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US Law

The US patriot act

The US Patriot Act is the one of the greatest act that has been established in the recent years. This was made by the President George W. Bush and it was made on 26 October 2001. It was made for the security and protection of the citizens. There were many reforms and good doing that fall in this act. Some of the major titles are Enhancing domestic security against terrorism, Anti-money-laundering to prevent terrorism, Removing obstacles to investigating terrorism, Increased information sharing for critical infrastructure protection, Improved intelligence, Border security, Surveillance procedures and many more (Justice.gov, 2016).

We can see that by implementing the act the country is much safer. There are many reforms that have been made due to this act and that have much more benefits for the country than ever before. What I can see that there are no sacrifices that are been made according to the law. In my opinion there are best practices that are been implemented by the police and the state to protect their citizen.

What I believe is that there must be good changes that can be made according to my opinion. For example, there should be more random checking and the crime should be eliminated according to the act. The police persons and we also knew that the smuggling, intoxications and the people who are not following the rules of the state. They should be caught in every case and the police officers who allow them to do that should be suspended forever.

I can personally give the sacrifice if they would stop me randomly and ask for the checking of the car or mine. This will be appreciated because due to this, there will be terror on the persons who are going against the law and the illegal acts will be reduced by this.

11-Miranda

Yes in my opinion, Miranda rights are still necessary. It was a good step taken by the State and it should be kept in progress. Before this right, we have seen that in many cases people were forced to speak something. By doing this there were many problems in the past as the person is confused and might say anything wrong and by doing that the data is been written and is been used against them. That his own statement goes against the person. That’s the reason in my opinion Miranda rights should be there so that is there is any problem the person could be remain silent and further steps can be taken in this regards (Nolo.com, 2016).

There were many changes made in the Miranda but there are some major change that have been made and that will be discussed. What we can see is that the biggest point in the Miranda was that a person could remain silent. However, we can see that it has been changed. Now there is no right for the person to remain silent. This change was made due to the some incidents.

If we look at the Miranda law then we come to know that it was a good stance that a person could remain quite as he will contact his lawyer in court or he do not want to give any kind of explanation to the police officers. Living in the Free State that right must be prevailing there so that there would be no pressure on the victim that you need to speak in any case. However, we know that the terrorist attacks and suicide is becoming common and the state needs to change the law so that no one could be left behind but still there are some rules, which needs to be followed.

  The purpose of the Miranda law is good and looking then it actually gives the security to the citizens so that there would be no harm to the society that is the best thing by implementing.

References

Justice.gov. (2016). The USA PATRIOT Act: Preserving Life and Liberty . Retrieved May 3, 2016, from https://www.justice.gov/archive/ll/highlights.htm

Nolo.com. (2016). Miranda Rights: What Happens If Police Don’t ‘Read Your Rights. Retrieved May 3, 2016, from http://www.nolo.com/legal-encyclopedia/police-questioning-miranda-warnings-29930.html

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Psycholinguistics

Psycholinguistics

Ho’s Student         

Here we come to know that Ho is the students that have came from Hong Kong to the American university so to complete his studies. It can be seen that the language in his native country and in here America is very different. We can see that he can listen and speak the language in a way but cannot read or write at all. Here we come to know that there are many problems that have been faced by the students and he is looking for the solution that how he can learn English in a quick way.

Looking at the problem of the student, I come to know that he uses the dictionary to convert English in Chinese than do the assignments. The solution is that he needs to start learning from the vowels of the English. The main composition is lost that needs to be regained in this case so that he could read in English and could be called with respect. He needs to be focused on the reading and the writing in English. The dictionary can help but till one extent. The student needs to go down to the alphabets of English.

Mari Carmen student

These students came from the Roman Orthography. Looking at them, as they want to learn the English language we can see that L1 reading strategies can be made to these students and the reason behind that is they can learn English with just a little modification. There are many things, which are same like pages goes from left to right, shapes, sizes, and scripts are almost the same as well. As both of the languages are not too different we can say that with just a little effort, the reading could be enhanced and learned.

Some of the strategies need to be taken care in this regard, as we know that both of the languages are much alike, however; there are some parts, which need to be considered effectively. If a student needs to read in English there are some compositions that will be taken care as the combination of (k, x), some of the different sounds that needs to be recognized and that are (g, h, j, ill, or, to). We can see a student needs to learn this kind of combination then he will easily learn English and can pronounce correctly.

Mohammed’s Student

Here talking about Mohammad, we come to know that this student has come from Egypt as there are many differences in the language of him and in English. Many serious constraints needs to be cleared for the student. He has been in a country where the language was in symbols and that is the reason he is very unaware of the alphabets of English. The modern Arabic standards are much different from the others that can be seen in here.

The strategy that can be used by the student is that he must go through the vowels in the English language; this is the basic thing to start. Further, we can see there are many problems that need to be resolved in here and basic steps need to be taken in this regard for the student. As the Arabic, writing is opaque but the other is not. This is the thing, which needs to be taken care of at every point. The main strategy is to revise the vowels in the beginning and the speed of learning English needs to be fast as well. 

Despina’s Student

It can be seen that Despina is a student moved from Greece to the US. The native language of her is Greek which is quite different from English. It can be seen that the basic letters are also very different and there are many less resemblance with each other. There will be many difficulties for her in order to read and understand English. The reason is they are almost different languages and the strategies need to be implemented in here. Some of the things are same like pages from left to right or so, however, she needs to learn many things about this.

However, if we look at the strategies that need to be looked, we can say that many procedures and the mechanisms need to be followed in order to learn and read English for the student. The main thing she needs to do is to learn English quickly by reading and writing the English sections and it must contain the words or the alphabets that are not familiar to her. However, in short, I will say that this student needs a couple of attention if needs to know about the English as it is the only thing, which prevails.

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what is the value of x given that pq bc

What is the value of x, given PQ || BC? Triangle: A, B, C with bisector PQ AP = 8 PB = x AQ = 12 QC = 18
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asked by jude on February 18, 2015
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The perimeter of triangle RXA is 39, PX=49 and AP=9.Find RX and RA. P is at the middle. I think it’s under triangle bisector theorem. Help me answer this guys. Thanks

asked by Jude on February 18, 2015
Area of a triangle i need help urgently
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asked by Collins on October 14, 2015
Area of a triangle
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Triangle $ABC$ is a right triangle with right angle at $A$. Suppose $\overline{AX}$ is an altitude of the triangle, $\overline{AY}$ is an angle bisector of the triangle, and $\overline{AZ}$ is a median of the triangle, and $\angle XAY = 13^\circ$. If $X$

asked by InfaRed on November 10, 2016
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Let (AB) and (CD) be 2 parallel lines by a transversal at E and F respectively.The bisector of AEF and BEF cut (CD) at M and N respectively.The bisector of CFE cuts [ME] at S, and the bisector of DFE cuts [Ne] at T.Show that: ETFS is a rectangle

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Let AB and CD be two lines intersecting at point O. Let OP be the bisector of ]AOC, OT the bisector of ]POB, and OR the bisector of ]TOD. If ]POR = 25, find ]AOC and ]AOD.

asked by Suzy on November 28, 2010

MATH_URGENT
Let M be the midpoint of side \overline{AB} of \triangle ABC. Angle bisector \overline{AD} of \angle CAB and the perpendicular bisector of side \overline{AB} meet at X. If AB = 40 and MX = 9, then how far is X from line {AC}?

asked by RhUaNg on April 12, 2014
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The perimeter of triangle ABC is 29 meters. Line segment AD bisects angle A. Find AB and AC. CD=5cm, DB=4 cm.(triangle angle bisector theorem)

asked by Lily on December 28, 2011
Geometry
What is the value of x, given PQ || BC? Triangle: A, B, C with bisector PQ AP = 8 PB = x AQ = 12 QC = 18

asked by Anonymous on February 12, 2015
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  1. Determine the equation of the right bisector of the line segment E(2, 6) and F(4, -2). Draw the diagram. 2. Given three points D(2, 5) E(-2, -3) and F(4, -6) determine whether or not the line through D and E is perpendicular to the line through E and F.

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Geometry
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asked by Anonymous on January 10, 2012
Geometry
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1) in triangle ABC, AD is the angle bisector of < A. If BD = 5, CD = 6 and AB = 8, find AC.

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In triangle ABC if m

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If ABC is a triangle with AB=20,BC=22 and CA=24. Let D lie on BC such that AD is the angle bisector of ∠BAC. What is AD2?

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Let AB and CD be two lines intersecting at point O. Let OP be the bisector of angle AOC, OT the bisector of angle POB, and OR the bisector of angle TOD. If angle POR = 25 degrees, find angle AOC and angle AOD.

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how do write and graph a coordinate proof? Isoceles triangle ABC with AB congruent to BC perpendicular bisector BD from B to AC

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In triangle ABC, BC = 20sqrt3 and angle C = 30 degrees. Let the perpendicular bisector of BC intersect BC and AC at D and E respectively. Find the length of E.

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The sides of a triangle are 15cm, 20cm, and 28cm. How long are the segments into which the bisector of the largest angle separates the opposite side?

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geometry
the legs of a right angled triangle are 5 cm and 12cm long. find the lengths, to the tenth, of the segment into which the bisector of the right angle divides the hypotenuse.

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Geometry
The legs of a right triangle are 5cm and 12 cm long. Find the lengths, to the nearest tenth, of the segments into which the bisector of the right angle divides the hypotenuse.

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PLEASE HELP!!!!! (Right Triangle Question)
Point N is on hypotenuse BC of triangle ABC such than angle CAN is 45 degrees. If AC=8 and AB=6, find AN. I did Pythagorean Theorem for triangle ABC, and hypotenuse BC will be 10. I don’t know how to continue from there. Oh, I’m also unsure about this, but

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asked by caleb on February 3, 2015
Math (Geometry)
ABC is a triangle with a right angle at A. M and N are points on BC such that AM is the altitude, and AN is the angle bisector of ∠BAC. If CN/NB=21, what is CM/MB?

asked by Dan on May 15, 2013
heeelp MATH
ABC is a triangle with a right angle at A.M and N are points on BC such that AM is the altitude, and AN is the angle bisector of ∠BAC. If CN/NB=21,what is CM/MB?

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Math (Geometry)
ABC is a triangle with a right angle at A. M and N are points on BC such that AM is the altitude, and AN is the angle bisector of ∠BAC. If CN/NB=21, what is CM/MB?

asked by Dan on May 16, 2013

maths
ABC is a triangle with ∠BAC=60∘,AB=5 and AC=25. D is a point on the internal angle bisector of ∠BAC such that BD=DC. What is AD^2?

asked by Anonymous on March 20, 2013
Geometry
ABC is a triangle with a right angle at A. M and N are points on BC such that AM is the altitude, and AN is the angle bisector of ÚBAC. If CN/NB =21 , what is CM/MB ?

asked by Andrew on May 16, 2013
MATHS
ABC is a triangle with a right angle at A. M and N are points on BC such that AM is the altitude, and AN is the angle bisector of ∠BAC. If CN/NB=21, what is CM/MB?

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math
ABC is a triangle with a right angle at A. M and N are points on BC such that AM is the altitude, and AN is the angle bisector of ∠BAC. If CN/NB=21, what is CM/MB?

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math
ABC is a triangle with a right angle at A. M and N are points on BC such that AM is the altitude, and AN is the angle bisector of ∠BAC. If CNNB=21, what is CMMB?

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Math
Triangle ABC has a right angle at C. The bisector of an exterior angle at B intersects line AC at D. If AB=13 and BC=5, what is the length of segment BD?

asked by Gems on October 24, 2016
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ABC is a triangle with a right angle at A. M and N are points on BC such that AM is the altitude, and AN is the angle bisector of A. If CN/NB=21, what is CM/MB ?

asked by AA on May 13, 2013
Math
If one of the angles of a triangle is 110 degree then the angle between the bisector of the other two angles is what ?

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Geometry
BC is a triangle with ∠BAC=60∘,AB=5 and AC=25. D is a point on the internal angle bisector of ∠BAC such that BD=DC. What is AD^2? It is not stated that D lies on BC. This assumption is not necessarily true.

asked by Stranger on March 18, 2013
SAT math
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trig
ABC is rightangled triangle. AD is the bisector of angle BAC. Angle DAC=15 degrees. X=CD. Find X. I know the answer is 7.1 but do not know how to do the actual sum. Can you please help.

asked by jane on May 5, 2011
trig
ABC is rightangled triangle. AD is the bisector of angle BAC. Angle DAC=15 degrees. X=CD. Find X. I know the answer is 7.1 but do not know how to do the actual sum. Can you please help AB = 23 CM

asked by jane on May 5, 2011
Math
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asked by Blissy on December 20, 2013
MMATH08
IN PARALLELOGRAM ABCD, BISECTOR OF ANGLE A BISECTS BC,WILL BISECTOR OF ANGLE B BISECT AD,EXPLAIN HOW.

asked by DIPI on May 2, 2017
Math
Can someone please check this? given: line AE and line BD bisect each other. prove: triangle ACB is congruent to triangle ECD Statements 1. Line AE and line BD bisect each other 2. Line AC is congruent to line EC, line DC is congruent to line BC 3. Angle

asked by Ryan on October 8, 2018
Vectors
In triangle OAB, OA = 3i + 4k and OB = i + 2j – 2k. Find OP, where P is the point where the bisector of Angle AOB intersects AB. Answer is 7i/4 + 5j/4 + k/4 Don’t use the matrix method as I haven’t learnt it yet and please show working. Thx a lot.

asked by C on January 11, 2017
math pls
The lengths of segments PQ and PR are 8 inches and 5 inches, respectively, and they make a 60-degree angle at P. (d) Find the sizes of the other two angles of triangle PQR. (e) Find the length of the median drawn to side PQ. (f) Find the length of the

asked by Maryann on April 21, 2010
geometry/math pls help
The lengths of segments PQ and PR are 8 inches and 5 inches, respectively, and they make a 60-degree angle at P. (1) Find the sizes of the other two angles of triangle PQR. (2) Find the length of the median drawn to side PQ. (3) Find the length of the

asked by Maryann on April 21, 2010
Math
How is constructing a perpendicular bisector similar to constructing an angle bisector’s? How is it different? Help I’m sick with this

asked by Marco on August 27, 2018
maths
Trigonometry query. ABC is a rightangled triangle. AD is the bisector of angle BAC. Angle DAC = 15 degrees. X = CD. find X. I know the answer is 7.1 but cannot work out the theory. Could you please help? Thankyou.

asked by jane on May 5, 2011

MAth
ina given parallelogram ABCD THE ANGLE BISECTOR OF ANGLE A BISECTS BC .WILL ANGLE BISECTOR OF B ALSO BISECT AD?GIVE REASON.

asked by DEEPI on May 1, 2017
math
In triangle ABC, angle A = 80 degrees. The bisector of angle B and angel C intersect at point P. Angle BPC = what?

asked by Mika on September 28, 2011
fundamentals of math
A point lies on the of a line segment if and only if the point is equidistant from the endpoints of the segment. angle bisector trisector altitude perpendicular bisector

asked by Anonymous on August 6, 2016
math plz check ;-; sorry
A triangle has sides of lengths 5 cm, 5 cm, and square root 47cm. Which of the following statements is true? A. The triangle is an obtuse triangle because (√47)^2>5^2+5^2 B. The triangle is an acute triangle because 5^2

asked by leo on May 31, 2016
math plz check ;-;
A triangle has sides of lengths 5 cm, 5 cm, and square root 47cm. Which of the following statements is true? A. The triangle is an obtuse triangle because (√47)^2>5^2+5^2 B. The triangle is an acute triangle because 5^2

asked by leo on May 31, 2016

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rank the crystal lattice structures in order of decreasing efficiency of space in the structure.

Rank the crystal lattice structures in order of decreasing efficiency of space in the structure?

Face centered cubic, body centered cubic, simple cubic, hexagonal close packing.

0 0 236
asked by gnozahs
May 14, 2009
I think you can find the answers here.
http://departments.kings.edu/chemlab/vrml/packgeo.html

0 0
posted by DrBob222
May 14, 2009

Categories
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where is most freshwater found

Where is most freshwater on Earth found?

lakes and rivers
oceans and seas
underground
ice caps and glaciers

How does algal growth caused by agricultural waste kill marine organisms?

by blocking sunlight and depleting oxygen
by increasing oxygen levels in the water
by maintaining balance in the water
by decreasing the carbon dioxide intake of organisms

Which of the following is not a major source of freshwater pollution?

human and animal waste
industrial waste
treated sewage
agricultural waste

1 0 2,515
asked by Princess Anna
Jan 4, 2014
I’ll be glad to check your answers.

0 2
👩‍🏫
Ms. Sue
Jan 4, 2014
1.D?
2.A
3.D

0 0
posted by Princess Anna
Jan 4, 2014
I agree with your first two answers, but not with your third answer.

0 0
👩‍🏫
Ms. Sue
Jan 4, 2014
3.C

0 0
posted by Princess Anna
Jan 4, 2014

Right.

0 0
👩‍🏫
Ms. Sue
Jan 4, 2014
Alright, Thank you. 🙂

0 0
posted by Princess Anna
Jan 4, 2014
You’re welcome.

0 0
👩‍🏫
Ms. Sue
Jan 4, 2014
did you answer all correctly?

0 0
posted by unknown
Jun 5, 2014
What’s bext

0 0
posted by Austin
Apr 7, 2015

number 1 is wrong its a fools

0 2
posted by lina
Apr 20, 2015
Lina, you are wrong. If you did the slightest bit of research on this topic, you would know. I just took this assesment and got all my answers correctly. Lina, it bothers me when people tell others they got it wrong, and then give them a wrong answer!

1 0
posted by Sarah
Apr 30, 2015
THis test is : Water pollution.

1.) D Ice caps and glaciers

2.) A By blocking sunlight and depleting oxygen

3.) C Treated sewage

4.) C Increasing the us of gasoline

I gotta 4/4 100%

I am not lying, my answers are all correct.

Its unit 4 lesson 5

31 0
posted by Amanda Fire
May 6, 2015
They are all right, i got 100%, thanks amanda fire

2 0
posted by smart one : )
May 11, 2015
thanks so much 😀 i don’t use my name because I’m scared con nexus gonna catch meh

1 0
posted by anonymous
May 12, 2015

I got it all right!

0 0
posted by Vanessa
May 20, 2015
Thanks

0 0
posted by Anonymous
May 22, 2015
Thank you, Amanda! I really appreciate it!!

0 0
posted by thatonegirl
May 29, 2015
thank you everyone
I really appreciate it!!

0 0
posted by mike
Sep 28, 2015
Thanks amanda

0 0
posted by Chizzy
Dec 15, 2015

Amanda is right, thank you sooo much!

0 0
posted by Star Wars Geek
Dec 16, 2015
Thank you Amanda Fire!!!😀👍👍

0 0
posted by Kpop is real
Apr 11, 2016
yup right answers

0 0
posted by wow
Apr 27, 2016
thanks Amanda fire!!

0 0
posted by Valeria
Apr 27, 2016
yup right answers

0 0
posted by wow
Apr 30, 2016

thx

0 0
posted by bacon
May 5, 2016
wow thx amanda 😀

0 0
posted by twenty one pilots lover
May 10, 2016
Thanks Amanda c:

0 0
posted by Josh Dun (he is bae dont deny it)
May 10, 2016
Thank you Amanda.

0 0
posted by Emma
May 12, 2016
Thanks Amanda Fire!😄

This test is: Water pollution Lesson 5 Unit 4

1) D / Ice caps and glaciers

2) A / By blocking sunlight and depleting oxygen

3) C / Treated sewage

4) C / Increasing the us of gasoline

I got a 4/4 100%

0 0
posted by Z_Dancing_Donut
May 17, 2016

Amanda is right. I just did it and got 100%. Trust her.

0 0
posted by Iko Matzou
Dec 14, 2016
I also got 100%.

0 0
posted by Marvel
Feb 10, 2017
d
a
c
c

1 0
posted by makayah
Mar 10, 2017
Makayah is right I got a 100

0 0
posted by Donut
Mar 22, 2017
Amanda fire, and mikayah are right I got 100

P.S. lisen to this!!!!—->BASS BOOSTED TRAP MIX → NEFFEX EDITION

0 0
posted by nathan
Apr 25, 2017

You all are liars

0 1
posted by Kailyn
Apr 26, 2017
Nah I’m just kidding i got all the answer right

0 0
posted by Kailyn
Apr 26, 2017
Thanks 😀

0 0
posted by Nyladna
May 1, 2017
Thank you so much Amanda Fire

0 0
posted by Grace13
May 16, 2017
thanks Amanda fire

0 0
posted by Connections student 2
May 21, 2017

This helps, and if you’re in connexus, it’s actually unit 13 lesson 5 for 8th graders

0 1
posted by Hi!!!
Dec 7, 2017
1: D
2: A
3: N
4: K

2 0
posted by Oh wow, i mean wow
Dec 19, 2017
Yeah so did I thanks I wanted to make sure my answers were corrcect

0 0
posted by Sup I need help please
Feb 21, 2018
Thank you sis 🙂

0 0
posted by Queen Elsa
Feb 22, 2018
D
A
C
C

0 0
posted by Hector
Mar 6, 2018

The Answers are 100% correct

1) D

2) A

3) C

4) C

0 0
posted by b_l_a_n_k
Mar 6, 2018
TYSM

D
a
c
c

0 0
posted by albert fan
May 15, 2018
Amanda Fire is on fire!!! THANK YOU SO MUCH!!!! Got a 100%

0 0
posted by its me!!!
Oct 18, 2018
Thanks Amanda you are on Fire lol * see what I did there? * sorry 😂😅

0 0
posted by I Am an Adorable A.R.M.Y
Oct 19, 2018
lol I got C. Mixed up with A.

Btw I changed my name a tiny bit lol

0 0
posted by I’m an adorable Army
Oct 19, 2018

how could you get caught this is not my real name cause people say that putting your name could get you kicked out of connexus

0 0
posted by Bree
Oct 24, 2018

  1. D
  2. A
  3. C
  4. C 0 0
    posted by Hal
    Nov 3, 2018
    I all are getting reported and kicked out of connexus for cheating. 0 2
    posted by Connexus
    Jan 30, 2019
    hi 0 0
    posted by Anonymous
    Feb 19, 2019
    @Oh wow, i mean wow
    thats a mood 0 0
    posted by big U W U
    Mar 21, 2019

Fire=Correct

0 0
posted by You
Apr 16, 2019
1.D
2.A
3.C
4.C

0 0
posted by 100%
Apr 18, 2019
thx 100%

0 0
posted by anonymous
Apr 18, 2019

Categories
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which molecule or compound below contains a polar covalent bond?

which molecule or compound below contains a polar covalent bond? why?
C2H4

LiI

NCL3

ZnS

AgCl

0 0 468
asked by natash
May 1, 2008
Draw the Lewis dot structure for each of the molecules. You can eliminate LiI, ZnS and AgCl because they are not covalent (but they are polar). The correct one, of the two remaining, is the one with an unshared pair of electrons.

0 0
posted by DrBob222
May 1, 2008
Pv

0 0
posted by S
Mar 10, 2016

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which was the most important effect of the bessemer process

  1. which is the most important effect of the Bessmer Process? 0 0 3,453
    asked by kat
    Feb 16, 2017
    http://www.american-historama.org/1850-1860-secession-era/bessemer-process.htm 1 3
    👩‍🏫
    Ms. Sue
    Feb 16, 2017
    the answers are
    1.C
    2.B
    3.D
    4.A
    😉 77 3
    posted by hw helper
    Feb 27, 2017
    hw helper is correct 6 0
    posted by Rory
    Mar 1, 2017
    omg Hw helper thank you so much my hero 6 1
    posted by hw Helper 678
    Mar 7, 2017

Thx you so much got a 100%!!!!!

2 0
posted by oOoo
Mar 7, 2017
c
b
d
a

9 3
posted by boo
Mar 20, 2017
The answers are correct…better be…

1 1
posted by Irtemed Rednaxela Nella
Mar 21, 2017
They are correct
C-It made steel cheaper
B-To outcompete rival businesses
D-Individual business owners set prices to compete for business
A-They formed monopolies or trusts

12 1
posted by .. 0_o ..
Mar 22, 2017
looks like all 3 sets of answers are correct (:

2 0
posted by idk
Feb 6, 2018

it is C B D A

4 1
posted by Harper
Feb 26, 2018
All 4 are correct thanks hw helper

2 0
posted by Caylee
Feb 26, 2018
Thanks boo!

1 0
posted by TwentyOneOtters
Mar 12, 2018
@hw helper is correct! & so is everyone else with the same answers!

1 0
posted by NootAfraid
Apr 13, 2018
On Page 1 of Unit 5 Lesson 3 For connexus students who watch Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D the flipped video has turned me into a conspiracy theorist because one of the pictures look like the Triskelion symbol.

0 0
posted by Anonymous Child Of Connexus
Apr 13, 2018

lol i got an F

3 4
posted by itsyoboi
Dec 11, 2018
let me confirm this for you all. One second…

Verifying Answers….

1 0
posted by Warrior Cat Lover
Dec 15, 2018
4/4 (100%). Great Job

1 0
posted by Warrior Cat Lover
Dec 15, 2018
still correct in 2019 yo

4 0
posted by cherry
Feb 8, 2019

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the exacting organizational culture is interested in

Question 1

Both individual ethics and organizational ethics have an impact on an employee’s

Answer

[removed]productivity.
[removed]personal happiness.
[removed]compensation.
[removed]fitness level.
[removed]ethical intention.

Question 2

Which of the following is not a form of retaliation commonly experienced by whistle-blowers?

Answer

[removed]Relocation or reassignment
[removed]No promotion or raises
[removed]The cold shoulder by coworkers
[removed]Exclusion from work activities
[removed]Praise by supervisors for their honesty

Question 3

Motivation is defined as

Answer

[removed]a person’s incentive or drive to work.
[removed]a force within the individual that focuses his or her behavior on achieving a goal.
[removed]personal ambition without regard to the impact on others.
[removed]a desire to be finished with a project.
[removed]individual goals.

Question 4

The ability to influence the behavior of others by offering them something desirable is best described as

Answer

[removed]coercive power.
[removed]reward power.
[removed]expert power.
[removed]legitimate power.
[removed]referent power.

Question 5

The exacting organizational culture is interested in

Answer

[removed]performance but has little concern for employees.
[removed]investors’ impressions of profitability.
[removed]maintaining a strong corporate culture.
[removed]employees and performance.
[removed]employees’ impressions

Question 6

The ________ leader demands instantaneous obedience and focuses on punishing wrong behavior, achievement, initiative, and self-control.

Answer

[removed]democratic
[removed]coaching
[removed]affiliative
[removed]coercive
[removed]pacesetting

Question 7

To motivate employees, an organization offers ________ to ________ employees to work toward organizational objectives.

Answer

[removed]punishment; force
[removed]peer pressure; guilt
[removed]incentives; encourage
[removed]rewards; bribe
[removed]threats; frighten

Question 8

A cultural audit may be used to identify

Answer

[removed]how cultured a firm’s employees are.
[removed]unethical employees.
[removed]unethical organizations.
[removed]an organization’s culture.
[removed]organizational structure.

Question 9

The ultimate “stick” associated with the FSGO is fines or probation, which involves on-site observation by consultants, monitoring of the company’s ethical compliance efforts, and

Answer

[removed]reporting to the U.S. Sentencing Commission on the company’s progress in avoiding misconduct.
[removed]installation of an ethics hotline.
[removed]payment of any penalties levied.
[removed]appointment of an appropriate high-level manager to oversee the company’s program.
[removed]divestiture of all assets.

Question 10

Organizational ________ can contribute to diminished employee trust and increased employee turnover.

Answer

[removed]leadership succession
[removed]compensation policies
[removed]ethics programs
[removed]rules
[removed]misconduct

Question 11

Which of the following strives to create order by requiring that employees identify with and commit to specific required conduct?

Answer

[removed]Conduct orientation
[removed]Values orientation
[removed]Coercive orientation
[removed]Obedience orientation
[removed]Compliance orientation

Question 12

In the absence of ethics programs, employees are likely to make decisions based on

Answer

[removed]their observations of how their coworkers and superiors behave.
[removed]how they and their family members behave at home.
[removed]their conscience.
[removed]their religious values.
[removed]their family values

Question 13

A strong ethics program includes all of the following elements except

Answer

[removed]a clause promising good stock market performance.
[removed]a written code of conduct or ethics.
[removed]formal ethics training.
[removed]auditing, monitoring, enforcement, and revision of standards.
[removed]an ethics officer to oversee the program

Question 14

For an ethical compliance program to properly function,

Answer

[removed]consistent enforcement and disciplinary action are essential.
[removed]employees must be monitored using any means necessary.
[removed]it is not necessary to set measurable program objectives.
[removed]the same program should be used in all countries of operation, regardless of cultural differences.
[removed]the company must wait until after misconduct occurs to develop a means of preventing

Question 15

In the long run, a(n) ________ orientation may be better for companies, perhaps because it increases employees’ awareness of ethics issues at work.

Answer

[removed]code
[removed]obedience
[removed]compliance
[removed]values
[removed]individual

Question 16

A(n) ________ orientation creates order by requiring that employees identify with and commit to specific required conduct, whereas a(n) ________ orientation strives to develop shared standards.

Answer

[removed]obedience; values
[removed]compliance; values
[removed]legal; values
[removed]values; compliance
[removed]values; obedience

Question 17

Which of the following is probably the best way for a manager to provide good ethics leadership?

Answer

[removed]Hire an ethics officer
[removed]Write a code of conduct
[removed]Conduct ethics audits
[removed]Set a good example
[removed]Only hire good employees

Question 18

________ is an independent assessment of the quality, accuracy, and completeness of a company’s social or ethics report.

Answer

[removed]Publication
[removed]Verification
[removed]Auditing
[removed]Analysis
[removed]Validation

Question 19

Which of the following does not have a significant impact on the success of an ethics program?

Answer

[removed]Senior management’s ability to successfully incorporate ethics into the organization
[removed]The quality of communication
[removed]The size of the company
[removed]The content of the company’s code of ethics
[removed]The frequency of communication regarding the ethical code and program

Question 20

Retaliation against employees that report misconduct is a problem in ________ cultures.

Answer

[removed]weak ethical
[removed]strong ethical
[removed]high power distance
[removed]diverse
[removed]international

Question 21

Ethics audits can help companies identify potential ________ so they can implement plans to eliminate or reduce them before they reach crisis dimensions.

Answer

[removed]competitive advantages
[removed]risks and liabilities
[removed]productivity issues
[removed]technological glitches
[removed]market opportunities

Question 22

Which of the following is not a benefit of ethics auditing?

Answer

[removed]It can improve a firm’s performance and effectiveness.
[removed]It can increase a firm’s attractiveness to investors.
[removed]It can identify potential risks.
[removed]It can harm relationships with stakeholders.
[removed]It can reduce the risks associated with misconduct.

Question 23

Which of the following is not a step in the ethics auditing process?

Answer

[removed]Secure commitment of top executives and directors.
[removed]Review organizational mission, goals, values and policies, and define ethical priorities.
[removed]Report the results to the U.S. Sentencing Commission.
[removed]Collect and analyze relevant information.
[removed]Verify the results.

Question 24

What should be the first step in the auditing process?

Answer

[removed]Secure the commitment of top executives and directors
[removed]Define the scope of the audit
[removed]Establish a committee to oversee the audit
[removed]Collect and analyze data
[removed]Review organizational mission, goals, values, and policies

Question 25

________ are a primary stakeholder group and should be included in the ethics auditing process because their loyalty determines an organization’s success.

Answer

[removed]Customers
[removed]Employees
[removed]Special interest groups
[removed]Competitors
[removed]Legislators
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what can readers infer from the following quote from act v scene 3 of romeo and juliet

  1. What can readers infer from the following quote from Act V, Scene 3 of Romeo and Juliet?
    6,150 results
    English
  2. What can readers infer from the following quote from Act V, Scene 3 of Romeo and Juliet? Romeo: O, be gone! By heaven, I love thee better than myself; For I come hither arm’d against myself: Stay not, be gone;–live, and hereafter say, A madman’s

asked by Kendra on March 13, 2015
English
Please help me with these question about Romeo and Juliet!!! They really are confusing me!! 1. In act 4 scene 1 of Romeo and Juliet, Paris tells Friar Laurence, “Immoderately she weeps for Tybalt’s death, / and therefore have I little talked of love.” What

asked by Becca on April 7, 2016
English
What can readers infer from the following quote from Act V, Scene 3 of Romeo and Juliet? Romeo: O, be gone! By heaven I love thee better than myself; For I come hither arm’d against myself Stay no, be gone; live, and hereafter say, A madman’s mercy bid

asked by BUBBLES on May 18, 2016
English
8.What can readers infer from the following quote from Act V, Scene 3 of Romeo and Juliet? Prince: A gloomy peace this morning with it brings; The sun for sorrow will not show his head. Go hence, to have more talk of these sad things; Some shall be

asked by Cassandra on May 22, 2017
Romeo and Juliet
What can readers infer from the following quote from Act V, Scene 3 of Romeo and Juliet? Montague: O thou untaught! what manners is in this, To press before thy father to a grave? a. Montague believes that sons who act disobediently die early deaths b.

asked by Kaai97 on April 15, 2016

Romeo and Juliet
What can readers infer from the following quote from Act V, Scene 3 of Romeo and Juliet? Montague: O thou untaught! what manners is in this, To press before thy father to a grave? a. Montague believes that sons who act disobediently die early deaths b.

asked by Kaai97 on April 14, 2016
English
What quote from Romeo and Juliet Act 3, Scene 5 illustrates Shakespeare’s use of comic relief?

asked by Steve on March 29, 2015
English 9
. Read the following line from Romeo’s monologue in Act II, Scene 2 of Romeo and Juliet, where Shakespeare employs personification: Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon, Who is already sick and pale with grief, That thou her maid art far more fair

asked by Jana on March 13, 2015
English
I have a Romeo & Juliet essay to be handed in 5 days from now. I mainly have to write about ‘Act 3 Scene 1’. The structure paper tells me to ‘Comment on the way Shakespeare contrasts the mood of this scene with the romantic atmosphere of the previous scene

asked by Leanne on April 22, 2007
Romeo and Juliet
Read the following line from Romeo’s monologue in Act II, Scene 2 of Romeo and Juliet: But soft! What light through yonder window breaks? What is Romeo saying in this passage? a. Romeo has broken the window even though he threw a rock softly. b. Juliet is

asked by Kaai97 on April 15, 2016
english
ROMEO AND JULIET what are juliets feelings towards romeo in act 3 scene 2 from lines 1-35?

asked by ali on February 21, 2012
English
IN THE BOOK OF SHAKESPEARE NAMED ROMEO AND JULIET. in act3 scene 1, which character seem to want peace and which one seem to want to fight most? What does mercutio mean when he says,”I have it, and soundly, too.Your houses”(scene1, line 104)? what

asked by Ted on May 17, 2010
English
Act 1 Scene 1 .. Romeo & Juliet I don’t know the answer to two of my questions for Romeo and Juliet the first one . . . Although Rome and Juliet is a tragedy, much of the play is quite comic. Outline briefly the comic elements in this scene. To whatextent

asked by Becca on February 13, 2007
English
PLEASE HELP!!! Please check my answers!! I’m not sure about a few of them, but i marked the answers that I think are correct. 1. In Act IV of Romeo and Juliet, what is Friar Lawrence’s advice to Juliet concerning her parents’ wishes that she marry

asked by Becca on March 17, 2016
English
Please someone explain these to me!!! I’ve put in the answers that i think are right but i don’t understand these very well. 1. Identify the type of irony found i Act IV, scene 1, of romeo and juliet, when paris meets juliet at friar lawrence’s cell and

asked by Starcatcher on March 17, 2016

Shakespear
Read the exchange between Romeo and Nurse in Act II, scene iv of Romeo and Juliet. Romeo: Bid her devise Some means to come to shrift this afternoon; And there she shall at Friar Laurence’ cell, Be shriv’d and married. Here is for thy pains. Nurse: No,

asked by Danny G on March 21, 2015
Romeo and Juliet Help!!!
Could someone please help me I can’t find the answer anywhere! thanks for you help! Why does Romeo’s answer to Tybalts insults upset Mercutio? What does he think Romeo is doing? (By the way this is all in act 3 scene 1)

asked by Alex on March 26, 2009
ELA- foreshadowing
what lines are foreshadowing I fear, too early: for my mind misgives Some consequence yet hanging in the stars Shall bitterly begin his fearful date With this night’s revels and expire the term Of a despised life closed in my breast By some vile forfeit of

asked by ADAM on December 15, 2011
What is a good quote for Romeo and Juliet?
What is a good quote for me to explain that it is important to think before you act? In the play, Romeo and Juliet? Thanks -Allyson I was thinking of something between Romeo and Juliet themselves, it would be helpful in my essay. I’ve already searched

asked by Allyson on May 11, 2011
English
1.) Identify the type of figurative language in the sentences below (taken from Act IV, scene 1 of Romeo and Juliet). Paris: “Poor soul, thy face is much abus’d with tears.” Juliet: “The tears have got small victory by that;/ For it was bad enough before

asked by Help. on March 7, 2016
English(Romeo and Juliet)
Capulet asks Nurse where Juliet has gone in the beginning of Act IV, scene 2. The Nurse indicates that she went to Friar Lawrence for confession purposes. Capulet responds by saying, “Well, he may chance to do some good in her. A peevish self-willed

asked by Anna on February 2, 2012
Romeo and Juliet Quick Question
Could you tell me in Act 1 Scene 5 what does Romeo compare Juliet to.

asked by Romeo on March 10, 2009
english
i need shaekspear translation for Romeo&Juliet act 3 scene 1

asked by hhhgggh on May 18, 2009
romeo and juliet
for my history project, I need to rewrite one scene from Romeo and Juliet. but it has to be modern. say, Juliet can text Romeo, or talk with him on messenger, and so on. which scene should I choose and any ideas how I can change it?

asked by rose marie on March 9, 2010
English
Write an essay explaining why you think The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet remains so popular. What is it about the characters of The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet that makes it so easy for young people to identify with them? Make at least two references to

asked by Talha on March 21, 2014

Romeo and Juliet
During act 2 and scene 2 what imagery comparisons does Romeo describe about Juliet. I need 3.

