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a person whose height is 6 feet is walking away

A person whose height is 6 feet is walking away from the base of a streetlight along a straight path at 4 feet per second. If the height of the streetlight is 15 feet, what is the rate at which the person’s shadow is lengthening?

0 0 590
asked by Anonymous
Oct 27, 2014
draw a diagram. Let the distance from the pole be x, and the shadow’s length be s. Using similar triangles, we have

s/6 = (x+s)/15
or,
5s = 2x+2s
3s = 2x

so,

ds/dt = 2/3 dx/dt

plug and chug

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posted by Steve
Oct 27, 2014
utr

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posted by Anonymous
Nov 9, 2017

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why was the ems telegram of particular importance?

Why was the Ems telegram of particular importance?
(a) It started the Austro-Prussian War.
(b) It ended the Austro-Prussian War.
(c) It started the Franco-Prussian War.**
(d) It ended the Franco-Prussian War.

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asked by Jessie
Feb 25, 2016
Correct.

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👩‍🏫
Ms. Sue
Feb 25, 2016

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honh3

How can I tell a conjugate base from a regular base and a conjugate acid from a regular acid? For example, in:

H2O + HONH3 (reversible arrows) HONH2 + H3O+

What is the acid, base, conjugate base, conjugate acid? Is there no base and conjugate base since HONH3 is an acid?

The H2O accepted a proton to become H3O^+; therefore, H2O must be a base and the H3O^+ is the conjugate acid.
HONH3 donated a proton so HONH3 must be the acid and HONH2 is the conjugate base. Check my thinking.

0 0 440
asked by Taasha
Aug 3, 2007
There is no base, only acid and conjugate base
the HONH3 acts as the acid here, and the HONH2 is its conjugate base. its the same exact thing as if the equation were
HONH3 >< HONH2 + H(+)

1 0
posted by nikki
Dec 19, 2007
H2O is actually your base

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posted by JS
Mar 23, 2009

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which of the following represents one of congress’s electoral powers

Which of the following represents one of congress’s electoral powers?
7,136 results
government
congress shares powers with the president in the field of foreign affairs. what other powers do congress and the president share? a. judicial powers b. postal powers c. territorial powers d. war powers b or c, but ill go with b.

asked by jere on January 15, 2008
check my work

  1. Which of the following provides the best definition of a strict constructionist interpretation of congressional power? (1 point) Congress must have more powers than the states. Congress should only use implied powers when directly connected to expressed

asked by kate on September 23, 2016
CHECK MY ANSWERS American Government
CHECK my answers. they are all below 1. Which of the following represents one of Congress’s electoral powers? (1 point) The Senate elects a president if the House cannot reach a consensus on a candidate. The House elects a president if no candidate

asked by Anonymous on November 8, 2016
AMERICAN GOVERMENT CCA
Which of the following represents one of congress’s electoral powers? A) the senate elects a president if the house cannot reach a consenus on a candidate B) The house elects a president if no candidate receives a majority of electoral votes C)The house

asked by A.A on October 24, 2016
government
congress shares power with the president in the field of foreign affairs. what other powers do congress and the president share? a judicial powers b postal powers c territorial powers d war powers

asked by john on April 2, 2013

check my work

  1. Which of the following provides the best definition of a strict constructionist interpretation of congressional power? (1 point) Congress must have more powers than the states. Congress should only use implied powers when directly connected to expressed

asked by kate on September 22, 2016
history (check my work)
. Which of the following provides the best definition of a strict constructionist interpretation of congressional power? (1 point) Congress must have more powers than the states. Congress should only use implied powers when directly connected to expressed

asked by kate on September 23, 2016
government
why did the framers include the necessary and proper clause in the constitution a. to empower congress to pass laws needed to carry out the expressed powers b. to limit congressional powers to those expressly stated in the constitution c. to define the

asked by jere on January 14, 2008
US History

  1. Which of the following was designed to ensure that the President would not gain dictatorial powers over government? a. the system of checks and balances b. the Elastic Clause c. the Electoral College d. the Cabinet System of checks and balances gave

asked by mysterychicken on September 30, 2010
American Government
the power of congress to print money is one of the legislative? A.Implied powers B.Expressed powers C.Inherent powers D.Nonlegislative powers

asked by Keef.IBH on September 28, 2017
Algebra
Based on The census state a has 15 fewer electoral votes for president Than b. if the total number of electoral votes for these two states is 87 find the number for each state X represents the number of electoral votes in state b. Then let X -15 represents

asked by Pj on October 1, 2017
Civics
which of the following are powers of Congress that are named or listed in the constitution? a.enumerated b.implied c.inherent d.reserved this is for connections academy, civics lesson 3 unit 2: powers of Congress

asked by mockingbird on February 15, 2019
History
Why did the House of Representatives decide the presidential election of 1800? a.Neither Federalists nor Republicans won a clear majority of the popular vote. b.Thomas Jefferson and Aaron Burr split the electoral votes. c.Members of Congress did not agree

asked by Kathlyn on May 14, 2014
civics help plz
Which is a true statement about the power of Congress? a)Congress may overrule the Bill of Rights. b)Congress may pass any law necessary and proper to carry out its enumerated powers. c)Congress may overrule decisions of federal judges. d)Congress may

asked by spunky on January 31, 2019
Civics
which is a true statement about the power of Congress a. congress may overrule the bill of rights b. congress may pass any law necessary and proper to carry out its enumerated powers c. congress may overrule decisions of federal judges d. congress may

asked by please help!!!! on February 11, 2019

American Government
Congress’ inability to consistently provide leadership on broad national issues is due to: A. the lack of talented leadership in Congress. B. constitutional restrictions on Congress’ lawmaking powers. C. the constant threat of a presidential veto. D. the

asked by Karen on May 23, 2012
american government
Congress’ inability to consistently provide leadership on broad national issues is due to a. the lack of talented leadership in Congress. b. the fragmented nature of Congress. c. constitutional restrictions on Congress’ lawmaking powers. d. the

asked by vedrana on July 2, 2010
American government
Which power allows congress to check the foreign affairs powers of the president? Eminent domain power Judicial power Taxing and spending power Commerce power**** Which of the following examples reflects an action that congress can take under the war

asked by ….. on October 17, 2016
check my work

  1. Which of the following best exemplifies how Congress’s use of its weights and measures powers plays an important role in business transactions? (1 point) With uniform and consistent standards, producers are allowed to charge different prices for a

asked by kate on September 22, 2016
government
the implied powers doctrine, upheld in mccullock v. maryland, gives congress the power to do a. only what the supreme court authorizes it to do b. only what is absolutely necessary to carry out the expressed powers c. anything reasonably related to

asked by jere on January 15, 2008
Social Studies (Check)
Explain how the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution affected the powers of Congress and the presidency. A: The Gulf of Tonkin Resolution affected the balance of power between Congress and the presidency by handing the war powers from Congress over to the president.

asked by Victoria on February 10, 2016
Government
Which of the following is a true statement about the power of congress? A. Congress may overrule the bill of rights B. Congress may pass any law necessary and proper to carry out it enumerated powers C. Congress may overrule decisions by federal judges D.

asked by Mila on October 26, 2016
American Government
Who counts the Electoral College vote? A) House of Representatives B) Senate C) State legislatures D) Supreme Court My textbook says “The president of the Senate opens the electoral votes from each State and counts them before a joint session of Congress.”

