymous on November 4, 2012
Chemistry
1) What is the charge on the ion that Selenium forms in an ionic compound? I am not sure about this. 2) What noble gas is isoelectronic with this ion. I was thinking Krypton because it is a noble gas and it is the closest to Selenium but I am not sure. 3)

asked by Hannah on November 2, 2011
Chemistry
How does the three dimensional structure of SP3 bonds of Carbon, Nitrogen, Oxygen and Fluorine cause them to form polar or non-polar molecules? The answer must include a 3d diagram of the molecules, and a discussion of the effect of their electron

asked by Carl on November 16, 2017
Chem 130
How do I do this? Using the symbol of the previous noble gas to indicate the core electrons, write the electron configuration for each of the following elements. (a) zirconium, Z = 40 (b) vanadium, Z = 23

asked by michelle on May 13, 2014
physical science
Which electron cannot occurr? a) 1s^22s^1 b) 1s^2 2s^2 2p^6 3s^2 c) 1s^2 1p^6 2s^2 2p^6 d) all can occurr How do I figure this out? s orbitals can contain 2 electrons maximum and p orbitals can contain 6. I do not see this condition being violated in any

asked by Elda on June 13, 2006
Chemistry130
Can someone please help me with this question? Propose a possible explanation as to why this trend exists. What characteristics of the elements lead to this trend? We are discussing Ionization energy! She’s asking for characteristics like subatomic

asked by Jess on September 17, 2009
Chemistry (Need) 7:00
What characterizes the electron configurations of transition metals such as silver and iron? Thanks Alot in Advance.. Fe is in the 3d transition series and Ag is in the 4d series. Thus, the distinguishing electron for the 3d series enters the 3d orbital

asked by Lance on November 12, 2006
Science
What are the Lewis structures for hydrogen cyanide and cyanogen?? I think it’s H:C:::N :N:::C:C:::N: with the inner upper electrons being shared. For the elements in these compounds, which is the noble gas whose electron configuration is attained in the

asked by Helen on March 11, 2007
Chemistry
I have drawn Lewis structures for hydrogen cyanide and cyanogen. I need to state the noble gas (for each element) whose electron configuration is attained in the Lewis structures. Can anyone help as I am quite confused! Many thanks Previous posts have

asked by Bean on March 4, 2007
CHEM
I just have one more question regarding electron configurations for the following ions: Mo^3+ V^3+ I cannot understand why my answers are not working. Not listing as ground-state configs, but as full e- configs: shouldn’t Mo^3+ be: 1s2, 2s2, 2p6, 3s2, 3p6,

asked by K on November 13, 2007

chemistry
Write both the complete electron-configuration notation and the noble-gas notation for each of the elements below a. Na b. Sr c. P

asked by jerson on May 18, 2008
chemistry,
,I NEED TO DRAW A LEWIS STRUCTURE for C2n2,cyanogen,and to state the noble gas,i know the answer is neon,but i have far to many electrons and am getting the gas argon,please help :N:::C:C:::N: please where do u think i am going wrong I don’t know. You

asked by jane on March 3, 2007
Chemistry
Use these answers for questions 4 – 7. (A) 1s2 2s22p5 3s23p5 (B) 1s2 2s22p6 3s23p6 (C) 1s2 2s22p62d10 3s23p6 (D) 1s2 2s22p6 3s23p63d5 (E) 1s2 2s22p6 3s23p63d3 4s2 4. An impossible electronic configuration 5. The ground-state configuration for the atoms of

asked by Rachel on April 12, 2007
Chemistry
How do I determine the noble gas configuration of Sm+3? I know the normal noble gas configuration of Sm is[Xe]6s2 4f6. Thanks!

asked by Kayla on January 8, 2011
Chemistry
Please check the following. 1. What compound is sodium sulfite? My answer:Na2SO3 2. Which element is a noble gas? a. N2 b. Cl2 c. Xe d. I2 My answer: c 3. Which element is most likely to form a cation with a 2+ charge? a. S b. P c. Be d. Al My answer: c 4.

asked by Anonymous on October 17, 2015
Chemistry
Please check the following. 1. What compound is sodium sulfite? My answer:Na2SO3 2. Which element is a noble gas? a. N2 b. Cl2 c. Xe d. I2 My answer: c 3. Which element is most likely to form a cation with a 2+ charge? a. S b. P c. Be d. Al My answer: c 4.

asked by Anonymous on October 17, 2015
Chemistry- Dr. Bob
Please check the following. 1. What compound is sodium sulfite? My answer:Na2SO3 2. Which element is a noble gas? a. N2 b. Cl2 c. Xe d. I2 My answer: c 3. Which element is most likely to form a cation with a 2+ charge? a. S b. P c. Be d. Al My answer: c 4.

asked by Anonymous on October 17, 2015
chemistry
The magnesium ion has an electron configuration like that of which noble gas?

asked by Rayniya on November 20, 2010
Chemistry
A gas in a discharge tube consists entirely of ions of the same element, of the same charge. Each ion has only one remaining electron. The voltage between the electrodes of the gas discharge tube is increased from zero. Electrons are accelerated across the

asked by Chemq on March 25, 2013
Physical Science
Which one is incorrect? a) Carbon is 1s^2 2s^2 3s^2 b) Sodium 1s^2 2s^2 2p^6 3s^1 c) Neon 1s^2 2s^2 2p^6 d) all are correct I suggest you review this web page http://www.webelements.com/webelements/elements/text/periodic-table/econ.html and then develop a

asked by Elda on June 13, 2006

Math
I’m really struggling with this — I have different table configurations – straight line, L-shaped, plus sign-shaped, and T-shaped. Suppose there are n tables arranged in these patterns. I need to write an expression of the number of tables with 2 chairs.