asked by Thai on October 10, 2007
english
romeo and Juliet Act 1 scene 3 questions: 1. what impression does the audience get of Juliet in this scene? 2.what impression does the audience get of Juliet’s nurse on this scene? 3.Explain the extended metaphor used by Lady Capulet (lines 80-95) what is

asked by patrik on February 26, 2012
english
I found 2 foil character in ROMEO AND JULIET can need one more please with (act and scene and line)thank for your help.

asked by marie on October 17, 2010
english
In Romeo and Juliet, what is the significance of the death of Paris in Act V, scene iii?

asked by Tiffany on May 28, 2008
english
i have to act out the first half of act3 scene 5 in romeo and juliet and i have to have some props. does anybody have any ideas for what i could use?

asked by christina on February 25, 2008
quote from Misanthrope
Hello, I can’t find this qoute in the Misanthrope “Still in a letter, appearances may decieve, this may not be as bad as you believe, I can’t find it in the book. thanks http://www.bibliomania.com/0/6/4/1967/frameset.html This website has the entire play

asked by cameron on February 12, 2007
Romeo and Juliet
Why does the nurse agree to help juliet marry romeo? By the way it’s in act 2 scene 5. I can’t find the answer. Thanks for your help

asked by Anonymous on March 23, 2009
English
I need help in identifying literary terms in Much Ado About Nothing by Shakespere. The literary terms must be from Act 5 Scene 1 page 163 Prince: “see see, here comes the man we went to seek.” to Act 5 scene 1 page 167 Benedick: “Fare you well…, and till

asked by Anonymous on June 17, 2008
memorization
does anybody have any tips on memorizing things? i have to memorize one of juleit’s speeches in romeo and juliet in act 2 scene 1. Please help!!

asked by anonymous on March 26, 2008
English
Is the “sober-suited matron” in Romeo and Juliet(Act 3,Scene 2,line 11)a metaphor? If it is, what is it being compared to?

asked by Emily on June 3, 2010

English
In Romeo and Juliet, what is ironic about Lord Capulet’s praise of Friar Lawrence in Act 4 Scene 2?

asked by Emily on November 29, 2012
Romeo and Juliet Quote Help
Could someone please help me with this quote I read the rest of act 2 today and I was wondering what this quote means: Mercutio: ” Alas poor Romeo, he is already dead: stabbed with a white wench’s black eye; run through the ear with a love song; the very

asked by Jamie:) on April 1, 2009
Romeo and Juliet quotation help!
I’m reading act 2 of Romeo and Juliet and I have no idea what the quote, “that which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet” means. Could someone please help me thanks:) J-J:)

asked by Jamie:) on March 31, 2009
ENGLISH
I don’t get this from Act 2 Scene 3 What are your feelings about Friar Lawrence’s involvement? Do you think he is right or wrong? Why? Use two quotes to support your answers. ITS FROM ROMEO AND JULIET

asked by LISA on January 5, 2012
English
When Romeo learns of Juliet’s “death” (Act 5 Scene 1), he plans to be join her and goes to an apothecary to buy poison. The question I have is why did he choose to use poison on HIMSELF rather than a dagger, to join Juliet? Ie. What was Shakespeare’s

asked by Kendry on May 26, 2010
English

  1. After he is wounded in Act III, Scene 1, Mercutio says to Romeo, “Why the devil came you between us? I was hurt your arm.” Which of the following is the best paraphrase of Mercutio’s words? a. I am so badly wounded that I feel I will die. b. Why did you

asked by Julie on March 10, 2017
Romeo and Juliet
What event do Benvolio’s lines from the opening of Act III, Scene 1 of Romeo and Juliet, hint at, or foreshadow? And, if we meet, we shall not ‘scape a brawl, For now, these hot days, is the mad blood stirring. a. the conversation the young men have later

asked by Kaai97 on April 14, 2016
Language Arts – Romeo and Juliet – Please Check
I need help with the following: 11. Read these lines from the prologue of Romeo and Juliet. “Two households, both alike in dignity, In fair Verona, where we lay our scene, From ancient grudge break to new mutiny, Where civil blood makes civil hands

asked by Brady on March 11, 2015
Language Arts – Please Check Answers
Please help me with the following questions: 1. Read the excerpt from Act II, scene v of Romeo and Juliet. Friar Laurence: These violent delights have violent ends, And in their triumph die, like fire and powder, Which, as they kiss consume: the sweetest

asked by Brady on April 28, 2015
english
in romeo and juliet, descibe juliet’s state of mind in act 4,scene one

asked by Ted on May 19, 2010

reading
compare and contrast Romeo and Juliet Soliloquies in act 2. what differences are revealed about their understanding of romantic relationships Juliet is a little more cautious than Romeo. She laments the fact that Romeo is a Montague and wonders how she

asked by yasminb on May 13, 2014
Romeo and Juliet
Read Capulet’s speech from Act IV, Scene 2, as he plans for the wedding: Tush, I will stir about, And all things shall be well, I warrant thee, wife. Go thou to Juliet, help to deck up her. I’ll not to bed tonight. Let me alone. I’ll play the housewife

asked by Kaai97 on April 15, 2016
English
Provide quotations in the book with the scene number, about how Romeo is a serious person, and lacks sense of humor. Romeo and Juliet

asked by B4 on November 11, 2016
English.
O Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo? Deny thy father and refuse thy name, Or if thou wilt not, be but sworn my love, And I’ll no longer be a Capulet. Can someone help me change this into a greeting card quote ?

asked by Thi on March 16, 2015
Romeo and Juliet
Could you please help me with this thanks. In act 1 scene 5 Romeo and Juliet say speeches that form a sonnet. Could you give me a link that will give me a translation of what they are saying. Thanks for your time

asked by Lala on March 11, 2009
Language arts unit 3 lesson 5 second read
If you have answers to 1-5 that would be great. 1. In act 1, scene 5, Scrooge sees himself as a child at school. What is revealed about his childhood in this scene? 2. In act one scene two Scrooge’s nephew stops by to wish Scrooge a Merry Christmas and to

asked by Abd on April 11, 2016
English
Read Capulet’s speech from Act IV, scene 2 , as he plans for the wedding: Tush , I will stir about , And all things shall be well , I warrant thee , wife: Go thou to Juliet , help to deck up her; I’ll not to bed to- night ; let me alone; I’ll play

asked by Mike on March 9, 2016
ENGLISH
Read Capulet’s speech from Act IV, scene 2 , as he plans for the wedding: Tush , I will stir about , And all things shall be well , I warrant thee , wife: Go thou to Juliet , help to deck up her; I’ll not to bed to- night ; let me alone; I’ll play

asked by HELLO WORLD<> on March 25, 2015
English Lit.
romeo and juliet: why is act 1 scene 5 an important part in the novel, basing on themes, lots of quotes, P-E-E-L (point, evidence, explain, link),and how is it relevant to these days? p.s – i would like to have an B grade answer to this please

asked by Baybee Cintia on March 25, 2009
Shakespeare
How would I use ellipses in Shakspearean quotes? I know that after every line you put a / but I want to omit like half a speech and get to the end. How would I do this? This is what I want to use: “You call me misbeliever, cutthroat dog/ And you spit

asked by Lena on May 6, 2009

english
What quote from Romeo and Juliet Act 3, Scene 5 illustrates Shakespeare’s use of comic relief? A) Lady Capulet: Marry, my child, early next Thursday morn/The gallant, young, and noble gentleman,/The County Paris, at Saint Peter’s Church,/Shall happily make

asked by Cassandra on May 23, 2017
english
What quote from Romeo and Juliet Act 3, Scene 5 illustrates Shakespeare’s use of comic relief? A) Lady Capulet: Marry, my child, early next Thursday morn/The gallant, young, and noble gentleman,/The County Paris, at Saint Peter’s Church,/Shall happily make

asked by Cassandra on May 23, 2017
english/ Romeo and Juliet
anyone know an oxymoron in Romeo and Juliet in Act1? sorry for such a random question…. thxs act 1 scene i line 170 Feather of lead, bright smoke, cold fire, sick health!

asked by Emily on May 1, 2007
english
act 1 secne 4 romeo and rosaline act 2 secne 1 Mercutio is foil for romeo act 1 secne 1 benvolio and tybalt

asked by marie on October 17, 2010
ENGLISH GCSE
i need to write 5 bullet points about act 1 scene 1 and act 1 scene 3. what websites would be good to look on that explains it simply. thankyou guys!

asked by HONEY BEE on October 1, 2010
english
We first meet juliet (act 1 scene 3) she has a conversation with her mother about marriage. discuss this. what do we learn about juliet from this? ROMEO AND JULIET

asked by jane on February 13, 2012
Romeo and Juliet
Read the following line from Act IV, Scene 5 of Romeo and Juliet, when Capulet speaks of Juliet’s death: Death, that hath ta’en her hence to make me wail, Ties up my tongue and will not let me speak. What effect does Shakespeare’s use of personification

asked by Kaai97 on April 15, 2016
Hamlet!
What is the dramatic purpose of Scene IV? sorry Act 4 scene 4 This scene reminds Hamlet of his purpose. “Act IV, scene iv restores the focus of the play to the theme of human action. Hamlet’s encounter with the Norwegian captain serves to remind the

asked by Justin on November 17, 2006
Romeo and Juliet
In Act IV, Scene 1 of Romeo and Juliet, Paris tells Friar Lawrence, “Immoderately she weeps for Tybalt’s death, And therefore have I little talked of love.” What makes Paris’s comment an example of dramatic irony? a. Juliet is saddened by the death of

asked by Kaai97 on April 15, 2016
ELA
“It is only with the heart that one can see rightly” and my interpretation of this quote is that If you truly believe in yourself, you can make the right decisions. I need help to relate this quote to ROmeo and Juliet with an appropriate literary element.

asked by LISA on January 16, 2012

English
Doing an assignment on act 4 scene 1-2 of Romeo and Juliet’s symbols I have to use these symbols and find an object for each one that reflects it it needs evidence too Here are the symbols and thanks for all your help Love Foolishness of the feud Extremes

asked by Haley on March 17, 2012
Romeo and Juliet (Check answers pplz hurry)
Could you please check these answers from Act 1 (Review it’s only 5 questions) 1.What warning does the Prince issue to the Capulets and Montagues? Answer: The Prince warns to the Capulet’s and Montague’s is if anyone fights they will be put to death. 2.

asked by lala on March 12, 2009
English
Romeo and Juliet! Explain and evaluate the literary device- I have chosen the quote “Indeed, I never shall be satisfied With Romeo, till I behold him—dead— Is my poor heart for a kinsman vexed. Madam, if you could find out but a man to bear a poison,

asked by Um on February 14, 2018
English
In Act 2 scene 4, lear is finally confronted by the betrayal of his daughters.Lear is stripped bare and reduced to a helpless old man and it also marks he start of his descent in to madness. How does Shakespeare do so in Act 2 Scene 4???

asked by Kelli on November 2, 2008
English
Some readers argue that the adults in this play– Friar Lawrence and Juliet’s nurce— do an incredibly BAD job of mentoring and providing guidance to romeo and juliet; in fact, some people believe that without these meddling adults, Romeo and Juliet would

asked by Darcy on May 2, 2013
LA
When did William Shakespeare live? A. in the late fifteenth and early sixteenth century b. in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth century c.in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth century Answer A 2. Which is NOT one of the differences between

asked by Shawn on February 19, 2015
English
Reading Bethune. Need help asap please! When Frances and Bethune quarrel in Act 1 Scene 2, Frances calls Bethune a hypocrite? How does Bethune defend himself from her accusation? In Bethune’s opinion, who are the real hypocrites in the medical profession?

asked by Tala on December 7, 2016
English – Hamlet
My teacher has asked me to identify and explain how Shakespeare creates atmosphere in Act 1, Scene i. I think he creates atmosphere by making the readers to think what will happen to Prince Hamlet and the ghost? I’m not really sure how to answer this

asked by … on September 5, 2007
Romeo and Juliet
Which word means the same as valiant is used in these lines from Act I, Scene 3 of Romeo and Juliet? Lady Capulet: Well, think of marriage now: younger than you, Here in Verona, ladies of esteem, Are made already mothers: by my count I was your mother much

asked by Kaai97 on April 14, 2016
Language
together now, Barbara Jordan’s main purpose is to a)persuade readers that a tolerant society is best created by working on a small scale.•• b)inform readers of the civil rights movement in the United States. c)praise the work of the leaders of the

asked by Estephania on January 11, 2016

literature
Two quotes dealing with puns in act one and two in Romeo and Juliet.And a 3-5 analysis. Best look in the text for these items. Here’s a link in case you left your book at school: http://shakespeare.mit.edu/romeo_juliet/index.html Once you have some ideas,

asked by michelle on April 24, 2007
reading
the scene before this one in the play is scene 3, act 1, scene 2, act 1 or act 2, scene 1 in the play from almost sisters

asked by Gabby ( 5 grade) on April 15, 2012
English
Where is Romeo in act IV of Romeo and Juliet? He is hiding in Friar Lawrence’s cell. He is in exile in Mantua. He is in exile in Verona. I don’t know:/

asked by SkatingDJ on March 10, 2016
English
Where is Romeo during Act IV of Romeo and Juliet? A: Hiding in Friar Lawerence’s Cell B: He is in Exile in Mantua C: He is in Exile in Verona I choose B is this correct? Thank you

asked by Marylyn on March 17, 2016
English
In Act IV, of Romeo and Juliet, Why do Juliet’s parents think she is crying? 1:Because Romeo wash banished 2: Tybalt is dead 3: Because she did not want to marry Paris I think it is 2 is this correct? Thank you

asked by Marylyn on March 17, 2016
Literature

  1. The Kellers allow Annie and Helen to live alone for two weeks because they a. believe that their interference creates too many obstacles b. trust Annie to care for Helen as they would c. fear that Helen will otherwise have to enter an institution d.

asked by mysterychicken on January 3, 2010
12 english, romeo and juliet
can someone help me out in anyway possiable, it says create a modern scene with two to four characters based on a theme in a ROMEO AND JULIET. Devise a new situation, new setting, and new character names, but be faithful both to the theme from ROMEO AND

asked by amanda on January 13, 2010
English
I need help writing a thesis sentence for an analytical essay about Romeo and Juliet. The topic the teacher chose is “Romeo and Juliet face untimely deaths because they act recklessly and hastily. thanks!

asked by Nicole on March 11, 2012
English -Macbeth
I need help understanding what the witches are saying exactly in act 4 , scene 1 when they are making the spell in the very begining of the scene

asked by Lizzie on December 1, 2008
English
In act one scene three of Julius Caesar, what are some details in the scene that help build suspense?

asked by Morgan on January 25, 2012

LA HELP!!!!
PLZ HELP! 1. Part A In “All Together Now,” Barbara Jordan’s main purpose is to persuade readers that a tolerant society is best created by working on a small scale.*** inform readers of the recent history of the civil rights movement in the United States.

asked by Agal on November 28, 2016
shakespeare
ok so i have to summarize 3 important events in act 1 of romeo and Juliet by using a creative way like an email or article or letter, poem, essay, joke, ect. I have to have to be a certain person in the act and be talking to another person in the act. and

asked by Anonymous on February 14, 2008
Romeo and Juliet (English Literature)

  1. To what heavenly body does Romeo compare Juliet? Why is this so? 2. What does Juliet mean when she says to Romeo, “tis, but thy name that is my enemy?” 3. How is Romeo let to Juliet’s home? 4. Is it difficult for Romeo to win Juliet’s love? Why? 5. Why

asked by Han on October 31, 2007
How can I show that Love is a Powerful Emotion?
PLEASE READ THIS In my essay for Romeo and Juliet, I’ve got to show a QUOTE and a few Setences to show that Love is a Powerfull emotion in Romeo and Juliet I need some help with this. What is a good way to express this? What should I use? I couldn’t find

asked by Allyson on May 9, 2011
Romeo and Juliet Quick Question
I’m doing a paper on act 5 of romeo and juliet does Capulet think Romeo killed Juliet

asked by Matt on April 12, 2009
Ninth Grade English
Romeo and Juliet; Act 1 Scene 5 Chorus Now old desire doth in his death-bed lie, and young affection gapes to be his heir; That fair for which love groan’d for and would die, With tender Juliet match’d is now not fair. Now romeo is belov’d, and loves

asked by Cathy on November 19, 2011
English
What does pestilence mean as it is used in the following lines from Act V,Scene 2 of Romeo and Juliet? Friar John:Going to find a barefoot brother out,One of our order,to associate me, Here in this city visiting the sick, and finding him,the searches of

asked by GummyBears16 on March 25, 2016
English: Quotes
What if there’s a quote inside a quote would I use this ” …’…'” and also what if I wanted to add something in my own words in between the quote would I end the quote then write my thought and then start a new quote OR would I use […] in between the

asked by Amy~ on September 20, 2010
English
In Romeo and Juliet, why doesn’t Juliet want to marry Paris? A: She is all ready married B: She is in love with Romeo C: Paris hasn’t won her affection D: All of the above I’m torn between B and D. Please help…this paper has been haunting me…I need to

asked by Marylyn on March 14, 2016
English
Act I of An Enemy of the People Question Think carefully about what each quote might infer about the character and choose the most appropriate answer in the context of the play. Taking one thing with another, there is an excellent spirit of toleration in

asked by Ella on November 17, 2014

ELAAAAAAAAAA
What does headstrong mean as it is used in the following lines from Act IV, scene 2 of Romeo and Juliet [ Enter Juliet ] Capulet : How now , my headstrong! Where have you been gadding?” Juliet: Where I have learn’d me to repent the sin Of disobedient

asked by HELLO WORLD<>!!!!!!!!!!! on March 26, 2015
English
What scene does romeo and juliets parents forbid them to see each other ?

asked by Cassandra on May 22, 2017
English
hat does headstrong mean as it is used in the following lines from Act IV, scene 2 of Romeo and Juliet [ Enter Juliet ] Capulet : How now , my headstrong! Where have you been gadding?” Juliet: Where I have learn’d me to repent the sin Of disobedient

asked by BUBBLES on May 18, 2016
english
Can someone link me sites where they have information on the two below? 1. In Act IV, Scene 1 of Romeo and Juliet, Juliet cries, ”O, bid me leap, rather than marry Paris . . . And I will do it without fear or doubt.” Both Romeo and Juliet seek out Friar

asked by Carl Wheezer on April 3, 2017
Romeo and Juliet Summary
Could you please read my act 1 summary of Romeo and Juliet and if there are any changes needed please let me know. It doesn’t matter if you don’t remember the first act but as long as it sounds right to you. Thanks God Bless Sampson, and Gregory who are

asked by Lala on March 16, 2009

Categories
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with Microsoft®

Office 2010 V O L U M E 1

PEARSON T O W N S E N D FERRETT HAIN VARGAS

with M ic roso f t

Office 2010 V O L U M E

T O W N S E N D I FERRETT I H A I N I VARGAS

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Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Townsend, Kris. Skills for success with Office 2010 / by Kris Townsend.

p. cm. ISBN 978-0-13-703257-0 (alk. paper) 1. Microsoft Office. 2. Business—Computer programs. I, Title.

HF5548.4.M525T692 201 I 005.5—dc22 2010016531

Editor in Chief: Michael Payne AVP/Executive Acquisitions Editor: Stephanie Wall Product Development Manager: Eileen Bien Calabro Editorial Project Manager: Virginia Gitariglia Development Editor: Nancy Lamm Editorial Assistant: Nicole Sam AVP/Director of Online Programs, Media: Richard Keaveny AVP/Dircctor of Product Development, Media: Lisa Strife Editor—Digital Learning & Assessment: Paul Gentile Product Development Manager, Media: Calhi Projitko Media Project Manager, Editorial: Alana Coles Media Project Manager, Production: John Cassar Director of Marketing: Kate Valentine Senior Marketing Manager: Tori Olscn Alves Marketing Coordinator SI/<<I« Osterlitz

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Credits and acknowledgments borrowed from other sources and reproduced, with permission, in this textbook appear on appropriate page within text. Microsoft’ and Windows* are registered trademarks of the Microsoft Corporation in the U.S.A. and other countries. Screen shots and icons reprinted with permission from the Microsoft Corporation. This book is not sponsored or endorsed by or affiliated with the Microsoft Corporation. Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Prentice Hall. All lights reserved. Manufactured in the United States of America. This publication is protected by Copyright, and permission should be obtained from the publisher prior to any prohibited reproduction, storage in a retrieval system, or transmission in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or likewise. To obtain permission(s) to use material from this work, please submit a written request to Pearson Education, Inc., Permissions Department, Upper Saddle River, New Jersey, 07458 Many of the designations by manufacturers and seller to distinguish their products are claimed as trademarks. Where those designations appear in this book, and the publisher was aware of a trademark claim, the designations have been printed in initial caps or all caps.

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Contents in Brief

Common Features Chapter 1 Common Features ot Office 2010 2

More Skills 26

Word Chapter 1 Create Documents with Word 2010 30

More Skills 54 Chapter 2 Format and Organize Text 64

More Skills 88 Chapter 3 Work with Graphics, Tabs, and Tables 98

More Skills 122 Chapter 4 Apply Special Text, Paragraph and

Document Formats 132 More Skills 156

Excel Chapter 1 Create Workbooks with Excel 2010 166

More Skills 190

Chapter 2 Create Charts 200 More Skills 224

Chapter 3 Manage Multiple Worksheets 234 More Skills 258

Chapter 4 Use Excel Functions and Tables 268 More Skills 292

Access Chapter 1 Work with Databases and

Create Tables 302 More Skills 326

Chapter 2 M a n a g e Datasheets and Create Queries 336 More Skills 360

Chapter 3 Create Forms 370 More Skills 394

Chapter 4 Create Reports 404 More Skills 428

PowerPoint Chapter 1 Getting Started with PowerPoint 2010 438

More Skills 462 Chapter 2 Format a Presentation 472

More Skills 496 Chapter 3 Enhance Presentations with Graphics 506

More Skills 530 Chapter 4 Present Data Using Tables, Charts,

and Animation 540 More Skills 564

Integrated Projects Chapter 1 Integrating Word, Excel, A c c e s s ,

and PowerPoint 574 More Skills 598

Chapter 2 More Integrated Projects for Word, Excel, A c c e s s , and PowerPoint 610 More Skills 634

Glossary 646

Index 654

Contents in Brief iii

Table of Contents

C o m m o n Fea tu res C h a p t e r 1 C o m m o n F e a t u r e s of Office 2 0 1 0 2

Skill 1 Start Word and Navigate the Word Window 6 Skill 2 Start Excel and PowerPoint and Work with

Multiple Windows 8 Skill 3 Save Files in New Folders 10 Skill 4 Print and Save Documents 12 Skill 5 Open Student Data Files and Save Copies

Using Save As 14 Skill 6 Type and Edit Text 16 Skill 7 Cut, Copy, and Paste Text 18 Skill 8 Format Text and Paragraphs 20 Skill 9 Use the Ribbon 22

Skill 10 Use Shortcut Menus and Dialog Boxes 24

More Skills More Skills 11 Capture Screens with the Snipping

Tool 26 More Skills 12 Use Microsoft Office Help 26 More Skills 13 Organize Files 26 More Skills 14 Save Documents to Windows Live 26

W o r d C h a p t e r 1 C r e a t e D o c u m e n t s with Word 2 0 1 0 3 0

Skill 1 Create New Documents and Enter Text 34 Skill 2 Edit Text and Use Keyboard Shortcuts 36 Skill 3 Select Text 38 Skill 4 Insert Text from Other Documents 40 Skill 5 Change Fonts, Font Sizes, and Font Styles 42 Skill 6 Insert and Work with Graphics 44 Skill 7 Check Spelling and Grammar 46 Skill 8 Use the Thesaurus and Set Proofing Options 48 Skill 9 Create Document Footers 50

Skill 10 Work with the Print Page and Save Documents in Other Formats 52

More Skills More Skills 11 Split and Arrange Windows 54 More Skills 12 Insert Symbols 54 More Skills 13 Use Collect and Paste to Create a

Document 54 More Skills 14 Insert Screen Shots into Documents 54

C h a p t e r 2 Format a n d O r g a n i z e Text 6 4 Skill 1 Set Document Margins 68 Skill 2 Align Text and Set Indents 70 Skill 3 Modify Line and Paragraph Spacing 72 Skill 4 Format Text Using Format Painter 74 Skill 5 Find and Replace Text 76 Skill 6 Create Bulleted and Numbered Lists 78 Skill 7 Insert and Format Headers and Footers 80 Skill 8 Insert and Modify Footnotes 82 Skill 9 Add Citations 84

Skill 10 Create Bibliographies 86

More Skills More Skills 11 Record AutoCorrect Entries 88 More Skills 12 Use AutoFormat to Create

Numbered Lists 88 More Skills 13 Format and Customize Lists 88 More Skills 14 Manage Document Properties 88

C h a p t e r 3 Work with G r a p h i c s , Tabs , a n d T a b l e s 9 8

Skill 1 Insert Pictures from Files 102 Skill 2 Resize and Move Pictures 104 Skill 3 Format Pictures Using Styles and

Artistic Effects 106 Skill 4 Set Tab Stops 108 Skill 5 Enter Text with Tab Stops 110 Skill 6 Apply Table Styles 112 Skill 7 Create Tables 114 Skill 8 Add Rows and Columns to Tables H6 Skill 9 Format Text in Table Cells 118

Skill 10 Format Tables 120

iv Table of Contents

More Skills More Skills 11 Insert Text Boxes 122 More Skills 12 Format with WordArt 122 More Skills 13 Create Tables from Existing Lists 122 More Skills 14 Insert Drop Caps 122

C h a p t e r 4 A p p l y S p e c i a l T e x t , P a r a g r a p h , a n d D o c u m e n t F o r m a t s 1 3 2

Skill 1 Create Multiple-Column Text 136 Skill 2 Insert a Column Break 138 Skill 3 Apply and Format Text Effects 140 Skill 4 Use and Create Quick Styles 142 Skill 5 Add Borders and Shading to Paragraphs

and Pages 144 Skill 6 Insert and Format Clip Art Graphics 146 Skill 7 Insert SmartArt Graphics 148 Skill 8 Format SmartArt Graphics 150 Skill 9 Create Labels Using Mail Merge 152

Skill 10 Preview and Print Mail Merge Documents 154

More Skil ls More Skills 11 More Skills 12 More Skills 13 More Skills 14

Create Resumes from Templates 156 Create Outlines 156 Prepare Documents for Distribution 156 Preview and Save Documents as Web Pages 156

Exce l C h a p t e r 1 C r e a t e W o r k b o o k s w i t h

Exce l 2 0 1 0 Skill 1 Create and Save New Workbooks Skill 2 Enter Worksheet Data and Merge and

Center Titles Skill 3 Construct Addition and

Subtraction Formulas Skill 4 Construct Multiplication and

Division Formulas Skill 5 Adjust Column Widths and Apply Cell Styles Skill 6 Use the SUM Function Skill 7 Copy Formulas and Functions

Using the Fill Handle

1 6 6 170

Skill 8 Format, Edit, and Check the Spelling of Data 184 Skill 9 Create Footers and Change Page Settings 186

Skill 10 Display and Print Formulas and Scale Worksheets for Printing

More Skil ls More Skills 11

More Skills 12 More Skills 13 More Skills 14

Create New Workbooks from Templates Use Range Names in Formulas Change Themes Manage Document Properties

C h a p t e r 2 Skill 1 Skill 2

Skill 3 Skill 4 Skill 5 Skill 6 Skill 7

Skill 8

Skill 9 Skill 10

C r e a t e C h a r t s Open Existing Workbooks and Align Text Construct and Copy Formulas Containing Absolute Cell References Format Numbers Create Column Charts Format Column Charts Create Pie Charts and Chart Sheets Apply 3-D Effects and Rotate Pie Chart Slices Explode and Color Pie Slices, and Insert Text Boxes Update Charts and Insert WordArt Prepare Chart Sheets for Printing

More Ski l ls More Skills 11 More Skills 12 More Skills 13

Insert and Edit Comments Change Chart Types Copy Excel Data to Word Documents

More Skills 14 Fill Series Data into Worksheet Cells

188

190 190 190 190

2 0 0 204

206 208 210 212 214

216

218 220 222

224 224

224

224

172 C h a p t e r 3 M a n a g e M u l t i p l e W o r k s h e e t s 2 3 4

172 Skill 1 Work with Sheet Tabs 238

174 Skill 2 Enter and Format Dates 240 174 Skill 3 Clear Cell Contents and Formats 242

176 Skill 4 Move, Copy, Paste, and Paste Options 244

178 Skill 5 Work with Grouped Worksheets 246

180 Skill 6 Use Multiple Math Operators in a Formula 248 Skill 7 Format Grouped Worksheets 250

182 Skill 8 Insert and Move Worksheets 252

Table of Contents v

Skill 9 Construct Formulas That Refer to Cells in Other Worksheets 254

Skill 10 Create Clustered Bar Charts 256

More Skills More Skills 11 Create Organization Charts 258 More Skills 12 Create Line Charts 258 More Skills 13 Set and Clear Print Areas 258 More Skills 14 Insert Hyperlinks 258

C h a p t e r 4 U s e Exce l F u n c t i o n s a n d T a b l e s 2 6 8 Skill 1 Use the SUM and AVERAGE Functions 272 Skill 2 Use the MIN and MAX Functions 274 Skill 3 Move Ranges with Functions,

Add Borders, and Rotate Text 276 Skill 4 Use the IF Function 278 Skill 5 Apply Conditional Formatting with

Custom Formats, Data Bars, and Sparklines 280 Skill 6 Use Find and Replace and Insert

the NOW Function 282 Skill 7 Freeze and Unfreeze Panes 284 Skill 8 Create and Sort Excel Tables 286 Skill 9 Use the Search Filter in Excel Tables 288

Skill 10 Convert Tables to Ranges, Hide Rows and Columns, and Format Large Worksheets 290

More Skills More Skills 11 Apply Conditional Color Scales

with Top and Bottom Rules 292 More Skills 12 Use the Payment (PMT) Function 292 More Skills 13 Create PivotTable Reports 292 More Skills 14 Use Goal Seek 292

A c c e s s C h a p t e r 1 Work with D a t a b a s e s

a n d C r e a t e T a b l e s 3 0 2 Skill 1 Open and Organize Existing Databases 306 Skill 2 Enter and Edit Table Data 308 Skill 3 Create Forms and Enter Data 310 Skill 4 Filter Data in Queries 312 Skill 5 Create, Preview, and Print Reports 314 Skill 6 Create Databases and Tables 316

vi Table of Contents

Skill 7 Change Data Types and Other Field Properties 318

Skill 8 Create Tables in Design View 320 Skill 9 Relate Tables 322

Skill 10 Enter Data in Related Tables 324

More Skills More Skills 11 Compact and Repair Databases 326 More Skills 12 Import Data from Excel 326 More Skills 13 Work with the Attachment Data

Type 326 More Skills 14 Work with the Hyperlink

and Yes/No Data Types 326

C h a p t e r 2 M a n a g e D a t a s h e e t s a n d C r e a t e Q u e r i e s 3 3 6

Skill 1 Find and Replace Data 340 Skill 2 Filter and Sort Datasheets 342 Skill 3 Use the Simple Query Wizard 344 Skill 4 Format Datasheets 346 Skill 5 Add Date and Time Criteria 348 Skill 6 Create Queries in Design View 350 Skill 7 Add Calculated Fields to Queries 352 Skill 8 Work with Logical Criteria 354 Skill 9 Add Wildcards to Query Criteria 356

Skill 10 Group and Total Queries 358

More Skills More Skills 11 Export Queries to Other Fie Formats 360 More Skills 12 Find Duplicate Records 360 More Skills 13 Find Unmatched Records 360 More Skills 14 Create Crosstab Queries 360

C h a p t e r 3 C r e a t e Forms 3 7 0 Skill 1 Use the Form Wizard 374 Skill 2 Format Forms in Layout View 376 Skill 3 Use Forms to Modify Data 378 Skill 4 Use the Blank Form Tool 380 Skill 5 Customize Form Layouts 382 Skill 6 Add Input Masks 384 Skill 7 Apply Conditional Formatting 386 Skill 8 Create One-to-Many Forms 388 Skill 9 Enter Data Using One-to-Many Forms 390

Skill 10 Create Forms from Queries 392

More Skills More Skills 11 Validate Fields 394 More Skills 12 Add Combo Boxes to Forms 394 More Skills 13 Create Multiple Item Forms 394 More Skills 14 Create Macros 394

C h a p t e r 4 C r e a t e R e p o r t s 4 0 4 Skill 1 Create Reports and Apply Themes 408 Skill 2 Modify Report Layouts 410 Skill 3 Prepare Reports for Printing 412 Skill 4 Use the Blank Report Tool 414 Skill 5 Group and Sort Reports 416 Skill 6 Format and Filter Reports 418 Skill 7 Create Label Reports 420 Skill 8 Use the Report Wizard 422 Skill 9 Modify Layouts in Design View 424

Skill 10 Add Totals and Labels to Reports 426

More Skills More Skills 11 Export Reports to Word 428 More Skills 12 Export Reports to HTML Documents 428 More Skills 13 Create Parameter Queries 428 More Skills 14 Create Reports for Parameter Queries 428

PowerPo in t C h a p t e r 1 G e t t i n g S t a r t e d w i t h

P o w e r P o i n t 2 0 1 0 4 3 8 Skill 1 Open, View, and Save Presentations 442 Skill 2 Edit and Replace Text in Normal View 444 Skill 3 Format Slide Text 446 Skill 4 Check Spelling and Use the Thesaurus 448 Skill 5 Insert Slides and Modify Slide Layouts 450 Skill 6 Insert and Format Pictures 452 Skill 7 Organize Slides Using Slide Sorter View 454 Skill 8 Apply Slide Transitions and View Slide Shows 456 Skill 9 Insert Headers and Footers

and Print Presentation Handouts 458 Skill 10 Add Notes Pages and Print Notes 460

More Skil ls More Skills 11 Type Text in the Outline Tab 462 More Skills 12 Use Keyboard Shortcuts 462

More Skills 13 Move and Delete Slides in Normal View 462

More Skills 14 Design Presentations for Audience and Location 462

C h a p t e r 2 F o r m a t a P r e s e n t a t i o n 4 7 2 Skill 1 Create New Presentations 476 Skill 2 Change Presentation Themes 478 Skill 3 Apply Font and Color Themes 480 Skill 4 Format Slide Backgrounds with Styles 482 Skill 5 Format Slide Backgrounds with Pictures

and Textures 484 Skill 6 Format Text with WordArt 486 Skill 7 Change Character Spacing and Font Color 488 Skill 8 Modify Bulleted and Numbered Lists 490 Skill 9 Move and Copy Text and Objects 492

Skill 10 Use Format Painter and Clear All Formatting Commands 494

More Skil ls More Skills 11 Edit Slide Master 496 More Skills 12 Save and Apply Presentation

Template 496 More Skills 13 Create Slides from Microsoft Word

Outline 496 More Skills 14 Design Presentations with Contrast 496

C h a p t e r 3 E n h a n c e P r e s e n t a t i o n s w i t h G r a p h i c s 5 0 6

Skill 1 Insert Slides from Other Presentations 510 Skill 2 Insert, Size, and Move Clip Art 512 Skill 3 Modify Picture Shapes, Borders, and Effects 514 Skill 4 Insert, Size, and Move Shapes 516 Ski l l5 Add Text to Shapes and Insert Text Boxes 518 Skill 6 Apply Gradient Fills and Group

and Align Graphics 520 Skill 7 Convert Text to SmartArt Graphics

and Add Shapes 522 Skill 8 Modify SmartArt Layouts, Colors, and Styles 524 Skill 9 Insert Video Files 526

Skill 10 Apply Video Styles and Adjust Videos 528

More Skil ls More Skills 11 Compress Pictures 530

Table of Contents vii

More Skills 12 Save Groups as Picture Files 530 More Skills 13 Change Object Order 530 More Skills 14 Design Presentations Using

Appropriate Graphics 530

C h a p t e r 4 P r e s e n t D a t a U s i n g T a b l e s , C h a r t s , a n d A n i m a t i o n 5 4 0

Skill 1 Insert Tables 544 Skill 2 Modify Table Layouts 546 Skill 3 Apply Table Styles 548 Skill 4 Insert Column Charts 550 Skill 5 Edit and Format Charts 552 Skill 6 Insert Pie Charts 554 Skill 7 Apply Animation Entrance

and Emphasis Effects 556 Skill 8 Modify Animation Timing

and Use Animation Painter 558 Skill 9 Remove Animation and Modify Duration 560

Skill 10 Navigate Slide Shows 562

More Ski l ls More Skills 11 Prepare Presentations to be Viewed

Using Office PowerPoint Viewer 564 More Skills 12 Insert Hyperlinks in a Presentation 564 More Skills 13 Create Photo Albums 564 More Skills 14 Design Presentations with

Appropriate Animation 564

I n t e g r a t e d Pro jec ts C h a p t e r 1 I n t e g r a t i n g W o r d , E x c e l , A c c e s s ,

a n d P o w e r P o i n t 5 7 4 Skill 1 Move Text between Word Documents 578 Skill 2 Apply Heading Styles in Word 580 Skill 3 Create a PowerPoint Presentation

from a Word Document 582 Skill 4 Insert and Modify a Shape in PowerPoint 584 Skill 5 Import a Word Table into

an Excel Workbook 586 Skill 6 Insert a Shape from PowerPoint into Word

and Excel 588 Skill 7 Create and Work with an Excel Table 590

viii Table of Contents

Skill 8 Link Data between Office Applications Using O L E

Skill 9 Create Envelopes Using Data from Access Skill 10 Create Name Tags Using Data in Excel

More Ski l ls More Skills 11 Insert Subtotals in Excel and

Link Data to a Word Document More Skills 12 Insert Slides from Another

Presentation More Skills 13 Move and Copy Excel Worksheets

and Consolidate Data More Skills 14 Compare Shared Excel Workbooks

C h a p t e r 2

Skill 1 Skill 2 Skill 3 Skill 4

Skill 5

Skill 6 Skill 7

Skill 8 Skill 9

M o r e I n t e g r a t e d P r o j e c t s f o r W o r d , E x c e l , A c c e s s , a n d P o w e r P o i n t Create an Access Append Query Export Data from Access into Excel Create an Excel PivotTable Report Create External References between Excel Workbooks Insert a SmartArt Organization Chart into PowerPoint Insert an Excel PivotTable into PowerPoint Insert a PowerPoint Outline in Word and Create a Cover Page and Table of Contents Link and Embed Data from Excel into Word Export Data from Access to an R T F File and Insert the File into Word Insert Objects from PowerPoint into Word Skill 10

kills More Skills 11 Create an Excel PivotChart

and Link the PivotChart to Word More Skills 12 Create a Hyperlink between

PowerPoint, Word, and Excel Files More Skills 13 Insert a Total Row in an Excel Table

and Link the Table to PowerPoint More Skills 14 Compare Word Documents

Glossary

592 594 596

598

598

598 598

6 1 0 614 616 618

620

622 624

626 628

630 632

634

634

634 634

646

Index 654

About the Authors Kris Townsend is an Information Systems instructor at Spokane Falls Community College in Spokane, Washington. Kris earned a bachelor’s degree in both Education and Business, and a master’s degree in Education. He has also worked as a public school teacher and as a systems analyst. Kris enjoys working with wood, snowboarding, and camping. He commutes to work by bike and enjoys long road rides in the Palouse country south of Spokane.