asked by Sarah on October 4, 2016
government
what is the implied power expressed by the necessary and proper clause in the constitution a. congress’s ability to make laws is severely limited by the constitution b. congress is given limited authority to interpret reserved powers c. congress must

asked by jere on January 15, 2008
government
what is the implied power expressed by the necessary and proper clause in the constitution a congress’s ability to make laws is severely limited by the Constitution b congress is given limited authority to interpret reserved powers c congress must follow a

asked by john on April 2, 2013

GOVERNMENT HELP
The powers of Congress are affected by all of the following EXCEPT what the a. Constitution expressly says Congress may do b. Constitution says only the Sttes may do. c. States’ constitutions say Congress may do d. Constitution is silent about. I believe

asked by Suzi on February 26, 2007
Civics
Which one of the enumerated powers of Congress do you think is most to the broad but vague “executive powers” of the president? I don’t understand what this question means. Can anyone help?

asked by Anonymous on October 14, 2009
American Government
“The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.” According to the 10th amendment which powers to the state have? (2 answers) a. The powers

asked by RoxJen on April 10, 2017
social studies
Regarding the Electoral College, which of the following statements is false? A. Electors vote on the first Monday after the second Wednesday in December. B. The electoral vote results are transmitted to the Secretary of State. C. The electoral college is

asked by tamijah23 on January 29, 2015
American Government Please Check

  1. Which of the following correctly describes how treaties are made? a. The president negotiates a treaty, and the House must approve funding for it. b. The Senate Foreign Relations Committee negotiates a treaty, and the House and the president must

asked by girly girl on March 1, 2018
GOVERNMENT
Please help. I’m trying to figure these True or False questions. A President’s threat to grant amnesty can sometimes convince Congress to make changes in a bill to satisfy the President’s objections. T or F I think it’s true. Am I right? As the nation has

asked by Suzi on April 19, 2007
History
Which of the following best explains some of the powers granted the Congress by the Articles of Confederation? A.)Congress could build schools, collect taxes, create a banking system, and create prisons. B.)Congress could declare war, make treaties, create

asked by YRN DJ on November 5, 2015
Government
The 18 powers of congress are know as _ powers.

asked by Anonymous on April 3, 2012
please check history
Two powers of Congress. 1. declare war 2. pass laws Two powers of the President: 1. make treaties 2. appoint ambassadors Three types of Federal Courts: 1. District Courts 2. Court of Appeals 3. The Supreme Court and then I just have one extra question that

asked by Anonymous on August 28, 2006
history
the aim that Congress had in passing the War Powers Act was to a. give the President more power in using American forces overseas b. forbid the President from ever sending American forces overseas c. limit the President’s emergency powers in sending troops

asked by history on April 20, 2009

American Government
Check answers? 1) When the Framers created the legislative branch of government, why did they decide that this branch would have a bicameral structure? A) They wanted to ensure equal representation for each of the thirteen states. B) The Framers formed a

asked by Scarlett on October 5, 2016
Us Government
a) Identify two express powers of the president b) what are the express powers of the Vice Presiden? c)Identify two express powers of Congree. a)commander in cheif and I wasn’t sure about the second one b)I couldn’t finad anything about the Vice President

asked by Jen on August 25, 2006
Social Studies

  1. TO which system of governemt is the feral system most similar? A. the unitary system, ecause both place most powers with legislature B. the conferal system, because both spilt powers among the state and national governemnts C. the unitary system,

asked by HELPPP on September 30, 2015
U.S. GOVERNMENT
1)The federal government has more expressed powers than implied powers. A) True B) False 2)Two inherent powers of the federal government are to regulate immigration and deport aliens. A) True B) False 3)Implied powers are essentially granted through the

asked by Booker Perry on June 25, 2012
exam three americangov section 3
What is the meaning of the cartoon? 5.0/5.0 A. Street mimes deserve their constitutional rights. B. The powers of Congress are limited. C. The powers of Congress are unlimited. D. Many federal laws tend to be unfair. Question 2 of 20 5.0/ 5.0 Points What

asked by austin on September 12, 2014
Government
The Intolerable Acts led to most directly to which event? A. Stamp Act Congress B. Constitutional Convention C. First Continental Congress D. Second Continental Congress The Framers Included the Supremacy Clause in the Constitution for the purpose of? A.

asked by Irene on September 12, 2016
National Government
The principal powers of Congress include all except the power of the purse. the power to declare war. implied powers. x the power to hire generals.

asked by Shirley on January 17, 2015
American government
What are powers of the U.S. government that are named and listed in the Constitution called? A.expressed powers B.implied powers C.inherent powers D.prohibited powers

asked by Kidthelearner on August 25, 2016
GOVERNMENT
Are delegated powers the powers that can only be exercised by the National Government? Then, what about expressed powers, implied powers and inherent powers. Do they all fall under the category of expressed powers?

asked by Suzanne on October 16, 2006
GOVERNMENT
Are delegated powers the powers that can only be exercised by the National Government? Then, what about expressed powers, implied powers and inherent powers. Do they all fall under the category of expressed powers?

asked by Suzanne on October 16, 2006

Science
The u.s. constitution provides that each of the three branches of the federal government has certain powers that can limit the powers of the other branches. These limitations are known as the system of checks and balances. Which of the following actions is

asked by Mydogbear on May 14, 2017
US History
I still don’t know about these and I realllyy need to finish this exam, so please help me!! 15. What effect did Supreme Court decisions on apportionment bring about? a. People accused of a crime must be informed on their rights b. Low-cost health insurance

asked by mysterychicken on November 11, 2010
Government and politics
Explain 2 enumerated powers of the president and 2 enumerated powers of congress

asked by Alyssa on November 3, 2016
politics
despite the principle of separation of powers,wich of the followings is an example of the president’s (the executive) legislative powers? a.the power to recommend measures to congress b.the power to remove cabinet secretaries c. executive review of supreme

asked by bev on September 4, 2015
politics
Which of the following is NOT true about the electoral college? A. Except for Maine and Nebraska, the states appoint their members of the electoral college on a “winner-take-all” basis. B. A presidential candidate needs 270 electoral votes to win

asked by bev on May 27, 2017
government
if no candidat receives a majority of the electoral votes, the president is chosen by a. both houses of congress b. the house of representatives c. the senate d. a new popular vote a.

asked by jere on January 15, 2008
Social Studies
1.Why is ” elastic clause’ an appropriate name for Clause 18 of Section 8 of Article l? 2.Think about what it mean to “express” something. Which powers – delegated or implied – could also be referred to as expressed powers? Why? 1.Elastic Clause is the

asked by Shadow on April 11, 2010
civics
1)What are the current flaws in the Electoral College system? 2) What changes would you make in the system? 3)Would you make these changes? Why? How? 1)There are several flaws in the Electoral College system. Among these, is the Winner Take All system.

asked by nirvana on March 8, 2009
American National Government
Can someone help me with these two questions? What are the Constitutional powers given to the House of Representatives? My answer is: 1. Revenue- raising bills must orginate. 2. Has the sole power of impeachment. 3. Elect president in electoral college

asked by B.B. on October 28, 2009
government
if no presidential candidate wins a majority of the electoral votes, the president is chosen in a. the senate b. both houses of congress c. the supreme court d. the house of representatives d.