asked by Carly on February 23, 2016
chm
Which of the following facts is evidence for the existence of induced dipole-induced dipole interactions between molecules? Answer >>>Ions in water become surrounded by water molecules and this is what we observe as “dissolving.” Water freezes into a solid

asked by lucky on February 20, 2013
Chemistry
A gas in a discharge tube consists entirely of ions of the same element, of the same charge. Each ion has only one remaining electron. The voltage between the electrodes of the gas discharge tube is increased from zero. Electrons are accelerated across the

asked by Sam Chem on March 22, 2013
chemistry
A gas in a discharge tube consists entirely of ions of the same element, of the same charge. Each ion has only one remaining electron. The voltage between the electrodes of the gas discharge tube is increased from zero. Electrons are accelerated across the

asked by schoolgirl on March 23, 2013
Blue laser discs
How many configurations blue laser discs (standard, physical size, number of layers, capacity, etc) are currently available?

asked by carmen on September 13, 2009

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what is the reaction that corresponds to the first ionization energy of lithium, li?

if x+3/3=y+2/2, then x/3=?
whats the answer? I think its y/2. but im probly wrong. please explain to me.

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asked by Corie
Feb 5, 2013
(x+3)/3 = (y+2)/2
x/3 + 1 = (y+2)/2
x/3 = (y+2)/2 – 1
= (y+2-2)/2
= y/2

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if x+3/3=y+2/2 then x/3=

if x+3/3=y+2/2, then x/3=?
whats the answer? I think its y/2. but im probly wrong. please explain to me.

0 0 675
asked by Corie
Feb 5, 2013
(x+3)/3 = (y+2)/2
x/3 + 1 = (y+2)/2
x/3 = (y+2)/2 – 1
= (y+2-2)/2
= y/2

good work

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posted by Steve
Feb 5, 2013
thanks so much!!!

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posted by Corie
Feb 6, 2013

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which is the degree measure of an angle whose tangent is 5.67

Which is the degree measure of an angle whose tangent is 5.67? Round the answer to the nearest whole number.

0 0 309
asked by Mike
May 19, 2014
Tan A = 5.67
A = 80 Degrees.

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posted by Henry
May 21, 2014
Thank you Henry!!

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posted by Bri
May 11, 2018
NP =)

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posted by Henry
May 16, 2018

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what statement best describes jefferson’s attitude toward government?

What statement best describes Jefferson’s attitude toward government?
A. He wanted a larger and more powerful government.
B. He wanted a smaller federal government with reduced taxes, military, and bureaucracy.
C. He believed that a government wasn’t needed to run the United States.
D. He wanted to keep government the same as it was under the Federalists.

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asked by aj_4you
Oct 13, 2016
Hello there! I believe the answer is, B!
Hope I helped, join me on Brainly(dot)com

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posted by Nick
Dec 7, 2016

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a light rail commuter train draws

a) A light-rail commuter train accelerates at a rate of 1.25 m/s2. How long does it take it to reach its top speed of 80.0 km/h starting from rest?

(b) The same train ordinarily decelerates at a rate of 1.75 m/s2. How long does it take to come to a stop from its top speed?

(c) In emergencies the train can decelerate more rapidly, coming to rest from 80.0 km/h in 8.30 s. What is its emergency deceleration in m/s2?

0 0 300
asked by Melissa
Jan 25, 2014
V = 80km/h = 80000m/3600s = 22.22 m/s.

a. V = Vo + a*t = 22.22 m/s.
0 + 1.25t = 22.22. Solve for t.

b. V = Vo + at = 0 22.22 – 1.75t = 0. Solve for t.

c. V = Vo + at = 0 22.22 + a8.30 = 0. Solve for a; it
should be negative.

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posted by Henry
Jan 26, 2014
17.776

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posted by jessica
Sep 1, 2014
12

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posted by Anonymous
Jun 3, 2015
V = 80km/h = 80000m/3600s = 22.22 m/s.

a. V = Vo + a*t = 22.22 m/s.
0 + 1.25t = 22.22. Solve for t.

b. V = Vo + at = 0 22.22 – 1.75t = 0. Solve for t.

c. V = Vo + at = 0 22.22 + a8.30 = 0. Solve for a; it
should be negative

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posted by Swagmaster69
Oct 14, 2015

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which of the following compounds is an unsaturated hydrocarbon


  1. Which of the following compounds is an unsaturated hydrocarbon?

methane
*propyne
nonane
methyl


  1. The general name for hydrocarbons with at least one triple covalent bond is __.

alkenes
alkyls
alkanes
*alkynes


  1. What is the name of the smallest alkyne?

butyne
*ethyne
methyne
propyne


  1. Which of the following is true about structural isomers?

Structural isomers have the same molecular formula.

Structural isomers have different physical and chemical properties.

Structural isomers have the same elemental composition.

*all of the above


  1. Alkanes do not have geometric isomers because the carbon atoms in their carbon-carbon bonds are __.

double bonds
*quite polar
free to rotate
asymmetric

Thank you.

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asked by Cassie
Apr 11, 2013
5 is wrong. The others are ok. In addition to being wrong for the wrong reason, C-C bonds are NOT polar so they can’t be quite polar.

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posted by DrBob222
Apr 11, 2013

  1. B
  2. D
  3. B
  4. D
  5. C

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