1

Robert L. Ferrett recently retired as the Director of the Center for Instructional Computing at Eastern Michigan University, where he provided computer training and support to faculty. He has authored or co-authored more than 70 books on Access, PowerPoint, Excel, Publisher, WordPerfect, Windows, and Word. He has been designing, developing, and delivering computer workshops for more than two decades.

Catherine Hain is an instructor at Central New Mexico Community College in Albuquerque, New Mexico. She teaches computer applications classes in the Business and Information Technology School, both in the classroom and through the distance learning office. Catherine holds a bachelor’s degree in Management and Marketing and a master’s degree in Business Administration.

f t Alicia Vargas is an Associate Professor of Business Information Technology at Pasadena City College in California. She holds a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in Business Education from California State University, Los Angeles and has authored numerous textbooks and training materials on Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel, and Microsoft PowerPoint.

A Special Thank You Pearson Prentice Hall gratefully acknowledges the contribution made by Shelley Gaskin to the first edition publication of this series—Skills for Success with Office 2007. The series has truly benefited from her dedication toward developing a textbook that aims to help students and instructors.We thank her for her continued support of this series.

About the Authors ix

Contributors We’d like to thank the following people for their work on Skills for Success:

Instructor Resource Authors Erich Adickes Parkland College Sharon Behrens Northeast Wisconsin Technical College Julie Boyles Portland Community College Barbara Edington St. Francis College Ranida Harris Indiana University Southeast Beth Hendrick Lake Sumter Community College Susan Holland Southeast Community College—Nebraska Andrea Leinbach Harrisburg Area Community College Yvonne Leonard Coastal Carolina Community College

Technical Editors Lisa Bucki Kelly Carling Hilda W i r t h Federico Jacksonville University Tom Lightner Missouri State University Elizabeth Lockley Joyce Nielsen

Reviewers Darrell Abbey Cascadia Community College Bridget I . Archer Oakton Community College Laura Aagard Sierra College John Alcorcha MTI College Barry Andrews Miami Dade College Natalie Andrews Miami Dade College Wilma Andrews Virginia Commonwealth University School

of Business Bridget Archer Oakton Community College Tahir Aziz J. Sargeant Reynolds Greg Balinger Miami Dade College Terry Bass University of Massachusetts, Lowell Lisa Beach Santa Rosa Junior College Rocky Belcher Sinclair Community College Nannette Biby Miami Dade College David Billings Guilford Technical Community College Brenda K. Br i t t Fayetteville Technical Community College Alisa Brown Pulaski Technical College Eric Cameron Passaic Community College

x Contributors

Trina Maurer Anthony Nowakowski Ernest Gines Stacey Gee Hollins John Purcell Ann Rowlette Amanda Shelton Steve St. John Joyce Thompson Karen Wisniewski

Georgia Virtual Technical College Buffalo State College Tarrant County College—Southeast St. Louis Community College—Meramec Castleton State College Liberty University J. Sargeant Reynolds Tulsa Community College Lehigh Carbon Community College County College of Morris

Janet Pickard Linda Pogue Steve Rubin Eric Sabbah Jan Snyder Mara Zebest

Chattanooga State Tech Community College Northwest Arkansas Community College California State University—Monterey Bay

Gene Carbonaro Trey Cherry Kim Childs Pualine Chohonis Lennie Coper Tara Cipriano Paulette Comet

Gail W . Cope Susana Contreras de Finch Chris Corbin Janis Cox Tomi Crawford Martin Cronlund Jennifer Day Ralph DeArazoza Carol Decker Loorna DeDuluc Caroline Delcourt

Long Beach City College Edgecombe Community College Bethany University Miami Dade College Miami Dade College Gateway Technical College Community College of Baltimore

Coun ty—Ca to nsville Sinclair Community College College of Southern Nevada Miami Dade College Tri-County Technical College Miami Dade College Anne Arundel Community College Sinclair Community College Miami Dade College Montgomery College Miami Dade College Black Hawk College

Contributors continued

Michael Discello Kevin Duggan Barbara Edington Donna Ehrhart Hilda Wirth Federico Tushnelda Fernandez Arlene Flerchinger Hedy Fossenkemper Kent Foster Penny Foster-Shiver Arlene Franklin George Gabb Barbara Garrell Deb Geoghan Jessica Gilmore Victor Giol Melinda Glander Linda Glassburn Deb Gross Rachelle Hall Marie Hartlein Diane Hartman Betsy Headrick Patrick Healy

Lindsay Henning Kermelle Hensley Diana Hill Rachel Hinton Mary Carole Hollingsworth Stacey Gee Hollins Bill Holmes Steve Holtz Margaret M. Hvatum Joan Ivey Dr. Dianna D. Johnson Kay Johnston Warren T. Jones, Sr. Sally Kaskocsak Renuka Kumar Kathy McKee Hazel Kates Gerald Kearns

Pittsburgh Technical Institute Midlands Technical Community College St. Francis College Genesee Community College Jacksonville University Miami Dade College Chattanooga State Tech Community College Paradise Valley Community College Withrop University Anne Arundel Community College Bucks County Community College Miami Dade College Delaware County Community College Bucks County Community College Highline Community College Miami Dade College Northmetro Technical College Cuyahoga Community College, West Ohio State University Glendale Community College Montgomery County Community College Utah Valley State College Chattanooga State Northern Virginia Community

College—Woodbridge Yavapai College Columbus Technical College Chesapeake College Broome Community College GA Perimeter St. Louis Community College—Meramec Chandler-Gilbert Community College University of Minnesota Duluth St. Louis Community College Lanier Technical College North Metro Technical College Columbia Basin College University of Alabama at Birmingham Sinclair Community College Community College of Baltimore County North Metro Technical College Miami Dade College Forsyth Technical Community College

Charles Kellermann

John Kidd Chris Kinnard Kelli Kleindorfer Kurt Kominek Dianne Kotokoff Cynthia Krebs Jean Lacoste Gene Laugh rey David LeBron Kaiyang Liang Linda Lindaman Felix Lopez Nicki Maines Cindy Manning Patri Mays Norma McKenzie Lee McKinley Sandy McCormack Eric Meyer Kathryn Miller

Gloria A. Morgan Kathy Morris Linda Moulton Ryan Murphy Stephanie Murre Wolf Jackie Myers Dell Najera

Scott Nason Paula Neal Bethanne Newman Eloise Newsome

Karen Nunan Ellen Orr Carol Ottaway Denise Passero Americus Pavese James Gordon Patterson Cindra Phillips

Northern Virginia Community College—Woodbridge

Tarrant County Community College Miami Dade College American Institute of Business NE State Tech Community College Lanier Technical College Utah Valley University Virginia Tech Northern Oklahoma College Miami Dade College Miami Dade College Black Hawk College Miami Dade College Mesa Community College Big Sandy Community and Technical College Paradise Valley Community College El Paso Community College GA Perimeter Monroe Community College Miami Dade College Big Sandy Community and Technical College,

Pike Ville Campus Monroe Community College University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa Montgomery County Community College Sinclair Community College Moraine Park Technical College Sinclair Community College El Paso Community College, Valle Verde

Campus Rowan Cabarrus Community College Sinclair Community College Paradise Valley Community College Northern Virginia Community

College—Woodbridge Northeast State Technical Community College Seminole Community College Chemeketa Community College Fulton-Montgomery Community College Community College of Baltimore County Paradise Valley Community College Clark State CC

Contributors

Contributors continued

Janet Pickard Chattanooga State Tech Community College Diane Stark Phoenix College Floyd Pittman Miami Dade College Neil Stenlund Northern Virginia Community College Melissa Prinzing Sierra College Linda Stoudemayer Lamar Institute of Technology Pat Rahmlow Montgomery County Community College Pamela Stovall Forsyth Technical Community College Mary Rasley Lehigh Carbon Community College Linda Switzer Highline Community College Scott Rosen Santa Rosa Junior College Margaret Taylor College of Southern Nevada Ann Rowlette Liberty University Martha Taylor Sinclair Community College Kamaljeet Sanghera George Mason University Michael M. Taylor Seattle Central Community College June Scott County College of Morris Roseann Thomas Fayetteville Tech Community College Janet Sebesy Cuyahoga Community College Ingrid Thompson-Sellers GA Perimeter Jennifer Sedelmeyer Broome Community College Daniel Thomson Keiser University Kelly SellAnne Arundel Community College Astrid Hoy Todd Guilford Technical Community College Teresa Sept College of Southern Idaho Barb Tollinger Sinclair Community College Pat Serrano Scottsdale Community College Cathy Urbanski Chandler Gilbert Community College Amanda Shelton J. Sargeant Reynolds Sue Van Boven Paradise Valley Community College Gary Sibbits St. Louis Community College—Meramec Philip Vavalides Guildford Technical Community College Janet Siert Ellsworth Community College Pete Vetere Montgomery County Community College— Robert Sindt Johnson County Community College West Campus Karen Smith Technical College of the Lowcountry Asteria Villegas Monroe College Robert Smolenski Delaware County Community College Michael Walton Miami Dade College Robert Sindt Johnson County Community College Teri Weston Harford Community College Gary R. Smith Paradise Valley Community College Julie Wheeler Sinclair Community College Patricia Snyder Midlands Technical College Debbie Wood Western Piedmont Community College Pamela Sorensen Santa Rosa Junior College Thomas Yip Passaic Community College Eric Stadnik Santa Rosa Junior College Lindy Young Sierra Community College Mark Stanchfield Rochester Community and Technical College Matt Zullo Wake Technical Community College

xii Contributors

I n s t r u c t o r s – Y o u a s k e d for it s o h e r e it is!

A M i c r o s o f t ® O f f i c e t e x t b o o k t h a t r e c o g n i z e s h o w s t u d e n t s l e a r n t o d a y –

Skills for Success with Microsoft

1 Office 2010 Volume 1

10 X 8.5 F o r m a t – Easy for students to read and type at the same time by simply propping the book up on the desk in front of their monitor

Clear ly Out l ined Sk i l l s – Each skill is presented in a single two-page spread so that students can easily follow along

Numbered S t e p s and Bul le ted Tex t – Students don’t read long paragraphs or text, but they will read information presented concisely

Easy-to-Find S t u d e n t Da ta Fi les – Visual key shows students how to locate and interact with their data files

S t a r t H e r e – Students know exactly where to start and what their starting file will look like

C H A P T E R

G e t t i n g S t a r t e d w i t h W i n d o w s 7 » YOU BK WINDOW 7 ro «CRK M I »F-JF IOM?«L« LOF RUINR-V.*™ PFLNJMN MO»»T*N>WN

MDAU mi mm • J- : >O-L

» IR WIND H I • >\XI OIJJAIZ* TOUR *»RK BV CNUR-J FILCI ir\i PUNNJ THOW tU« WIS FOLDCRI IHJIYAU

Your ilartlng » c r e « n will look Ilk* this: S K I L L !

chapter, you will be

S k i l l s L is t – A visual snapshot of what skills they will complete in the chapter

O u t c o m e – Shows students up front what their completed project will look like

You will tdvo your filoi a t :

T J H N M I M H7_S«II| ‘ ‘

S e q u e n t i a l P a g i n a t i o n – Saves you and your students time in locating topics and assignments I

VISUAL WALK-THROUGH XIII

Skills for Success l ock – Tells how much time students

need to complete the chapter

Introduct ion

• KM US TUNTNW *IR*I fie, 01 FGWRN INTO 4 «IR J .: -I—. IT…. I AIULT :;I N..I..: .:

• MIMIJ-»TT*IIHDR»«U««IJI;UIF.:M*NJFOU« |*:R-P<TKF* T > ffirt IN NUJX ITXFFL R»»I« IN RI«J

t Written for T o d a y ‘ s S t u d e n t s – skills are taught with numbered steps and bulleted text so students are less likely to skip valuable information T w o – P a g e S p r e a d s – Each skill is

presented on a two-page spread to help students keep up their momentum

* TITTR.TI bim irii mug], TU L>«

_ J

D a t a Files Are a S n a p – Students can now find their files easier than ever before with this visual map

C o l o r e d Text – Clearly shows what a student types

Hands-On – Students start actually working on their skills from Step 1

D o n e ! – Students always know when they’ve completed a skill

XIV VISUAL WALK-THROUGH

Skills for S u c c e s s

UorsSkJh © U M l d t o m i o C k g c n n f M

End-o f -Chapte r M a t e r i a l – Several levels of assessment so you can assign the material that best fits your students’ needs

M o r e S k i l l s – Additional skills included online

K e y T e r m s O n l i n e H e l p Sk i l ls

Midi .. – .! -.. I – :T.

O n l i n e P r o j e c t – Students practice using Microsoft Help online to help prepare them for using the applications on their own

H > u » i « i i HI

•.m • m •

Visual Walk-Through xv

Skills for S u c c e s s

Al l V i d e o s

a n d I n s t r u c t o r m a t e r i a l s

a v a i l a b l e o n t h e I R C D

Instructor Mater ia ls

I n s t r u c t o r ‘ s M a n u a l – Teaching tips and additional resources for each chapter

A s s i g n m e n t S h e e t s – Lists all the assignments for the chapter, you just add in the course information, due dates and points. Providing these to students ensures they will know what is due and when

S c r i p t e d L e c t u r e s – Classroom lectures prepared for you

A n n o t a t e d S o l u t i o n F i l e s – Coupled with the scoring rubrics, these create a grading and scoring system that makes grading so much easier for you

P o w e r P o i n t L e c t u r e s – PowerPoint presentations for each chapter

P r e p a r e d E x a m s – Exams for each chapter and for each application

S c o r i n g R u b r i c s – Can be used either by students to check their work or by you as a quick check-off for the items that need to be corrected

S y l l a b u s T e m p l a t e s – for 8-week, 12-week, and 16-week courses

T e s t B a n k – Includes a variety of test questions for each chapter

C o m p a n i o n W e b S i t e – Online content such as the More Skills Projects, Online Study Guide, Glossary, and Student Data Files are all at www.pearsonhighered.com/skills

xvi Visual Walk-Throughhttp://www.pearsonhighered.com/skills

with M ic roso f t

Office 2010 V O L U M E 1

C H A P T E R J Common Features of Office 2010 • The programs in Microsoft Office 2010—Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Access—share common

tools that you use in a consistent, easy-to-learn manner.

• Common tasks include opening and saving files, entering and formatting text, and printing your work.

Your starting screen will look like this: SKILLS SKILLS 1 – 1 0 TRAINING Umt Insert Pjgt 1

C M M mailt – 1 1 – * 41 IT

«3f»or>

AaBtccJK AaBbCcIK A A B B G .-YABBCC

‘ Items’ “Mo:ca; . rtfacmgl H*jding2 ChtDQt

Past 1 ol I Wmdi 0

A t t h e e n d o f t h i s chapter , y o u w i l l be a b l e t o :

Skill 1 Start Word and Navigate the Word Window Skill 2 Start Excel and PowerPoint and Work with

Multiple Windows Skill 3 Save Files in New Folders Skill 4 Print and Save Documents Skill 5 Open Student Data Files and Save Copies

Using Save As Skill 6 Type and Edit Text Skill 7 Cut, Copy, and Paste Text Skill 8 Format Text and Paragraphs Skill 9 Use the Ribbon Skill 10 Use Shortcut Menus and Dialog Boxes

MORE SKILLS

More Skills 11 Capture Screens with the Snipping Tool More Skills 12 Use Microsoft Office Help More Skills 13 Organize Files More Skills 14 Save Documents to Windows Live

2 C O M M O N FEATURES OF OFFICE 2 0 1 0 | C O M M O N FEATURES C H A P T E R 1

Outcome Using the skills listed to the left will enable you to create documents similar to this:

Visit Aspen Falls! A s p e n F a l l s o v e r l o o k s t h e P a c i f i c O c e a n

a n d is s u r r o u n d e d b y m a n y v i n e y a r d s a n d

w i n e r i e s . O c e a n r e c r e a t i o n is a c c e s s e d

p r i m a r i l y a t D u r a n g o C o u n t y P a r k . T h e

A s p e n L a k e R e c r e a t i o n A r e a p r o v i d e s y e a r

r o u n d f r e s h w a t e r r e c r e a t i o n a n d is t h e

c i t y ‘ s l a r g e s t p a r k .

Local Attractions • W i n e C o u n t r y

o W i n e Tas t ing Tou rs

o Winer ies

• W o r d s w o r t h Fel lowship Museum of A r t

• Du rango C o u n t y M u s e u m of H is to ry

• Conven t ion Center

• A r t Galleries

• Gl ider T o u r s

Aspen Fallc Annual Events • Annua l Starving Artists Sidewalk Sale

• A n n u a l W i n e Festival

• C inco de Mayo

• Vintage Car S h o w

• Her i tage D a y Parade

• Harvest Days

• A m a t e u r Bike Races

• Farmer ‘s Market

• Aspen Lake Nature Cruises

• Aspen Falls T r ia th lon

• Tas te of Aspen Falls

• W i n t e r Blues Festival

Contact Y o u r N a m e for more informat ion.

Common Features of Office 2010

You will save your files as: Lastname_Firstname_cfO 1 _Visit 1 Lastname_Firstname_cfO l_Visit2 Lastname_Firstname_cf01_Visit3

Common Features Chapter 1 | Common Features of Office 2010 3

In t h i s c h a p t e r , y o u w i l l c r e a t e d o c u m e n t s f o r t h e A s p e n F a l l s C i t y

H a l l , w h i c h p r o v i d e s e s s e n t i a l s e r v i c e s f o r t h e c i t i z e n s a n d v i s i t o r s o f

A s p e n F a l l s , C a l i f o r n i a .

C o m m o n Features of Of f ice 2 0 1 0 • Microsoft Office is the most common software used to create and share

personal and business documents.

• Microsoft Office is a suite o f several programs—Word, PowerPoint, Excel, Access, and others—that each have a special purpose.

• Because of the consistent design and layout o f Microsoft Office, when you learn to use one Microsoft Office program, you can use most o f those skil ls when working wi th the other Microsoft Office programs.

• T h e files you create w i t h Microsoft Office need to be named and saved in locations where they can be easily found when you need them.

C o m m o n F e a t u r e s o f O f f i c e 2 0 1 0 | C o m m o n F e a t u r e s C h a p t e r 1

Time to complete all 10 skills – 50 to 90 minutes

Find your student data files here:

Student data files needed for this chapter:

« cf01_Visit

• cf01_Visit_Events

cfOl Visit River

C O M M O N FEATURES C H A P T E R 1 | C O M M O N FEATURES OF OFFICE 2 0 1 0 5

• The Word 2010 program can be launched by clicking the Start button, and then locating and clicking the Microsoft Word 2010 command.

• When you start Word, a new blank document displays in which you can type text.

1. In the lower left corner of the desktop, click the Start button © .

2 . In the lower left corner of the Start menu, click the All Programs command, and then compare your screen with Figure 1 . –

The Microsoft Office folder is located in the All Programs folder. If you have several programs installed on your computer, you may need to scroll to see the Microsoft Office folder.

3 . Click the Microsoft Office folder, and then compare your screen with Figure 2. –

Below the Microsoft Office folder, commands that open various Office 2010 programs display.

4 . From the Start menu, under the Microsoft Office folder, click Microsoft Word 2010, and then wait a few moments for the Microsoft Word window to display.

5 . If necessary, in the upper right corner of the Microsoft Word window, click the Maximize button B| .

• C o n t i n u e t o t h e n e x t p a g e t o c o m p l e t e t h e s

6 Common Features of Office 2010 | Common Features Chapter 1

OotxMvtntx

Ptttuin All Programs folder list

(your list will be different)

Microsoft Office folder

Start button Figure 1

Adobe Acrobat 70 Professional Q Adcbe Designer 7.0 C Dtftuft Program; 9. DesHoe Gadget Gallery tr Internet Eiplorer Cj Window; Anytime Upgrade | | Window! DVD 1 M B . i Window, Fu ind Son

Window, Media Center Q Window! Media Pla/cr ‘ : Window! Update — XPSVI | Accn

Gamei

MOMSR Cflic SharePoi Startup

Microsoft Office folder

Office 2 0 1 0 programs (your

list may be different)

«•# Window! f a> and Sun • » Window, Media Center B Window! Media Player

Window! Update •4 XPS Viewer

l l l l l l l l l l Game!

Maintenance

Microsoft Office Aj Microsoft Access 2 0 1 0

• M.crcscfl tjcel 2 0 1 0 J3 • ‘ . – WoPath Dowgne. 2 0 1 0 X i r.l;rcsofl Inf cPaal FtCti M 0

N Microsoft OneNcle 2 0 1 0 0 MKicMfl Outlook 2 0 1 0

i_ Mjcroioft PowerPoint 2 3 1 0 _tj Microsoft Publnher 2 0 1 0 1 Microsoft SharePomt Workspace 21 4 lAcrcsoft Wort 2 0 1 0

Mcrosft Olf.ce 2 0 1 0 Tool!

M lhttp://Olf.ce

SKILL 1: Start Word and Navigate the Word Window

^ — — — i i !ni(rt fsgcUrrcut RefcuoM! M*!ingl P*.,f.> \

– CWtmlBon,. • u • A” A ‘ A.- ;=•!=•••> 51 “I V • A • c

AaBbCcOc AaBbCcCX AaBbCi A a B b C c r tioimil ‘ I no Sp»cl… Htadlng I Hf a&ng ? Cnarige

Ribbon tab E –

6 .

St)M» • -< * « ‘ « « •

J –

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On the Ribbon’s Home tab, in the Paragraph group, click the Show/Hide button H until it displays in gold indicating that it is active. Compare your screen with Figure 3 .

Above the blank Word document, the Quick Access Toolbar and Ribbon display. At the top of the Ribbon, a row of tab names display. Each Ribbon tab has buttons that you click to perform actions. The buttons are organized into groups that display their names along the bottom of the Ribbon.

In the document, the insertion point— a vertical line that indicates where text will be inserted when you start typing—flashes near the top left corner.

The Show/Hide button is a toggle button— a button used to turn a feature both on and off. The paragraph mark (f) indicates the end of a paragraph and will not print.

In the document, type your first and last names. As you type, notice that the insertion point and paragraph mark move to the right.

On the Home tab, in the Styles group, point to—but do not click—the Heading 1 thumbnail to show the Live Preview—a feature that displays the result of a formatting change if you select it.

Click the Heading 1 thumbnail to apply the formatting change as shown in Figure 4. If the Word Navigation Pane displays on the left side of the Word window, click its Close [*] button.

You have completed Skill 1 of 10

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Common Features Chapter 1 | Common Features of Office 2010 7

• When you open more than one Office program, each program displays in its own window.

• When you want to work with a program in a different window, you need to make it the active window.

1 . Click the Start button © , and then compare your screen with F i g u r e 1.

Your computer may be configured in such a way that you can open Office programs without opening the All Programs folder. The Office 2010 program commands may display as shortcuts in the Start menu’s pinned programs area or the recently used programs area. Your computer’s taskbar or desktop may also display icons that start each program.

2 . From the Start menu, locate and then click Microsoft Excel 2010. Depending on your computer, you may need to double-click—not single click—to launch Excel. Compare your screen with F i g u r e 2 . If necessary, click the Maximize – button mm\<

A new blank worksheet displays in a new window. The first cell—the box formed by the intersection of a row and column—is active as indicated by the thick, black border surrounding the cell. When you type in Excel, the text is entered into the active cell.

The Quick Access Toolbar displays above the spreadsheet. The Excel Ribbon has its own tabs and groups that you use to work with an Excel spreadsheet. Many of these tabs, groups, and buttons are similar to those found in Word.

On the taskbar, two buttons display—one for Word and one for Excel.

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3 . From the Start menu <PJ, locate and then click Microsoft PowerPoint 2010.

— Compare your screen with F i g u r e 3 . If necessary, Maximize N = M the Presentation 1 – Microsoft PowerPoint window.

A new, blank presentation opens in a new window. The PowerPoint window contains a slide in which you can type text. PowerPoint slides are designed to be displayed as you talk in front of a group of people.

4. In the upper right corner of the PowerPoint window, click the Close button fcgaj.

5. On the taskbar, click the Word button to make it the active window. With the insertion point flashing to the right of your name, press [Enter], and then type Skills for Success Common Features Chapter

6 . In the upper right corner of the Document 1 – Microsoft Word window, click the Minimize button

The Word window no longer displays, but its button is still available on the taskbar.

7 . With the Excel window active, in the first cell—cell A l — t y p e your first name. Press [Tab], and then type your last name.

Press (Enter), type =TODAY() and then press (Enter) to calculate the current date and to display it in the cell.

In the Excel window, click the Restore Down button |jSU and then compare your screen with F i g u r e 4.

The window remains open, but it no longer fills the entire screen. The Maximize button replaced the Restore Down button.

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8 .

9 .

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• SKILL 3: Sav<

• A new document or spreadsheet is stored in the computer ‘s temporary memory (RAM) until you save it to your hard drive or USB flash drive.

1 . If you are saving your work on a USB flash drive, insert the USB flash drive into the computer now. If the Windows Explorer button [3 flashes on the taskbar, right-click the button, and then on the Jump List, click Close window.

2 . On the taskbar, click the Word button to make it the active window. On the Quick Access Toolbar, click the Save button [y].

For new documents, the first time you click the Save button, the Save As dialog box opens so that you can name the file.

3 . If you are to save your work on a USB drive, in the Navigation pane scroll down to display the list of drives, and then click your USB flash drive as shown in F i g u r e 1 . If you are saving your work to another location, in the Navigation pane, locate and then click that folder or drive.

4. On the Save As dialog box toolbar, click the New folder button, and then immedi­ ately type Common Features Chapter 1

5 . Press [En te r ] to accept the folder name, and then press [En te r ] again to open the new folder as shown in F i g u r e 2 .

The new folder is created and then opened in the Save As dialog box file list.

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6. In the Save As dialog box, click in the File name box one time to highlight all of the existing text.

7. With the text in the File name box still highlighted, type Lastname_Firstname_ cfOl_Visitl

– 8 . Compare your screen with F i g u r e 3 , and then click Save.

After the document is saved, the name of the file displays on the title bar at the top of the window.

9 . On the taskbar, click the Windows Explorer button \^\. In the folder window Navigation pane, open [ft] the drive on which you are saving your work, and then click the Common Features Chapter 1 folder. Verify that Lastname_Firstname_ cpl_Visitl displays in file list.

1 0 . On the taskbar, click the Excel button to make it the active window. On the Excel Quick Access Toolbar, click the Save button § ] .

1 1 . In the Save As dialog box Navigation pane, open 0 the drive where you are saving your work, and then click the Common Features Chapter 1 folder to display its file list.

The Word file may not display because the Save As box typically displays only files created by the program you are using. Here, only Excel files will typically display.

1 2 . Click in the File name box, replace the existing value with Lastname_Firstname_ cf01_Visit2 and then click the Save button.

1 3 . On the taskbar, click the Windows Explorer button, and then compare your screen with F i g u r e 4.

Y o u h a v e c o m p l e t e d S k i l l 3 o f 1 0

F i g u r e 4

C o m m o n F e a t u r e s C h a p t e r 1 | C o m m o n F e a t u r e s o f O f f i c e 2 0 1 0 1 1

• SKILL 4: Print an.

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1 . O n t h e t a s k b a r , c l i c k t h e Excel b u t t o n , a n d t h e n c l i c k t h e Maximize |Uey b u t t o n .

2 . O n t h e R i b b o n , c l i c k t h e View tab, a n d t h e n i n t h e Workbook Views group, c l i c k t h e Page Layout b u t t o n . C o m p a r e y o u r s c r e e n w i t h F i g u r e 1 .

The worksheet displays the cells, the margins, and the edges of the paper as they will be positioned when you print. The cell references—the numbers on the left side and the letters across the top of a spreadsheet that address each cell—will not print.

O n t h e R i b b o n , c l i c k t h e Page Layout tab. I n t h e Page Setup group, c l i c k t h e Margins b u t t o n , a n d t h e n i n t h e Margins g a l l e r y , c l i c k Wide.

C l i c k t h e File tab, a n d t h e n o n t h e l e f t s i d e o f t h e B a c k s t a g e , c l i c k Print. C o m p a r e y o u r s c r e e n w i t h F i g u r e 2.

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The Print tab has commands that affect your print job and a preview of the printed page. Here, the cell references and grid- lines—lines between the cells in a table or spreadsheet—do not display because they will not be printed.

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6. Check with your Course Assignment Sheet or Course Syllabus, or consult with your instructor to determine whether you are to print your work for this chapter. If you are to print your work, at the top left corner of the Print Settings section, click the Print button. If you printed the spreadsheet, retrieve the printout from the printer.

7. On the File tab, click Save.

Because you have already named the file, the Save As dialog box does not display.

O n the File tab, click Exit to close the spreadsheet and exit Excel.

In the Word document, verify that the insertion point is in the second line of text. If not, on the taskbar, click the Word button to make it the active window.

10. On the Home tab, in the Styles group, click the Heading 2 thumbnail. Compare your screen with Figure 3.

11. On the File tab, click Print to display the Print tab. If you are printing your work for this chapter, click the Print button, and then retrieve your printout from the printer.

12. On the File tab, click Exit, and then com- pare your screen with Figure 4.

When you close a window with changes that have not yet been saved, a message will remind you to save your work.

13. Read the displayed message, and then click Save.

• You hove completed Skill 4 of 10

Figure 4 C o m m o n F e a t u r e s C h a p t e r 1 | C o m m o n F e a t u r e s o f O f f i c e 2010 1 3

• This book often instructs you to open a student data file so that you do not need to start the project with a blank document.

• The student data files are located on the student CD that came with this book. Your instructor may have provided an alternate location.

• You use Save As to create a copy of the stu­ dent data file onto your own storage device.

1 . If necessary, insert the student CD that came with this text. If the AutoPlay dialog box displays, click Close U a 4 .

2 . Using the skills practiced earlier, start Microsoft Word 2010.

3 . In the Documentl – Microsoft Word window, click the File tab, and then click Open.

4 . In the Open dialog box Navigation pane, scroll down and then, if necessary, open \V\ Computer. In the list of drives, click the CD/DVD drive to display the contents of the student CD. If your instructor has provided a different location, navigate to that location instead of using the student CD.

5. In the file list, double-click the 01_ student_data_files folder, double-click the 01_common_features folder, and then double-click the chapter_01 folder. Compare your screen with F i g u r e 1 . –

6. In the file list, click cf01_Visit, and then click the Open button. Compare your screen with F i g u r e 2 .

If you opened the file from the student CD, the title bar indicates that the document is in read-only mode—a mode where you cannot save your changes.

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7. If the document opens in Protected View, click the Enable Editing button.

Protected View is a view applied to documents downloaded from the Internet that allows you to decide if the content is safe before working with the document.

8 . Click the File tab, and then click Save As.

Because this file has already been saved with a name in a specific location, you need to use Save As to create a copy with a new name and location.

9. In the Save As dialog box Navigation pane, navigate to the C o m m o n Features Chapter 1 folder that you created previ­ ously—open 0 the drive on which you are saving your work, and then click the C o m m o n Features Chapter 1 folder.

1 0 . In the File n a m e box, replace the existing value with Lastname_Firstname_cf01_ Visit3 Be sure to use your own first and last names.

1 1 . Compare your screen with F i g u r e 3, and then click the Save button.

1 2 . On the title bar, notice the new file name displays and [Read-Only] no longer displays.

1 3 . On the taskbar, click the Windows Explorer button. Verify that the three files you have saved in this chapter display as shown in F i g u r e 4.

1 4 . In the Windows Explorer window, navigate to the s tudent CD, and then display the chapter_01 file list.

1 5 . Notice that the original student data file—cf01_Visit—is still located in the chapter_01 folder, and then Close the Windows Explorer window.

Y o u h o v e c o m p l e t e d S k i l l 5 o f 1 0

F i g u r e 4

C o m m o n F e a t u r e s C h a p t e r 1 | C o m m o n F e a t u r e s o f O f f i c e 2 0 1 0 1 5

• To edit is to insert text, delete text, or replace text in an Office document, spreadsheet, or presentation.

• To edit text, you need to position the insertion point at the desired location or select the text you want to replace.

1 . With the W o r d document as the active window, in the first line, click to the left of the word Aspen. Press (Bksp) 12 times to delete the words the City of. Be sure there is one space between each word as shown in F i g u r e 1 .

The Backspace key deletes one letter at a time moving from right to left.

2 . In the second line of the document, click to the left of the words The City of Aspen Falls. Press [ D e l e t e ] 12 times to delete the phrase The City of.

The Delete key deletes one letter at a time moving from left to right.

3 . In the line Area Attractions, double-click the word Area to select it. Type l o c a l and then compare your screen with F i g u r e 2 . —

When a word is selected, it is replaced by whatever you type next.

• Continue to the next page to complete the skill ̂

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Fast l o l l – ::;<a: il . > F i g u r e 2 16 C o m m o n F e a t u r e s o f O f f i c e 2 0 1 0 | Common Features Chapter 1

E E T T I

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SKILL 6: Type and Edit Text

4. Place the pointer approximately 1 inch to the left of the line Convention Center. When the [21 pointer displays as shown in

— F i g u r e 3, click one time.

Placing the pointer in the Selection bar and then clicking is a way to select an entire line with a single click. After selecting text, the Mini toolbar—a toolbar with common formatting buttons—may display briefly as you move the mouse.

5. With the entire line still selected, press [Delete) to delete the line.

6. On the Quick Access Toolbar, click the Undo button @ one time. Notice the Convention Center line displays again.

When you perform an incorrect action, clicking the Undo button often returns your document to its previous state.

7. At the end of the last line—Glider Tours— click between the last word and the para­ graph formatting mark (If). Press [Enter] to insert a new line.

8 . With the insertion point in the new line, type Contact Your Name for more information. Be sure to use your first and last names in place of Your and Name.

M Compare your screen with F i g u r e 4. 9. On the Quick Access Toolbar, click

Save Q .

When a document has already been saved with the desired name, click the Save button—the Save As dialog box is not needed.

M I N I T O O L B A R ( T H I S

M A Y N O T D I S P L A Y

O N Y O U R S C R E E N )

P O I N T E R I N

S E L E C T I O N B A R

F I G U R E 3

• Y o u h a v e c o m p l e t e d S k i l l 6 o f 1 0

N E W L I N E I N S E R T E D

F I G U R E 4

C o m m o n F e a t u r e s C h a p t e r 1 | C O M M O N F E A T U R E S O F O F F I C E 2 0 1 0 1 7

»• The copy command places a copy of the selected text or object in the Clipboard— a temporary storage area that holds text or an object that has been cut or copied.

• You can move text by moving it to and from the Clipboard or by dragging the text.

1 . Click the File tab, and then click Open. In the Open dialog box, if necessary, navigate to the student files and display the contents of the chapter_01 folder. Click cft)l_Visit_Events, and then click Open.

2. On the right side of the Ribbon’s Home tab, in the Editing group, click the Select button, and then click Select All. Compare your screen with F i g u r e 1.

3 . With all of the document text selected, on the left side of the Home tab, in the Clipboard group, click the Copy button 0.

4 . In the upper right corner of the Word window, click Close l U o j . You do not need to save changes—you will not turn in this student data file.

5. In Lastname_Firstname_cf01_Visit3, click to place the insertion point to the left of the line that starts Contact Your Name.

6. On the Home tab, in the Clipboard group, point to—but do not click—the Paste button. Compare your screen with F i g u r e 2 .

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The Paste button has two parts—the upper half is the Paste button, and the lower half is the Paste button arrow. When you click the Paste button arrow, a list of paste options display.

Continue to the next page to complete the skill ^

18 C o m m o n F e a t u r e s o f O f f i c e 2 0 1 0 | C o m m o n F e a t u r e s C h a p t e r 1

I n s e r t i o n p o i n t

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F i g u r e 2 : * b E I V

SKILL 7: Cut, Copy, and Paste Text

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7. Click the upper half of the Paste but ton to paste the selected text. Compare your

— screen with F i g u r e 3.

When you paste, you insert a copy of the text or object stored in the Clipboard and the Paste Options button displays near the pasted text.

Press [Esc] to hide the Paste Options button.

Scroll up to display the line Winter Blues Festival. Place the \T\ pointer to the left of the W, and then drag down and to the right to select two lines—Winter Blues Festival and Taste of Aspen Falls.

To drag is to move the mouse while holding down the left mouse button and then to release it at the appropriate time.

1 0 . On the Home tab, in the Clipboard group, click the Cut button 0.

The ait command removes the selected text or object and stores it in the Clipboard.

1 1 . Click to place the insertion point to the left of Contact Your Name, and then in the Clipboard group, click the Paste button to insert the text.

1 2 . Drag to select the text Taste of Aspen Falls, including the paragraph mark.

1 3 . With the [§] pointer, drag the selected text to the left of Winter Blues Festival. When the [¥] pointer displays to the left of Winter as shown in F i g u r e 4, release the mouse button.

1 4 . On the Quick Access Toolbar, click Save m.

• You have completed Skill 7 of 10

F i g u r e 4

C o m m o n F e a t u r e s C h a p t e r 1 | C o m m o n F e a t u r e s o f O f f i c e 2 0 1 0 1 9

• To format is to change the appearance of the text—for example, changing the text color to red.