asked by jere on January 11, 2008

Government
Please help me with government 1. The 10th amendment to the Constitution reads as follows: ” The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.”

asked by M on December 24, 2016
government
the lawmaking function of congress is central to democracy because a. it enables elected representatives to do the daily work of government b. legislative powers are necessary to check the power of the president c. it frees members of congress from the

asked by maria on December 27, 2007
American Government
Consider the expressed, nonlegislative powers related to patents and copyrights. Why did the Founding Fathers include these ideas in the expressed powers of Congress? How have patents and copyrights contributed to U.S. history and identity? I have no idea

asked by Brighton on March 3, 2017
American Government
Consider the expressed non-legislative powers related to patents and copyrights. Why did the founding fathers include these ideas in the expressed powers of Congress? How have patents and copyrights contributed to U.S. History an identity?

asked by Anonymous on December 13, 2016
History
What are the four powers denied to congress?

asked by Emma on November 19, 2012
gov
How many votes does each state have in the Electoral College? is equal to number of members the state has in congress Just checking if this is correct.

asked by Adam on October 12, 2015
American government
1.) Which of the following is true about the formal amendment process for the Constitution? A.) Any citizen may propose an amendment. B.) only Congress may propose an amendment. C.) both houses of Congress must pass a resolution to propose an amendment.

asked by Taylor on September 1, 2016
Civics
Which of the below concepts most closely relates to reserved powers, delegated powers, and concurrent powers? Shared powers*** The amendment process Judicial review Federalism

asked by jeje on January 18, 2015
WorldHistory
Why was the Congress of Vienna considered a success? The Congress of Vienna was consider a success because of three main outcomes. One Britain gained control over several strategic colonies and become the first superpower of the world. Two Russia extended

asked by (; on May 15, 2013
Civics
Which of the bellow concepts most closely relates to reserved powers, delegates powers, and concurrent powers? A) Shared Powers B) the amendment process C) Judical review D) Federalism

asked by Chanelle on December 19, 2018

government
all of the following are examples of thenonlegislative powers of Congress except

asked by Anonymous on November 22, 2010
Government Help Please
The power to establish local units of government such as counties and to control education are examples of_____ 1)reserved powers 2)delegated powers 3)implied powers 4)inherent powers Please help. thanks

asked by Coraline on February 2, 2016
US History II
Which one would be right…I don’t really understand This is the question: What was the signifianceof the War Powers Resolution of 1973? 1) gives the Executive Branch the power to wage wars instead of leaving that power to Congress to declare it.

asked by Amy~ on July 11, 2010
American Government
1) Which of the following is a function of the executive branch? A) writing legislation B) administering the law** C) challenging legislation in court D) repealing law 2) Which of the following reasons best explains why Congress enacted the War Powers

asked by Juliet on November 8, 2016
Social studies
Why is this important for these powers to belong to Congress rather than to individual states

asked by Anonymous on October 29, 2018
American Government
The Continental Congress exercised both _ and __ powers.

asked by Nefthali Bryant on April 2, 2012
Government
Why is it important for these powers to belong to congress rather than to individual states ?

asked by Anonymous on April 25, 2016
algebra,math
i am clueless about this: (#1)What expression raised to the fourth power is 81x^12y^8z^16? (#2)Simplify each of the following expressions. Write your answers with positive exponents only. (x^2)^-3(x^-2) divided by (x^2)^-4 #1 answer (3x^3)(y^2)(z^4)

asked by jasmine20 on January 21, 2007
Social Studies Check Answers
Anyone mind checking these 2 quiz answers please? Which statement best explains why nation-states write constitutions? A: Constitutions give citizens unlimited powers. B: Constitutions establish nation-states. C: Constitutions allow governments to elect

asked by Natalie on December 11, 2016
Social Studies

  1. What two answers are reasons that Congress decided the election of 1800? a.)Based on the outcome, it was mandated by the U.S. Constitution.* b.)The popular vote was a tie. c.)No candidate won the electoral vote.*

asked by Dylan on November 21, 2016

American Government
Which of the following reasons best explains why congress enacted the war powers resolution in 1973? a. to grant the president unrestricted authority to send troops abroad b. to allow the president unlimited war powers c. funding for the military d. to

asked by Alice Keign on November 7, 2016
US History

  1. To which groups did George Wallace target his campaign? a. southerners and blue-collar voters b. Republicans and left-leaning Democrats c. campus radicals and antiwar forces d. professors and editorial writers A? 15. What effect did Supreme Court

asked by mysterychicken on November 11, 2010
American Government
Why was it a problem that Congress did not have the power to tax under the Articles of Confederation? a. Congress wanted to provide more services, but it could not afford to without taxes. b. Congress could not regulate trade between the states. c.

asked by Steve on January 9, 2018
Government
Homework Help Powers that are shared by both the National Government and the States are called… A) reserved powers B) enumerated powers C) inherent powers D) implied powers E) concurrent powers The Supreme Court carries out most of the country’s

asked by Alyssa on June 26, 2013
Government
The framers of the constitution were not always specific about the powers granted to congress or the president.exlpain why

asked by Tedy on April 25, 2016
government
the specific powers of the president come from a. the military b. the supreme court c. congress d. the constitution d.

asked by jere on January 15, 2008
gov
According to David Mayhew’s “electoral connection” thesis, the primary purpose of members of Congress is get reelected. serve the public interest. hold the Executive Branch accountable to the public. get programs enacted.

asked by eden on July 5, 2015
poli sci 150
One important cause of the United States’ two-party system is a) single-member electoral districts b) proportional representaion c) the Constitution’s requirement for bipartisanship in Congress d) internal mobilization e) multimember electioral districts

asked by tina on April 13, 2012
History
I need help because I want to make certain I am right. The United States Constitution reserves to the States all powers not delegated to Congress or denied to the States, meaning that the States a. hold almost no power b. have little responsibility to the

asked by Pat on January 20, 2007
US History your opinion??
Agree or disagree and why Article One in the US constitution leaves little room for interpretation of the powers of Congress.

asked by Lynn on October 27, 2008

History
What impact did the Congress of Vienna have on Europe? It established a blueprint for international cooperation among the major European powers. European powers were required to relinquish their hold over imperial territories. Great Britain was required to

asked by Portia on October 5, 2018
U.S. History
Electoral Vote in 1792: At the Constitutional Convention, why did Virginia favor a plan by which states with larger populations would have more voting power in Congress than states with smaller populations?

asked by y912f on January 29, 2009
Civics
Which of the following is the best example of the idea of “separation of powers” in the American constitutional system? A.The president appoints judges, but legislators get elected.** B. The process for creating laws involves Congress and the president.**

asked by Need help on December 8, 2016
Math
How many integers are NOT perfect powers between 1 and 1000? It might be easier to count how many are powers and subtract that number from 1000. To do this you should first find the highest power of 2 less than 1000, then you’ll know how high of powers you

asked by Nathan on October 24, 2006
Civics
Which of the following is the best example of the idea of “separation of powers” in the American constitutional system? A.The president appoints judges, but legislators get elected.** B. The process for creating laws involves Congress and the president.**

asked by Civics help on December 8, 2016
Can u check my answer? U.S History
“I consider the foundation of the Constitution as laid on this ground: That “all powers not delegated to the United States, by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States or to the people.” [10th Amendment] To take a

asked by Cassidy on February 2, 2014
american government
just to make sure my answers is A) national government the delegated powers belong to the:but the other choices are B)the states C) congress D)the president

asked by Anonymous, on September 20, 2008
government
All legislative Powers herein granted shall be vested in a Congress of the United States, which shall consist of a Senate and House of Representatives. what does it mean??

asked by anonymous on October 1, 2014
Agree or disagree with this statement US history
Agree or disagree and why?– just taking a poll Article One in the US constitution leaves little room for interpretation of the powers of Congress.

asked by Lynn on October 27, 2008
math,algebra
Use the five properties of exponents to simplify each of the following expressions (y^5)^3(y^3)^2 divided by (y^4)^4 can someone show me how to solve these types of problems (y^5)^3= y^15 multiply the powers (y^3)^2=y^6 multiply the powers again as you

asked by jasmine20 on January 21, 2007

HELP ME PLEASE I NEED HELP history
Why did Congress decide the election of 1800? Select two a. based on the outcome, it was mandated by the us consitutuion *** b. the popular vote was a tie c. no candidate won the electoral vote d: not enough citizens voted to determine the outcome ***

asked by anon on October 10, 2016
Social Studies
Match each statement below with the constitutional principle it illustrates. P-Popular soverignty R-Republicanism F-Federalism L-Limited Government S-Separation of powers C-Checks and balances Citizens elect senators to Serve in Washington, D.C. R? The

asked by Jerald on December 1, 2012
US History

  1. New France was shaped mainly by a. raising cash crops b. the fur trade c. enslaving Native Americans d. the search for gold B? 15. Which one of the following helped the colonial legislatures come to dominate colonial government? a. The king appointed

asked by mysterychicken on September 29, 2010
government
the first battle over the implied powers of congress was fought over the creation of a. an army b. a direct tax c. a national bank d. a patent d

asked by jere on January 11, 2008
American Gov’t–please check
Most of Congress’s implied powers are based on the _ Clause. 1.)Equal Protection 2.)Judicial My answer3.)Necessary and Proper 4.)Authority

asked by Mackenzie on March 2, 2012

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a block with a mass of m

A block with a mass of m = 31 kg rests on a frictionless surface and is subject to two forces acting on it. The first force is directed in the negative x-direction with a magnitude of F1 = 11 N. The second has a magnitude of F2 = 22.75 N and acts on the body at an angle θ = 15° up from the horizontal, as shown.

A. Write an expression for the component of net force, Fnet,x, in the x direction, in terms of the variables given in the problem statement.

B. Write an expression for the magnitude of the normal force, FN, acting on the block, in terms of F2, and the other variables of the problem . Assume that the surface it rest on is rigid. FN=?

C. Find the block’s acceleration in the x direction, ax, in meters per square second. ax=

I am completely stock tried almost everything but not getting the right answer !!!!

0 0 398
asked by John
Oct 9, 2014
a)Fnetx=F2cos(theta)-F1
b)FN=F2sin(theta)+mg
c)i don’t know

0 0
posted by Delara
Dec 13, 2016
Part C)
F = ma
a = F/m
acceleration = Fnetx / 31

0 0
posted by Teddy
Sep 16, 2018

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nut a fits on bolt b

Nut C fits on Bolt C. Nut B fits on Bolt B. Nut A fits on Bolt A. Bolt C is larger than Bolt B. bolt A and Bolt B are exactly the same. Which is true?

a. Nut C will fit on all of the bolts.

b. Nut A will fit on Bolt C and Bolt B

c. Bolt A will fit Nut A and Nut B

d. Nut C will fit on Bolt A, but not on Bolt B.

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asked by Ingrid
Mar 21, 2016
read the information. A and B are the same.

C is different from the others.

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posted by Steve
Mar 21, 2016
C, cz bolt a & b are the same!!

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posted by Sara Draz
May 18, 2016
d

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posted by Anonymous
Jul 19, 2016
l

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posted by ;
Dec 8, 2016

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in “the new colossus,” the statue of liberty is compared to a/an

  1. In “The New Colossus,” the Statue of Liberty is compared to alan A. European queen. C. immigrant. B. mother. D. door 7. Describing the chariot that bears the human
    4,401 results
    English
  2. In “The New Colossus,” the Statue of Liberty is compared to alan A. European queen. B. mother. C. immigrant D. door 7. Describing the chariot that bears the human soul as “frugal” is an example of A. paradox. B. denotation. C. epiphany. D. realism 9.

asked by Carrie on September 1, 2008
math
The Statue of Liberty is about 151 feet tall. If the angle of elevation from a tree in Liberty State Park to the statue’s top is 1.5 degrees, how far is the tree from the statue?

asked by Kenny on April 18, 2015
poetry/ english

  1. In “The New Colossus,” the Statue of Liberty is compared to alan A. European queen. C. immigrant. B. mother. D. door 7. Describing the chariot that bears the human soul as “frugal” is an example of A. paradox. C. epiphany. B. denotation. D. realism 9.

asked by Carrie on August 25, 2008
poetry/ english

  1. In “The New Colossus,” the Statue of Liberty is compared to alan A. European queen. C. immigrant. B. mother. D. door 7. Describing the chariot that bears the human soul as “frugal” is an example of A. paradox. C. epiphany. B. denotation. D. realism 9.

asked by Carrie on August 26, 2008
Geometry
You purchased a scale model of the Statue of Liberty. The scale is 1:456. The model is 8 inches high and has a surface area of 0.052 ft^2. a. What is the height of the Statue of Liberty? b. What is the surface area of the Statue of Liberty? Thanks for

asked by Mary on May 19, 2011

math
Manday read that the arm of the Statue of Liberty is 42 ft long. She would like to know how long the Statue of Liberty’s nose is. How would you advise her to proceed?

asked by joshua on August 22, 2009
math
The Statue of Liberty is about 151 feet tall. If the angle of elevation from a tree in Liberty State Park to the statue’s top is 1.5 degrees, how far is the tree from the statue? cot 1.5 DEGREES= h/ 151 151 cot 1.5= h h= __

asked by Kenny on April 18, 2015
U.S history
When Uncle Sam and the Statue of Liberty are together what does it represent? I know Uncle Samm represents America and I think the Statue of Liberty represents enlightenment and liberty. I think when they are together it represents Americas enlightenment.

asked by Sage on March 7, 2016
ELA

  1. At the end of “The New Colossus,” the statue says, “I lift my lamp beside the golden door!” What is “the golden door”? A: a door that lets tourists climb to the top of the Statue of Liberty B: the gate of heaven, to which the statue’s raised arm points

asked by Yerrrrrr on February 8, 2019
Language Arts
What is the main message of the words that the Statue of Liberty speaks in “The New Colossus” by Emma Lazarus? Key: * is my answer A. I am a tired, old woman, but I am still strong. B. Welcome to needy immigrants in search of a new home.* C. America is

asked by Angel on February 9, 2016
english
In the sentence Rosie sang in the play about the Statue of Liberty. What would be the prepostional phrases. I need this before tomorrow and 8 o’clock tonight. Thank you for using the Jiskha Homework Help Forum. When in doubt as to a part of speech, any

asked by jojo on April 12, 2007
English expression
Look at the Statue of Liberty and the Lincoln Memorial Statue on the page. ———————————— Is the expression above grammatical? Do I have to capitalize and do I have to use ‘the’? I’d like you to check the articles and the

asked by John on March 12, 2008
Geography
Which landmark in the Northeast region represents the arrival of the Pilgrims on the Mayflower in 1620? a. White House b. Liberty Bell c. Plymouth Rock d. Statue Of liberty I think the answer is d.