> Before formatting text, you first need to select the text that will be formatted.

»• Once text is selected, you can apply formatting using the Ribbon or the Mini toolbar.

1 . Scroll to the top of the document, and then click anywhere in the first line, Visit Aspen Falls.

2. O n the Home tab, in the Styles group, click the Heading 1 thumbnail .

When no text is selected, the Heading 1 style is applied to the entire paragraph.

3 . Click in the paragraph, Local Attractions, and then in the Styles group, click the Heading 2 thumbnail . Click in the paragraph, Aspen Falls Annual Events, and then apply the Heading 2 style. Compare your screen with Figure 1.

4 . Drag to select the text Visit Aspen Falls! Immediately point to—but do not click— the Mini toolbar to display it as shown in Figure 2. If necessary, right-click the — selected text to display the Mini toolbar.

C o n t i n u e t o t h e n e x t p a g e t o c o m p l e t e t h e s k i l l >

Heading 1 applied

Heading 2 applied

Figure 1

Mini toolbar (your toolbar location may be different)

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Figure 2

2 0 C o m m o n F e a t u r e s o f O f f i c e 2 0 1 0 | C o m m o n F e a t u r e s C h a p t e r 1

SKILL 8: F< and Paragraphs

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F i g u r e 4

5. On the Mini toolbar, click the Font Size arrow I” •[, and then from the list, click 28 to increase the size of the selected text.

6. Place the pointer approximately 1 inch to the left of the line Wine Country. When the SQ pointer displays, drag straight down. When all the lines between and including Wine Country and Glider Tours are selected, release the left mouse button.

7. On the Ribbon, in the Paragraph group, click the Bullets button IB-I and then compare your screen with F i g u r e 3.

8 . Click to the left of Annual Starving Artists Sidewalk Sale. Scroll down to display the bottom of the page. Press and hold [ S h i f t ] while clicking to the right of Winter Blues Festival to select all of the text between and including Annual Starving Artists Sidewalk Sale and Winter Blues Festival.

9. In the Paragraph group, click the Bullets button |B’L

1 0 . Scroll to the top of the document. Use either technique just practiced to select Wine Tasting Tours and Wineries.

1 1 . In the Paragraph group, click the Increase Indent button [*] one time. Compare your screen with F i g u r e 4.

1 2 . On the Quick Access Toolbar, click Save [H].

• Y o u h o v e c o m p l e t e d S k i l l 8 o f 1 0

C o m m o n F e a t u r e s C h a p t e r 1 | C o m m o n F e a t u r e s o f O f f i c e 2 0 1 0 2 1http://Visit-Aspen-Falls.ilhttp://An-Geaer.il*http://vvmar.eshttp://ao-cv.eehttp://e-aAnnuaiWini-Ftitlva.lt

• SKILL 9: Use the Ribbon

• Each Ribbon tab contains commands organized into groups. Some tabs display only when a certain type of object is selected—a graphic, for example.

1. Press and hold [ C t r l ] , and then press [Homel to place the insertion point at the begin­ ning of the document.

2 . On the Ribbon, to the right of the Home tab, click the Insert tab. In the Illustrations group, click the Picture button.

3. In the Insert Picture dialog box, navigate as needed to display the contents of the student files in the chapter_01 folder. Click cf01_Visit_River, and then click the Insert button. Compare your screen with F i g u r e 1.

When a picture is selected, the Format tab displays below Picture Tools. On the Format tab, in the Picture Styles group, a gallery— a visual display of choices from which you can choose—displays thumbnails. The entire gallery can be seen by clicking the More button to the right and below the first row of thumbnails.

4. On the Format tab, in the Picture Styles group, click the More button 0 to display the Picture Styles gallery. In the gallery, point to the fourth thumbnail in the first row—Drop Shadow Rectangle—to display the ScreenTip as shown in F i g u r e 2 .

Picture Tools Format tab

Picture Styles gallery

More burton

Picture selected

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• L o c a J ‘ A t t r a c t i o i i s ^

Figure l

th picture style thumbnai Fourth picture

ScreenTip

A ScreenTip is informational text that displays when you point to commands or thumbnails on the Ribbon.

5. Click the Drop Shadow Rectangle thumbnail to apply the picture style.

• Continue to the next page to complete the skill •

22 Common Features of Office 2010 | Common Features Chapter l

Live Preview of Drop Shadow

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K E Y T I P S F O R

H O M E T A B

K E Y T I P F O R I T A L I C

B U T T O N

F I G U R E 4

6. On the Format tab, in the Arrange group, click the Wrap Text button, and then from the list of choices, click Square.

7. Point to the picture, and then with the \%\ pointer, drag the picture to the right side of the page as shown in F I G U R E 3.

8. Click a blank area of the page, and then notice the Picture Tools Format tab no longer displays.

9. On the Page Layout tab, in the Themes group, click the Themes button.

1 0 . In the Themes gallery, point to—but do not click—each of the thumbnails to dis­ play the Live Preview of each theme. When you are done, click the Civic thumbnail .

1 1 . On the View tab, in the Zoom group, click the One Page button to display the entire page on the screen. If necessary, adjust the position of the picture.

1 2 . On the View tab, in the Zoom group, click the 100% button.

1 3 . Select the text Visit Aspen Falls! without selecting the paragraph mark. Press [W] to display KeyTips—keys that you can press to access each Ribbon tab and most com­ mands on each tab. Release [Ait], and then press (TT) one time to display the Home tab. Compare your screen with F I G U R E 4 .

With KeyTips displayed on the Home tab, pressing [T] is the same as clicking the Italic button 0. In this manner, you select Ribbon commands without using the mouse.

1 4 . Press (T) to apply the Italic format to the selected text.

1 5 . Save (5] the document.

• You have completed Skill 9 of 10

C O M M O N F E A T U R E S C H A P T E R 1 | C O M M O N F E A T U R E S O F O F F I C E 2 0 1 0 2 3http://Ho.milhttp://VisitAspenFalls.1Ifile://-/-ineyatC3

• Commands can be accessed in dialog boxes—boxes where you can select multiple settings.

• You can also access commands by right-clicking objects in a document.

1. In the paragraph that starts Aspen Falls overlooks the Pacific Ocean, triple-click— click three times fairly quickly without moving the mouse—to highlight the entire paragraph.

2. O n the Home tab, in the lower right cor­ ner of the Font group, point to the Font Dialog Box Launcher [|] as shown in F i g u r e 1.

The [1] buttons at the lower right corner of most groups open a dialog box with choices that may not be available on the Ribbon.

3 . Click the Font Dialog Box Launcher [s] to open the Font dialog box.

4. In the Font dialog box, click the Advanced tab. Click the Spacing arrow, and then click Expanded.

5. To the right of the Spacing box, click the By spin box up arrow three times to display 1.3 pt. Compare your screen with F i g u r e 2, and then click OK to close the dialog box and apply the changes.

• Continue to the next page to complete the skill

C o m m o n F e a t u r e s o f O f f i c e 2 0 1 0 | C o m m o n F e a t u r e s C h a p t e r 1

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s e l e c t e d

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Use Shortcut Menus and Dialog Boxes

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Spacing after value typed

Figure 4

6. With the paragraph still selected, right-click—click the paragraph with the right mouse but ton—and then

— compare your screen with Figure 3. When you right-click selected text, the Mini toolbar and a shortcut menu display. A shortcut menu displays a list of commands related to the type of object that you right-click.

From the displayed shortcut menu, click the Paragraph command. Alternately, on the Home tab, click the Paragraph Dialog Box Launcher.

7.

8.

9.

10.

11.

In the Paragraph dialog box, under Spacing, click the Before spin up arrow three times to display 18 pt.

In the After box, highlight the existing value, and then type 15 Compare your screen with Figure 4, and then click OK.

If your instructor asks you to print your work, click the File tab, click Print, and then click the Print button.

Click Save [5], click the File tab, and then click Exit.

Done! You have completed Skill 10 of 10, and your document is complete!

C O M M O N F E A T U R E S C H A P T E R 1 | C O M M O N F E A T U R E S O F O F F I C E 2010 2 5

T h e fo l lowing M o r e Skills a re located at www.pearsonhighered.com/skills

M o r e S k i l l s Q C a p t u r e S c r e e n s w i t h t h e S n i p p i n g T o o l

S O M E O F THE W O R K THAT Y O U D O IN THIS B O O K C A N N O T B E G R A D E D

W I T H O U T S H O W I N G Y O U R C O M P U T E R SCREENS TO THE GRADER. Y O U C A N

U S E THE S N I P P I N G TOOL TO CREATE PICTURES O F YOUR SCREENS. S N I P FILES

CAN B E P R I N T E D OR S U B M I T T E D ELECTRONICALLY.

I N M O R E SKILLS 1 1 , Y O U WILL U S E THE S N I P P I N G TOOL TO CREATE A

PICTURE O F YOUR SCREEN A N D THEN C O P Y THE PICTURE I N T O A W O R D

D O C U M E N T .

T O B E G I N , O P E N Y O U R W E B BROWSER, NAVIGATE TO

W W W . P E A R S O N H I G H E R E D . C O M / S K I L L S , LOCATE THE N A M E O F YOUR

TEXTBOOK, A N D THEN FOLLOW THE INSTRUCTIONS O N THE W E B S I T E .

M o r e S k i l l s ^ U s e M i c r o s o f t O f f i c e H e l p

M I C R O S O F T O F F I C E 2 0 1 0 H A S A H E L P S Y S T E M I N W H I C H Y O U CAN

SEARCH FOR ARTICLES THAT S H O W Y O U H O W TO A C C O M P L I S H TASKS.

I N M O R E SKILLS 1 2 , Y O U WILL U S E THE O F F I C E 2 0 1 0 H E L P S Y S T E M

TO V I E W A N ARTICLE O N H O W TO C U S T O M I Z E THE H E L P W I N D O W .

T O B E G I N , O P E N Y O U R W E B BROWSER, NAVIGATE TO

W W W . P E A R S O N H I G H E R E D . C O M / S K I L L S , LOCATE THE N A M E O F YOUR

TEXTBOOK, A N D THEN FOLLOW THE INSTRUCTIONS O N THE W E B S I T E .

M o r e S k i l l s ^ O r g a n i z e F i l e s

O V E R T I M E , Y O U M A Y CREATE H U N D R E D S O F FILES U S I N G MICROSOFT

OFFICE. T O FIND Y O U R FILES W H E N Y O U N E E D T H E M , T H E Y N E E D TO B E

WELL-ORGANIZED. Y O U C A N ORGANIZE Y O U R C O M P U T E R FILES B Y CAREFULLY

N A M I N G T H E M A N D B Y PLACING T H E M INTO FOLDERS.

I N M O R E SKILLS 1 3 , Y O U WILL CREATE, DELETE, A N D R E N A M E FOLDERS.

Y O U WILL T H E N C O P Y , DELETE, A N D M O V E FILES INTO THE FOLDERS THAT Y O U

CREATED.

T O B E G I N , O P E N Y O U R W E B BROWSER, NAVIGATE TO

W W W . P E A R S O N H I G H E R E D . C O M / S K I L L S , LOCATE THE N A M E O F Y O U R

TEXTBOOK, A N D THEN FOLLOW THE INSTRUCTIONS O N THE W E B S I T E .

M o r e S k i l l s S a v e D o c u m e n t s t o W i n d o w s L i v e

I F Y O U R C O M P U T E R IS C O N N E C T E D TO THE INTERNET, Y O U C A N SAVE

YOUR O F F I C E D O C U M E N T S TO A DRIVE AVAILABLE TO Y O U FREE O F CHARGE

THROUGH W I N D O W S L I V E . Y O U C A N THEN O P E N THE FILES F R O M OTHER

LOCATIONS S U C H AS H O M E , SCHOOL, OR W O R K .

I N M O R E SKILLS 1 4 , Y O U WILL SAVE A M E M O TO W I N D O W S L I V E .

T O B E G I N , O P E N Y O U R W E B BROWSER, NAVIGATE TO

W W W . P E A R S O N H I G H E R E D . C O M / S K I L L S , LOCATE THE N A M E O F YOUR

TEXTBOOK, A N D T H E N FOLLOW THE INSTRUCTIONS O N THE W E B S I T E .

C O M M O N FEATURES OF OFFICE 2 0 1 0 | C O M M O N FEATURES C H A P T E R 1http://www.pearsonhighered.com/skillshttp://www.pearsonhighered.com/skillshttp://www.pearsonhttp://highered.com/skillshttp://www.pearsonhighered.com/skillshttp://www.pearsonhighered.com/skills

K e y T e r m s

Cell 8

Cell reference 12

Clipboard 18

Copy 18

Cut 19

Dialog box 24

Drag 19

Edit 16

Format 20

Gallery 22

Grid line 12

Insertion point 7

KeyTip 23

Live Preview 7

Mini toolbar 17

Page Layout view 12

Paste 19

Protected View 15

RAM 10

Read-only mode 14

Right-click 25

ScreenTip 22

Shortcut menu 25

Toggle button 7

Triple-click 24

O n l i n e H e l p Sk i l l s

1. Start f J Word. In the upper right corner o f the Word window, click the Help button [©]. In the Help window, click the Maximize h&H button.

2. Click in the search box, type Create a document and then click the Search button. In the search results, click Create a document.

3. Read the article’s introduction, and then below What do you want to do, click Start a document from a template. Compare your screen wi th Figure 1.

4. Read the Start a document from a template section to see i f you can answer the following: What types o f documents are available as templates? On the New tab, under Available Templates, what are the two general locations that you can find templates?

Common Features Chapter 1 | Common Features of Office 2010

Matching Match each term in the second column with its correct definition in the first column by writing the letter of the term on the blank line in front of the correct definition.

1, A feature that displays the result of a formatting change if you

select it.

2 . A line between the cells in a table or spreadsheet.

3. A mode where you can open and view a file, but you cannot save your changes.

4. A view where you prepare your document or spreadsheet for printing.

5. Quickly click the left mouse but ton two times without moving the mouse.

6. To insert text, delete text, or replace text in an Office document, spreadsheet, or presentation.

7. A command that moves a copy of the selected text or object to the Clipboard.

8. A command that removes the selected text or object and stores it

in the Clipboard.

9. To change the appearance of the text.

10. A menu that displays a list of commands related to the type of object that you right-clicked on.

28 Common Features of Office 2010 | Common Features Chapter 1

A Copy

B Cut

C Double-click

D Edit

E Format

F Grid line

G Live Preview

H Page Layout

I Read-only

J Shortcut

Multiple Choice Choose the correct answer.

1 . The flashing vertical line that indicates where text wi l l be inserted when you start typing.

A. Cell reference B. Insertion point C. KeyTip

2. A button used to turn a feature both on and off. A. Contextual button B. On /Of f button C. Toggle button

3. The box formed by the intersection o f a row and column.

A. Cell B. Cell reference C. Insertion point

4. U n t i l you save a document, it is stored only here. A. Clipboard B. Live Preview C. R A M

5. The combination of a number on the left side and a letter on the top of a spreadsheet that addresses a cell.

A. Coordinates B. Cell reference C. Insertion point

Topics for Discussion 1. You have briefly worked with three Microsoft Office

programs: Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. Based on your experience, describe the overall purpose o f each of these programs.

6. A temporary storage area that holds text or an object that has been cut or copied.

A. Clipboard B. Dialog box C. Live Preview

7. A toolbar w i th common formatting buttons that displays after you select text.

A. Gallery toolbar B. M i n i toolbar C. Taskbar toolbar

8. Informational text that displays when you point to commands or thumbnails on the Ribbon.

A. Live Preview B. ScreenTip C. Shortcut menu

9. A visual display of choices from which you can choose.

A. Gallery B. Options menu C. Shortcut menu

10. An icon that displays on the Ribbon to indicate the key that you can press to access Ribbon commands.

A. KeyTip B. ScreenTip C. T o o l T i p

2. Many believe that computers enable offices to go paperless—that is, to share files electronically instead o f printing and then distributing them. What are the advantages of sharing files electronically, and in what situations would it be best to print documents?

Common Features Chapter 1 | Common Features of Office 2010

C H A P T E R

C r e a t e D o c u m e n t s W o r d 2 0 1 0

• Microsoft Office Word is one of the most common programs that individuals use on a computer.

• Use Word to create simple documents such as memos, reports, or letters and to create sophisticated documents that include tables and graphics.

Your starting screen will look similar to this:

flat: 1 ol 1 i Weidv 0 J A A : – too’.i

SKILLS SKILLS 1 – 1 0 TRAINING At t h e e n d of t h i s c h a p t e r , y o u will b e a b l e t o :

Skill 1 Create New Documents and Enter Text Skill 2 Edit Text and Use Keyboard Shortcuts Skill 3 Select Text Skill 4 Insert Text from Other Documents Skill 5 Change Fonts, Font Sizes, and Font Styles Skill 6 Insert and Work with Graphics Skill 7 Check Spelling and Grammar Skill 8 Use the Thesaurus and Set Proofing

Options Skill 9 Create Document Footers Skill 10 Work with the Print Page and Save

Documents in Other Formats

M O R E S K I L L S

More Skills 11 Split and Arrange Windows More Skills 12 Insert Symbols More Skills 13 Use Collect and Paste to Create

Documents More Skills 14 Insert Screen Shots into

Documents

3 0 C R E A T E D O C U M E N T S WITH WORA 2 0 1 0 | MICROSOFT W O R D C H A P T E R 1

Outcome Using the skills listed to the left will enable you to create documents like these:

A S P E N F A L L S P U B L I C L I B R A R Y 2SS EbnStttvl

Aspen Falls. CA 93463

May 5. 2012

Dr. Janis Imlay Aspen Falls Community College 1 College Drive Aspen Fall*, CA 93464

Dv-i Dr. Imlay:

Subject: New Logo for Library

fhank youso much for vour letter effenng the servicesot your jraphicdesign sluoents lor libfary-

related projects. We currently have a projectiri mind thai might benefitboth the library and youi

sludents.

We want to update our losotomoicaccurately reflect the wide variety of services offered in a modern

library Alogoconteslwouldbeag-caticJea.Callmeat (805) 555 1011 to discuss this further

I have attached a listol libiaiy activities to give the sludents an idea of some ol the things we do.

Sincerely.

Douglas Hopkins, Director

Ustname_rirstn»me_w01_Ubrary

Book DiscusstonGroups

There are several different book discussion groups, all led by

volunteer moderators from the community. Some discussion groups

focus on different types of books, such as biographies, history, fiction,

classics.sdenecand technology.andSpanlsh language literature.

Comp uter Tra in ing

Computer training isoffered in the computer lab of the main branch only. The following dassesa

offered once a month and others J re offered intermittently:

• Introduction to Computers

• MicrosoltWord

• Microsoft Excel

• Adobe Photoshop

• WindowsXP and Vista

• Using the Internet

Speakers and Entertainers

The library brings in noted authors once a month for an ongoing lecture series. Folk singers, small jazz

ensembles, and other musical groups perform in the Hawken Community Room as they can be booked.

A second bookmobile has been added, and mutes are displayed on the library website. Bookmobiles

visiteachschool in the district at least once a week.

Story timesare available in the Hawken Community Room on Saturday momingfor toddlers, Saturday

afternoon for early elementary students.and Sunday afternoon for kids interested in chapter books.

GamwNight

Games are played inthe HawkenCommunity Room on Friday even ing after the library closes at 6p .m.

Among the more popular games are chess, bridge, and backgammon. Experts are available to help

patrons learn the games or improve tbeirskils.

Electronic Book Downloads

More than 1,000 c Books a re available for download toanMP3 player. Library patronscan check these

books out for three weeks, and can renew them one time. The books range from today’s popularficoon

to the classics.

Lastname_Flrstname_w01_Ubrarv

You will save these documents as: Lastname_Firstname_w01_Library Lastname_Firstname_w01_Library_2003

MICROSOFT WORD C H A P T E R 1 | CREATE D O C U M E N T S WITH WORD 2 0 1 0 3 1

In t h i s c h a p t e r , y o u wi l l c r e a t e d o c u m e n t s f o r t h e A s p e n F a l l s C i t y

H a l l , w h i c h p r o v i d e s e s s e n t i a l s e r v i c e s f o r t h e c i t i z e n s a n d v i s i t o r s o f

A s p e n F a l l s , C a l i f o r n i a .

In t roduc t ion

• Entering text, formatt ing text, and navigating within a Word d o c u m e n t are the first basic skills you need to work efficiently with Word.

• You can change the font and font size, and add emphasis to text, but use caution not to apply too many different formats to your text. This can be distracting to the reader.

• It is easy to insert a picture into a Word document , and doing so increases the visual appeal and the reader’s interest. Pictures should be clearly associated with the sur rounding text and should not be inserted just to have a picture in the documen t .

• It is never acceptable to have errors in spelling, g rammar , or word usage in your documents ; you can use Word to prevent this from happening.

C R E A T E D O C U M E N T S WITH WORD 2 0 1 0 | MICROSOFT W O R D C H A P T E R 1

I

Time to complete all 10 skills – 50 minutes

Student data files needed for this chapter:

New blank Word document

wO l_Library_Activities

Find your student data files here:

[W] O p e n

(^/y^J I ” 02_word • chapter.01 Organize » N e w folder

CD Mockup

• 01_student_data_files

O l . commcn jea tu res

a 02_word

Documents library chapte’ .Ol

Arrange by. Folder •

chapte»_01

chapter_02

ehapter_03

c h a p t e r M

‘ . 03_excel

chapter_01

c h a p t e r ^

chapter_03

chap te rW

> i . M.access

chapter_01

file n a m e

Name

B*0A.

a]woi.

:£] WOL.

-aj WOL.

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.Donation_Opportunrties

.Donation_Phcto

.Library .Activities

.library_Logo

.Meadows

Meadows.Improvements

Meadows.Research

T r u ‘

Tour_Topics

Trustees.Report

– (Al l files

TOOTS -r

Page: l o l l | Words: 0 , ; i J .

U B 3 J B ioo?i .- r +

Microsoft Word Chapter 1 | Create Documents with Word 2010

• SKILL 1: Create New Documents and Enter Text

• When you start Microsoft Office Word 2010, a blank document displays.

• The first time you save the document, give it a name and choose a storage location. Then, save your changes frequently.

1. On the taskbar, click the Start button From the Start menu, locate and then start Microsoft Word 2010.

2. In the lower right corner of your screen, if necessary, click the Print Layout but ton HI.

3. On the Home tab, in the Paragraph group, click the Show/Hide button H until it displays in gold indicating it is active, as shown in Figure 1.

When you press (Enter), [Spacebar], or [Tab] on your keyboard, characters display in your document to represent these keystrokes. These characters do not print and are referred to as formatting marks or nonprinting characters.

4. In all uppercase letters, type ASPEN FALLS PUBLIC LIBRARY and press [EnteT], Type 255 Elm Street and press [Enter). Type Aspen Falls, CA 93463 and press (Enter) two times.

5. Type May 5, 2012 and press [Enter] three times; type Dr. Janis Imlay and press (EnteT); type Aspen Falls Community College and press ||nter|> type 1 College Drive and press [Enter); and type Aspen Falls, CA 93464 and press (Enter).

6. Type Dear Dr. Imlay: and press (EnteT). Type Subject: New Logo for Library and press [Enter]. Compare your screen with Figure 2. –

Continue to the next page to complete the ski

34 C R E A T E D O C U M E N T S W I T H W O R D 2010 | Microsoft Word Chapter 1

Show/Hide button

Print Layout view displays as a sheet of paper

Print Layout button

Figure 1

Letterhead

Nonprinting paragraph mark

Inside address Small dots

indicate spaces between words

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8.

7. Type the following, inserting only one space after the period at the end of a sen­ tence: Thank you so much for your letter offering the services of your graphic design students for some library-related projects. We currently have a very good project in mind that might benefit both the library and your students. Compare

— your screen with Figure 3.

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Press [Enter], and then type We want to update our logo to more accurately reflect the wide variety of services offered in a modern library. A logo contest would be a great idea. Call me at (805) 555-1011 at any time to discuss this further.

Press (Enter] and type Sincerely, and then press [Enter] two times. Type Douglas Hopkins, Director

10. On the Quick Access Toolbar, click Save \M • Navigate to the location where you are saving your files, create a folder named Word Chapter 1 and then using your own name, Save the document as Lastname_ Firstname_w01_Library

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essays online help me write my essay need someone to write my essay

according to levinson, middle adulthood begins with a

1.        Puberty is controlled by a complex feedback loop involving ____.

a. the thalamus, hypothalamus, and reticular formation                                                                                          b. the hypothalamus, pituitary gland, gonads, and hormones                                                                                           c. the frontal lobe, the hypothalamus, the amygdala, and the brainstem                                                                       d. the cerebral cortex, the gonads, the cerebellum, and the angular gyrus

   2.                  Sexually transmitted infections (STIs):

                        a. always has visible symptoms

                        b. are rarely problematic over long run for the one who caught one

                        c. can always be treated with antibiotics.

                        d. are contracted by millions of young adults in the United States every year         

3.         American adolescents are growing taller than their parents.

a. True

b. False

4.         College development in college is:

a. only a result of being exposed to the right materials.                                                                                                     b. less involved than the development that occurs for people who do not go to college.                                       c. fostered by being exposed to others with different views from oneself.                                                                       d. a matter of changing from relativistic to dualist thinking.

5.         In which area are adolescents most likely to be influenced by their peers, as opposed to their parents?

 a. career goals                        

b. moral principles      

c. educational plans                

d. fashion    

            6.         More than _____ students between the ages of 18 and 24 are accidentally injured each year while under the influence, are assaulted by other students who have been drinking, or are raped by college men who have been drinking.

a.

one thousand

b.

ten thousand

c. fifty thousand

d. one million

7.         Girls are fertile immediately after their first menstrual period.

a. True

b. False

            8.         Jealousy can lessen feelings of affection and heighten feelings of insecurity and depression, leading to a breakup.

                        a. True

                        b. False           

                9.     Reciprocity in relationships:

a. is unimportant for determining longevity of relationships.

b.  involves a two-way giving of admiration and compliments

c. shows weakness in a couple’s relationship.

d. occurs when one partner is comfortable being a “giver” and the other is comfortable being a receiver.”

            10.       Sleep disorders in late adulthood:

a. are less common than in early adulthood.

b. may signal physical or psychological problems.

c. cannot be treated with medication.

d. protect older adults from heart disease and strokes.

            11.       The fastest growing segment of the American population is aged:

                        a. 0-3 years

                        b.15-20 years

                        c. 25-30 years

                        d. 65 years and above

            12.       How does reaction time change as people get older?

                        a. it increases with age.

                        b. it becomes a component of crystallized intelligence

                        c. it is significantly longer during middle adulthood than early adulthood.

                        d. becomes a component of applied intelligence

13.                   In the fantasy stage of Super’s career development theory:

a.

one’s final career is most often chosen.

b.

interest and values are considered as most critical reasons for a match with  career choice.

c.

glamour of the career has little to do with its being chosen.

d.

one’s abilities and chosen career often do not match.

            14.       American culture tends to deny the existence of death. Which of the following is an example of how it does that, according to Kübler-Ross (1969)?

a. People tend to use the word “died” instead of more comfortable terms to refer to a person who has died.

b. How the dead bodies are prepared for viewings.

c. Children are usually encouraged to attend funerals and family events surrounding a death.

d. Medicine encourages physicians to accept death as a part of their job, and to view it with acceptance rather than resistance.

            15.       Chronologically, middle age occurs:

                        a. later today than in the past

                        b. between 30 and 65

            c. after one gets married

            d. between 30 and 50

            16.       During early adulthood:

a.

memory begins to decline rapidly.

b.

memory improves while verbal skills decline.

c.

verbal skills and general knowledge typically improve, while memory may decline gradually.

d.

all cognitive skills decline.

17.       Employers should:

a. avoid hiring middle-aged workers                                                                                                                                           b. understand that middle-aged workers know more and have verbal skills as good as younger adults.       c. are more limited in their ultimate potential in a career.                                                                                               d. recognizes that middle-aged workers will have more need for missed work days than younger-adults.

18.        Girls who mature early have higher self- esteem than those who mature late.

a. True

b. False

            19.       Whole brain death:

a. occurs when the cerebral cortex has no EEG reading.

b. may involve lower brain activity, but no cortical activity.

c. involves an absence of breathing and circulation without life-support machinery.

d. is the definition most frequently used in legal cases where a person’s status is in question

            20.       Research on personality characteristics in middle adulthood found that:

                        a. those who were generative were emotionally unstable                                                                                            b. those who were stagnated were more conscientious                                                                                                      c. there is a relationship between those who were stagnated and neuroticism, but the exact nature of that relationship is unclear                                                                                                                                                               d. those who were generative were less extroverted that those who were not

            21.       Theories of development during middle adulthood:

a. debate whether or not middle adulthood is a distinct event.

b. all include the concept of a midlife crisis.

c. agree that middle adulthood begins at age 35.

d. all suggest that one’s age is the primary determinant of when middle adulthood begins

            22.       Psychological characteristics that are risk factors for heart disease include:

a.

family history

c.

job strain

b.

obesity

d.

high serum cholesterol.

23.       Which person first referred to adolescence as a time of “storm and stress”?

a. Sigmund Freud 

b. G. Stanley Hall

c. Erik Erikson      

 d. Jean Piaget

            24.         All aspects of cognitive skills generally decline in late adulthood. 

                        a. True

                        b. False

            25.       In later adulthood, people have the most difficulty remembering key life events from their teens and early adulthood.

                        a. True

                        b. False

            26.       Ego integrity is the sense that people feel better about themselves because they are better than other people.

                        a. True

                        b. False

            27.         Disengagement theory says that when older adults disengage from society and society disengages from them, they will be dissatisfied with life.

                        a. True

                        b. False

            28.         Middle-aged workers:

a. are less satisfied than they were as young adults.

b. have more expertise and realistic career goals, which may be linked to higher job satisfaction.

c. are less realistic about their careers than they were when they were younger.

d. are less happy since they realize they have not attained their lifelong dreams

            29.         Levinson and colleagues’ theory called “seasons of life”:

                        a. indicated that men had more social constraints affecting them.

                        b. have virtually identical  timing for men and women.

                        c. may be less applicable to today’s women than previously

                        d. found that people in their later 30s and early 40s were often looking to make significant changes in their lives, including new jobs, families and homes.

            30.       Which of the following is true regarding physical development during middle adulthood?

                        a. it is at its peak

                        b. it declines gradually for most people who exercise and eat well

                        c. accident rates are at their peak

                        d. physical decline occurs rapidly regardless of exercise and diet

            31.       Which of the following is not one of the stressful events that those in middle adulthood are more likely to encounter?

                        a. The death of a parent      

                        b. Hospitalization

                        c. Divorce or marital separation

                        d. The beginning of their first career-oriented job

            32.       All middle-aged adults experience the same level of cognitive changes.

                        a. True

                        b. False

            33.       Osteoporosis:

                        a. affects few older adults; it is primarily a problem experienced during early adulthood

                        b. is unrelated to mortality rates

                        c. is a result of severe calcium loss from bones

                        d. a disorder that only affects women

            34.       An intrinsic motive for working is:

                        a. to earn money

                        b. for insurance

                        c. to ensure future security

                        d. to fill days with meaningful activity

35.       According to Erikson, the primary task for adolescents is to develop:

a. industry

b. ego identity

c. trust

d. intimacy

36.       Kübler-Ross’s (1969) stages of death include all of the following except:

a. denial

b. absence

c. bargaining

d. depression

37.       At what age do most homosexual persons “come out” to others?

a. 18   

b. 8

c. 13               

d. 21

38.                   Older adults may be screened and treated less for cancer than younger adults in part because of elder bias.

                        a. True

                        b. False

            39.       Untreated depression in older adults:

a. is okay, since it rarely works to treat their depression.

b. is not recommended since it is important that older adults work through their sadness.

c. may lead to suicide, particularly in older men.

d. will probably lead to chronic physical illnesses, including Alzheimer’s disease

40.                   _____ refers to the fact that people’s intellectual abilities are not absolutely fixed but can be modified under certain conditions at almost any time in life.

a. plasticity                                                                                                                                                                               b. Interindividual identity                                                                                                                                                     c. Multidirectionality                                                                                                                                                                 d. Interindividual variability

            41.       According to Erikson’s psychosocial theory, stagnation occurs when:

                        a. people reject their natural drive to have children                                                                                                         b. people no longer increase in salary upgrades as they get older                                                                                  c. adult children move out of their parent’s house                                                                                                               d. a loss of drive to continue advancing in one’s career

42.       Separation of young adults from the family home:

a. occurs at different times and in different circumstances for many                                                                                       b. should always occur by 18 years of age.                                                                                                                         c. is more stressful when the home of origin includes only one parent.                                                                              d. is usually damaging to the parent-child relationship

43.       According to Butler (2002), reminiscence is:

a. a sign of dementia                                                                                                                                                             b. a negative reaction to aging                                                                                                                                            c. uniform in its quality among different individuals                                                                                                        d. a way to make life meaningful

44.       Which of the following statements is an example of “denial”, according to Kübler-Ross (1969)?

a. The diagnosis must be wrong.                                                                                                                                       b. Why is God punishing me?                                                                                                                                                  c. I promise to be good if this illness goes away.                                                                                                                         d. I understand that I am going to die and I am going to prepare for it.

45.       U. S. adolescent males are more concerned about occupational choices than U. S. adolescent females are? 

   a. True                                        

  b. False

46.       How does your author explain the fact that those who cohabit before marriage are more likely to get divorced after marriage?

a. cohabitation weakens marital bonds                                                                                                                              b. Cohabitors may be less committed to marriage because of their nontraditional views                                          c. Cohabitors are less educated than those who get married without cohabiting and thus they are less committed to marriage                                                                                                                                                                        d.none of these; cohabitors are not more likely to get divorced than those who do not cohabit before marriage

47.                   “Lifespan” refers to:

                        a. how long a person will live on average

                        b. the longest a person could expect to live under the best circumstances

                        c. how long a person lives under normal circumstances

                        d. the median age a person will live in a given population at a given time

48.                   Successful retirement:

a. requires mandatory retirement ages.

b. involves financial security.

c. is rare in today’s society.

d. usually occurs even if one is “forced out” of their job.

49.                   Attractiveness is:

a. determined purely by physicality.                                                                                                                                       b. unaffected by the sound of one’s voice.                                                                                                                                 c. determined in part by psychological characteristics.                                                                                                d. often determined by the pheromones that one emits.

50.                   Evidence suggests that one in four women in the U.S. will be raped during her lifetime.

                                    a. True

                        b. False

51.                   Many people remain lonely because they fear being rejected by others.

                                    a. True

                        b. False

52.                   The effects of Alzheimer’s disease range from forgetting recent events to significant confusion to death.

                                    a. True

                        b. False

53.                   Why might children from poorer, non-industrialized countries still be growing taller while those in industrialized countries are not?

a. nutrition in industrialized countries is getting poorer                                                                                              b. medical care in industrialized countries has not yet prompted a growth trend.                                                 c. nutrition continues to improve in non-industrialized countries                                                                             d. technology is allowing for decreases in neonatal illnesses and deaths in non- industrialized countries

54.       It is normal for male adolescents to think of themselves as action heroes and to act as though they are made of steel?

a. True

b. False

55.       Which of the following is not an example of a carcinogen?

a. Chemicals in tobacco

b. viruses

c. ultraviolet radiation

d. metastasis

56.       When a person experiences self-acceptance as a member of their ethnic group, they are in which stage of the development of ethnic identity?

a. ethnic identity search         

b. ethnic identity diffusion

c. unexamined ethnic identity

d. achieved ethnic identity

57.       Living together, or being POSSLQs:

a. is considered a sin by most people today in the U.S.                                                                                                  b. is accepted in American society more today than ever.                                                                                           c. has increased 10-fold since the 1960s in the U.S.                                                                                                      d. requires a legally binding contract that is prepared by an attorney

            58.       Havighurst’s (1972) model of normalcy in middle adulthood leaves no room for:

                        a. gays and lesbians

                        b. people who do not adhere to organized rebellion

            c.         the unemployed

                  d. those who are physically handicapped

59.       Substance abuse is the leading cause of death among male adolescents in the United States.

a. True

b. False

60.       People in college are often at the realistic choice stage of occupational development.

a. True

b. False

61.       Hospice care:

a. takes control over someone’s situation so he/she won’t have to make any decisions.

b. focuses on curing the patient of his/her illness.

c. only works with the dying patient.

d. provides medication to relieve pain and other services to help the patient and his/her family.

62.       Erickson and theorized four forms of identity formation: Identity diffusion, Foreclosure, Moratorium and Identity achievement.

  a. True                                        

  b. False

  63.                 Ageism would be most accurately defined as :

                        a. the process of aging

                        b. the respect people shoe for older adults

                        c. prejudice against people because of their age

                        d. decline in our reproductive capacity

            64.       During middle adulthood, cognitive development involves:

a. some drop in processing speed and lapses in memory.                                                                                                    b. a sharp decline in working memory capacity.                                                                                                                    c. is better than it has ever been for those in developed nations.                                                                                                 d. is best for all people who live in the United States today.

            65.       Havighurst’s (1972) model of developmental tasks during middle adulthood:

a. is based in the television series “Father knows Best”                                                                                                       b. encompasses the lives of diverse individuals                                                                                                                      c. has no relevance to modern life                                                                                                                                       d. describes tasks that are relevant to some, but not all adults

66.       Losing one’s spouse:

a.  is associated with decreased physical and mental health.

b. has little effect on older adults since they expected their partners to die.

c. typically increases the social interaction of the surviving spouse.

d. usually leads to an increase in social activities.