asked by BUB on April 20, 2015
business law
Alan has authority to make purchase contracts. Alan has a friend who sells hot dogs, the friend offers Alan a vacation condo. Applying the Newspaper Test the headlines would read “ Alan awards Hotdog Contract for frien in exchange for vacation resort,

asked by Anonymous on February 10, 2014
geometry
Miguel looks out from the crown of the Statue of Liberty approximately 250 ft above ground. He sights a ship coming into New York harbor and measures the angle of depression as 18 degrees. Find the distance from the base of the statue to the ship to the

asked by kaelan on May 4, 2012

geometry
The Statue of Liberty is 3661 inches from the base to the tip of the torch. A New York vendor sells a souvenir model of the statue that is 6 inches tall. What is the scale factor of the model? Round to the nearest thousandth.

asked by kirk on August 18, 2016
English
Every word in a poem is supposed to have meaning, but what does Chelsea, Massachusetts have to do with the poem? I know the word “liberty” has connotations with freedom, the statue of liberty, etc…the latin culture is having to sell their dreams to make

asked by Debra on October 20, 2007
math
the statue of liberty is 150 feet tall, and stands on a 150 foot pedestal. How far from the base should you stand to have the statue subtend the largest possible angle at your camera lens, assuming the camera is held 5 feet off the ground and the ground is

asked by Chris on May 2, 2010
Reading and comprehension
Who gave the Statue of Liberty to the United States?

asked by kiki on October 5, 2018
chemistry
why do you think the statue of liberty was made of copper instead of zinc

asked by cesar on February 26, 2009
HELP PLEASE ITS KIND OF HISTORY SLASH MATH
WHAT IS THE SIZE OF THE BASE THAT THE STATUE OF LIBERTY SITS ON

asked by MADI <333 on May 11, 2009
POETRY, PART 2

  1. Which one of the following poems depends heavily on the use of allusion for effect? A. “Death, Be Not Proud” B. “Grass” C. “Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night” D. “God’s Grandeur” 5. The theme of the poem “Richard Cory” is that A. money can’t buy

asked by Calvin on March 7, 2013
social studies
Which does the European Council do in the government of the European Union? A.passes laws and adopts budgets B.resolves disputes among members C.ensures legislation is applied fairly D.represents the EU globally A recent challenge to the European Union

asked by Arthur casella on February 1, 2019
english
At the end of “The New Colossus,” the statue says, “I lift my lamp beside the golden door!” What is “the golden door”?

asked by ebic on February 25, 2018
English ( Dorian Gray Book)
Some questions I need answered to prepare for a test I am going to take. 1) How does Dorian react to Basil’s murder? Why is this significant? 2) What does the author reveal about dorian’s acquaintance with Alan Campbell? How has it affected Alan? 3)

asked by Lincoln on November 18, 2007

math
The weight of the base only of the Statue of Liberty. Been looking in a lot of websites but no success

asked by math student on May 12, 2009
Math
The Statue of Liberty weighs 450,000 pounds how many tons is this

asked by Anonymous on February 18, 2014
U.S.History
Could anyone explain to me what “The Colossus” was and why someone would say America would be a new Colossus

asked by Ray Scholz on February 2, 2011
math
you are standing 15 feet from a statue the angle of the elevation from eye level to the top of the statue is 27 degrees, and the angle of depression to the base of the statue is 18 degrees. How tall is the statue? show work

asked by z on May 17, 2011
English
For the poem below named the new colussus i have to define what the new world is being portrayed as but i don’t understand it, if someone can help me please : Is anyone familiar with the poem the new colossus : The New Colossus Not like the brazen giant of

asked by Sandi on January 11, 2012
Math
The Statue of Liberty is 305 feet tall. What scale would be used to make a model 20 inches high?

asked by Sam on January 26, 2017
Satue of Liberty
I know this may seem like quite a weird and/or stupid question. The Statue of Liberty has a crown with 7 spokes on it. Do they represent the 7 seas, or continents? I get them confused… Thank you.

asked by bvbarmyforlife on October 7, 2014
Physics
As Alan is taking a shower, the soap falls out of the dish and Alan steps on it with a force of 500 N. If Alan slides forward and the frictional force between the soap and the tub is 50 N, what is the coefficient of friction between these two surfaces?

asked by Micah on November 1, 2010
Physics
As Alan is taking a shower, the soap falls out of the dish and Alan steps on it with a force of 500 N. If Alan slides forward and the frictional force between the soap and the tub is 50 N, what is the coefficient of friction between these two surfaces?

asked by Micah on November 1, 2010
Physics
As Alan is taking a shower, the soap falls out of the dish and Alan steps on it with a force of 500 N. If Alan slides forward and the frictional force between the soap and the tub is 50 N, what is the coefficient of friction between these two surfaces?

asked by Micah on November 1, 2010

physics…
As Alan is taking a shower, the soap falls out of the dish and Alan steps on it with a force of 500 N. If Alan slides foward and the frictional force between the soap and the tub is 50 N, what is the coefficient of friction between these two surfaces? I

asked by hailey on November 5, 2008
social studies
Where can I find facts about: *Johnson Space Center aka NASA [Houston] *Grand Canyon *Statue of Liberty

asked by liz on December 14, 2011
Physics
Two skaters, Alan and Betsy, move toward each other on a very smooth skating rink. Their masses and speeds are respectively: 60 kg; 4.0 m/s and 50 kg; 0.4 m/s. After the skaters collide and use their hands to push each other away, Alan is moving backwards

asked by Anonymous on July 4, 2014
geometry
A 5-foot tall girl stands 15 feet from a statue. She must look at an angle of 60 degrees to see the top of the statue. Approximately how tall is the statue?

asked by north pitt on December 6, 2011
3rd grade language
Circle the verb in each sentence. then think of an exact verb to make the sentence more interesting. rewrite the sentence using your exact verb. 1. One night, Zia concetta goes to the statue. 2. The giant statue moves off the pedestal. 3. the statue’s

asked by mythreyee on December 11, 2012
language
Circle the verb in each sentence. then think of an exact verb to make the sentence more interesting. rewrite the sentence using your exact verb. 1. One night, Zia concetta goes to the statue. 2. The giant statue moves off the pedestal. 3. the statue’s

asked by mythreyee on December 10, 2012
Geometry
A 5 foot tall woman stands 15ft from a statue. She must look up at an angle of 60 degrees to see the top of the statue. How tall is the statue?

asked by George on September 25, 2013
History
1: Assume the Chilean peso is decreasing in exchange value compared to the U.S. dollar. Who will benefit most in this situation? A Chilean company that imports oil from Venezuela A Chilean family visiting relatives in the United States A Chilean exporter

asked by Rose on June 28, 2017
geometry
An artist wants to make a statue of a man who is 6 feet tall. The artist wants the scale of the statue to be 3.2. What is the height of the statue?

asked by kirk on August 18, 2016
Maths
Bob has 15 more cards than Alan. Colun gives Bib 25 cards. Bob now has 3 times as many as Alan. How nany has Alan got?

asked by Danielle on April 27, 2016

physics
A 20.0kg solid gold statue is raised from the sea bottom. What is the tension in the hoisting cable (assumed massless) when the statue is accelerating upward at 2m/s^2? (assume the statue is still completely underwater) The density of gold is

asked by Casey on December 9, 2012
Geometry
A 5 foot tall woman stands 15 ft from a statue. She must look up at an angle of 60° to see the top of the statue. How tall is the statue?

asked by George on September 20, 2013
7th grade math
alan,bonnie and calvinshared 153 marbles alan gets 3 times as miny as bonnie and calvin gets 6 more than alan .how miny marbles does each person get

asked by mariah on May 26, 2009
Calculus
A statue 5m high is standing on a base 8m high. Is an observer’s eye is 2.5 m above the ground, how far should he stand from the base of the statue in order that the angle between his lines of sight to the top and bottom of the statue be a maximum.

asked by Natasha on August 29, 2016
literature

  1. Hopkins’s use of “seared,” “bleared,” and “smeared” is an example of A. metaphor. B. assonance. C. simile. D. alliteration. 2. A villanelle is A. a narrative poem written in blank verse. B. a formal poem using extensive repetition. C. a favorite

asked by angie on December 9, 2008
Art
This American monument was inspired by Ramses’ Abu Simbel. Washington Monument Mount Rushmore Statue of Liberty Lincoln Monument

asked by Anonymous on February 13, 2014
literary

  1. Hopkins’s use of “seared,” “bleared,” and “smeared” is an example of A. metaphor. C. simile. B. assonance. D. alliteration. 2. A villanelle is A. a narrative poem written in blank verse. B. a formal poem using extensive repetition. C. a

asked by pucci on May 19, 2010
Poetry, Part 2

  1. Hopkins’s use of “seared,” “bleared,” and “smeared” is an example of A. metaphor. C. simile. B. assonance. D. alliteration. 2. A villanelle is A. a narrative poem written in blank verse. B. a formal poem using extensive repetition. C. a

asked by Ari on December 7, 2009
Pre-Cal
Nancy and Harry are lifting a stone statue and moving it to a new location in their garden. Nancy is pushing the statue with a force of 120 newtons(N) at a 60 degree angle with the horizontal while Harry is pulling the statue with a force of 180 newtons at

asked by james on January 10, 2010
Math 11
From a window in a building 20 m above ground the angle of depression of the top of a statue across the street is 30 degrees, and the angle of depression of the base of the statue is 34. How tall is the statue?

asked by Dylan on June 8, 2014

Math
So Prize money of $500 is divided between Alan & Jim so that Alan receives $170 more than Jim How much does each receive —– Using one variable:: Let Jim have “x” Then Alan has “x+170” —- Equation: x + x+170 = 500 2x = 330 x = $165 (Jim’s share) x+170

asked by Jeremy on March 28, 2016
Vaux-le-Vicomte Statue
The gardens of Vaux-le-Vicomte are terraced and end at a hill overlooking canals and grottos. In the center of this beautiful hill is a statue of mythological significance. Who is the subject of the statue, and what event (or feat, shall we say), does the

asked by Joe on October 19, 2006
English-please help
In 1886, the Statue of Liberty was dedicated. What is the meaning of the word “dedicated” in this context? Can’t seem to find the meaning from the dictionary.

asked by chimingbell on January 18, 2017
math
Alan wants to bake blueberry muffins and bran muffins for the school bake sale. For a tray of blueberry muffins, Alan uses mc017-1.jpg cup of oil and 2 eggs. For a tray of bran muffins, Alan uses mc017-2.jpg cup of oil and 1 egg. Alan has 4 cups of oil and

asked by momar on October 9, 2016
Corporate Tax
Alan just immigrated to Canada and owns STARS ltd (US company). Alan owned 100% of shares to STARS ltd. STARS ltd. was incorporated in the US in 2004. Alan wanted to know if he should use STARS ltd or a new company to carry on his business in Canada? He’s

asked by Rachel on May 18, 2008
math
cards have been removed from a wall one at a time down to last two, a queen of spades and a queen of hearts what are odds of picking the queen of hearts

asked by harold on April 8, 2011
Trigonometry
If someone could tell me if this is correct, it would really help me out. Problem: A statue 20 feet high stands on top of a base. From a point in front of the statue, the angle of elevation to the top of the statue is 48 degrees, and the angle of elevation

asked by Lee on December 10, 2009
English
Queen Elizabeth II came to Korea on April 21st, 1999. 1. Queen Elizabeth Two 2. Queen Elizabeth the Second (How do we read ‘Queen Elizabeth II? #1 or #2?)

asked by John on December 8, 2008
Maths
Cynthia’s afternoon train normally arrives at her station at 5:30 pm each day, where she is picked up by Alan and driven home. One day she was on an earlier train which arrived at 5 pm, and she decided to walk in the direction Alan was coming from home.

asked by Joel on March 9, 2017
Algebra Please Help
I have reread this promble so many times and am still not getting it. I posted this yesterday and am still not understanding it. Please help again The length of the Statue of Liberty’s index finger is 8 feet while the height to the top of the head is about

asked by Shawn L on April 20, 2011

Algebra Please Help
I have read and read this promble and I just am not understanding it, could some one please help. I have been out of school for a long time. The length of the Statue of Liberty’s index finger is 8 feet while the height to the top of the head is about 111

asked by Shawn L on April 19, 2011
American Goverment
is core to the notion of “life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness” in the Declaration of Independence. (Points : 1) Human agency Pure unfettered liberty the idea that government may never restrict citizens’ liberty the concept of American

asked by Christopher on May 4, 2015
English
Identify the choice that best describes the CAPITALIZED phrase. The Statue of Liberty has stood FOR MORE THAN 100 YEARS in New York Harbor. a. adverb phrase b. adjective c. appositive phrase d. adverb

asked by Kaai97 on January 19, 2016
POL 201
_ is core to the notion of “life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness” in the Declaration of Independence. (Points : 1) Human agency Pure unfettered liberty the idea that government may never restrict citizens’ liberty the concept of American

asked by Jo on November 3, 2014
character education
What is the difference between liberty and license? Liberty and license are the same thing. Liberty recognizes consequences of actions; license does not. Liberty has restrictions; license does not. B? Good judgment results from ____________ .

asked by Bri on December 7, 2017
History
Which accurately describes the achievements of Amerigo Vespucci and his role during the Age of Discovery? He was an English explorer who was granted a charter by Queen Elizabeth and established the first European colonies in Virginia. He proved the New

asked by Rylee on December 1, 2017
Wonders of the world (new and ancient)
I need a map of the seven wonders of the new world and the ancient world which are: Great Wall of China, Great Pyramid of Giza, Egypt Petra, Jordan Hanging Gardens of Babylon, Iraq Christ Redeemer, Brazil Statue of Zeus, Olympia, Greece Chichen Itza,

asked by Anonymous on November 5, 2011
history (Declaration)
How do you see the ideas in the Declaration compared to typical Medieval European?

asked by Sarah on February 23, 2014
Europe
What is unique about the geography of Spain compared to other European countries?

asked by Susan on July 4, 2013
English
Choose the version of the sentence below that has correctly placed modifiers. A. Coughing and sputtering, Alan steered the old car to the side of the road. B. The old car was coughing and sputtering as Alan steered it to the side of the road. C. The car

asked by Angela on April 14, 2014

physics
While polishing a 1-kg brass statue, you do 760 J of work against sliding friction. Assuming that all of the resulting heat flows into the statue, how much does its temperature rise?