67.       According to Levinson’s “seasons of life” theory, during middle adulthood:

a. people are likely to experience a midlife crisis                                                                                                                  b. people look back at their youth more often than looking ahead to their death                                                          c. people will experience great happiness when they realize that they are approaching the end of their work years.                                                                                                                                                                                    d. menopause is seen as a positive event

            68.       Erikson’s theory of psychosocial development states that the conflict during late adulthood is:

                        a. intimacy vs. isolation 

                        b. identity vs. identity confusion

c.         c. ego integrity vs. despair     

                        d. generativity vs. stagnation

69.       Of those who receive hospice care, the most common location for their death is:

a. in a private residence

b. in a hospital

c. in a nursing home

d. in a hospice inpatient facility

70.       Which of the following is NOT one of the four areas of psychological problems that suicidal adolescents experience?

a. confusion about the self       

b. impulsiveness

c. interpersonal problems    

d. financial difficulties 

71.       Suicide is the leading cause of death among U. S. adolescents.

  a. True                                      

  b. False

            72.       No two people age in the same way or at the same rate. This is called interindividual variability.               

                        a. True

                        b. False

            73.       At what age are women who become pregnant first advised to check for chromosomal abnormalities in their fetus?

                        a. 35 years of age

                        b. 40 years of age

                        c. 45 years of age

                        d. 50 years of age

            74.       Older Americans report being much less happy than younger adults.

                        a. True

                        b. False

            75.       Which of the following is recommended to those who are supporting a dying person?

a. Don’t talk about the impending death.      

b. Don’t touch the person too much.

c. Don’t talk about your own problems

d. Don’t minimize the person’s pain or need to grieve.

            76.       Adaptive thermogenesis is:

a. The rate of those 18- to 24-years of ages who are overweight or obese adulthood.

b. A cluster of symptoms that results from sudden decrease in the use of a drug.

c. One reason why those who are overweight or obese may have difficulty losing weight.

d. The need to take more of a drug to achieve same effect.

77.       Gina and David are both 12 years old. Given what we know about adolescent height and weight growth spurts, which would you, expect to find?

a. David is taller than Gina         

b. Gina is taller than David

c. David weighs more than Gina 

 d. both would be same height and weight as neitherhas enteredinto growth spurts.

78.       According to Peck (1968), ego transcendence:

a. comes when people realize they are going to decline physically.

b. involves helping future generations and leaving a legacy of oneself.

c. is the same thing as self-love.

d. is a result of embracing one’s career and recognizing that retirement is just an   acceptance that one has nothing more to contribute to the world.

79.       In older adults, depression:

a. often goes undiagnosed and untreated.

b. is considered normal.

c. is indistinguishable from sadness.

d. has symptoms that are unique and distinctive from physical conditions.

80.       Current “death education” suggests:

a. Kübler-Ross was wrong about the stages of dying.

b. people should fight death to the end.

c. people should be supported as they go through the stages of death identified by Kübler-Ross.

d. if people resist the stages proposed by Kübler-Ross they should be “urged” to experience them for their own mental well-being.

81.       Adolescents are in constant state of rebellion against their parents.

a. True                                        

b. False

82.       Viagra, Levitra, and Cialis are:

a. immunological disorders experienced mostly by middle-aged men.

b. medications used to treat colon cancer in women.

c. medications used to treat erectile disorder in men.

d. three researchers who study physical aging during middle adulthood.

83.       Which of the following is true regarding how stress affects people during middle adulthood?

a. all people experience stress the same way                                                                                                                         b. those who believe a stressor is global are less likely to be depressed                                                                        c. those who believe they have control are less likely to be depressed                                                                                                                                 d. those who believe that stressful life events cannot be changed are less likely to be depressed

84.       Which of the following is the definition of a secular trend?

a. the onset of puberty occurring earlier than in past generations                                                                                      b. a historical trend towards increasing adult height and earlier puberty                                                                          c. individuals having a longer life span than those in previous generations                                                                          d. a 3 to 5 point increase in a population’s IQ score over several generations.

            85.       Identifying what stresses one out is a good step toward managing one’s stress.

a. True

b. False

86.       Being able to understand both sides of the debate on abortion while maintaining a particular view is an example of relativistic thinking.

a. True

b. False

87.       Life expectancy is:

a.

the same thing as lifespan.

b.

how long a member of a species can live.

c.

the average number of years someone is expected to live.

d.

controlled by genetics alone.

88.       According to Erikson, the key “crisis” of young adulthood is:

a. separating from one’s parents.                                                                                                                                     b. establishment of intimate relationships.                                                                                                                     c. developing a sense of themselves                                                                                                                                d. understanding the sexual nature of one’s relationships with one’s mother

            89.       Which of the following is true regarding hospice care?        

a. It focuses on palliative rather than curative care.

b. It treats the disease, not the patient.

c. It emphasizes quantity of life, not quality.

d. It recommends shortening one’s life in many cases.

            90.       After college graduation, Ricardo has decided to embark on a new phase of his life, following his dream of opening up his own consulting firm. According to Levinson and his colleagues, what is Ricardo following?

                        a. his heart

                        b. his parents’ wishes, which he does not realize are theirs rather than his

                        c. the dream

                        d. the wrong direction

91.       The leading causes of death in middle adulthood:

a. are suicide, accidents, and homicide.

b. the same as during early adulthood.

c. include cancer, heart disease, and accidents.

d. include heart disease, homicide, and suicide.

            92.       Generalized anxiety disorder:

                        a. is rare in older adults

                        b. is considered the same thing as depression

c. may result from the perception that one lacks control over one’s life.

d. is a phobic disorder

93.       Much of the difference in mortality rates from cancer during middle adulthood can be attributed to lack of early detection and treatment.

a. True

b. False

94.       According to Erikson’s psychosocial theory of development, generativity is:

a. the ability to create power                                                                                                                                                 b. what is needed during early adulthood                                                                                                                                 c. a negative outcome of middle adulthood                                                                                                                        d. the ability to produce something

            95.       Which of the following is true regarding late adulthood, according to Erikson’s psychosocial theory of development?

a. Those who achieved positive responses to earlier crises are more likely to achieve ego integrity during late adulthood.

b. Those who achieved positive responses to earlier crises are less likely to achieve ego integrity during late adulthood.

c. There is no relationship between the responses to earlier crises and achieving ego integrity during late adulthood

d. It is not positive to achieve ego integrity unless one has successfully “overcome” all of the previous developmental crises.

96.       Life expectancy:

a. is related to gender but not race.

b. is related to race but not gender

c. is related to race and gender but not geographic location.

d. is related to race, gender, geographic location, and health-related behavior.

97.       In 1900, _____ people lived past their 65th birthday. Now that number is more like  _____.

a. 1 in 1000; 1 in 100

b. 1 in 100; 1 in 25

c. 1 in 25; 1 in 8

d. 1 in 8; 1 in 5

            98.       According to your author death has many different meanings. It is not, however, a(n) ________ matter.

a. biological

b. legal

c. emotional

d. educational

            99.       The health of people between 40 and 65 years of age:

a.  is the same around the world.

b. has decreased in the last century.

c. is better than it has ever been for those in developed nations.

d. is best for all people who live in the United States today.

100.     Middle Adulthood:

a. is a time of great responsibility, but few positive aspects.

b. has few stressors.

c. is a time when few people are able to cope well with multiple stressors.

d. has positive and negative aspects.

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calcite will scratch gypsum. this is an example of the physical characteristics called ____.

Question 1

You can enter the correct range in a function by typing the beginning and ending cell references separated by a ____. 

Question 2

How many chart types does Excel offer? 

Question 3

In Excel, a number can contain the characters _____. 

Question 4

To enter a number such as 6,000,000,000,000,000 you can type 6,000,000,000,000,000 or
you can type _____. 

Question 5

What effect does the Comma Style format have on the selected cells? 

Question 6

To enter data in a cell, you must first select or activate the _____. 

Question 7

Pressing the _____ key to complete an entry activates the adjacent cell to the right. 

Question 8

Clicking the _____ box completes an entry. 

Question 9

By default, text is _____ in a cell. 

Question 10

The _____ is the small black square located in the lower-right corner of the heavy border around the active cell. 

Question 11

nar005-1.jpg

In the accompanying figure, the _____ identifies the colors assigned to each bar in the chart on a worksheet. 

Question 12

To cancel an entire entry before entering it into the cell, press the _____ key. 

Question 13

nar004-1.jpg

A _____ is a series of two or more adjacent cells in a column or row or a rectangular group of cells, as shown in the accompanying figure. 

Question 14

What effect does the Accounting Number Format have on the selected cells? 

Question 15

The first step in creating an effective worksheet is to make sure you _____. 

Question 16

Which of the following calculations multiplies 23 by 0.01? 

Question 17

Which of the following happens when you enter the formula =G15 into a cell? 

Question 18

To start a new line in a cell, press the _____ keys. 

Question 19

To copy cell contents, you can select the cell and then press the _____ keys. 

Question 20

When you enter a two-digit year that is less than 30, Excel changes the year to _____. 

Question 21

Which of the following is the path to the Conditional Formatting button? 

Question 22

You can select a range using the keyboard by pressing the _____ key and then an ARROW key. 

Question 23

Which of the following is the path to the Spelling button? 

Question 24

All of the following are valid Excel arithmetic operators except _____. 

Question 25

The adjusted cell references in a copied and pasted formula are called _____ references. 

Question 26

Which of the following is not a valid format symbol? 

Question 27

_____ refers to cells not wide enough to display the entire entry. 

Question 28

Which of the following formulas contains an absolute cell reference? 

Question 29

nar005-1.jpg

In the accompanying figure, the split double arrow mouse pointer _____. 

Question 30

The _____ function is useful when you want to assign a value to a cell based on a logical test. 

Question 31

When you set up a worksheet, you should use cell references in formulas whenever possible, rather than _____ values. 

Question 32

If formulas located in other cells reference cells in a deleted row or column, Excel does not adjust these cell references but instead displays the _____ error message. 

Question 33

You can press the _____ keys to open the Format Cells dialog box. 

Question 34

Pressing the _____ key(s) removes the marquee from the source area. 

Question 35

Which of the following is the path to the Increase or Decrease Indent button? 

Question 36

The _____ function sums the numbers in the specified range and then divides the sum by the number of cells with numeric values in the range. 

Question 37

When Excel follows the order of operations, the formula, 8 * 3 + 2, equals _____. 

Question 38

The _____ function determines the lowest number in a range. 

Question 39

The _____ function displays the highest value in a range. 

Question 40

The _____ displays numbers with a fixed dollar sign to the left of the number, a comma every three positions to the left of the decimal point, and displays numbers to the nearest cent.

Categories
do my assignment essay help need someone to write my essay

a 12-ft-by-15-ft rectangular swimming pool

A 12-ft-by-15-ft rectangular swimming pool has a 3-ft-wide-no-slip surface around it. What is the outer perimeter of the no-slip surface?

78 ft
78 ft^2
198 ft
198 ft^2

I’ve already completed it, and know the answer is 78 ft, but I don’t quite understand it. I would appreciate if someone could explain the problem. I thought it would have been +3 to each side, so 12 ft becomes 15 ft, and the other side, which is 15 ft, will be 18 ft. This is incorrect though, so I’m confused.

Thank you!

0 0 329
asked by Anonymous
Oct 7, 2016
it’s 3 ft on each side (left&right, top&bottom), so 12 becomes 18, 15 becomes 21.

2(18+21) = 78

0 0
posted by Steve
Oct 7, 2016

Categories
need someone to write my essay order essay online pay for essay

what is a data pattern that repeats itself after a period of​ days, weeks,​ months, or​ quarters?

what is a data pattern that repeats itself after a period of​ days, weeks,​ months, or​ quarters?
Categories
coursework help essay writing help online essays online need someone to write my essay professional dissertation writers

find the length of the missing side leave your answer in simplest radical form

Can anyone check my answers?

  • = My answer
  1. Find the length of the missing side. Leave your answer in simplest radical form (1 point) The triangle is not drawn to scale.
    Sides 4 on the bottom and 3 on the side

a. 25
b. 144
c. 5
d. √5*

  1. Find the length of the missing leg of a right triangle given a leg of length 8 and a hypotenuse of length 10. Leave your answer in simplest radical form (1 point)

a. 2√41*
b. 164
c. 6
d. 2

  1. Does the set of numbers 13, 21, and 24 form a Pythagorean triple? Explain. (1 point)

a. Yes; 13²+21²≠24²
b. No; 13²+21=24²
c. No; 13²+21²≠24²
d. Yes; 13²+21²=24²*

  1. A triangle has side lengths of 12 cm, 15cm, and 20 cm. Classify it as acute, obtuse or right. (1 point)

a. Acute
b. Obtuse
c. Right*
d. There is not enough information

  1. A gardener wants to divide a square piece of lawn in half diagonally. What is the length of the diagonal if the side of the square is 8ft? Leave your Answer in simplest radical form. (1 point)

a. 16√8
b. 2√8*
c. 8√2
d. 4

0 3 1,859
asked by Kairi
Oct 27, 2016

1. Nope – 3^2+4^2 = 25

2. Nope – the hypotenuse is 10, not the leg

3 ok

4 ok

5 nope – look carefully

0 3
posted by Steve
Oct 27, 2016
Steve is wrong
its
5
6
c
obtuse
8_/2

18 0
posted by tomy
Mar 3, 2017
question 2 is 5 not 6 i just did the test

0 7
posted by creeper
Mar 23, 2017
Tomy is correct

7 0
posted by helping hand
Apr 23, 2018

the answers are:
1 c
2 c
3 c
4 b
5 c
100 %

17 1
posted by Kenz
Apr 25, 2018
Kenz is correct, I got 100

6 1
posted by Natalie
May 25, 2018
kenz is right

3 0
posted by Mason
Feb 12, 2019
Kenz is right. 100%.

1 0
posted by иван
Mar 13, 2019
Tommy and kenz are both right

0 0
posted by Unicorns
Mar 20, 2019

Thank you, Kenz! Just took quiz and got 100%

0 0
posted by Taken ♥
Apr 10, 2019

Categories
do my assignment help me write my essay how to write an admission essay need someone to write my essay phd dissertation writing services

a solution of licl in water has xlicl = 0.0500. what is the molality?

A solution of LiCl in water has XLiCl = 0.0800. What is the molality?

0 0 734
asked by jamiya
Sep 18, 2012
XLiCl = 0.08; therefore,
XH2O = 0.92
If we take 1 mol of solution, we have 0.92 mols H2O or 0.92*18 = 16.56g H2O or 0.01656 kg solvent.
m LiCl = mols LiCl/kg solvent or
0.08/0.01656 = ?

0 0
posted by DrBob222
Sep 18, 2012
What is the molality of a solution composed of 38.0 g of cane sugar (C12H22O11) dissolved in 175 g of water?

0 0
posted by Jai
Jun 5, 2013

Categories
essays online help me write my essay need someone to write my essay

holscience

Laboratory Techniques and Measurements Hands-On Labs, Inc. Version 42-0165-00-02

Review the safety materials and wear goggles when

you will need and set aside a safe work space in

Experiment Summary:

learn about the common techniques and laboratory

will also use the laboratory equipment to make measurements such as temperature and density,

1V1 2V2

EXPERIMENT

© Hands-On Labs, Inc. www.HOLscience.com 1

Learning Objectives

www.HOLscience.com 2 ©Hands-On Labs, Inc.

Experiment Laboratory Techniques and Measurements

Materials Student Supplied Materials

1 1 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 5 3 1 1 1

HOL Supplied Materials

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

www.HOLscience.com 3 ©Hands-On Labs, Inc.

Experiment Laboratory Techniques and Measurements

Note: To fully and accurately complete all lab exercises, you will need access to:

Note: The packaging and/or materials in this LabPaq kit may differ slightly from that which is listed above. For an exact listing of materials, refer to the Contents List included in your LabPaq kit.

www.HOLscience.com 4 ©Hands-On Labs, Inc.

Experiment Laboratory Techniques and Measurements

Background

measurements

Table 1.

www.HOLscience.com 5 ©Hands-On Labs, Inc.

Experiment Laboratory Techniques and Measurements

Table 2

Length

Length meter

www.HOLscience.com 6 ©Hands-On Labs, Inc.

Experiment Laboratory Techniques and Measurements

Figure 1. A. B. C.

Temperature and Time

Temperature

kelvin

A ruler is a tool used to measure length. However, a

an instrument used to rule (create) straight lines. A calibrated ruler is a ruler which contains measurements to measure length along a straight

line.

www.HOLscience.com 7 ©Hands-On Labs, Inc.

Experiment Laboratory Techniques and Measurements

F K C F C C

(T – 32)T = T + 273.15 T = (1.8)T + 32 T = 1.8

Figure 2.

second

www.HOLscience.com 8 ©Hands-On Labs, Inc.

Experiment Laboratory Techniques and Measurements

Atomic clocks

Volume

Volume 3

3

3

Figure 3. 3

3

Graduated Cylinder, Meniscus, Volumetric Flask, and Graduated Pipet

graduated cylinder

www.HOLscience.com 9 ©Hands-On Labs, Inc.

Experiment Laboratory Techniques and Measurements

Figure 4.

meniscus

Figure 5. A.

B.

www.HOLscience.com 10 ©Hands-On Labs, Inc.

Experiment Laboratory Techniques and Measurements

Figure 6.

The majority of liquids in glass will form a concave shaped meniscus. However, some liquids,

such as mercury, will form a convex meniscus. In the case of a convex meniscus, the volume is read from the top of the curve rather than

the bottom.

www.HOLscience.com 11 ©Hands-On Labs, Inc.

Experiment Laboratory Techniques and Measurements

graduated pipets serological pipets

Figure 7.

Figure 8.

www.HOLscience.com 12 ©Hands-On Labs, Inc.

Experiment Laboratory Techniques and Measurements

Figure 9.

Figure 10. A. B. C.

www.HOLscience.com 13 ©Hands-On Labs, Inc.

Experiment Laboratory Techniques and Measurements

Archimedes’ method Buoyancy

Figure 11. A. B.

Archimedes, a Greek mathematician and scientist, was

asked by King Hiero II to determine if a crown made for him was composed of pure

gold, or contained a mixture of gold and silver. As Archimedes could not damage the crown, he

It is from this challenge that he developed what is now known as Archimedes’ Principle. Knowing

that density is a physical property that does not change, Archimedes could determine if the density of the crown was equal to the density of

pure gold. As the densities of the crown and pure gold did not match, he concluded that the crown was not made from

pure gold!

www.HOLscience.com 14 ©Hands-On Labs, Inc.

Experiment Laboratory Techniques and Measurements

Mass and Density

Mass kilogram

Figure 12.

“weigh”

Density

3

MassDensity = Volume

www.HOLscience.com 15 ©Hands-On Labs, Inc.

Experiment Laboratory Techniques and Measurements

Molarity

MolesMolarity = Liter

1 1 2 2 = M V M V

V V

V V V

1 1 2 2 5.6M ( ) = 3.7M 40mL

= 26.43

= x x

M V M V

www.HOLscience.com 16 ©Hands-On Labs, Inc.

Experiment Laboratory Techniques and Measurements

Figure 13.

www.HOLscience.com 17 ©Hands-On Labs, Inc.

Experiment Laboratory Techniques and Measurements

Experimental Error:

Measured Value – Accepted Value Percent Error (%) = 100

Accepted Value

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Experiment Laboratory Techniques and Measurements

Exercise 1: Length, Temperature, and Mass

Length Measurements

Note: Record every measurement you make with this ruler to the same decimal place. Remember to do this any time you use this ruler throughout the experiment.

Data Table 1 Lab Report Assistant

Data Table 1

Data Table 1.

Temperature Measurements

Note: The thermometer is shipped in a protective cardboard tube, labeled “thermometer.”

Note: Record every measurement you make with this thermometer to the same decimal place. Remember to do this any time you use this measuring device throughout the experiment.

Data Table 2 Lab Report Assistant.

www.HOLscience.com 19 ©Hands-On Labs, Inc.

Experiment Laboratory Techniques and Measurements

Note: When measuring the temperatures place the thermometer into the water so that the silver bulb is fully submerged, but not touching any sides of the glass beaker. The measurement is complete when the thermometer remains the same temperature without changing.

Note: When the burner is lit, the flame may be barely visible.

Data Table 2.

Data Table 2.

Data Table 2.

Data Table 2.

Data Table 2.

Data Table 2.

www.HOLscience.com 20 ©Hands-On Labs, Inc.

Experiment Laboratory Techniques and Measurements

Mass Measurements

Note: There may be a cardboard protector between the scale base and top. If so, remove the cardboard from the scale.

Data Table 3 Lab Report Assistant.

Data Table 3.

Data Table 3

Data Table 3.

Data Table 3.

Questions o o

o

o

www.HOLscience.com 21 ©Hands-On Labs, Inc.

Experiment Laboratory Techniques and Measurements

Exercise 2: Volume and Density

Data Table 4 Lab Report Assistant

Data Table 4.

Data Table 4

Data Table 4.

Data Table 4

Data Table 5 Lab Report Assistant.

Data Table 5.

Data Table 5.

www.HOLscience.com 22 ©Hands-On Labs, Inc.

Experiment Laboratory Techniques and Measurements

Data Table 5.

Data Table 6 Lab Report Assistant

Data Table 6.

Data Table 6,

Data Table 6.

Data Table 6.

Data Table 7 Lab Report Assistant.

Figure 14.

www.HOLscience.com 23 ©Hands-On Labs, Inc.

Experiment Laboratory Techniques and Measurements

Data Table 7

Data Table 7

Data Table 7

Questions

3

www.HOLscience.com 24 ©Hands-On Labs, Inc.

Experiment Laboratory Techniques and Measurements

Data Table 8 Laboratory Report Assistant

Note: You will use the mass of the dry volumetric flask throughout the experiment.

Figure 15.

Data Table 8

O

Data Table 8

Data Table 8

www.HOLscience.com 25 ©Hands-On Labs, Inc.

Experiment Laboratory Techniques and Measurements

Data Table 8.

Note: You will need to convert the 25-mL to liters to determine this volume.

Moles in Volumetric Flask (mol)Molarity = Total Volume (L)

Data Table 8 Data Table 9 Lab Report Assistant

Data Table 9

Data Table 9

Data Table 9

Data Table 9

www.HOLscience.com 26 ©Hands-On Labs, Inc.

Experiment Laboratory Techniques and Measurements

Data Table 9

Data Table 9

Data Table 9.

Note: In step 24, transfer the appropriate volume of sugar solution dilutions (4.5 mL, 3 mL, and 6 mL).

Data Table 10 Lab Report Assistant

Questions

Data Table 10,

1 1 2 2

1 1 2 2

In this equation: = Initial Concentration, = Volume Transferred, = 25 mL, = Final Concentration

=

M V V M

M V M V

www.HOLscience.com 27 ©Hands-On Labs, Inc.

Experiment Laboratory Techniques and Measurements

Laboratory Techniques and Measurements Hands-On Labs, Inc. Version 42-0165-00-02

Lab Report Assistant

Exercise 1: Length, Temperature, and Mass Data Table 1.

Object

Data Table 2.

Water

www.HOLscience.com 28 ©Hands-On Labs, Inc.

Experiment Laboratory Techniques and Measurements

Data Table 3.

Object

Questions ° °

°

o

www.HOLscience.com 29 ©Hands-On Labs, Inc.

Experiment Laboratory Techniques and Measurements

Exercise 2: Volume and Density

Data Table 4.

Mass A Mass B Mass B – A

Liquid Volume Graduated Graduated

Cylinder with Density

g/mL % Error

Data Table 5.

Object: Mass Width Volume 3 cm3

Data Table 6.

Object Mass graduated cylinder graduated cylinder Object Volume

Data Table 7.

Object Mass – –

placed Water

www.HOLscience.com 30 ©Hands-On Labs, Inc.

Experiment Laboratory Techniques and Measurements

Questions

3

www.HOLscience.com 31 ©Hands-On Labs, Inc.

Experiment Laboratory Techniques and Measurements

Data Table 8.

Chemical Volumetric Flask

Molar Mass Moles in Volumetric Flask

Total Volume Molarity

O

Data Table 9.

Volume Mass Density – Volume Final Concen-

3

Data Table 10.

Molarity vs. Density

www.HOLscience.com 32 ©Hands-On Labs, Inc.

Experiment Laboratory Techniques and Measurements

Questions

Data Table 10,

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Experiment Laboratory Techniques and Measurements

Categories
Assignment Help how to write an admission essay need someone to write my essay phd dissertation writing services

which of the following excerpts from orpheus and eurydice is an example of hyperbole

1.Which of the following excerpts from Orpheus and Eurydice is an example of hyperbole?
235 results
language arts
Read the following hyperbole from Orpheus and Eurydice: “Rivers stopped flowing along the banks so that they could hear Orpheus, whose music was more harmonious than theirs.” What is the most likely reason that the author included this hyperbole? a)to

asked by sandra on February 19, 2015
English
1.) Which of the following excerpts from Orpheus and Eurydice is an example of hyperbole? a.) …even the ice-hard heart of Hades melted b.) …the music he played tore at the hearts of everyone who followed. c.) …Persephone, her face veiled by the

asked by Ello mates on January 29, 2016
English
1.Which of the following excerpts from Orpheus and Eurydice is an example of hyperbole? A. even the ice hard heart of hades melted B. the music he played tore at the hearts of everone who followed. C persephone her face veiled by the shadows of that

asked by GummyBears on January 24, 2016
English
In Betty Bonham Lie’s retelling of the myth of Orpheus and Eurydice, how is the narrator’s description of Orpheus’s music an example of hyperbole? A. The narrator retells old myths about orpheus’s powers B. The narrator exaggerates the effects of orpheus’s

asked by Yes on December 21, 2018
English
one year ago 2. Read the following sentence from Betty Bonham Lies retelling of myth of Orpheus and Eurydice: “Orpheus’s music was so compelling that even the ice-hard heart of Hades melted” What is the effect of the hyperbole in this quote? a.) It

asked by Hello on May 15, 2016

English
What does the following hyperbole from Orpheus and Eurydice accomplish? “How could he live without his wife, the other half of his soul?” a. It emphasizes the strength of Orpheus’s love for his wife.*** b. It shows the Greek view of married people being

asked by Kaai97 on March 9, 2016
English
Read the following quote from Betty Bonham Lies’s retelling of the myth of Orpheus and Eurydice. When Orpheus made music, all the world stopped to listen. Wild beasts drew near him, so entranced they put aside their fierceness. Trees gathered around to

asked by Mike on May 18, 2016
English
Which of the following quotes from Orpheus and Eurydice best shows the power of Orpheus’ music? a. “Even before he reached manhood, he was accomplished in all the arts, but especially in poetry and music.” b. “Orpheus drew the most wonderful music from his

asked by Kaai97 on March 9, 2016
English
Which of these sentences from the story is an example of a hyperbole? Orpheus and Eurydice. A.) Soon he saw the River Styx, which separates the Underworld from the world of the living. B.) He was the King of Thrace, the most musical of all the Greek

asked by Dylan on February 22, 2018
English
Which phrase best defines an epic simile? a. a figure of speech in which one thing is spoken of as if it were something else b. a literary technique that involves differences between meaning and intention c. a work created in imitation of another d. a

asked by Kaai97 on June 11, 2016
English
How does Margaret Atwood draw on source material in The Penelopiad? A: She tells The Odyssey from the view of Penelope’s maids B: She tells The Odyssey from the view of a more modern woman C: She reveals Odysseus’ true feelings about the events in the

asked by SkatingDJ on February 27, 2016
English 9
Which of the following meanings of the vocabulary word broached is used in the following excerpt from Orpheus and Eurydice? In vain, Orpheus tried to follow his bride. But this time the Underworld was firmly closed to him. No other mortal had broached it

asked by Anonymous on September 17, 2017
English
Which of the following meanings of the vocabulary word broached is used in the following excerpt from Orpheus and Eurydice? In vain, Orpheus tried to follow his bride. But this time the Underworld was firmly closed to him. No other mortal had (BROACHED) it

asked by GummyBears16 on January 24, 2016
Hyperbole
Read the oral notes carefully. Then, decide whether each of the following statements contain a hyperbole! Q1. “If I’ve told you this story once, I’ve told it a million times!” a. Hyperbole b. No Hyperbole Ans: a. Hyperbole Q2. “I feel so hungry today.

asked by deyond ng on February 27, 2017
English – help
Which of the following is the antecedent of the pronoun “theirs” in the sentence below? Rivers stopped flowing along the banks so that they could hear Orpheus, whose music was more harmonious than “theirs”. The story is Orpheus and Eurydice and the word we

asked by Cassie on January 22, 2014

English
so for theme of story of few notes for orpheus before i think that the title of story meant message for orpheus but i guess that not be because orpheus way different than jake. jake be so cranky when orpheus be so charming, and caring. i think it be a

asked by Mohammad on February 17, 2012
english

  1. What personality trait does Odysseus reveal when he devises a plan to listen to the Sirens’ song and yet escape destruction? (1 point) irritability loyalty curiosity generosity10. Read the following passage from the Odyssey: Tell me, where was it, now,

asked by fluffy on February 4, 2014
english (check my work)

  1. What personality trait does Odysseus reveal when he devises a plan to listen to the Sirens’ song and yet escape destruction? (1 point) irritability loyalty curiosity generosity10. Read the following passage from the Odyssey: Tell me, where was it, now,

asked by fluffy on February 5, 2014
english

  1. What personality trait does Odysseus reveal when he devises a plan to listen to the Sirens’ song and yet escape destruction? (1 point) irritability loyalty curiosity generosity10. Read the following passage from the Odyssey: Tell me, where was it, now,

asked by love on February 5, 2014
English – Ms. Sue
Hi Ms. Sue I’m Aaron and I’m Mohammad’s friend, I helped Mohammad edit his, and I’m also doing a theme on the story “A few notes for Orpheus” and could gladly use your help. As Mohammad had pointed out before that the title is a musical tribute

asked by Aaron on February 20, 2012
english
what roles are played by the female characters you encountered in this unit? describe some of these females characters, their traits, and the roles they played within the selections you read, especially considering that all of those selections had male

asked by anne on December 19, 2017
Social studies
Identify which principle of government is expressed in each of the seven excerpts from the Declaration of Independence. Excerpts may express more than one principles.

asked by ???? on November 16, 2016
la
wat is a hyperbole Hyperbole is exaggeration or overstatement. Example: I have told you a million times. They are so tiny you could put a million on the head of a pin. http://volweb.utk.edu/school/bedford/harrisms/hyperbole.htm

asked by Is 9+9=10? on March 29, 2007
english
What roles are played by the female characters you encountered in this unit? Describe some of these female characters, their traits, and the roles they played within the selections you read, especially considering that all of those selections had male

asked by erica on February 19, 2019
English 9 – HELP!

  1. The small boat was scudding into the open sea with a full sail. (1 point) getting stuck sinking deeply moving swiftly rocking harshly 2. As an outdoor enthusiast, Kristina abhorred the fact that people left debris along the hiking trail. (1 point)

asked by Abby on March 11, 2014

English
Here the once embattled farmers stood and fired the shot heard round the world. metaphor simile personification hyperbole D hyperbole

asked by christopher on April 21, 2010
english!
what is the effect of a hyperbole in a essay?? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperbole It’s usually used for emphasis — emphasis of the opposite of what is said! =)

asked by henry! on November 27, 2006
English
i know what hyperbole mean that be overexaggeration, but what be Hyperbole litotes?

asked by Mohammad on May 28, 2012
English
i take better quotes from story a few notes for orpheus i need help choosing best 5 ones. all these show theme really well so i not know which 5 to choose. “I was almost glad to hear her. But something must be wrong. She never phoned me.” “Will you come up

asked by Mohammad on February 18, 2012
english
so i am really confused if this is a hyperbole: the tattoo killed him. i am reading the same book as another girl called the barcode tattoo and i am in need of some hyperboles for my project. please tell me if that quote: the tatoo killed him, is an

asked by jamie on November 13, 2010
English
I have to answer these questions but i am confused…please help 🙂 As flies to the wanton boys are we to the gods; they kill us for sport Metaphor Personification Hyperbole Litotes None of these I do not understand the sentence itself 🙁 I wish I had a

asked by Sandara on May 23, 2011
Eng- Hyperbole example
Anyone noe an example of a hyperbole being used in romantic poetry? provide the poem, and the line being used plz. Tnx This Wordsworth poem has an example of hyperbole. http://www.bartleby.com/145/ww260.html

asked by thomas on February 21, 2007
English – Hyperbole
what is it used for, and how and why might it appear in literature? its used to make an obvious exaggeration like “to wait an eternity” “Hyperbole is a figure of speech which is an exaggeration. Persons often use expressions such as “I nearly died

asked by thomas on February 21, 2007
English
Which elements from “Amelia Earhart: Pioneer” show that it is not a tall tale? Select all that apply. A. It talks about an exciting person and events. B. It has a real person, not a larger-than-life character.*** C. It describes real events that could

asked by Anonymous on March 15, 2018
English/Lang. Arts
Which of the following sentences from the article is an example of hyperbole? Here are the examples… A. Ivory-billed woodpeckers still graced the planet. B.According to experts, they need large areas of old-growth forest, including many big, dead trees,

asked by Cassie on February 11, 2013

Literature
Which of the following excerpts is the best example of persuasion through an appeal to reason?

asked by Anonymous on November 22, 2007
Social Studies

  1. Which of the following excerpts is a grievance of the American colonists that was included in Declaration of Independence?

asked by Student on October 20, 2016
English ms. sue
ms. sue one my really good english friend also writing essay on theme of a few notes for orpheus u please be able to help him also get 100 words? he be able to post new question?

asked by Mohammad on February 20, 2012
english/reading.
I can’t find an actual summary of the picture bride by yoshiko uchida. All that comes up are sites with little excerpts of summarys and if you want more of it you have to pay. Can someone please help me?

asked by stacy. on August 19, 2010
to mikh
sorry i read reply so late you read the book “a few notes for orpheus?

asked by Mohammad on February 13, 2012
english
i read this book and if anyone read it, please be able to help me with questions? 1D_SS_CA_A Few Notes For Orpheus . d o c

asked by Mohammad on February 13, 2012
math
About hyperbole

asked by kwanda on June 10, 2017
English
what is a Hyperbole?

asked by Kill Aura on December 22, 2015
Writing
I have to write a page on my take about Oprah Winfrey speech at Howard university. Where can i find a transcript of her speech at Howard? I’ve looked at www.oprah.com, www.howard.edu, and searched www.google.com, but all I find are excerpts. The entire

asked by Devon on May 19, 2007
VOCABULARY STUDIES
WHICH SENTENCE IS AN EXAMPLE OF HYPERBOLE?

asked by AMY on April 2, 2011

english
What’s the full story of Don Quixote, Quixotic, tilting at windmills? I’ve googled it but have only found excerpts and small summaries. I need the details for an allusion card. Thanks much!

asked by claire on September 12, 2012
READING
Is this a hyperbole? They Have the best pie in the world.

asked by AMY on June 24, 2012
English
Help me write a hyperbole poem

asked by Anonymous on January 7, 2017
5th grade reading
Can someone tell me what is the difference between an idiom and a hyperbole?Thanks if you help!:)

asked by Kim on April 17, 2013
English
what be theme of this story? move on with life? don’t look back at past? also i not understand the title of story. i before thought orpheus be someone in story but it not be anyone.

asked by Mohammad on February 14, 2012
READING/LANGUAGE ARTS
I need an example of HYPERBOLE with the word CLOMPED. plzz !

asked by Gigi on March 6, 2013
poetry
how do you write a hyperbole poem? (with instructions)

asked by Ysabel on December 9, 2009
English
The literary device of foreshadowing is used in which of the following excerpts ? Answers are They’re spoiled and we’re spoiled Those screams and they sound familiar I have a feeling it’ll be africa again before then They’re not old enough to do that alone

asked by snow on March 17, 2014
English
the literary device of foreshadowing is used in which of the following excerpts? They’re spoiled and we’re spoiled Those screams — they sound familiar I have a feeling it’ll be Africa again before then They’re not old enough to do that alone, I explained

asked by Steve on March 20, 2017
language arts
are my feet are killing me is a alliteration, personification , or hyperbole?

asked by patrick on December 8, 2011

English
So get in where you fit in go on and shine free your mind is this a hyperbole

asked by Annaa on May 14, 2011
english
ok i just need a good devolved hyperbole (a big exageration)

asked by jimmy on February 20, 2013
english
is when my dad asked me to get the remote from the table near the tv i said it’s too far a hyperbole?

asked by A Dunce who needs an answer on February 20, 2013
english
is when my dad asked me to get the remote from the table near the tv i said it’s too far a hyperbole?

asked by A Dunce who needs an answer on February 20, 2013
english
what is an example of a hyperbole (with the chapter number) in animal farm

asked by jamie on April 17, 2011
English
when jake tell her daughter that her grandfather be really sick, she say “Oh” which be a wounded soung. a moan. orpheus look back and regret in his throat. what this tell about jake daughter? she be innocent?

asked by Mohammad on February 14, 2012
english 10th
what is a metaphor and hyperbole for the book the Bar Code Rebllion

asked by jessica on November 21, 2010
English
for slideshow presentation i want to add another theme caption for story. i not really know how to say it though like follow your heart to positive direction. like i want to take something positive from orpheus story and teach lesson to jake.

asked by Mohammad on February 19, 2012
English
Would ““The chain that bound her here was of iron links…” be a hyperbole? If not, than what literacy device is this?

asked by Jen on March 31, 2017
English-Poetry
do you know any bird poems that have alliteration, personification, imagery, hyperbole, and onomatopoeia?? please help!!!!

asked by Tony on November 2, 2008

English
“Beauty if only skin deep” is an example of ? A. personification. B. hyperbole. C. a generalization. D. a cliche

asked by Kayla on July 16, 2011
english
i read story today it be called ” A few notes for orpheus” anyone read this story before? i need help with questions.

asked by Mohammad on February 13, 2012
Vocab
I’m excited about my vacation. The beach has been calling my name. A. Personification B. Irony C. Hyperbole D. Onomatopoeia A??

asked by Alex on November 12, 2015
english
is the quote “you sit on a throne of lies” from the movie elf a hyperbole or an idiom?

asked by merri on April 18, 2016
Vocab
My mom told me not to worry. We will cross that bridge when we come to it. A. Hyperbole B. Simile C. Metaphor D. Cliche D?

asked by Alex on November 12, 2015
English
Question 19 But time did beckon to the flowers. Herbert metaphor simile personification hyperbole A

asked by christopher on April 21, 2010
english
An exaggeration used to emphasize a point. Question 9 options: Malapropism Irony Imagery Hyperbole

asked by Anonymous on December 1, 2018
English Literature
Which figure of speech does Paz use most frequently in “Two Bodies”? a. metaphor *** b. simile c. hyperbole d. paradox

asked by Anonymous on August 8, 2018
Language arts
…his eyes…were like the mountain sky when rain is pending…” is an example of __ . A) hyperbole B) metaphor C) assonance D) simile

asked by Anonymous on October 16, 2018
English
What kind of figurative language is in “She pulled in her horizon like a great fish-net,”. Is it both a hyperbole and a simile?