asked by Anonymous on November 7, 2012
physics
While polishing a 1-kg brass statue, you do 760 J of work against sliding friction. Assuming that all of the resulting heat flows into the statue, how much does its temperature rise?

asked by Anonymous on November 7, 2012
Social Studies Ms. Sue
6.How did European rule in South America change the people of the continent? A. European missionaries introduced religion. *** B. European colonists brought diseases that killed millions of natives. C. European conquistadors incited conflict on the

asked by Tana on April 17, 2017
social studies(updated answers)—Mrs.Sue
6.C 6.How did European rule in South America change the people of the continent? A. European missionaries introduced religion. B. European colonists brought diseases that killed millions of natives. C. European conquistadors incited conflict on the

asked by Kayla on March 17, 2014
Math
A picture of a statue is drawn to scale 1:5 If the height of the statue in the picture is 5/6, what is the actual height of the statue?

asked by Itiel on April 6, 2011
college algebra
Your office window is a = 35 feet high. Looking out your window, you find that the top of a statue lines up exactly with the bottom of a building that is b = 650 horizontal feet from your office. You know the statue is c = 175 feet from the building. How

asked by manver on October 10, 2016
business
What are the “Statue of Frauds” and what is it’s purpose? This article tells about a statue that is claimed to be a fraud. http://www.cwnews.com/news/viewstory.cfm?recnum=31142

asked by Anonymous on April 16, 2007
History
Which most accurately describes New Imperialism? a movement of European intellectuals who used reason to advance political ideas connected to liberty and equality a period of political change advancing the belief of balanced global governance and

asked by Annamarie on August 2, 2018
history
Which most accurately describes New Imperialism? a period of political change advancing the belief of balanced global governance and interconnected economic systems a movement of European intellectuals who used reason to advance political ideas connected

asked by Bri on October 3, 2018
Physics
In two successive chess moves, a player first moves his queen four squares forward, then moves the queen five steps to the left (from the player’s view). Assume each square is 2.0 cm on a side. Using forward (toward the player’s opponent) as the

asked by Kelly on February 8, 2011

math
Fran works due north of home. Her husband Alan works due east. By the time Fran is 7 miles from home, the distance between them is one mile more than Alan’s distance from home. How far from home is Alan? Miles Please and thank you in Advanced!!!

asked by Mandy on December 11, 2011
Grade 5 maths
Alan, Bill and Carl shared $372. After Alan spend 2/ 5 of his share, Bill spent 1 /2 of his share and Carl spent 1/3 of his share, the boys found they had the same amount of money left. (a) What is the ratio of Alan’s share to Bill’s share to Carl’s share?

asked by Bryan on January 21, 2014
Creative Writing
I know I asked this earlier, but right now I want to know if this is close enough to the original Alice in Wonderland to be a fractured fairytale (I’ve never seen Alice in Wonderland before and don’t have enough time to watch it and write this before it’s

asked by Millie on April 8, 2013
Precalculus

  1. A man stands 12 feet from a statue. The angle of elevation from the eye level to the top of the statue is 30 degrees, and the angle of depression to the base of the statue is 15. How tall in the statue? 2. Two boats lie on a straight line with the base

asked by Mz. Suzie on March 2, 2009
Math
a statue is 8 feet tall. the display case for a model of the statue is 18 inches tall. which scale allows for the tallest model of the statue that will fit in the display case?

asked by no on September 3, 2013
math
Four brothers in one family have a combined age of 39 years. Alan is three times collins age, bill is 6 years younger than Alan and don is a quarter of bills age. How old are each of the four browser

asked by Anonymous on January 6, 2016
math
alan scored a total of 14 points for answering all 15 questions on a math quiz for every correctly answered question alan got 2 points for every wrong ahe lost 2 points how many questions did he answer correclty

asked by Anonymous on November 7, 2012
math
alan scored a total of 14 points for answering all 15 questions on a math quiz for every correctly answered question alan got 2 points for every wrong ahe lost 2 points how many questions did he answer correclty

asked by Anonymous on November 7, 2012
SOCIAL STUDIES
To what extent did the French Revolution adhere to the principles of liberty, equality and fraternity? Not sure if this will answer your question, but these are my thoughts. The french started their little revolution a little while after the american

asked by Yuri on February 21, 2007
finite math
Suppose that two cards are randomly selected from a standard 52-card deck. (a) What is the probability that the first card is a queen and the second card is a queen if the sampling is done without replacement? (b) What is the probability that the first

asked by Dee on April 19, 2017

Social studies
The late 1400’s through the early 1600’s was a time of exploration and early settlement of several European colonies. Each European country had different reasons for their exploration and settlement, but all encountered Native Americans during their

asked by Emily on January 25, 2019
science
the queen bee knows how to do her dance, because _. a) she is very smart b) of the energy that the queen has c) of the experience of seeing the dance d) of the enery that the queen has e) of the experience of seeing the dance performed e

asked by pam on September 10, 2010
physics
. A small statue in the shape of a falcon has a weight of 24.1 N. The owner of the statue claims it is made of solid gold.When the statue is completely submerged in a container brimful of water, the weight of the water that spills over the top and into a

asked by Nathan on December 13, 2009
Math
Jim is able to sell a hand-carved statue for $670 which was a 35% profit over his cost. How much did the statue originally cost him? How do you find the answer to this?

asked by Smith on March 11, 2008
math
Jim is able to sell a hand-carved statue for $670 which was a 35% profit over his cost. How much did the statue originally cost him?

asked by … on March 3, 2009

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which of the following is an example of the principle of checks and balances

Government
which of the following is an example of the principle of checks and balances?
A)President can veto an act of congress.
B)Members of congress have the power to raise their own salaries
C)Federal courts have the power to hear cases involving federal law
D)President can appoint officers of the armed forces
My answer is A am i right?

0 0 421
asked by Fred
Sep 2, 2016
Yes, A.

0 0
👩‍🏫
Ms. Sue
Sep 2, 2016

  1. A
  2. D
  3. C 0 0
    posted by Becky2theg
    Sep 21, 2016
    Thanks So much Becky2theg! She’s 100% correct for connexus! 🙂 0 0
    posted by Fox Girl
    Sep 21, 2017
    LIES ONLY FIRST ONE IS CORRECT FOR CONNEXUS 0 1
    posted by Nahhsnitch
    Oct 4, 2017

Woah woah, WHICH IS IT??!!!

0 0
posted by Girly
Oct 10, 2017
Becky2theg is correct

0 0
posted by anon
Oct 12, 2017

  1. a
  2. d
  3. c
    becky is correct 0 0
    posted by rabes
    Feb 3, 2018
    Lesson 10: Principles of the Constitution

45.0570001 American Government Unit 2: Foundations of American Government

  1. Which of the following is an example of the principle of checks and balances?
    A. Presidents can veto an act of congress
  2. Which branch of government has the power to make laws?
    D. Legislative
  3. The U.S. government is divided into three branches. What is this an example of?

C. Separation of power

There are all right!