asked by danny123 on November 26, 2010

English
1.) Which of the following is the antecedent of the pronoun theirs in the sentence below? Rivers stopped flowing along the banks so that they could hear Orpheus, whose music was more harmonious than theirs a.) Rivers b.) Banks c.) Music C?

asked by Hello friend on January 29, 2016
English
i not get this question which be author come back to his Orpheus allusions with question referrring to jakes dad, “what songs found their out, or had any?” what be jakes hope for his dad?

asked by Mohammad on February 14, 2012
english PLZ HELP
the phrase “tradesman’s wagon were hurrying soundlessly” in line 6 is an example of OPTIONS simile metaphor alliteration hyperbole i’d really appreciate it thank you

asked by roeeeee on January 24, 2019
Descriptive Writing
Colby gave her Romeo a lecture for the mean comment he made about her in front of his friends. Is this a simile, metaphor, personification or hyperbole?

asked by sAMANTHA on September 11, 2008
poetry
I have to write a poem at least 15 lines about how i have accomplised something and these elements have to be in it …. Rhyme,imagery,simile,mataphor,figurativelanguage,slang/hyperbole HELP ME PLEASE!(:

asked by candace on January 11, 2012
LA- Grade 9
“Something invisible, seeking shelter from the cruel and pitiless vacuum of space.” Is an example of: a. metaphor b. personification c. symbolism d. hyperbole Your help is much appreciated !!

asked by Maddison on June 17, 2011
English

  1. Which of these lines contains the clearest example of dialect in poetry? A.) “I’ll get a blessin’ wi’ the lave…” B.) “By the stream & o’er the mead…” C.) “To such a deep delight ‘twould win me…” D.) “But oft, in lonely rooms, and ‘mid the din…”

asked by Cassie on May 14, 2015
AP English Literature
“every nerve I had feared him; and every morsel of flesh on my bones shrank when he came near,” uses all of the literary devices EXCEPT A) parallelism, B) hyperbole, C) paradox, D) personification, E) synecdoche

asked by james on February 13, 2012
English
What literary device is most strongly represented in the following line from “Beowulf?” “Follower and the strongest of the Geats” A. Alliteration B. Hyperbole C. Kenning D. Caesura

asked by Maria on January 12, 2016
English
Question 17 Mortality weighs heavily upon me like an unwilling sleep. Samuel Johnson metaphor simile personification hyperbole my answer B

asked by christopher on April 21, 2010

English
Question 20 Here the once embattled farmers stood and fired the shot heard round the world. metaphor simile personification hyperbole my answer A

asked by christopher on April 21, 2010
English
Question 20 Here the once embattled farmers stood and fired the shot heard round the world. metaphor simile personification hyperbole my answer A

asked by christopher on April 21, 2010
English-Poetry
I need to write a couple using 5 of these words: interfere, intermediate, interpret, recommend, remarkable, adjective, convection cell, weather, climate, or hyperbole

asked by Miranda on December 3, 2009
English-Metaphors
Which of the following excerpts from Frost’s poems is NOT a metaphor? A.Magnified apples appear and disappear / Stem end and blossom end B.Spring is the mischief in me C.My apple trees will never get across / And eat the cones under his pines, I tell him.

asked by Jess on February 8, 2012
English
In Chapter 3 of The Scarlet Letter In describing the momentary revelation of the stranger’s emotion, the narrator employs a. Allusion B. personification C. Simile D. Antithesis C. Hyperbole

asked by Amy on January 14, 2015
English
Which of these excerpts from Ben Jonson’s “Song: To Celia” compares love to intoxication? A. “But thou thereon didst only breathe/And sent’st it back to me.” B. “… As giving it a hope, that there/It could not withered be.” C. “The thirst that from a soul

asked by Steve on October 28, 2017
English
But time did beckon to the flowers. Herbert metaphor simile personification hyperbole my answer simile

asked by christopher on April 21, 2010
English
Can someone please tell me what, if any, figure of speech is used here? “Anyone who calls a spade a spade should be compelled to use one.” Simile Metaphor Personification Analogy Hyperbole None of these

asked by Anonymous on December 20, 2011
English
Which of these excerpts from Beowulf best describes Beowulf reason for attacking grendels mother? A- “whispered together/ and said that hope was gone, that the hero/had lost” B- and holy/god, who sent him victory, gave judgment/for truth and right” C “so

asked by Steve on December 7, 2017
AP English Literature
Can someone please help me? In Jane Eyre in chapter 1 with the quote, “every nerve I had feared him; and every morsel of flesh on my bones shrank when he came near,” all the literary devices illustrate all of the following EXCEPT A) parallelism, B)

asked by james on February 13, 2012

English
“Suddenly there came a tapping, / As of someone gently rapping, rapping at my chamber doors”. Which poetic device does Poe use in these lines? A. consonance B. hyperbole C. metaphor D. onomatopoeia is it A or b.

asked by hi on June 4, 2017
Literature- Urgent!!
Can anyone help me find a hyperbole in the book the lord of the flies, please? I’ve been trying to find one for the past two months! And now, school is about to start. The quotation, page number and a brief summary would be appreciated!!

asked by IB student on August 10, 2012
English
Argue a case for either the usage of hyperbole or understatement. Which do you think is more effective? More humorous? Explain your opinions, citing examples from the texts. Explain what this means and give an example…

asked by vickie on October 10, 2013
English
Which of these excerpts from Beowulf best describes what Beowulf expects the outcome of his battle with the dragon to be? A. thought nothing/ of the bests claws, or wings, or flaming/ Jaws B. soon/ Would leave this brief life, but would take the

asked by Steve on December 7, 2017
reading
nelson mandela speech glory and hope what are some similes, personification allusion, anaphora, pathos,ethos,logical appeals, metaphors,hyperbole,call to action,counter argument,rebuttal,etc

asked by Reina B. on October 30, 2013

Categories
help me write my essay need someone to write my essay order essay online

hermann rorschach introduced what has become the most widely used ________ test.

Personality10

Enduring Issues in Personality

Studying Personality

Psychodynamic Theories • Sigmund Freud • Carl Jung • Alfred Adler • Karen Horney • Erik Erikson

• A Psychodynamic View of Jaylene Smith

• Evaluating Psychodynamic Theories

Humanistic Personality Theories • Carl Rogers • A Humanistic View of

Jaylene Smith

• Evaluating Humanistic Theories

Trait Theories • The Big Five • A Trait View of Jaylene Smith • Evaluating Trait Theories Cognitive–Social Learning Theories • Expectancies, Self-Efficacy,

and Locus of Control

• A Cognitive–Social Learning View of Jaylene Smith

• Evaluating Cognitive–Social Learning Theories

Personality Assessment • The Personal Interview • Direct Observation • Objective Tests • Projective Tests

O V E R V I E W

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Thirty-year-old Jaylene Smith is a talented physician whomeets with a psychologist because she is troubled by cer-tain aspects of her social life. Acquaintances describe Jay in glowing terms, saying she is highly motivated, intelligent, attractive, and charming. But Jay feels terribly insecure and anxious. When the psychologist asked her to pick out some self- descriptive adjectives, she selected “introverted,” “shy,” “inad- equate,” and “unhappy.”

Jay was the firstborn in a family of two boys and one girl. Her father is a quiet, gentle medical researcher. His work often allowed him to study at home, so he had extensive contact with his children when they were young. He loved all his children, but clearly favored Jay. His ambitions and goals for her were extremely high; and as she matured, he responded to her every need and demand almost immediately and with full conviction. Their relationship remains as close today as it was during Jay’s childhood.

Jay’s mother worked long hours away from home as a store manager and consequently saw her children primarily at night and on an occasional free weekend. When she came home, Mrs. Smith was tired and had little energy for “nonessential” interactions with her children. She had always been career ori- ented, but she experienced considerable conflict and frustration trying to reconcile her roles as mother, housekeeper, and finan- cial provider. Mrs. Smith was usually amiable toward all her children but tended to argue more with Jay, until the bickering subsided when Jay was about 6 or 7 years of age. Today, their relationship is cordial but lacks the closeness apparent between Jay and Dr. Smith. Interactions between Dr. and Mrs. Smith were sometimes marred by stormy outbursts over seem- ingly trivial matters. These episodes were always followed by periods of mutual silence lasting for days.

Jay was very jealous of her first brother, born when she was 2 years old. Her parents recall that Jay sometimes staged

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temper tantrums when the new infant demanded and received a lot of attention (especially from Mrs. Smith). The temper tantrums intensified when Jay’s second brother was born, just 1 year later. As time passed, the brothers formed an alliance to try to undermine Jay’s supreme position with their father. Jay only became closer to her father, and her relationships with her brothers were marked by greater-than-average jealousy and rivalry from early childhood to the present.

Throughout elementary, junior high, and high school, Jay was popular and did well academically. Early on, she decided on a career in medicine. Yet, off and on between the ages of 8 and 17, she had strong feelings of loneliness, depression, insecurity, and confusion—feelings common enough during this age period, but stronger than in most youngsters and very distressing to Jay.

Jay’s college days were a period of great personal growth, but several unsuccessful romantic involvements caused her much pain. The failure to achieve a stable and long-lasting rela- tionship persisted after college and troubled Jay greatly. Although even-tempered in most circumstances, Jay often had an explosive fit of anger that ended each important romantic relationship that she had. “What is wrong with me?” she would ask herself. “Why do I find it impossible to maintain a serious relationship for any length of time?”

In medical school, her conflicts crept into her conscious- ness periodically: “I don’t deserve to be a doctor”; “I won’t pass my exams”; “Who am I, and what do I want from life?”

How can we describe and understand Jaylene Smith’s person- ality? How did she become who she is? Why does she feel insecure and uncertain despite her obvious success? Why do her friends see her as charming and attractive, though she describes herself as introverted and inadequate? These are the kinds of questions that personality psychologists are likely to ask about Jay—and the kinds of questions we will try to answer in this chapter.

ENDURING ISSUES IN PERSONALITY As we explore the topic of personality in this chapter, the enduring issues that interest psychologists emerge at several points. The very concept of personality implies that our behavior differs in significant ways from that of other people (diversity–universality) and that our behavior in part reflects our personality as opposed to the situations in which we find ourselves (person–situation). We will also assess the extent to which personality is a result of inheritance, rather than a reflection of life experiences (nature–nurture). Finally, we will consider the extent to which personality changes as we grow older (stability–change).

STUDYING PERSONALITY What do psychologists mean when they talk about personality?

Many psychologists define personality as an individual’s unique pattern of thoughts, feel- ings, and behaviors that persists over time and across situations. There are two important parts to this definition. On the one hand, personality refers to unique differences—those

L E A R N I N G O B J E C T I V E • Define personality. Explain the

difference between describing personality (in particular trait theory) and understanding the causes of personality (psychodynamic, humanistic, and cognitive–social learning theories).

personality An individual’s unique pattern of thoughts, feelings, and behaviors that persists over time and across situations.

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pleasure principle According to Freud, the way in which the id seeks immediate gratification of an instinct.

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aspects that distinguish a person from everyone else. On the other hand, the definition asserts that personality is relatively stable and enduring—that these unique differences per- sist through time and across situations.

Psychologists vary in their approach to the study of personality. Some set out to iden- tify the most important characteristics of personality, whereas others seek to understand why there are differences in personality. Among the latter group, some consider the family to be the most important factor in personality development, whereas others emphasize the importance of influences outside the family. Still others see personality as the product of how we think about ourselves and our experiences. In this chapter, we explore representa- tive theories of these various approaches. We see how each theoretical paradigm sheds light on the personality of Jaylene Smith. Finally, we will evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of each approach and will see how psychologists go about assessing personality.

PSYCHODYNAMIC THEORIES What ideas do all psychodynamic theories have in common?

Psychodynamic theories see behavior as the product of internal psychological forces that often operate outside our conscious awareness. Freud drew on the physics of his day to coin the term psychodynamics: As thermodynamics is the study of heat and mechanical energy and the way that one may be transformed into the other, psychodynamics is the study of psychic energy and the way that it is transformed and expressed in behavior. Although psy- chodynamic theorists disagree about the exact nature of this psychic energy, the following five propositions are central to all psychodynamic theories and have withstood the tests of time (Huprich & Keaschuk, 2006; Westen, 1998):

1. Much of mental life is unconscious; as a result, people may behave in ways that they themselves do not understand.

2. Mental processes (such as emotions, motivations, and thoughts) operate in paral- lel and thus may lead to conflicting feelings.

3. Not only do stable personality patterns begin to form in childhood, but early expe- riences also strongly affect personality development.

4. Our mental representations of ourselves, of others, and of our relationships tend to guide our interactions with other people.

5. Personality development involves learning to regulate sexual and aggressive feel- ings as well as becoming socially interdependent rather than dependent.

Sigmund Freud When Freud proposed that sexual instinct is the basis of behavior, how was he defining “sexual instinct”?

To this day, Sigmund Freud (1856–1939) is the best known and most influential of the psy- chodynamic theorists (Solms, 2004). As we saw in Chapter 1, “The Science of Psychology,” Freud created an entirely new perspective on the study of human behavior. Up to his time, the field of psychology had focused on thoughts and feelings of which we are aware. In a radical departure, Freud stressed the unconscious—the ideas, thoughts, and feelings of which we are not normally aware (Zwettler-Otte, 2008). Freud’s ideas form the basis of psychoanalysis, a term that refers both to his particular psychodynamic theory of person- ality and to the form of therapy that he invented.

According to Freud, human behavior is based on unconscious instincts, or drives. Some instincts are aggressive and destructive; others, such as hunger, thirst, self-preservation, and sex, are necessary to the survival of the individual and the species. Freud used the term sexual instinct to refer not just to erotic sexuality, but to the craving for pleasure of all kinds. He used the term libido for the energy generated by the sexual instinct. As we will see, Freud regarded the sexual instinct as the most critical factor in the development of personality.

L E A R N I N G O B J E C T I V E S • Describe the five propositions that

are central to all psychodynamic personality theories.

• Describe Freud’s theory of personality, including the concepts of sexual instinct, libido, id, ego, superego, and pleasure principle versus reality principle. Summarize Freud’s stages of development and the consequences of fixation at a particular stage.

• Compare and contrast Freud’s theory, Carl Jung’s theory, Adler’s theory, Horney’s theory, and Erikson’s theory of personality.

• Explain how contemporary psychologists view the contributions and limitations of the psychodynamic perspective.

psychoanalysis The theory of personality Freud developed, as well as the form of therapy he invented.

unconscious In Freud’s theory, all the ideas, thoughts, and feelings of which we are not and normally cannot become aware.

libido According to Freud, the energy generated by the sexual instinct.

id In Freud’s theory of personality, the collection of unconscious urges and desires that continually seek expression.

reality principle According to Freud, the way in which the ego seeks to satisfy instinctual demands safely and effectively in the real world.

ego Freud’s term for the part of the personality that mediates between environmental demands (reality), conscience (superego), and instinctual needs (id); now often used as a synonym for “self.”

superego According to Freud, the social and parental standards the individual has internalized; the conscience and the ego ideal.

ego ideal The part of the superego that consists of standards of what one would like to be.

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Personality 337

How Personality is Structured Freud theorized that personality is formed around three structures: the id, the ego, and the superego. The id is the only structure present at birth and is completely unconscious. (See Figure 10–1.) Consisting of all the unconscious urges and desires that continually seek expression, it operates according to the pleasure principle—that is, it tries to obtain immediate pleasure and to avoid pain. As soon as an instinct arises, the id seeks to gratify it. Because the id is not in contact with the real world, however, it has only two ways of obtaining gratification. One way is by reflex actions, such as coughing, which immediately relieve unpleasant sensations. The other is through fan- tasy, or wish fulfillment: A person forms a mental image of an object or a situation that par- tially satisfies the instinct and relieves the uncomfortable feeling. This kind of thought occurs most often in dreams and daydreams, but it may take other forms. For instance, if someone insults you and you spend the next half hour imagining clever retorts, you are engaging in wish fulfillment.

Mental images of this kind provide fleeting relief, but they cannot fully satisfy most needs. For example, just thinking about being with someone you love is a poor substitute for actually being with that person. Therefore, the id by itself is not very effective at gratifying instincts. It must link to reality if it is to relieve its discomfort. The id’s link to reality is the ego.

Freud conceived of the ego as the psychic mechanism that controls all thinking and reasoning activities. The ego operates partly con- sciously, partly preconsciously, and partly uncon- sciously. (“Preconscious” refers to material that is not currently in awareness but can easily be recalled.) The ego seeks to satisfy the id’s drives in the external world. But instead of acting according to the pleasure principle, the ego oper- ates by the reality principle: By means of intelli- gent reasoning, the ego tries to delay satisfying the id’s desires until it can do so safely and suc- cessfully. For example, if you are thirsty, your ego will attempt to determine how effectively and safely to quench your thirst. (See Figure 10–2.)

A personality consisting only of ego and id would be completely selfish. It would behave effectively, but unsociably. Fully adult behavior is governed not only by reality, but also by the individual’s conscience or by the moral stan- dards developed through interaction with par- ents and society. Freud called this moral watchdog the superego.

The superego is not present at birth. In fact, in Freud’s view young children are amoral and do whatever is pleasurable. As we mature, how- ever, we adopt as our own the judgments of our parents about what is “good” and “bad.” In time, the external restraint applied by our par- ents gives way to our own internal self-restraint. The superego, eventually acting as our conscience, takes over the task of observing and guiding the ego, just as the parents once observed and guided the child. In addition, the superego compares the ego’s actions with an ego ideal of perfection and then rewards or punishes the ego accordingly. Like the ego, the superego works at the conscious, preconscious, and unconscious levels.

Ideally, our id, ego, and superego work in harmony, with the ego satisfying the demands of the id in a reasonable manner that is approved by the superego. We are then free to love and hate and to express our emotions sensibly and without guilt. When our id is dominant, our instincts are unbridled and we are likely to endanger both ourselves and society. When our superego dominates, our behavior is checked too tightly and we are inclined to judge ourselves too harshly or too quickly, impairing our ability to act on our own behalf and enjoy ourselves.

Figure 10–1 The structural relationship formed by the id, ego, and superego. Freud’s conception of personality is often depicted as an iceberg to illustrate how the vast workings of the mind occur beneath its surface. Notice that the ego is partly conscious, partly unconscious, and partly preconscious; it derives knowledge of the external world through the senses. The superego also works at all three levels. But the id is an enirely uncon- scious structure. Source: Adapted from New Introductory Lectures on Psychoanalysis by Sigmund Freud, 1933. New York: Carlton House.

Unconscious: Well below the surface of awareness

Preconscious: Material that can be easily recalled

Id Pleasure principle Unconscious urges and desires

Ego Self Reality principle

Superego Ego ideal Moral guardian

Conscious: Ideas, thoughts, and feelings of which we are aware

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How Personality Devel- ops Freud’s theory of personal- ity development focuses on the way in which we satisfy the sexual instinct during the course of life. As infants mature, their libido becomes focused on various sensitive parts of the body during sequential stages of development. If a child is deprived of pleasure (or allowed too much gratification) from the part of the body that dominates a certain stage, some sexual energy may remain permanently tied to that part of the body, instead of moving on in normal sequence to give the individual a fully integrated personality. This is called fixation and, as we shall see, Freud believed that it leads

to immature forms of sexuality and to certain characteristic personality traits. Let’s look more closely at the psychosexual stages that Freud identified and their presumed relation- ship to personality development.

In the oral stage (birth to 18 months), infants, who depend completely on other peo- ple to satisfy their needs, relieve sexual tension by sucking and swallowing; when their baby teeth come in, they obtain oral pleasure from chewing and biting. According to Freud, infants who receive too much oral gratification at this stage grow into overly optimistic and dependent adults; they are likely to lack confidence and to be gullible. Those who receive too little gratification may turn into pessimistic and hostile people later in life who are sar- castic and argumentative.

During the anal stage (roughly 18 months to 31/2 years), the primary source of sexual pleasure shifts from the mouth to the anus. Just about the time children begin to derive plea- sure from holding in and excreting feces, toilet training takes place, and they must learn to regulate this new pleasure in ways that are acceptable to their superego. In Freud’s view, if par- ents are too strict in toilet training, some children throw temper tantrums and may live in self-destructive ways as adults. Others are likely to become obstinate, stingy, and excessively orderly. If parents are too lenient, their children may become messy, unorganized, and sloppy.

When children reach the phallic stage (after age 3), they discover their genitals and develop a marked attachment to the parent of the opposite sex while becoming jealous of the same-sex parent. In boys, Freud called this the Oedipus complex, after the character in Greek mythology who killed his father and married his mother. Girls go through a corre- sponding Electra complex, involving possessive love for their father and jealousy toward their mother. Most children eventually resolve these conflicts by identifying with the parent of the same sex. However, Freud contended that fixation at this stage leads to vanity and egotism in adult life, with men boasting of their sexual prowess and treating women with contempt, and with women becoming flirtatious and promiscuous. Phallic fixation may also prompt feelings of low self-esteem, shyness, and worthlessness.

At the end of the phallic period, Freud believed, children lose interest in sexual behav- ior and enter a latency period. During this period, which begins around the age of 5 or 6 and lasts until age 12 or 13, boys play with boys, girls play with girls, and neither sex takes much interest in the other.

At puberty, the individual enters the last psychosexual stage, the genital stage. Sexual impulses reawaken and, ideally, the quest for immediate gratification of these desires yields to mature sexuality in which postponed gratification, a sense of responsibility, and caring for others all play a part.

fixation According to Freud, a partial or complete halt at some point in the individual’s psychosexual development.

oral stage First stage in Freud’s theory of personality development, in which the infant’s erotic feelings center on the mouth, lips, and tongue.

anal stage Second stage in Freud’s theory of personality development, in which a child’s erotic feelings center on the anus and on elimination.

phallic stage Third stage in Freud’s theory of personality development, in which erotic feelings center on the genitals.

Oedipus complex and Electra complex According to Freud, a child’s sexual attachment to the parent of the opposite sex and jealousy toward the parent of the same sex; generally occurs in the phallic stage.

latency period In Freud’s theory of personality, a period in which the child appears to have no interest in the other sex; occurs after the phallic stage.

genital stage In Freud’s theory of personality development, the final stage of normal adult sexual development, which is usually marked by mature sexuality.

Figure 10–2 How Freud conceived the workings of the pleasure and reality principles. Note that according to the reality principle, the ego uses rational thought to postpone the grati- fication of the id until its desires can be satis- fied safely.

Unpleasure in the id

Release of discomfort by first available

means

External stimulus

Pleasure in the id

Increasing discomfort

in the id

Internal stimulus

External stimulus

Internal stimulus

Unpleasure in the id

Rational thought of ego

Release of discomfort by

safest and best available means

Pleasure in the id

Increasing discomfort

in the id

How the Pleasure Principle Works

How the Reality Principle Works

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Freud is certainly not without his critics. As we will see, even members of Freud’s own psychoanalytic school did not completely endorse his emphasis on sexuality. Contempo- rary psychodynamic theorists tend to put greater emphasis on the ego and its attempts to gain mastery over the world. Finally, some critics have suggested that male and female per- sonality development occur in very different ways, and that Freud’s male-centered theory sheds little if any light on female personality development (Zeedyk & Greemwood, 2008).

Carl Jung How did Carl Jung’s view of the unconscious differ from that of Freud?

Carl Jung (1875–1961) agreed with many of Freud’s tenets, including his emphasis on the role of the unconscious in human behavior, but he expanded the role of the unconscious. Jung contended that libido represents all life forces, not just pleasure-seeking. And where Freud viewed the id as a “cauldron of seething excitations” that the ego has to control, Jung saw the unconscious as the ego’s source of strength and vitality. He also believed that the unconscious consists of the personal unconscious and the collective unconscious. The personal unconscious includes our repressed thoughts, forgotten experiences, and undevel- oped ideas, which may enter consciousness if an incident or a sensation triggers their recall.

Diversity–Universality Universal Human Archetypes The collective unconscious, Jung’s most original concept, comprises memories and behav- ior patterns that are inherited from past generations and therefore are shared by all humans. Just as the human body is the product of millions of years of evolution, so too, according to Jung, is the human mind. Over millennia, it has developed “thought forms,” or collective memories, of experiences that people have had in common since prehistoric times. He called these thought forms archetypes. Archetypes appear in our thoughts as mental images. Because all people have mothers, for example, the archetype of “mother” is universally associated with the image of one’s own mother, with Mother Earth, and with a protective presence.

Jung felt that specific archetypes play special roles in shaping personality. The persona (an archetype whose meaning stems from the Latin word for “mask”) is the element of our personality that we project to other people—a shell that grows around our inner self. For some people, the public self so predominates that they lose touch with their inner feelings, leading to personality maladjustments. ■ personal unconscious In Jung’s theory of

personality, one of the two levels of the unconscious; it contains the individual’s repressed thoughts, forgotten experiences, and undeveloped ideas.

introverts According to Jung, people who usually focus on their own thoughts and feelings.

extraverts According to Jung, people who usually focus on social life and the external world instead of on their internal experience.

Jung also divided people into two general attitude types—introverts and extraverts. Extraverts turn their attention to the external world. They are “joiners” who take an active interest in other people and in the events going on around them. Introverts are more caught up in their own private worlds. They tend to be unsociable and lack confidence in dealing with other people. Everyone, Jung felt, possesses some aspects of both attitude types, but one is usually dominant.

Jung further divided people into rational individuals, who regulate their actions by thinking and feeling, and irrational individuals, who base their actions on perceptions, whether through the senses (sensation) or through unconscious processes (intuition). Most people exhibit all four psychological functions: thinking, feeling, sensing, and intuit- ing. Jung felt, however, that one or more of these functions is usually dominant. Thus, the thinking person is rational and logical, and decides on the basis of facts. The feeling person is sensitive to his or her surroundings, acts tactfully, and has a balanced sense of values. The sensing type relies primarily on surface perceptions and rarely uses imagination or deeper understanding. And the intuitive type sees beyond obvious solutions and facts to consider future possibilities.

archetypes In Jung’s theory of personality, thought forms common to all human beings, stored in the collective unconscious.

collective unconscious In Jung’s theory of personality, the level of the unconscious that is inherited and common to all members of a species.

According to Carl Jung, we all inherit from our ancestors collective memories or “thought forms” that people have had in com- mon since the dawn of human evolution. The image of a motherlike figure with protective, embracing arms is one such primordial thought form that stems from the important, nurturing role of women throughout human history. This thought form is depicted here in this Bulgarian clay figure of a goddess that dates back some six or seven thousand years.

persona According to Jung, our public self, the mask we wear to represent ourselves to others.

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compensation According to Adler, the person’s effort to overcome imagined or real personal weaknesses.

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While Freud emphasized the primacy of the sexual instincts, Jung stressed people’s rational and spiritual qualities. And while Freud considered develop- ment to be shaped in childhood, Jung thought that psychic development comes to fruition only during middle age. Jung brought a sense of historical continuity to his theories, tracing the roots of human personality back through our ancestral past; yet he also contended that a person moves constantly toward self-realization—toward blending all parts of the personality into a harmonious whole.

Alfred Adler What did Alfred Adler believe was the major determinant of personality?

Alfred Adler (1870–1937) disagreed sharply with Freud’s concept of the conflict between the selfish id and the morality-based superego. To Adler, people possess

innate positive motives and they strive for personal and social perfection. One of his earli- est theories grew out of personal experience: As a child, Adler was frail and almost died of pneumonia at the age of 5. This early brush with death led him to believe that personality develops through the individual’s attempt to overcome physical weaknesses, an effort he called compensation.

Adler later modified and broadened his views, contending that people seek to over- come feelings of inferiority that may or may not have a basis in reality. He thought that such feelings often spark positive development and personal growth. Still, some people become so fixated on their feelings of inferiority that they become paralyzed and develop what Adler called an inferiority complex. Later in his life, Adler again shifted his theoretical emphasis in a more positive direction suggesting that people strive both for personal per- fection and for the perfection of the society to which they belong.

The emphasis Adler placed on positive, socially constructive goals and on striving for perfection is in marked contrast to Freud’s pessimistic vision of the selfish person locked into eternal conflict with society. Because of this emphasis, Adler has been hailed by many psychologists as the father of humanistic psychology (Cain, 2002), a topic we will explore in greater depth later in this chapter.

Karen Horney What major contributions did Karen Horney make to the psychodynamic perspective?

Karen Horney (1885–1952), another psychodynamic personality theorist greatly indebted to Freud, nevertheless took issue with some of his most prominent ideas, espe- cially his analysis of women and his emphasis on sexual instincts. Based on her experi- ence as a practicing therapist in Germany and the United States, Horney concluded that environmental and social factors are the most important influences in shaping personal- ity; and among these, the most pivotal are the human relationships we experience as chil- dren (W. B. Smith, 2007).

In Horney’s view, Freud overemphasized the sex drive, resulting in a distorted picture of human relationships. Horney believed that sexuality does figure in the development of personality, but nonsexual factors—such as the need for a sense of basic security and the person’s response to real or imagined threats—play an even larger role. For example, all people share the need to feel loved and nurtured by their parents, regardless of any sexual feelings they might have about them. Conversely, parents’ protective feelings toward their children emerge not only from biological forces but also from the value that society places on the nurturance of children.

A contemporary representation from U.S. cul- ture of the Jungian archetype of the Wise Old Man can be seen in Albus Dumbledore (from the movies based on J. K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series).

22-time Grammy Award winner Stevie Won- der, who cultivated particularly acute audi- tory abilities, illustrates what Alfred Adler referred to as compensation.

Source: © 2000, Mike Twohy from cartoonbank.com. All Rights Reserved.

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Karen Horney, a psychotherapist during the first half of the 20th century, disagreed with Freud’s emphasis on sexual instincts. She considered environmental and social factors, especially the relationships we have as chil- dren, to be the most important influences on personality.

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For Horney, anxiety—an individual’s reaction to real or imagined dangers—is a pow- erful motivating force. Whereas Freud believed that anxiety usually emerges from uncon- scious sexual conflicts, Horney stressed that feelings of anxiety also originate in a variety of nonsexual contexts. For example, in childhood anxiety arises because children depend on adults for their very survival. Insecure about receiving continued nurturance and protec- tion, children develop inner protections, or defenses, that provide both satisfaction and security. They experience more anxiety when those defenses are threatened.

In adulthood, anxiety and insecurity can lead to neurotic lifestyles that that may help to deal with emotional problems and ensure safety but only at the expense of personal independence (Horney, 1937). Some people develop an overriding need to give in or sub- mit to others and feel safe only when receiving their protection and guidance. Others deal with basic feelings of insecurity and anxiety by adopting a hostile and domineering man- ner. Still others withdraw from other people, as if saying “If I withdraw, nothing can hurt me.” In contrast, well-adjusted people deal with anxiety without becoming trapped in neu- rotic lifestyles because their childhood environment enabled them to satisfy their basic emotional needs.

inferiority complex In Adler’s theory, the fixation on feelings of personal inferiority that results in emotional and social paralysis.

Stability–Change Is Biology Destiny? Horney’s conviction that social and cultural forces are far more important than biological ones had a profound effect on her views of human development. For example, in contrast to Freud’s view that personality is largely formed by the end of childhood, Horney believed that adults can continue to develop and change throughout life by coming to understand the source of their basic anxiety and trying to eliminate neurotic anxiety. Horney also opened the way to a more constructive and optimistic understanding of male and female personality. She emphasized that culture, rather than anatomy, determines many of the characteristics that differentiate women from men. For example, if women feel dissatisfied with their gender or men are overly aggressive, the explanation is likely to be found in their social status and social roles, not in their anatomy; and fortunately, social status and social roles can be changed. Indeed, she was a forerunner of contemporary thinkers who believe that we can change culture and society and, in the process, transform human relationships (Gilman, 2001). ■

Erik Erikson, another psychodynamic theorist, also stressed the importance of parent–child relationships for shaping personality. His eight-stage theory of personality develop- ment is still influential today.

Erik Erikson Erikson’s theory focused less on unconscious conflict and more on what factors?

Like Horney, Erik Erikson—a psychodynamic theorist who studied with Freud in Vienna—took a socially oriented view of personality development. While Erikson agreed with much of Freud’s thinking on sexual development and the influence of libidinal needs on personality, he put much greater emphasis on the quality of parent–child relationships. According to Erikson, only if children feel competent and valuable, in their own eyes and in society’s view, will they develop a secure sense of identity. In this way, Erikson shifted the focus of Freud’s personality theory to ego development.

Whereas Freud’s stages of personality development ended with adolescence, Erikson believed that personality continues to develop and change throughout life. But in contrast to Horney, he believed that the various stages of life present a variety of different chal- lenges. Success in dealing with early challenges lays the groundwork for effective adjust- ment at later stages. Conversely, failure to resolve early crises makes later adjustment more difficult. In Chapter 9 (“Life-Span Development”) we explored each of Erikson’s stages in considerable detail. Figure 10–3 provides a concise comparison of Erikson’s and Freud’s stages of personality development.

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A Psychodynamic View of Jaylene Smith How would a psychodynamic theorist view the personality of Jaylene Smith?

According to Freud, personality characteristics such as insecurity, introversion, and feelings of inadequacy and worthlessness often arise from fixation at the phallic stage of develop- ment. Thus, had Freud been Jaylene’s therapist, he would probably have concluded that Jay has not yet effectively resolved her Electra complex. Working from this premise, he would have hypothesized that Jay’s relationship with her father was either very distant and unsat- isfying or unusually close and gratifying. We know, of course, that it was the latter.

In all likelihood, Freud would also have asserted that at around age 5 or 6, Jay had become aware that she could not actually marry her father and do away with her mother, as he would say she wished to do. This possibility might account for the fact that fights between Jay and her mother subsided when Jay was about 6 or 7 years of age. Moreover, we know that shortly thereafter, Jay began to experience “strong feelings of loneliness, depression, insecu- rity, and confusion.” Clearly, something important happened in Jay’s life when she was 6 or 7.

Finally, the continued coolness of Jay’s relationship with her mother and the unusual closeness with her father would probably have confirmed Freud’s suspicion that Jay has still not satisfactorily resolved her Electra complex. Freud would have predicted that Jay would have problems making the progression to mature sexual relationships with other men. Jay, of course, is very much aware that she has problems relating to men, at least when these

relationships get “serious.” And what does Erikson’s theory tell us about

Jaylene Smith’s personality? Recall that for Erikson, one’s success in dealing with later developmental crises depends on how effectively one has resolved earlier crises. Because Jay is having great difficulty in dealing with intimacy (Stage 6), he would have sug- gested that she is still struggling with problems from earlier developmental stages. Erikson would have looked for the source of these problems in the qual- ity of Jay’s relationship with others. We know that her mother subtly communicated her own frustra- tion and dissatisfaction to her children and spent lit- tle time on “nonessential” interactions with them.

Figure 10–3 Erikson’s eight stages of personality development. Each stage involves its own developmental crisis, whose resolution is crucial to adjustment in successive stages. The first five of the eight stages correspond to Freud’s stages of personality development. Source: Figure, “Erickson’s Stages of Personality Development” from Childhood and Society by Erik H. Erikson. Copyright 1950, © 1963 by W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. Renewed 1978, 1991 by Erik H. Erikson. Used by permission of W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. and Random House Ltd., UK.

Stage

Oral

Anal

Phallic

Latency

Genital

Young adulthood

Adulthood

Maturity

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Basic trust vs.

mistrust

Erikson’s stages of personality development

Fr eu

d ’s

s ta

g es

o f

p er

so n

al it

y d

ev el

o p

m en

t

Autonomy vs. shame,

doubt Initiative

vs. guilt

Industry vs.

inferiority

Identity vs. role

confusion Intimacy

vs. isolation

Generativity vs.

stagnation Ego

integrity vs. despair

Psychoanalysis

Freud’s original theory was based on case studies of his patients; and the lit-erature on psychoanalysis consists mainly of case studies—descriptions ofindividual cases of psychopathology, probable causes, and their treatment. Today, however, psychological science depends increasingly on experimental evidence and biological explanations for mental phenomena. Review the five basic concepts of psychodynamic theory described by Westen on page 336 and think about what kinds of evidence might convince you that they are indeed cor- rect. What evidence would lead you to conclude that they are not in fact correct?

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These feelings and behavior patterns would not have instilled in a child the kind of basic trust and sense of security that Erikson believed are essential to the first stage of develop- ment. In addition, her relationship with her mother and brothers continued to be less than fully satisfactory. It is not surprising, then, that Jay had some difficulty working through subsequent developmental crises. Although she developed a close and caring relationship with her father, Jay was surely aware that his affection partly depended on her fulfilling the dreams, ambitions, and goals that he had for her.

Evaluating Psychodynamic Theories How do modern psychologists view the contributions and limitations of the psychodynamic perspective?

Freud’s emphasis on the fact that we are not always—or even often—aware of the real causes of our behavior has fundamentally changed the way people view themselves and others. Freud’s ideas have also had a lasting impact on history, literature, and the arts (Krugler, 2004). Yet, Freud was a product of his time and place. Critics who contend his theory reflects a sexist view of women have pointed out that he was apparently unable to imagine a con- nection between his female patients’ sense of inferiority and their subordinate position in society. Psychodynamic views have also been criticized as lacking a scientific basis in that they are based largely on retrospective (backward-looking) accounts of a limited sample of individuals who have sought treatment, rather than on research with “healthy” individuals.

Although it is often difficult to translate psychodynamic personality theories into hypotheses that can be tested experimentally (Cloninger, 2003; Holt, 2003), Freud’s theory has received limited confirmation from research (Leichsenring, 2005). For example, people with eating disorders often have oral personalities (J. Perry, Silvera, & Rosenvinge, 2002). Orally fixated people generally eat and drink too much, tend to mention oral images when interpret- ing inkblot tests, and also seem to depend heavily on others, as Freud predicted (Fisher & Greenberg, 1985). Moreover, research confirms an association between specific personality types in childhood and later development of psychological problems. For example, a child with an inhibited temperament is more likely to develop social anxiety disorder as an adult (Gladstone, Parker, Mitchell, Wilhelm, & Malhi, 2005). The effectiveness of psychoanalysis as a therapy has also been cited as evidence in support of Freud’s theories (Leichsenring, 2005). Still, as we shall see in Chapter 13,“Therapies,”psychoanalysis does not seem to be any more or less effective than therapies based on other theories (J. A. Carter, 2006).

Freud’s theories have clearly expanded our understanding of personality, or they would not still be so vigorously debated today, more than 100 years after he proposed them. Whatever their merit as science, psychodynamic theories attempt to explain the root causes of all human behavior. The sheer magnitude of this undertaking helps to account for their lasting attractiveness.

CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING

Match the following Jungian terms with the appropriate definition. 1. 2.

3.

4. According to Alfred Adler, a person with a fixation on or belief in a negative characteristic has an ___________. They may try to overcome their perceived weakness through ____________.

5. Horney believed that ____________ is a stronger source of emotional disturbance than sexual urges.

persona a. typical mental image or mythical representation collective unconscious b. memories and behavior patterns inherited from

past generations archetype c. aspect of the personality by which one is

known to other people

Answers:1. c.2. b.3. a.4. inferiority complex; compensation.5. anxiety.

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HUMANISTIC PERSONALITY THEORIES What are the major ways that humanistic personality theory differs from psychodynamic theories?

Freud believed that personality grows out of the resolution of unconscious conflicts and developmental crises. Many of his followers—including some who modified his theory and others who broke away from his circle—also embraced this basic viewpoint. But in the the- ory of Alfred Adler, we glimpsed a very different view of human nature. Adler focused on forces that contribute to positive growth and a move toward personal perfection. For these reasons, Adler is sometimes called the first humanistic personality theorist.

Humanistic personality theory emphasizes that we are positively motivated and progress toward higher levels of functioning—in other words, there is more to human exis- tence than dealing with hidden conflicts. Humanistic psychologists believe that life is a process of opening ourselves to the world around us and experiencing joy in living. They stress people’s potential for growth and change as well as the ways they experience their lives right now, rather than dwelling on how they felt or acted in the past. Finally, humanists also believe that given reasonable life conditions, people will develop in desirable directions (Cloninger, 2003; Criswell, 2003). Adler’s concept of striving for perfection laid the ground- work for later humanistic personality theorists such as Abraham Maslow and Carl Rogers. We discussed Maslow’s theory of the hierarchy of needs leading to self-actualization in Chapter 8, “Motivation and Emotion.” We now turn to Rogers’s theory of self-actualization.

Carl Rogers According to Rogers, how can thinking of yourself as self-assured help you to become so?

One of the most prominent humanistic theorists, Carl Rogers (1902–1987), contended that men and women develop their personalities in the service of positive goals. According to Rogers, every organism is born with certain innate capacities, capabilities, or potentialities—“a sort of genetic blueprint, to which substance is added as life progresses” (Maddi, 1989, p. 102).

APPLY YOUR UNDERSTANDING

1. An angry parent imagines hitting a child for misbehaving, but decides instead to discuss the misbehavior with the child and to point out why the behavior was wrong. After hearing the child’s explanation for the behavior, the parent feels guilty for having been so angry. The parent’s anger and fantasy are the result of the ____________; the decision to discuss the problem is the result of the ____________; and the guilt derives from the ____________.

a. ego; superego; id b. id; ego; superego c. ego; id; superego d. id; superego; ego

2. John is a young adult. According to Erikson, the major challenge he faces is ____________, which will be followed in middle adulthood by the crisis of ____________.

a. intimacy vs. isolation; integrity vs. despair b. intimacy vs. isolation; generativity vs. stagnation c. identity vs. role confusion; intimacy vs. isolation d. identity vs. role confusion; integrity vs. despair e. identity vs. role confusion; initiative vs. guilt

humanistic personality theory Any personality theory that asserts the fundamental goodness of people and their striving toward higher levels of functioning.

Answers:1. b.2. b.

L E A R N I N G O B J E C T I V E S • Explain how humanistic personality

theories differ from psychodynamic theories. Distinguish Rogers’ concept of actualizing tendency and self- actualizing tendency, conditional versus unconditional positive regard, and what it means to be a fully functioning person.

• Summarize the contributions and limitations of the humanistic perspective.

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The goal of life, Rogers believed, is to fulfill this genetic blueprint, to become the best of what- ever each of us is inherently capable of becoming. Rogers called this biological push toward fulfillment the actualizing tendency. Although Rogers maintained that the actualizing ten- dency characterizes all organisms—plants, animals, and humans—he noted that human beings also form images of themselves, or self-concepts. Just as we try to fulfill our inborn bio- logical potential, so, too, we attempt to fulfill our self-concept, our conscious sense of who we are and what we want to do with our lives. Rogers called this striving the self-actualizing tendency. If you think of yourself as “intelligent” and “athletic,” for example, you will strive to live up to those images of yourself.

When our self-concept is closely matched with our inborn capacities, we are likely to become what Rogers called a fully functioning person. Such people are self-directed: They decide for themselves what it is they wish to do and to become, even though their choices may not always be sound ones. Fully functioning people are also open to experience—to their own feelings as well as to the world and other people around them—and thus find themselves “increasingly willing to be, with greater accuracy and depth, that self which [they] most truly [are]” (Rogers, 1961, pp. 175–176).

According to Rogers, people tend to become more fully functioning if they are brought up with unconditional positive regard, or the experience of being treated with warmth, respect, acceptance, and love regardless of their own feelings, attitudes, and behaviors. But often parents and other adults offer children what Rogers called conditional positive regard: They value and accept only certain aspects of the child. The acceptance, warmth, and love that the child receives from others then depend on the child’s behaving in certain ways and fulfilling certain conditions. In the process, self-concept comes to resemble the inborn capacity less and less, and the child’s life deviates from the genetic blueprint.

When people lose sight of their inborn potential, they become constricted, rigid, and defensive. They feel threatened and anxious, and experience considerable discomfort and uneasiness. Because their lives are directed toward what other people want and value, they are unlikely to experience much real satisfaction in life. At some point, they may realize that they don’t really know who they are or what they want.

A Humanistic View of Jaylene Smith How would humanistic theorists view the development of Jaylene Smith’s personality?

Humanistic personality theory would focus on the discrepancy between Jay’s self-concept and her inborn capacities. For example, Rogers would point out that Jay is intelligent and achievement-oriented but nevertheless feels that she doesn’t “deserve to be a doctor,” wor- ries about whether she will ever be “truly happy,” and remembers that when she was 13, she never was able to be herself and really express her feelings, even with a good friend. Her unhappiness, fearfulness, loneliness, insecurity, and other dissatisfactions similarly stem from Jay’s inability to become what she “most truly is.” Rogers would suspect that other people in Jay’s life made acceptance and love conditional on her living up to their ideas of what she should become. We know that for most of her life, Jay’s father was her primary source of positive regard. Very possibly, he conditioned his love for Jay on her living up to his goals for her.

Evaluating Humanistic Theories What have humanistic theories contributed to our understanding of personality?

The central tenet of most humanistic personality theories—that the overriding purpose of the human condition is to realize one’s potential—is difficult if not impossible to verify sci- entifically. The resulting lack of scientific evidence and rigor is one of the major criticisms

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actualizing tendency According to Rogers, the drive of every organism to fulfill its biological potential and become what it is inherently capable of becoming.

conditional positive regard In Rogers’s theory, acceptance and love that are dependent on another’s behaving in certain ways and on fulfilling certain conditions.

unconditional positive regard In Rogers’s theory, the full acceptance and love of another person regardless of his or her behavior.

self-actualizing tendency According to Rogers, the drive of human beings to fulfill their self-concepts, or the images they have of themselves.

fully functioning person According to Rogers, an individual whose self-concept closely resembles his or her inborn capacities or potentials.

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of these theories. In addition, some critics claim that humanistic theories present an overly optimistic view of human beings and fail to take into account the evil in human nature. Others contend that the humanistic view fosters self-centeredness and narcissism, and reflects Western values of individual achievement rather than universal human potential.

Nonetheless, Maslow and especially Rogers did attempt to test some aspects of their theories scientifically. For example, Rogers studied the discrepancy between the way people perceived themselves and the way they ideally wanted to be. He discovered that people whose real selves differed considerably from their ideal selves were more likely to be unhappy and dissatisfied.

CHECK YOUR UNDERSTANDING

Indicate whether the following are true (T) or false (F). 1. ________ Humanistic personality theory emphasizes that we are motivated by conflicts,

whereas psychodynamic personality theory emphasizes positive strivings. 2. ________ The goal of life, Rogers believed, is to become the best person that we can

inherently become. 3. ________ Our self-concept is our inborn biological potential. 4. ________ When people lose sight of their inborn potential, they are unlikely to experience

much satisfaction.

Answers:1. (F).2. (T).3. (F).4. (T).

Answers:1. b.2. d.

L E A R N I N G O B J E C T I V E S • Compare and contrast the trait theories

of Cattell and Eysenck and the current five-factor model of personality. Briefly summarize the research evidence on the usefulness and universality of the five-factor model, the stability of personality traits over time and across situations, and the biological basis of personality traits.

• Summarize the contributions and limitations of the trait perspective.

APPLY YOUR UNDERSTANDING

1. Barbara was brought up with unconditional positive regard. According to Rogers, she is likely to

a. be vain and narcissistic. b. feel she is valued regardless of her attitudes and behavior. c. have self-concepts that do not correspond very closely to her inborn capacities. d. Both (b) and (c) are true.

2. Your friend has always known that she wants to be a doctor. When you ask her how she knows that, she says, “That’s just who I am. It’s what I want to do with my life.” Rogers calls the push toward fulfilling this sense of who she is

a. being fully functioning. b. engaging in a compensatory process. c. expressing a high need for achievement. d. the self-actualizing tendency.

TRAIT THEORIES What is the key focus of trait theories?

The personality theories that we have examined so far all emphasize early childhood expe- riences; and all attempt to explain the varieties of human personality. Other personality theorists focus on the present, describing the ways in which already-developed adult per- sonalities differ from one another. These trait theorists assert that people differ according to the degree to which they possess certain personality traits, such as dependency, anxiety, aggressiveness, and sociability. We infer a trait from how a person behaves. If someone con- sistently throws parties, goes to great lengths to make friends, and travels in groups, we might safely conclude that this person possesses a high degree of sociability.

Our language has many words that describe personality traits. Gordon Allport, along with his colleague H. S. Odbert (1936), found nearly 18,000 dictionary entries that might refer to personality traits. However, only about 2,800 of the words on Allport and Odbert’s

personality traits Dimensions or characteristics on which people differ in distinctive ways.

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list concern the kinds of stable or enduring characteristics that most psychologists would call personality traits; and when synonyms and near-synonyms are removed, the number of possible personality traits drops to around 200—which is still a formidable list. Psycholo- gist Raymond Cattell (1965), using a statistical technique called factor analysis, found that those 200 traits tend to cluster in groups. Thus, a person who is described as persevering or determined is also likely to be thought of as responsible, ordered, attentive, and stable and probably would not be described as frivolous, neglectful, and changeable. On the basis of extensive research, Cattell originally concluded that just 16 traits account for the complex- ity of human personality; later he suggested that it might be necessary to add another 7 traits to the list (Cattell & Kline, 1977).

Other theorists thought that Cattell used too many traits to describe personality. Eysenck (1976) argued that personality could be reduced to three basic dimensions: emotional stabil- ity, introversion–extraversion, and psychoticism. According to Eysenck, emotional stability refers to how well a person controls emotions. On a continuum, individuals at one end of this trait would be seen as poised, calm, and composed, whereas people at the other end might be described as anxious, nervous, and excitable. Introversion–extraversion refers to the degree to which a person is inwardly or outwardly oriented. At one end of this dimension would be the socially outgoing, talkative, and affectionate people, known as extraverts. Introverts— generally described as reserved, silent, shy, and socially withdrawn—would be at the other extreme. Eysenck used the term psychoticism to describe people characterized by insensitivity and uncooperativeness at one end and warmth, tenderness, and helpfulness at the other end.

Nature–Nurture Is Personality Inherited? For Allport, traits—or “dispositions,” as he called them—are literally encoded in the ner- vous system as structures that guide consistent behavior across a wide variety of situations. Allport also believed that while traits describe behaviors that are common to many people, each individual personality comprises a unique constellation of traits. While few psycholo- gists today would deny the influence of the environment in shaping personality, recent evi- dence substantiating the importance of genetic factors to the development of specific personality traits supports Allport’s hunch that at least some personality traits are encoded biologically (Rushton, Bons, & Hur, 2008). ■

The Big Five What five basic traits describe most differences in personality?

As listed in Table 10–1, contemporary trait theorists have boiled down personality traits to five basic dimensions: extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, emotional stability, and culture (Costa & McCrae, 2006; McCrae et al., 2008). There is a growing consensus today that these Big Five personality dimensions, also known as the five-factor model, capture the most salient dimensions of human personality (Costa & McCrae, 2006; De Raad, 1998), although there is some disagreement about whether the fifth dimension should be called “culture” or “openness to experience” or “intellect.” Recently, each of the Big Five traits has been shown to have at least six facets, or components, as shown in Table 10–1 (DeYoung, Quilty, & Peterson, 2007; Jang, Livesley, McCrae, Angleitner, & Riemann, 1998).

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jiskha review
Hello my name is am i am making a review on this site. Jiskha is a wonderful, excellent and spectacular site to go to for school help. Jiskha helped me birng my grade up from a 60 to an 80. If I asked a question and i had a quick response. Jiskha does not

asked by jam on February 1, 2015
jiskha.com will remain ad-free
About 9 months ago I made the decision to pull all banner advertisements from jiskha.com in an effort to make the website more educational and user-friendly. Since my other streams of income have stabalized, I am confident that jiskha.com will remain free

asked by Jiskha Webmaster on August 28, 2005
Physics
I need more help on these, please? jiskha. com/ display.cgi?id=1165350274 jiskha. com /display.cgi?id=1165357718 jiskha. com /display.cgi?id=1165347130 Thanks… I’m desperate. I’ve been gone today and yesterday from school and don’t quite understand what

asked by Becca on December 5, 2006
random
what kind of website is this? what is jiskha? Jiskha is the name given to the site by the man who runs the show here. His name is Leo. This is a help site with the emphasis on help. We try to help students do their homework. But we like to see what the

asked by cc on January 18, 2007
services for teachers
This question is for the teachers that visit jiskha.com. What services could jiskha.com provide that would benefit you and your students?

asked by Leo on August 16, 2008

Question and Comment
You do not need to answer this but: Who is the creator of Jiskha? And why was Jiskha created? I think when a bad word is posted, it should be replaced with something cutting it off….

asked by Anonymous on December 29, 2017
Spanish/History for Laura & Carry
Thank you for using the Jiskha Homework Help Forum. I’ve seen this question so many times lately, that I hope everything is on the following link: http://www.jiskha.com/display.cgi?id=1191557979

asked by SraJMcGin on October 11, 2007
Some questions..
How does Jiskha work? and is being a jiskha tutor an actual job?

asked by New Member on November 22, 2017
SPANISH
how did jorge luis borges change life today Thank you for using the Jiskha Homework Help forum. Please see the Spanish by Jackie for answers: http://www.jiskha.com/post.cgi

asked by Joe on April 22, 2007
To: Kathy — finance
I removed your two posts containing a lengthy assignment that appears to be a semester project. If you’re posting to be sure it’s included in Jiskha archives, you’re misusing this forum. If you honestly want some help, please post a small part of it and

asked by Ms. Sue on December 19, 2010
homework help ranking
When I search for homework help on google from my computer, jiskha is ranked at #14. What is jiskha ranked on your computer? Thanks. Jiskha came in 12th on my computer. About 14 with or without ” ” Probably because of lower use during summer? 14th here —

asked by Leo on July 16, 2006
subject areas now display relevant questions
All of the subject areas now display relevant questions from the forum. Here are some great examples: Spanish: http://www.jiskha.com/foreign_languages/spanish/ Algebra: http://www.jiskha.com/mathematics/algebra/ Biology:

asked by Leo on January 22, 2008
Spanish for Alicia and/or Vicky
Be sure you see all 3 of your posts: 1. http://www.jiskha.com/display.cgi?id=1201054594 2. http://www.jiskha.com/display.cgi?id=1201051522 3. http://www.jiskha.com/display.cgi?id=1201046009 NOTE: Please decide if you prefer Alicia or Vicky. It’s confusing

asked by SraJMcGin on January 22, 2008
To Rashida Agee — Sci275
Your post has been removed because it refers to materials that the Jiskha volunteers cannot access. Please note that we do not do homework. The Jiskha Homework Forum has no connection with any school or college.

asked by Ms. Sue on May 10, 2009
Riddles, etc.
Since riddles aren’t homework, Chris’s riddle and many others need to be posted in the Riddles section at the very bottom of the main Jiskha page. http://www.jiskha.com/net_riddle/ Thanks. =)

asked by Writeacher on July 22, 2007

Jiskha
The other day I was on this site and my sister saw me. She told me to never go on this site, and she was accused of cheating off of it before. I told her that cheating is prohibited on Jiskha(and that Jiskha doesn’t give answers, it just helps), but she

asked by Anonymous on March 1, 2018
teaser
what is this brain teaser ioooo Riddles and brain teasers belong in the riddle message board at the bottom of the main Jiskha webpage. http://www.jiskha.com/net_riddle/ Thanks. =)

asked by Anonymous on August 9, 2007
English
anyone know where my other question went regarding the mythology sources??? much needed…. Thanks for reading this 🙂 nvm i found it 🙂 thanks to all who answered: its on page 4 i believe ok yeah i need more resourcesfor that topic 🙁 This one???

asked by Alexx on June 27, 2007
room for improvement?
With the school year starting soon, we’re interested in making Jiskha the best homework help website online. If you have any suggestions for improving our website, please contact us by using this form: http://www.jiskha.com/contact/

asked by Jiskha Webmaster on August 18, 2005
Social Studies
how do you make a riddle? Thank you for using the Jiskha Homework Help Forum. There actually is a Website for how to make a riddle: 1. http://www.catb.org/~esr/riddle-poems.html This is an answer from Jiskha earlier: 2.

asked by Anonymous on March 21, 2007
English
In modern English, the comparative/superlative for the word “bad” is indicated as worse/worst. A number of years ago, it was worse/worse. When did this change? It has not changed. See below: http://www.jiskha.com/display.cgi?id=1165241783.1165245841 =)

asked by Mary on December 5, 2006
Calculus
Sorry to bother you so much but do you think you could check my answers for these two: jiskha.com/questions/1788952/Hi-I-missed-school-due-to-illness-and-my-school-isnt-very-forgiving-so-I-would

asked by George on March 19, 2019
search box on jiskha.com
The search box at the top of this page now searches the entire jiskha.com forum in real time. http://www.jiskha.com/search/search.cgi?query=apples Nice. very nice.

asked by Leo on October 11, 2006
Germany and China
I need to know if Germany and China both have liability insurance and what does it cover? (need references) also driving under the influence/BAC and punishment for (both countries) are selt belts required for these countries? Thank you for using the Jiskha

asked by Travis on March 27, 2007
if you’re in the mood for riddles
The riddle forum is back up: http://www.jiskha.com/net_riddle There are some truly clever riddles being posted. The following is one of my favorites. Try not to scroll down because then you’ll see the answer(s):

asked by Leo on April 11, 2007

2 on msn

I just noticed that if you search for homework help on m.s.n, we’re number 2. … and #8 on Google! =) # 4 on Yahoo And #1 with me. For a couple weeks now, if I search for homework help on my own connection, jiskha is ranked at #11 or #12. But if I go to

asked by Leo on June 28, 2006
To Kuromi – re English
http://www.jiskha.com/display.cgi?id=1254257821 and http://www.jiskha.com/display.cgi?id=1254258297 and http://www.jiskha.com/display.cgi?id=1254263202 Your first (and better) thesis statement attempt: “While some are struggling to survive in this world

asked by Writeacher on September 29, 2009
Written Communication
Discuss how you would approach creating a negative message for a superior (such as a manager at work or an instructor) versus creating a message for a colleague, subordinate, or fellow student. Answers from previous postings:

asked by Mimi on June 27, 2007
school supplies
We just added a number of articles: http://www.jiskha.com/school_supplies This is one of my favorites: http://www.jiskha.com/school_supplies/staples.html Very nice!! =)

asked by Leo on October 30, 2006
??????
are new people her during the summer?for ppl who need help with summer school? Most of us teachers answer questions on the Jiskha board all year round. 🙂 We’ll be glad to help all students whenever they post questions. P.S. — We’re all volunteers and

asked by Anonymous on July 5, 2006
IDIOM
GRABBING THE BULL BY THE HORNS A WOLF IN SHEEP’S CLOTHING Thank you for using the Jiskha Homework Help Forum. This expression means to “get right to the point.” If you have something to say you do not “beat around the bush” but come right out and say it.

asked by ray on February 21, 2007
social project
the need to preserve and protect konark temple Answered before: http://www.jiskha.com/display.cgi?id=1167286948.1167316111 http://www.jiskha.com/display.cgi?id=1164191056.1164213875

asked by noopur on January 6, 2007
Arts/social science
What is the relevance of academic study of the Bible today,especially in African context? Define Ethics and show how it relates to Epistemology. Here are previous answers to these very same questions: http://www.jiskha.com/display.cgi?id=1187166711

asked by Simon on August 20, 2007
eth 125
list three characteristics of orientalism We have a great search engine at Jiskha, in the Search window above. http://www.jiskha.com/search/search.cgi?query=ist+three+characteristics+of+orientalism

asked by Delma on July 5, 2007
To All The Teachers In Jiskha Website
Happy New Year!!!!!!!!!!!!! Thanks to the teachers who helped me with my homework and wished me “HAPPY BIRTHDAY” yesterday!!!!!!!!!! Thanks for your help! Wishing all the teachers of Jiskha Website a HAPPY NEW YEAR! Sincerely, Kaveri Thank you and Happy

asked by Kaveri on January 1, 2007

“Y912f”, please givethis note to your pare
“Y912f”, please give the follow note to your parents. Dear Parents of Y912f, Your daughter has been receiving help from Jiskha for quite some time. Our task on this site is to “help” students learn, not do their work for them. It has become obvious that

asked by GuruBlue on May 16, 2010
Algebra 2 – reposted for Erin
http://www.jiskha.com/display.cgi?id=1185647843 http://www.jiskha.com/display.cgi?id=1185649562 http://www.jiskha.com/display.cgi?id=1185652522

asked by Writeacher on July 29, 2007
written communication
What steps would one take to ensure that the purpose of your message (whether informative, negative, or persuasive) is conveyed to your readers? As already answered: http://www.jiskha.com/display.cgi?id=1161095998 =) what kinds fo unwanted reactions might

asked by ann on July 1, 2007
Social Studies
Why was self-rule initially difficult for the Congo Already answered: http://www.jiskha.com/display.cgi?id=1187027745 Please do not double-post. Thanks. Those sites didn’t help, but if you could help me I would appreciate it Thank you for using the Jiskha

asked by Dali on August 13, 2007
Two for Damon
I don’t know the rowing terminology! http://www.jiskha.com/display.cgi?id=1410596117 and http://www.jiskha.com/display.cgi?id=1410596417

asked by Writeacher on September 13, 2014
English for sou
I hope you’re still working on these: http://www.jiskha.com/display.cgi?id=1378614319 http://www.jiskha.com/display.cgi?id=1378616294

asked by Writeacher on September 8, 2013
Jiskha.com Upgraded to New Server
The upgrade to the new web server is complete. The server will prove to be faster, more reliable, and more stable. The new server enables live homework help experts on our website: http://www.jiskha.com/features/experts/ If you are interested in helping

asked by Jiskha Webmaster on July 11, 2005
English
how did using a formal writing process (planning, drafting, developing, revising, editing, and proofreading)help you creat more effective academic paper? This question sounds as if your teaching is asking YOU about how the writing process helped YOU write

asked by Dina on June 20, 2006
I have some questions
Hello, My name is Chandra Mukhi. I am a girl. I am new in America.This is my first time using Jiskha.I have some questions. My questions are: In school how do you make friends? In school how do you get to know if someone becomes your friend? Be your true

asked by Chandra Mukhi on December 23, 2006
Disease Question
Can you help with this question? Giardiasis is a communicable illness that is transmitted: 1. through direct and indirect contact with infected fecal matter or 2. by touching the moist lining of the eyes and nose. I want to say the correct answer is (A)

asked by Tottally confused-please help!! on April 15, 2007

ETH 125
WOW, LOL seems like we all done the same thing to find an answer to a question. Tooooo funny. I am in my second week of ETH and was browsing for an answer to how sociologist calculate prejudice. 🙁 really strugglin in COM 215 anyone have any advice. I

asked by Tonya on July 19, 2007
I have a question, I am new In Jiskha!
Hello, My name is Chandra Mukhi. I am a girl. I am new in America and Jiskha. This is my second time useing Jiskha. I have a question. I watch 30 minute meals in Food Network Channel.I have Cable.The woman who does this program I think her name is Rachael

asked by Chandra Mukhi on December 29, 2006
grammar
Richard III supposedly had the young princes murdered. Never found out what really happened to them. Thank you for using the Jiskha Homework Help Forum. This should not be labeled “grammar” but “English.” There was a lot of supposition about who exactly

asked by Anonymous on March 22, 2007
cultural diversity
considering racial imbalances in education, the economy, family life, housing, criminal justice, health acre, and politics. Of these societal challenges facing modern african american, which do you think are most difficult to overcome and why?

asked by dee on July 26, 2007
Test used to measure prejudice
I took the Implicit Association Test to measure prejudice. What other test does sociologist use to measure prejudice? I found no further recognized tests to specifically measure general prejudice. You can find assorted tests ( I don’t know how reputable)

asked by Sherrel McCord on July 27, 2007
math
So I don’t have a question I just wanted to wish all of the Jiskha tutors a very Happy Thanksgiving! All of the Students that use this site really appreciate all of the help. Thanks you all for checking our questions, and explaining materials to us when we

asked by swimmer girl on November 23, 2017
Riddle
Looking for a word that fits this riddle: Look near a lively game; pointing to a path with a rabbit in its name. There’s a place to post riddles at the bottom of the main Jiskha webpage: www.jiskha.com Better results there, too, since you’ll have fellow

asked by Elayne on March 3, 2007
description for Jiskha.com
A few of you have noted that Google’s description of jiskha.com is ineffective on the search results. It currently reads: —– Articles, games, humor and puzzles for many school areas including art, computers, English, foreign languages, health, home

asked by Leo on January 24, 2007
immigrants U.S.A
Immigrants U.S.A What do you want to know about immigrants to the U.S.A.? Since most of us are descended from immigrants — who began arriving about four hundred years ago — that’s a lot of time and people. Please clarify your question and we’ll try to

asked by Piggy on April 22, 2007
FRENCH HELP
I don’t get french It is to hard help me understand plz someone help I can’t fail grade six plz help French is the most beautiful language in the world. Thank you for using the Jiskha Homework Help Forum. In order to help you, please give us some examples

asked by melissa on October 8, 2006

written communication
I need a example on how to write a Persuasive message and a negative message. Marie or Ann or whoever, http://www.jiskha.com/search/search.cgi?query=negative+message http://www.jiskha.com/search/search.cgi?query=persuasive+message Here are some previously

asked by marie on July 4, 2007
Multiplying and Dividing Rational Expression
Can someone solve these for me?Can someone correct meif I didn’t type these right 1.(m-2)/(m-5)(m+5)/(m-2) 2.4(x+2)/5x(6x^2)/2x 3.(25-x^2)/126/(5-x) 4.(a^2-9)/a^2(a^2-3a)/(a^2+a-12) 5.(5x-5)/(16)/(x-1)/6 6.(6-3x)/(5)/(4x-8)/25 7.(x^2-9)/(4X+12)/(x-3)/6

asked by mike on May 16, 2007
random
How do you pronounce jiskha?

asked by huncho jack on March 6, 2018
curiousity
Is Jiskha actually helpful?

asked by ??? on October 9, 2013
anti
I Hate jiskha

asked by amitvile on April 9, 2016
A question
May I ask why this site is called jiskha

asked by anonymous on April 2, 2014
?
How do you become a tutor on Jiskha Homework Help

asked by jman on October 12, 2012
Music
How do you download music from jiskha?

asked by Corey on March 2, 2010
test
http://www.jiskha.com/

asked by MathMate on May 30, 2009
Invention
Who was Jiskha invented by? Was it Ms. Sue?

asked by Mr. Market on March 19, 2018

Question
I’m actually curious about this- What does Jiskha mean or stand for?

asked by Anonymous on November 2, 2018
Business
How long has jiskha been a website?

asked by Elizabeth B. on February 20, 2016
Math
Please Help (I am new in Jiskha) How do you multiply 367 and 72?

asked by Shaina on January 27, 2007
Orientalism
List two to three characteristics of Orientalism We’ve had many questions about Orientalism in the last year, but many of us don’t really know what it means. Please post a definition of Orientalism, and we’ll try to help you find its characteristics. These

asked by Anonymous on May 16, 2007
algebra
hi jiskha. how do you solve x-4/x+2 + 2/x-2 = 17/x^2-4? I factored it so it became x-4(x+2)(x-2)+2(x+2)(x-2)=17, but I don’t know where to go from there. thanx!!

asked by Alec on January 26, 2009
any
Does jiskha erase comments and answers?

asked by Aluminum<3 Helping & C.S.I ♪♫ on October 9, 2014
preschool
how does a preschooler even know how to post a question on jiskha? i mean really

asked by (⊙_◎) on September 24, 2015
history
why isnt jiskha not allowing me to ask a question

asked by abcdd on October 16, 2014
English
Oh ok because Whitacher said that Guru told me something but he did not. Who is Jiskha?

asked by Ruth on February 21, 2010
History,geography,tourism,math lit,zulu.
Do Jiskha have A sarturday schools near soweto

asked by Anonymous on August 26, 2014

Urgenttt
hello, how do i delete all the questions i published on jiskha

asked by Amna on January 22, 2010
english
i need someone’s help What do you need help with? Please put your question on the board and someone will be more than please to help. thanks for asking Jiskha.

asked by chandani on October 28, 2006
Valentin Frech
need to know what a card with the picture of a boy hiding behind a heart might be. I got: Carte de _ _ _ H _ I _ _ I don’t know what it is 🙁 1.) Dis a tes _ _ _ _ combien tu les amies. 2.) Ce qu’on ressent pour ses amis. 5.) On en envoie une a celui qu’on

asked by Sammy on February 18, 2007
reading
i really need to know the them for “the face on the milk carton”. can anyone help me? Thank you for using the Jiskha Homework Help Forum. Sorry, but your question is not clear. If you mean “the theme” it is to try to locate the missing children pictured on

asked by tracy on August 6, 2007
French
I’m trying to figure out how you would say “he is being” in French. I know it has something to do with the present participle “étant,” but we haven’t really gotten very far into this yet in class. Would you say “il est étant” or “il étant?” Ok I found

asked by Alice on March 4, 2007
Spanish
Are there teachers/people on Jiskha that can help me with my Spanish?? Also, are there any homeschoolers on here?

asked by SetonHomeschool10 on October 21, 2018
Algebra
Solve the system by graphing. x+y=−2 y=13x+2 Thanks jiskha,com 🙂

asked by Norman on January 1, 2016
@BK, aka Connexus Cheater
Your posts have been deleted and you’ve been banned from posting on Jiskha.

asked by Ms. Sue on May 25, 2016
Algebra
Can you guys please help? : jiskha. com /display.cgi?id=1395865500

asked by Hailey on March 26, 2014
math
Dear people of Jiskha, Thank you for helping me today

asked by Anonymous on February 22, 2018

To mk-tintin
Please note that several of the Jiskha teachers can read French. 🙂

asked by Ms. Sue on January 31, 2008
@ Flo From Progressive
Cheaters are not tolerated here! You are now banned from posting on Jiskha.

asked by Ms. Sue on January 19, 2017
About Posting
Very few people have permission to post links on this board. However, you could tell the person to go to Wikipedia.com and tell the search term you used to find the information. Is it true that I’ll never be able to post a link here on Jiskha? I’ve tried

asked by Ms. Sue on August 16, 2007
Merry Christmas from Jiskha
Merry Christmas from Jiskha to all of the students and homework help experts.

asked by Leo on December 25, 2008
For Sam – re “Crossing the Bar”
http://www.jiskha.com/display.cgi?id=1313885018

asked by Writeacher on August 21, 2011
algebra
can yu help me solve my algebra problems jiskha/ I use to get help from you a year ago

asked by edna on August 5, 2013
algebra
can yu help me solve my algebra problems jiskha/ I use to get help from you a year ago

asked by edna on August 5, 2013
question!
What are the operating times at Jiskha when I can actually get a response within half an hour?

asked by Hannie on October 29, 2008
Latin for Alex
http://www.jiskha.com/display.cgi?id=1260481134

asked by Writeacher on December 10, 2009
For Loli – persuasion
http://www.jiskha.com/display.cgi?id=1379184170

asked by Writeacher on September 15, 2013

to Scooby
See below: http://www.jiskha.com/display.cgi?id=1263526317

asked by Writeacher on January 15, 2010
Science repost for Krishna
http://www.jiskha.com/display.cgi?id=1207535544

asked by Writeacher on April 7, 2008
6th grade
what are pareleleo lines this is math jiskha ,please answer thankyou

asked by deborah on October 8, 2008
psychology
Jiskha experts, can someone please explain to me what is the premise of business psychology?

asked by Sharon on September 17, 2011

Categories
need someone to write my essay order essay online pay for essay

a balance sheet that displays only component percentages is called

1. When implementing a new management accounting and control system, it is BEST:
to allow management to implement their ideas.
for management to involve employees in the implementation.
to involve consultants and implement their experienced ideas.
to engage in benchmarking.

2. Knowledge-based pay for employees is a form of:
input-based reward.
output-based reward.
outcome-based reward.
None of these is correct.
3. When discussing the roles of budgets, a control role includes:
identifying organizational objectives and short-term goals.
developing long-term strategies and short-term plans.
measuring and assessing performance against budgeted amounts.
developing the master budget.
4. All of the following are true of flexible budgets EXCEPT that they:
use the same flexible (variable) cost per unit as the master budget.
result in higher total costs for greater levels of production.
allow comparison of actual results to targets based on the achieved level of production.
reflect the same level of production as the master budget.

5. The sales plan and inventory plan is compared to available productive capacity levels and ________ is determined.
an aggregate plan
a new sales plan
a materials purchasing plan
an administrative and discretionary spending plan

6. The numerator of the rate earned on total assets ratio is equal to
net income
net income plus tax expense
net income plus interest expense
net income minus preferred dividends

7. ________ provide(s) the starting point for developing the operating budget.
The demand forecast
Projected income statement
The production plan
Expected cash flows

8. ________ occur(s) when managers ask subordinates to discuss their ideas about the budget, but no joint decision-making occurs.
Authoritative budgeting
Stretch targets
Consultative budgeting
Budget slack
9. An analysis in which all the components of an income statement are expressed as a percentage of net sales is called
vertical analysis
horizontal analysis
liquidity analysis
common-size analysis
10. The MAJOR criticism of using return on investment (ROI) for financial control is that it:
gives managers an incentive to reject projects with an ROI greater than the company’s required rate of return but less than the department’s current ROI.
usually uses the blended rate of capital as the required rate of return.
encourages competition among segment managers.
is a measure of overall performance.

11. One reason that a common-size statement is a useful tool in financial analysis is that it enables the user to
judge the relative potential of two companies of similar size in different industries.
determine which companies in a single industry are of the same value.
determine which companies in a single industry are of the same size.
make a better comparison of two companies of different sizes in the same industry.

12. To the extent that an ethical hierarchy exists, ________ have the highest authority.
societal norms
legal rules
organizational norms
personal norms

13. A cost center is a business segment:
that usually evaluates employee performance by comparing the center’s actual costs with target or standard costs for the amount and type of work done.
in which interperiod cost comparisons can be misleading if the output level and production mix are constant.
that usually includes individual stores within a department-store chain.

14. The five stages in the process of keeping an organization in control are:
planning, implementing, measuring, evaluating and correcting.
planning, executing, monitoring, evaluating and correcting.
budgeting, implementing, monitoring, evaluation and feedback.
budgeting, executing, measuring, feedback and evaluation.

15. Corporate annual reports typically do not contain which of the following?
management discussion and analysis
SEC statement expressing an opinion
accompanying foot notes
auditor’s report
that should be evaluated solely on its ability to control and reduce costs.

16. Financial budgets are prepared:
to specify expectations for selling, purchasing, and production.
to evaluate the financial results of the proposed decisions.
so that financial statements can be prepared for shareholders.
to plan for production capacity.

17. ________ occur(s) when managers ask subordinates to discuss their ideas about the budget, but no joint decision-making occurs.
Traditional budgeting
Stretch targets
The beyond budgeting approach
Budget slack

18. All of the following encourage ethical behavior among employees EXCEPT:
having a system for employees to point out violations of the organization’s code of ethics without fear of retribution.
dealing promptly and consistently with persons who violate the organization’s code of ethics.
exemplary behavior demonstrated by senior management.
protecting whistle blowers who report unethical behavior who have also acted unethically.

19. Which of the following items appear on the corporate income statement before income from continuing operations?
cumulative effect of a change in accounting principle
income tax expense
extraordinary gain
loss on discontinued operations

20. A balance sheet that displays only component percentages is called
trend balance sheet
comparative balance sheet
condensed balance sheet
common-sized balance sheet

21. L&M Manufacturing produces a single product that sells for $16. Variable (flexible) costs per unit equal $11.20. The company expects the total fixed (capacity-related) costs to be $7,200 for the next month at the projected sales level of 20,000 units. In an attempt to improve performance, management is considering a number of alternative actions. Each situation is to be evaluated separately.
Suppose that L&M Manufacturing’s management believes that a 10% reduction in the selling price will result in a 30% increase in sales. If this proposed reduction in selling price is implemented, then:
profit will decrease by $12,800 in a month.
profit will increase by $12,800 in a month.
profit will decrease by $32,000 in a month.
profit will increase by $32,000 in a month.

22. When a subordinate is caught padding an expense report, the supervisor should FIRST:
ignore the incident if it is the first offense.
report the incident to the personnel department.
confront the employee and ask him to submit a corrected expense report.
take action that complies with the organization’s code of ethics.

23. Although planners update or revise the budgets during the period, ________ is typically performed once per year.
zero-based budgeting
periodic budgeting
incremental budgeting
continuous budgeting

24. In a centralized organization:
local-division managers do not need higher approval for most business decisions.
company-wide standard operating procedures are common.
local-division managers have an opportunity to gain decision-making experience.
decisions are made by local division managers.

25. In a management accounting and control system design, behavioral expectations are BEST incorporated by:
using a mix of short-term and quantitative performance measures.
developing a task-related control system.
including the organization’s code of conduct.
monitoring behavior with time and motion studies.

26. Which of the following ratios provides a solvency measure that shows the margin of safety of noteholders or bondholders and also gives an indication of the potential ability of the business to borrow additional funds on a long-term basis?
ratio of fixed assets to long-term liabilities
ratio of net sales to assets
number of days’ sales in receivables
rate earned on stockholders’ equity

27. The dimensions of motivation that are important in designing jobs and specific task include all of the following EXCEPT:
persistence.
control.
direction.
intensity.

28. The variance that LEAST affects cost control is the ________ variance.
flexible budget
direct material price
planning
direct labor efficiency
29. Hsu Company reported the following on its income statement:
Income before income taxes  $420,000
Income taz expense   120,000
Net Income  $300,000
An analysis of the income statement revelaed that interest expense was $80,000. Hsu Company’s times interest earned was
8 times
6.25 times
5.25 times
5 times
30. The PRIMARY reason for using cost variances is:
that they diagnose the cause of a problem and what should be done to correct it.
for superiors to communicate expectations to lower level employees.
to administer appropriate disciplinary action.
for financial control of operating activities.

31. Caution should be taken when interpreting a segment margin income statement because:
revenues may be based on transfer prices.
the interactive effects among responsibility centers are generally not clearly captured.
expenses may be a result of subjective allocation of jointly incurred costs.
All of these are correct.

32. Randall Company makes and distributes outdoor play equipment. Last year sales were $4,800,000, operating income was $1,200,000, and the assets used were $6,000,000.
Return on sales, the efficiency component of return on investment (ROI), is:
20%.
80%.
25%.
125%.

33. Feedback systems that force a dialogue among all organizational participants about the data that are coming out of the system and what to do about the data are called:
diagnostic control systems.
monitoring.
preventative controls.
interactive control systems.

Categories
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nosotros / ser / simpático / y / trabajador

Write an adjective with the opposite meaning.

alto

difícil

malo

grande

viejo

Nacionalidades

Rewrite the sentences using adjectives of nationality.

Olivia es de Argentina.

El profesor es de Alemania.

Carlos y yo somos de Canadá.

La turista es de Costa Rica.

Los ingenieros son de España.

Margaret y Anne son de Inglaterra.

Oraciones

Write sentences using the information provided. Make any necessary changes. Follow the model.

mi novio / ser / inteligente / y / guapo

la mujer / pelirrojo / enseñar / periodismo

nosotros / ser / simpático / y / trabajador

¿los turistas / japonés / esperar / el autobús?

ustedes / tomar / mucho / pruebas / en la clase de español

Completar

Fill in the blanks with the appropriate form of the correct adjectives.

Mi madre es muy (1) (trabajador / rubio): es artista y también enseña en una universidad. A los estudiantes les gusta mi madre porque es una profesora (2) (bueno / antipático), pero ella da (gives) exámenes muy (3) (bonito / difícil). Este semestre enseña dos clases de arte (4) (delgado / chino). Mi madre es una (5) (grande / mismo) mujer, ¿verdad?

Categories
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to use language vividly, your textbook recommends that speakers employ

CENGAGE ADVANTAGE EDITION

BUILDING A SPEECH Eighth Edition

Sheldon Metcalfe Community College of Baltimore County

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To my mother, who gave me the values, and my father, who gave me the vision

to write this book.

This page intentionally left blank

Brief Contents

Preface xxi

Unit One SURVEYING THE LANDSCAPE

Chapter 1 Introducing the Study of Public Speaking 2

Chapter 2 Understanding and Reducing Your Apprehension 15

Chapter 3 Building Your First Speech 28

Chapter 4 Analyzing Your Audience 43

Chapter 5 Improving Your Listening Skills 64

Chapter 6 Considering the Ethics of Public Speaking 81

Unit Two PREPARING THE FOUNDATION

Chapter 7 Selecting the Topic and Purpose 102

Chapter 8 Conducting Research 116

Chapter 9 Choosing Supporting Materials 141

Unit Three CREATING THE STRUCTURE

Chapter 10 Organizing the Body of the Speech 160

Chapter 11 Selecting the Introduction and Conclusion 179

Unit Four REFINING THE APPEARANCE

Chapter 12 Using Audiovisual Aids 206

Chapter 13 Considering Language 229

Chapter 14 Developing the Delivery 247

v

Unit Five CONSIDERING DIFFERENT TYPES OF STRUCTURE

Chapter 15 Speaking to Inform 270

Chapter 16 Speaking to Persuade 292

Chapter 17 Speaking to Persuade: Motivating Audiences 324

Chapter 18 Speaking for Special Occasions 340

Chapter 19 Speaking in Groups 357

v i Brief Contents

Contents

Preface xxi

Unit One Survey ing the Landscape

Chapter 1 Introducing the Study of Public Speaking 2 COMMUNICATION IN THE MODERN WORLD 3

THE COMMUNICATION PROCESS 4

A Communication Model 5

The Sender: Encoding Ideas into Symbols 5

The Message 6

The Channel 6

The Receiver: Decoding Symbols into Ideas 6

Feedback 7

Setting 7

Noise 8

UNDERSTANDING THE TOOLS OF COMMUNICATION 10

APPLYING THE COMMUNICATION PROCESS 12

DESIGNING A PLAN FOR SUCCESS 13

SUMMARY 14

SKILL BUILDERS 14

BUILDING A SPEECH ONLINE 14

Chapter 2 Understanding and Reducing Your Apprehension 15 SPEECH ANXIETY IS COMMON 16

RESEARCH INTO STRESS AND COMMUNICATION APPREHENSION 17

REDUCING COMMUNICATION APPREHENSION 19

Face Anxiety Honestly and Overcome It 19

Develop a Positive Attitude 21

Adopt Constructive Behaviors 23

Maintain a Healthy Body 23

Be Thoroughly Prepared 24

Reward Yourself 24

Learn from Mistakes 25

Accept Constructive Criticism 25

vii

TAKING RESPONSIBILITY TO REDUCE APPREHENSION 26

SUMMARY 27

SKILL BUILDERS 27

BUILDING A SPEECH ONLINE 27

Chapter 3 Building Your First Speech 28 EXTEMPORANEOUS DELIVERY AND SPEAKING STYLES 29

CREATING A BLUEPRINT 30

Step 1: Choose an Interesting, Well-Defined Topic 30

Step 2: Understand the General Purpose 31

Step 3: Conduct Extensive Research 31

Step 4: Write Specific Purpose and Thesis Statements 32

Step 5: Write a Comprehensive Outline 32

Step 6: Be Sensitive to Audience Members 33

Step 7: Understand Your Ethical Responsibilities 33

Step 8: Choose Extemporaneous Delivery 33

Step 9: Practice the Speech 33

Step 10: Be Confident and Prepared 35

THE CAREER SPEECH 36

Researching the Career Speech 36

Developing the Career Speech 37

SAMPLE SPEECH: CAREERS IN ANTHROPOLOGY 37

SUMMARY 41

SKILL BUILDERS 42

BUILDING A SPEECH ONLINE 42

Chapter 4 Analyzing Your Audience 43 THE IMPORTANCE OF AUDIENCE ANALYSIS 44

Audience Perception of the Speaker 45

Audience Perception of the Topic 46

Motivations of the Audience 49

Physiological Needs 50

Safety Needs 50

Love Needs 50

Esteem Needs 50

Self-Actualization Needs 50

Impact of Social Groups on Listeners 51

Age 51

Gender 52

Religion 53

Cultural and Ethnic Origin 53

Educational Level, Occupation, and Interests 55

Income Level 56

v i i i Contents

Geographic Location 56

Social Organizations 56

Targeting Specific Groups 57

Impact of the Occasion on Listeners 58

The Purpose of the Occasion 58

The Physical Location of the Event 59

The Expectations of the Speaker 59

CONDUCTING AN AUDIENCE ANALYSIS 60

Collecting Demographic Data about the Audience 60

Informal Assessments 60

Surveys 60

Questionnaires 61

Interviews 61

Processing the Data with a Computer 62

Evaluating the Audience Profile 62

SUMMARY 62

SKILL BUILDERS 62

BUILDING A SPEECH ONLINE 63

Chapter 5 Improving Your Listening Skills 64 THE SIGNIFICANCE OF LISTENING 65

THE PROCESS OF LISTENING 66

KINDS OF LISTENING 68

Discriminative Listening 68

Evaluative Listening 69

Appreciative Listening 69

Empathic Listening 70

Active and Passive Listening 70

BARRIERS TO LISTENING: THE LACK OF BEING “PRESENT” 70

Yielding to Distractions 71

Blocking Out Communication 72

Listening Selectively 73

Overcriticizing the Speaker 74

Faking Attention 74

Avoiding Difficult or Unpleasant Listening Situations 74

HOW TO BECOME AN ACTIVE LISTENER AND SPEAKER 75

Withhold Judgment 75

Avoid the Appearance Trap 75

Don’t Be Easily Swayed by Delivery and Style 76

Give All Topics a Fair Hearing 76

Avoid Extraneous Mental Activity During the Speech 76

Give Honest, Attentive Feedback 76

Contents ix

Eliminate Distractions 78

Evaluate the Communication When It Is Finished 78

SUMMARY 79

SKILL BUILDERS 80

BUILDING A SPEECH ONLINE 80

Chapter 6 Considering the Ethics of Public Speaking 81 THE NEED FOR ETHICS IN SOCIETY 83

EVALUATING A SPEAKER’S ETHICS 84

Honesty and the Speaker 84

The Speaker’s Reliability 87

The Speaker’s Motivations 87

The Speaker’s Policies 88

APPLYING ETHICAL STANDARDS 90

Be Honest 91

Direct Quotation 91

Paraphrased Passage 91

Plagiarized Passage 91

Advocate Ideas That Benefit Others 92

Evaluate Your Motives for Speaking 92

Develop a Speaking Code of Ethics 93

SAMPLE SPEECH: PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE: KNOWING IS NOT THE SAME THING AS DOING 95

SUMMARY 99

SKILL BUILDERS 99

BUILDING A SPEECH ONLINE 99

Unit Two Prepar ing the Foundat ion

Chapter 7 Selecting the Topic and Purpose 102 GETTING IDEAS 103

Your Own Knowledge and Experience 103

Brainstorming 104

Library Databases and the Internet 104

Ask for Help 104

SELECTING THE TOPIC 104

It Should Interest You, the Speaker 104

It Should be Sufficiently Narrow and Conform to the Time Limit 105

It Should Provide New Information 106

It Should be Appropriate 106

It Should Conform to the General Purpose 107

Speeches to Inform 107

Speeches to Persuade 107

Speeches to Entertain 108

x Contents

WRITING THE SPECIFIC PURPOSE 108

Be Clear, Concise, and Unambiguous 108

Include Only One Major Idea 109

Use a Declarative Statement 110

WORDING THE THESIS STATEMENT 110

Problems with the Thesis Statement 112

PUTTING IT TOGETHER 113

SUMMARY 114

SKILL BUILDERS 114

BUILDING A SPEECH ONLINE 115

Chapter 8 Conducting Research 116 PREPARING FOR RESEARCH 117

ESTABLISHING CREDIBILITY 117

PRIMARY AND SECONDARY SOURCES 118

ACCESSING THE LIBRARY 119

The Online Catalog 119

Databases 119

GUIDELINES FOR SEARCHING THE INTERNET 121

RESEARCHING REFERENCE SOURCES 123

Biographies 123

Directories and Handbooks 124

The Dictionary and Thesaurus 124

Encyclopedias 124

Almanacs, Yearbooks, and Statistical Publications 125

Collections of Quotations 125

Books 125

Magazines, Journals, and Newspapers 125

Legal Research 126

Audiovisual Aids 126

Interviews with Authorities 127

Legislative and Governmental Research 129

Institutional and Organizational Research 129

Specialized Libraries and Museums 130

KEEPING ACCURATE NOTES 130

INTERVIEWING 132

Preparing for the Interview 132

Conducting the Interview 133

Taking Notes During the Interview 134

THE BIBLIOGRAPHY: HOW TO RECORD AN ENTRY 134

AVOIDING PLAGIARISM 136

THINKING CRITICALLY ABOUT SPEECH RESEARCH AND CONSTRUCTION 136

Contents xi

Be Willing to Test Information 136

Be Organized 138

View Ideas from Different Perspectives 138

Think for Yourself 139

SUMMARY 140

SKILL BUILDERS 140

BUILDING A SPEECH ONLINE 140

Chapter 9 Choosing Supporting Materials 141 MAKING THE APPROPRIATE SELECTION 142

STATISTICS, POLLS, AND SURVEYS 142

Using Statistics 142

Poll 143

Study 143

Startling Statistics 143

EXAMPLES, ILLUSTRATIONS, CASE STUDIES, AND NARRATIVES 144

Using Examples 144

Example 144

Hypothetical Example 145

Illustration 145

Case Study 146

Narrative 147

QUOTATIONS AND TESTIMONY 147

Using Quotations and Testimonies 148

Quotation 148

Expert Testimony 148

Prestige Testimony 149

Personal Testimony 149

VISUAL EVIDENCE 149

COMPARISONS AND CONTRASTS 149

Using Comparisons and Contrasts 150

PERSONAL EXPERIENCE AND OBSERVATION 151

Using Experience and Observation 151

HUMOR AND ANECDOTES 152

Using Humor and Anecdotes 152

ROLE-PLAYING 153

Using Role-Playing Techniques 153

SAMPLE SPEECH: THE FLAG RAISINGS ON IWO JIMA 154

SUMMARY 157

SKILL BUILDERS 157

BUILDING A SPEECH ONLINE 157

xi i Contents

Unit Three Creat ing the Structure

Chapter 10 Organizing the Body of the Speech 160 APPROACHING ORGANIZATION LOGICALLY 161

PRINCIPLES OF OUTLINING 161

Building Block One: The Body Should Contain Between Two and Four Main Points or Numerals in a Five- to Seven-Minute Speech 162

Building Block Two: Main Points in the Body Should be Structured in an Organizational Sequence that is Logical, Interesting, and Appropriate to the Topic 162

Chronological Sequence 162

Spatial Sequence 163

Cause-Effect Sequence 164

Topical Sequence 164

Other Sequences 165

Building Block Three: A System of Roman Numerals, Letters, and Arabic Numbers Should be Combined with Indentation to Identify Main and Subordinate Levels 166

Building Block Four: The Outline Should Include Supporting Materials That are Coordinated and Subordinated in a Logical Manner 167

Building Block Five: Every Subdivision must Contain at Least Two Items 169

Building Block Six: Each Point Should Include Only One Topic or Idea 170

Building Block Seven: Main Points (Numerals) and Supporting Items Should be Linguistically Parallel 171

Building Block Eight: The Outline Should be Expressed in Either Sentences or Topics 172

Building Block Nine: The Outline Should Identify Sources for Major Supporting Materials 173

Building Block Ten: The Outline Should Include External Transitions Between Main Numerals 174

YOUR SPEAKING NOTES 175

SUMMARY 177

SKILL BUILDERS 177

BUILDING A SPEECH ONLINE 178

Chapter 11 Selecting the Introduction and Conclusion 179 PURPOSE OF THE INTRODUCTION 180

THE INADEQUATE INTRODUCTION 180

PLANNING AN EFFECTIVE INTRODUCTION 181

Examples, Stories, and Illustrations 182

Shocking Statement or Situation 183

Statistics 184

Questions 185

Quotation 186

Suspense 186

Contents xi i i

Personal Reference, Compliment, or Reference to the Occasion 187

Humor 188

The Flexible Introduction 189

Combination of Strategies 190

OUTLINING THE INTRODUCTION 190

PURPOSE OF THE CONCLUSION 191

THE INADEQUATE CONCLUSION 191

PLANNING THE EFFECTIVE CONCLUSION 192

Summary of Main Points 192

Quotation 193

Reference to the Introduction 194

Challenge or Appeal 194

Humor 195

Question 196

Story, Illustration, and Example 197

Statistics 197

OUTLINING THE CONCLUSION 198

SPEAKING NOTES FOR THE INTRODUCTION AND CONCLUSION 199

SAMPLE OUTLINE: RAISING THE MONITOR 200

SUMMARY 203

SKILL BUILDERS 203

BUILDING A SPEECH ONLINE 203

Unit Four Ref in ing the Appearance

Chapter 12 Using Audiovisual Aids 206 TYPES OF AUDIOVISUAL AIDS 207

Electronic Media 207

The Data Projector and Computer 207

Devices for Capturing Text and Media 208

The Document Camera 208

The Touch Screen Monitor or Whiteboard 209

Audience Response Systems 209

Older Technologies 209

Graphs 213

Illustrations, Photographs, and Pictures 214

Posters, Flipcharts, and Chalkboards 218

Models and Objects 220

You as a Visual Aid 220

Copyright Cautions 223

xiv Contents

SAMPLE SPEECH: HOW DO AIRPLANE WINGS PRODUCE LIFT? 223

SUMMARY 227

SKILL BUILDERS 228

BUILDING A SPEECH ONLINE 228

Chapter 13 Considering Language 229 DEVELOPING CLARITY 230

Avoiding Euphemisms 231

USING CONCRETE LANGUAGE 232

Denotation and Connotation 233

BUILDING A UNIQUE STYLE 234

Similes 234

Metaphors 235

Alliteration 236

Amplification 236

Antithesis 236

Repetition 237

Mnemonic Phrases 237

BEING APPROPRIATE 238

Be Aware of Cultural Differences 238

Recognize Differences Due to Gender 240

Avoid Offensive Terms 241

Eliminate Irrelevant Language 241

Avoid Trite Expressions 242

Eliminate Grammatical Errors 242

Build Vocabulary Skills 243

MAKING IDEAS MEANINGFUL AND INTERRELATED 243

Personal Pronouns 243

Transitions 244

SUMMARY 245

SKILL BUILDERS 246

BUILDING A SPEECH ONLINE 246

Chapter 14 Developing the Delivery 247 DELIVERING THE SPEECH 248

PROPER BREATHING FOR VOCAL DELIVERY 249

VOCAL DELIVERY 250

Volume 250

Articulation 251

Pitch and Inflection 251

Quality 252

Rate 253

Contents xv

Pronunciation 253

Pauses 254

Emphasis and Phrasing 255

VISUAL, NONVERBAL DELIVERY 256

Eye Contact 256

Appearance 257

Gestures 257

Facial Expression 258

Body Position and Movement 259

Culture and Nonverbal Delivery 260

Gender and Nonverbal Delivery 261

COMBINING VOCAL AND VISUAL DELIVERY 263

BUILDING SKILLS IN DELIVERY 264

Know Your Material 264

Be Well Organized 264

Prepare Your Speaking Notes 264

Practice the Delivery 266

SUMMARY 267

SKILL BUILDERS 267

BUILDING A SPEECH ONLINE 268

Unit Five Considering Dif ferent Types of Structure

Chapter 15 Speaking to Inform 270 THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN INFORMATION AND PERSUASION 271

TYPES OF INFORMATIVE SPEECHES 272

The Descriptive Speech 272

An Example 273

Outlining the Descriptive Speech 275

The Demonstration Speech 276

An Example 278

Outlining the Demonstration Speech 278

The Speech of Definition 280

Other Informative Types: Reports, Lectures, and Personal Experience 282

SAMPLE SPEECH: RAISING THE MONITOR 285

Alternative Introduction: Series of Questions 289

Alternative Conclusion: Quotation 290

SUMMARY 290

SKILL BUILDERS 291

BUILDING A SPEECH ONLINE 291

xv i Contents

Chapter 16 Speaking to Persuade 292 PERSUASION IN TODAY’S SOCIETY 293

THE NATURE OF PERSUASION 293

Speeches to Convince 294

Speeches to Stimulate 294

Speeches to Actuate 294

Selecting the Persuasive Topic 295

Wording the Proposition Statement 295

Propositions of Fact, Value, and Policy 296

ETHOS, PATHOS, AND LOGOS: THE MEANS OF PERSUASION 297

Ethos: The Ethical Appeal 297

Pathos: The Emotional Appeal 299

Identify Emotions 300

Understand Audience Emotions 301

Express Your Own Feelings 302

Connect Emotions to the Occasion 303

LOGOS: THE APPEAL TO REASON 304

Arguments Based on Enumeration 305

Arguments Based on Analogy 306

Arguments Based on Causation 307

Developing Rebuttal Arguments 308

METHODS OF ORGANIZING PERSUASIVE SPEECHES 311

Reasons 311

Problem-Solution 313

Comparative Advantages 315

Motivated Sequence 316

SAMPLE SPEECH: COMPUTER-ENHANCED ADVERTISING SHOULD BE CLEARLY LABELED 318

SUMMARY 322

SKILL BUILDERS 323

BUILDING A SPEECH ONLINE 323

Chapter 17 Speaking to Persuade: Motivating Audiences 324

STRATEGIES FOR MOTIVATING LISTENERS 325

Appeal to the Needs of the Audience 325

Physical 325

Safety and Security 325

Love 325

Esteem 326

Self-Actualization 326

Appeal to Listeners’ Beliefs and Values 326

Contents xv i i

Provide Listeners with Incentives 327

Involve the Audience Emotionally 328

THE SPEECH TO ACTUATE 329

Attention Step 329

Need Step 329

Satisfaction Step 330

Visualization Step 330

Action Step 330

Phrasing the Thesis 330

APPLYING THE MOTIVATED SEQUENCE 331

Attention Step 331

Need Step 331

Satisfaction Step 332

Visualization Step 332

Action Step 333

Outlining the Motivated Sequence 335

SAMPLE SPEECH: GENOCIDE IN SUDAN 336

SUMMARY 338

SKILL BUILDERS 339

BUILDING A SPEECH ONLINE 339

Chapter 18 Speaking for Special Occasions 340 TYPES OF SPECIAL-OCCASION SPEECHES 341

The Speech of Tribute 341

Construct a Brief Biographical Sketch 341

Acknowledge Significant Achievements and Virtues 341

Convey Hope and Encouragement 341

The Presentation Speech 342

The Acceptance Speech 343

The Speech of Dedication 344

The Speech of Welcome 345

The Speech of Introduction 345

The Keynote Speech 346

The Nominating Speech 347

The Farewell Speech 348

The Victory Speech 348

The Commencement Speech 349

The After-Dinner Speech 349

Toasts 350

SAMPLE SPEECH: DEDICATION OF THE WORLD WAR II MEMORIAL 352

SUMMARY 355

SKILL BUILDERS 355

BUILDING A SPEECH ONLINE 356

xv i i i Contents

Chapter 19 Speaking in Groups 357 CHARACTERISTICS OF SMALL GROUPS 358

Shared Goals 358

Group Interaction 359

Size 359

Time Period 359

Leadership 359

DEVELOPMENT OF SMALL GROUPS 360

Forming 360

Storming 361

Norming 361

Performing 361

SOLVING PROBLEMS IN GROUPS 361

Questions for Discussion 361

Questions of Fact 361

Questions of Value 362

Questions of Policy 362

Developing a Problem-Solving Agenda 362

Define the Problem 362

Narrow the Problem 362

Analyze the Issue 363

Set Up Criteria 363

Suggest Solutions 363

Apply Criteria to Solutions 364

Implement the Selected Solution 364

Monitor the Success of the Solution 364

A Sample Agenda 365

PARTICIPATING IN GROUPS 365

Group-Centered Behavior 366

Be an Active Observer 366

Support Group Procedure 366

Be Reliable 366

Be Willing to Compromise 366

Be Courteous and Respectful 367

Encourage and Energize Members 367

Self-Centered Behavior 367

LEADERSHIP IN SMALL GROUPS 369

Leadership Theories 369

Positive Leadership Behaviors 369

Be Prepared 369

Keep to Time Limits 370

Be Organized 371

Know When to Intervene 371

Contents xix

SPECIAL DISCUSSION FORMATS 374

Focus Groups 374

The Symposium 375

The Panel 375

The Forum 376

Buzz Groups 376

Role-Playing Groups 376

SUMMARY 376

SKILL BUILDERS 377

BUILDING A SPEECH ONLINE 377

Notes 378

Glossary 387

Suggested Topic Areas 395

Index 400

xx Contents

Preface

Public speaking is a building process wherein students gradually acquire skills in speech research, organization, and delivery. Students learn these skills step-by-step from their own experiences, by observing the presentations of others, through peer criticism, and from the guidance of effective instructors. This book establishes a caring environment for the learning process using a conversational style that aims to both interest and moti- vate students while conveying encouragement through topics such as apprehension and listening that will help students to realize that they are not alone in their struggles. It is grounded in the philosophy that students can master the steps of speech construction if provided with a caring environment, clear blueprints, and creative examples.

PLAN OF THE BOOK The five units in this book organize skills in a sequence that is meaningful and under- standable to students.

Unit One, “Surveying the Landscape,” presents modern theories of communication and a brief overview of communication in our contemporary world. In addition, it con- siders apprehension, introduces students to their first speaking experience, and includes chapters on listening and ethics.

Unit Two, “Preparing the Foundation,” describes how to select topics, write purpose statements, conduct research, and choose supporting materials for speeches.

Unit Three, “Creating the Structure,” discusses outlining as well as speech introduc- tions and conclusions.

Unit Four, “Refining the Appearance,” describes the refinements necessary to com- plete speech construction. It helps students build skills in delivery and language, explains the use of visual aids, and includes a sample demonstration speech.

Unit Five, “Considering Different Types of Structures,” discusses descriptive and process speeches and includes a sample descriptive speech; examines persuasive speaking, with sample convincing and actuating speeches; considers presentations for special occa- sions, including the after-dinner speech; and explores the dynamics of speaking in group situations.

FEATURES OF THE EIGHTH EDITION The Eighth Edition retains all of the popular features of previous editions, including a conversational style, vivid examples, and guidelines for speeches. It retains essential chapters on apprehension, listening, ethics, and discussion of diversity. In addition, Building a Speech, Eighth Edition, includes the following new and revised features:

Expanded and Relocated Apprehension Chapter Since studies show that speech apprehension is among the top two fears of most Amer- icans, “Understanding and Reducing Your Apprehension” is now presented as Chapter 2 to help students handle this anxiety early in the course. Chapter 2 has been

xxi

expanded as well. The section titled, “Accept Anxiety Honestly and Face It,” includes a three-column table that identifies a fear, asks challenge questions in response to the fear, and provides encouraging statements of affirmation to help students reduce their anxiety. In the section “Adopt Constructive Behaviors,” journaling before and after a speech is recommended and sample journal entries are provided for student practice. There are also updated examples of celebrities who have reported anxiety before per- formances and a new box with a statement about stage fright by actor Al Pacino.

Updated Chapter 1 Chapter 1, “Introducing the Study of Public Speaking,” includes a new discussion of past and present speakers who have influenced our modern world. In addition to well known leaders of the past such as Roosevelt, Kennedy, King, and Reagan, Chapter 1 describes how Elie Wiesel, Bono, Mother Teresa, Nelson Mandela, Princess Diana, Christopher Reeve, Michael J. Fox, Condoleezza Rice, Hillary Clinton, and Michelle Obama have used communication to shape our world. Reviewers suggested that the inclusion of con- temporary speakers replace discussion of ancient orators presented in earlier editions.

Boxed Examples in Audience Analysis Chapter Two example boxes have been added to Chapter 4, “Analyzing Your Audience.” One box includes a discussion of political lightening rods Nancy Pelosi and Sarah Palin and how public perception has changed over time regarding the policies and actions of these controversial political women. Another includes an example from Wall Street Journal col- umnist Jeffrey Zaslow who describes how a phrase he used as a college student was hurt- ful to the ethnicity of his Spanish professor.

New Boxed Examples and Building Strategies in Listening Chapter New example boxes have also been added to Chapter 5, “Improving Your Listening Skills.” “Caught by the Camera” describes how a sports writer for the Daily Herald in Arlington, Illinois was captured napping in a photograph when he should have been doing his job taking notes as a reporter and listening to a political speaker. A second boxed example presents an individual who is so absorbed in texting that she loses aware- ness and creates an embarrassing situation for herself. The chapter concludes with a new “building” box that summarizes skills that students need when listening to the content and delivery of a speech.

Updated Ethics Chapter Chapter 6, “Considering the Ethics of Public Speaking,” includes updated examples of the ethical lapses of prominent speakers in business and politics. The chapter also con- tains a boxed example describing accusations of plagiarism that caused Senator Joseph Biden to withdraw from the Democratic presidential primary race in the 1980s. There is also a boxed example describing an incident in which a Columbia University valedic- torian plagiarized a portion of his commencement address to his 2010 graduating class. In addition to an updated example of plagiarism, the chapter presents a new “building” box to help students develop a code of ethics for public speaking.

Revised MLA Examples in Research Chapter Since the Modern Language Association recently revised the format for bibliographic citations, all new bibliographic examples in Chapter 8, “Conducting Research,” conform to the new MLA standard. There are also updated examples for citing sources, new note card illustrations, and a new plagiarism example.

xxi i Preface

Revisions and Additions to Supporting Materials Chapter In Chapter 9, “Choosing Supporting Materials,” polls, studies, and startling statistics are more clearly defined and indicated. In addition, brief and hypothetical examples, illustra- tions, case studies, and narratives are more clearly differentiated. The chapter also now includes and explains the differences among expert, prestige, and personal testimony. Although visual aids are extensively presented and discussed in Chapter 12, visual evi- dence is introduced as a significant supporting material in Chapter 9.

Additional Development of the Introduction and Conclusion Chapter 11, “Selecting the Introduction and Conclusion,” further develops and clarifies the purpose of the introduction and conclusion. In addition, the chapter presents exam- ples of ineffective beginnings and endings and explains why they are poor. The chapter also clearly highlights the thesis to each sample introduction so students can see the sig- nificance of its placement as the last line of the introduction.

Updated Terminology in the Visual Aids Chapter In Chapter 12, “Using Audiovisual Aids,” terminology in the electronic media section has been updated and revised to help student speakers understand how current advance- ments such as audience response systems, document cameras, whiteboards, touch screens, and file capturing can help speakers create visuals more easily and stimulate added inter- est among listeners. A new section is also included titled, “Copyright Cautions,” to help students understand the important legal difference between “fair use” and “commercial use” for copyrighted visual and textual materials that require written permission.

Revised Speaking Notes in Delivery Chapter The section titled, “Prepare Your Speaking Notes,” in Chapter 14, “Developing the Delivery,” has been expanded and revised. Since extemporaneous delivery is so impor- tant for the beginning speaker to learn, this section provides five sample note cards to show students how to use key words and brief phrases to present a speech instead of a written manuscript. This section also explains and visually illustrates how students can use markings on their speaking notes to remind them where to state sources, use visuals, or emphasize significant words and phrases. The speech titled, “How Do Airplane Wings Produce Lift?,” from Chapter 12 is used for the sample note cards.

New Table Identifying Fallacies in Persuasive Chapter In addition to describing ethical and logical fallacies in Chapter 16, “Speaking to Persuade,” now contains a comprehensive table that identifies, defines, and provides examples of the principal ethical and logical fallacies presented in the chapter for easier student access. Additional logical fallacies are also included to help students avoid com- mon speaking errors. The chapter also contains an updated boxed example showing students how to construct persuasive arguments on opposing sides of the controversial issue, “The detention facility at Guantanamo Bay should be closed and detainees should be brought to trial in U.S. civilian courts.”

Original Cartoon Illustrations In addition to other updates and changes, the Eighth Edition includes original cartoons drawn by artist George Goebel whose Greek cartoon appears in Chapter 1 and was also featured in earlier editions. New cartoons in this edition include a nervous speaker in Chapter 2, texting in front of truck in Chapter 5, and gullible students in a strange med- ical lecture in Chapter 8.

Preface xxi i i

STUDENT RESOURCES Building a Speech, Eighth Edition, features an outstanding array of supplements to assist in making this course as meaningful and effective as possible. Available student resources include:

• Resource Center. This useful site offers a variety of rich learning assets designed to enhance the student experience. Organized by tasks as well as by chapter, these assets include self-assessments, Web activities, chapter outlines, and review questions. The Resource Center also features course resources such as Speech Builder Express™ 3.0, InfoTrac College Edition, and more.

• Speech Builder Express™ 3.0. This online program coaches students through the entire process of preparing speeches and provides the additional support of built-in video speech models, a tutor feature for concept review, direct links to InfoTrac College Edition, an online dictionary and thesaurus, and leading professional organizations’ online documentation style guidelines and sample models. Equipped with their speech type or purpose, a general topic, and preliminary research, students respond to the program’s customized prompts to complete interactive activities that require critical thinking about all aspects of creating an effective speech. Students are able to specify a speech purpose, identify an organizational pattern, write a thesis statement or central idea, establish main points, integrate support material, craft transitions, plan visual aids, compose their speech introduction and conclusion, and prepare their bibliography. Students are also able to stop and start work whenever they choose and to complete, save online, export to Microsoft Word®, or e-mail up to five outlines.

• InfoTrac College Edition with InfoMarks™. This online library provides access to more than 18 million reliable, full-length articles from over 5,000 academic and popular periodicals. Students also have access to InfoMarks—stable URLs that can be linked to articles, journals, and searches to save valuable time when doing research—and to the InfoWrite online resource center, where students can access grammar help, critical thinking guidelines, guides to writing research papers, and much more. For more information about InfoTrac College Edition and the InfoMarks linking tool, visit www.infotrac-college.com and click on “User Demo.”

• Book Companion Website. The website features study aids such as chapter outlines, flash cards, and other resources for mastering glossary terms as well as chapter quizzes that help students check their understanding of key concepts.

• iChapters.com. This online store provides students with exactly what they’ve been asking for: choice, convenience, and savings. A 2005 research study by the National Association of College Stores indicates that as many as 60 percent of students do not purchase all required course material; however, those who do are more likely to succeed. This research also tells us that students want the ability to purchase “a la carte” course material in the format that suits them best. Accordingly, iChapters.com is the only online store that offers eBooks at up to 50 percent off, eChapters for as low as $1.99 each, and new textbooks at up to 25 percent off, plus up to 25 percent off print and digital supplements that can help improve student performance.

• A Guide to the Basic Course for ESL Students. Written specifically for communi- cators whose first language is not English, this guide features FAQs, helpful URLs, and strategies for managing communication anxiety.

• Conquer Your Speech Anxiety. Learn How to Overcome Your Nervousness About Public Speaking by Karen Kangas Dwyer. Drawing from the latest research, this

xxiv Prefacewww.infotrac-college.com

innovative resource helps students understand and develop a plan to overcome their fear of public speaking. The CD-ROM includes both audio relaxation exercises and techniques for overcoming anxiety.

RESOURCES FOR INSTRUCTORS Building a Speech, Eighth Edition, also features a full suite of resources for instructors. To evaluate any of these instructor or student resources, please contact your local Cengage Learning representative for an examination copy, contact our Academic Resource Cen- ter at 800-354-9706, or visit us at www.cengage.com/. Instructor resources include:

• Instructor’s Resource Manual. Written by the author, the Instructor’s Resource Manual provides a comprehensive teaching system. Included in the manual are a syllabus, criteria for evaluation, chapter objectives, in-class activities, handouts, and transparency masters. All of the Skill Builder and InfoTrac College Edition exercises included on the Resource Center and companion website are included in the Instructor’s Resource Manual in case online access is unavailable or inconvenient. The Instructor’s Resource Manual includes a printed test bank that features class- tested and reliability-rated multiple-choice, true-false, short-answer, essay, and fill-in-the-blank test questions. Print and electronic versions are available.

• Instructor’s Website. The password-protected instructor’s website includes electronic access to the Instructor’s Resource Manual and other tools for teaching. To gain access to the website, simply request a course key by opening the site’s home page.

• PowerLecture. This CD-ROM contains an electronic version of the Instructor’s Resource Manual, ExamView computerized testing, and videos associated with Building a Speech. This all-in-one tool makes it easy for you to assemble, edit, and present materials for your course.

• Turn-It-In®. This proven online plagiarism-prevention software promotes fairness in the classroom by helping students learn to correctly cite sources and allowing instructors to check for originality before reading and grading papers and speeches. Turn-It-In quickly checks student work against billions of pages of Internet content, millions of published works, and millions of student papers and speeches and within seconds generates a comprehensive originality report.

• Wadsworth Communication Video and DVD Library. Wadsworth’s video and DVD series for speech communication includes communication scenarios for critique and analysis, student speeches for critique and analysis, and ABC News videos and DVDs for human communication, public speaking, interpersonal communication, and mass communication.

• The Teaching Assistant’s Guide to the Basic Course. Written by Katherine G. Hendrix of the University of Memphis, this resource was prepared specifically for new instructors. Based on leading communication teacher-training programs, this guide discusses some of the general issues that accompany a teaching role and offers specific strategies for managing the first week of classes, leading productive discus- sions, managing sensitive topics in the classroom, and grading students’ written and oral work.

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suppose that the amount of algae in a pond doubles

  1. Suppose that the amount of algae in a pond doubles every 4 hours. If the pond initially contains 90 pounds of algae, how much algae will be in the pond after 12 hours?

A.)720 pounds

B.)360 pounds

C.)1,440 pounds

D.)114 pounds

I think the answer is D.
Please help.
Thank You.

1 1 945
asked by Deborah
Jan 24, 2013
How on earth did you get 114 lbs.???

At the end of 4 hours >> 90 * 2 = 180 lbs.

At the end of 8 hours >> 180 * 2 = 360 lbs.

At the end of 12 hours >> 360 * 2 = 720 lbs.

2 1
👩‍🏫
Ms. Sue
Jan 24, 2013
Thank you – just misread the question…

0 0
posted by Deborah
Jan 25, 2013
answer is a) 720 lbs thank you

2 0
posted by raychelz
Jan 26, 2018
Ms.sue, don’t be an ahole

8 2
posted by Anna
Jan 8, 2019