0 0
posted by Yandere_Wolfie
Aug 20, 2018
they’re*

0 0
posted by Yandere_Wolfie
Aug 20, 2018

  1. which of the following is an example of the principle of checks and balances?
    A)President can veto an act of congress.
    B)Members of congress have the power to raise their own salaries
    C)Federal courts have the power to hear cases involving federal law
    D)President can appoint officers of the armed forces
  2. Which branch of government has the power to make laws?
    A) executive
    B) federal
    C) judicial
    D) legislative
  3. The U.S. government is divided into three branches. What is this an example of?
    A)federalism
    B) interpretation
    C) Separation of power
    D)confederate system
    Correct Answers.
    1) A
    2) D
    3) C 0 0
    posted by Noboby
    Sep 4, 2018
    1.a
    2.d
    3.c 0 0
    posted by Jacob
    Sep 14, 2018
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a satellite is in a circular orbit about the earth

A satellite is in a circular orbit about the earth (ME = 5.98 x 1024 kg). The period of the satellite is 1.77 x 104 s. What is the speed at which the satellite travels?

0 0 782
asked by Anonymous
Mar 5, 2014
F = G Mm/R^2 = m v^2/R

v^2 R = G M = 6.67*10^-11 * 5.98*10^24
v^2 R = 39.9 * 10^13

v T = circumference = 2 pi R
so
R = v T/(2 pi)
R = v [1.7710^4/(2 pi)] R = 2.8210^3 v
so
v^3 (2.82*10^3) = 39.9 * 10^13
v^3 = 14.1 * 10^10 = 141 * 10^9
v = 5.2 * 10^3
v = 5,200 m/s

0 0
posted by Damon
Mar 5, 2014
v =1.01 m/s

0 0
posted by Regheim Beck
Oct 9, 2015

Categories
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which of the following sentences contains a verb in the subjunctive mood

Which of the following sentences contains a verb in subjunctive mood?
9,358 results
english
In what mood (or case) are the following sentences? 82. Zach wishes that he didn’t live in a small apartment. A: indicative mood B: imperative mood C: subjunctive mood D: none of the above 83. He uses headphones when he practices at home. A: indicative

asked by Susan on July 27, 2017
English
Which of the following sentences contains a verb in the subjunctive mood? A:All me to introduce myself B:If water reaches 32 degrees, it turns to ice. C:I wish you had more confidence in yourself*** Which of the following sentences contains a verb in the

asked by Anonymous on January 20, 2018
English
Which of the following sentences contains a verb in subjunctive mood? If it rains, we can move the party outside If you were taller, you could try out for the basketball team Do you believe that the Jacksons are moving to Alaska? We were going to cook

asked by Cami on November 23, 2015
English
What is the verb mood of the sentence? Wear your coat when you are in the snow. indicative mood imperative mood subjunctive mood

asked by kevin on January 9, 2012
Language…Grammar

  1. If they had tried their best, they would have succeeded in the interview. (subjunctive mood) 2. As they didn’t do their best, they didn’t succeed in the interview. 3. As they didn’t do their best, they wouldn’t succeed in the interview. 4. As they

asked by John on July 5, 2007

Language Arts
Which of the following sentences is written in the subjunctive mood? A) I will feel flush after I get my very first paycheck for this job. B) I insisted that my brother do the dishes because I set the table. C) If I were rich, I would get convertibles for

asked by Kevin Black on November 11, 2015
Language Arts
1) Which of the following is an example of subjunctive verb mood? Going outside in your bare feet could make you cold. Will you go away? If I make the baseball team, I will skip around the field.*** The bread was old and crusty. 2) Which of the following

asked by Gabby on September 17, 2013
mood! + check!
Identify the mood indicative, imperative, and subjunctive : 1. Karl suggested that we consider his new proposal carefully. 1a) Subjunctive 2. Don’t watch that movie. 2a) Indicative mood 3. Sasha didn’t like that book. 3a) Indicative mood 4. I wish that

asked by adam on October 12, 2006
English
Choose the mood of the underlined verb. 1. (Look) out of the window and tell me what you see. (1 point) indicative imperative* subjunctive 2. Yosemite National Park (is) a national treasure. (1 point) indicative* imperative subjunctive 3. If I (were)

asked by Anonymous on January 19, 2018
language arts
Which verb mood is used in the following sentence from the selection? So if you have any sense at all, avoid Storm Fever. (storm fever is a movie) Is it subjunctive or conditional? Mrs. sue said it’s subjunctive and “writing teacher” said it’s conditional.

asked by hope on December 1, 2014
Grammar check
Hello, can you please check my answer. Which of the following sentences is written in the subjunctive mood? A. If the sun is shining, then I will wear sandals. B. It was the weekend, so she slept until noon. C. My health teacher recommends that I eat five

asked by kevin on November 11, 2015
ELA
Which correctly identifies the verb and its mood in this sentence? Be careful with that dripping paintbrush. A) Verb: be Mood: indicative B) Verb: be Mood: imperative C) Verb: dripping Mood: imperative D) Verb: dripping Mood: indicative c?

asked by Dolphin on February 15, 2018
Language Arts Help

  1. which verb mood is used in the following sentence from the selection? The movie was advertised as “full of adventure”. a. indicative b. subjunctive c. conditional d. imperative

asked by Night_Fury on December 9, 2015
Language Arts
Which verb mood is used in the following sentense from the selection? If you have any sense at all , avoid Storm Fever. A. Indicative B. Subjunctive C. Conditional D. Imperative Is the answer A?

asked by Callie on December 1, 2014
Language Arts
Which verb mood is used in the following sentence from the selection? This movie was advertised as “full of adventure.” (1 point) indicative (my answer) subjunctive conditional imperative

asked by Hi on November 3, 2016

English Grammar

  1. If they had tried their best, they would have succeeded in the interview. (subjunctive mood) 2. As they didn’t try their best, they didn’t succeed in the interview. 3. As they didn’t try their best, they wouldn’t succeed in the interview. 4. As they

asked by John on July 6, 2007
English answer check

  1. Which of the following sentences uses the passive voice? Almost every night Frances sang her son the same lovely lullaby. Because of the light color, Jason gave the room a second coat of paint. Have you ever been taken to the state fair? Despite her

asked by kelsey on May 2, 2012
Languate…Grammar
Hello. 1. I wish he were a bird. 2. I wish he was a bird. 3. I wish I were a doctor. I think #1 is correct. What about #2? Is it OK? And what about #3? Numbers 1 and 3 are correct; 2 is incorrect. Read about the use of subjunctive mood in English:

asked by John on July 5, 2007
language grammar
can someone explain to me what is inductive mood, subjunctive mood, andimparitive moodby giving examples. thanks

asked by reem on May 20, 2011
English
Which Of The Following Sentences Uses The Subjunctive Mood Correctly? A: On Most Days, He Wished He Were An artist B: Knowing He Couldn’t Get Far By Walking, He Took A Cab Instead*** C: Even When He Was Young, He Ate Too Much D:When He Saves Enough Money,

asked by Science Nerd-In-Training on October 13, 2015
Language Arts!
Which of the following uses the indicative mood? A. I will feel flush after I get my very first paycheck for this job B. I insisted that my brother do the dishes because I set the table ** C. If I were rich I would get convertibles for us both D. If I won

asked by Mary on November 11, 2015
language arts
Which verb mood is used in the following sentence from the selection? So if you have any sense at all, avoid Storm Fever. (storm fever is a movie) A. indicative B. subjunctive C. conditional D. imperative is it c?

asked by hope on December 1, 2014
English
Which of the following sentences uses the word skeptically correctly? a.)The teacher was trusted by her students, and as a result, they learned their lessons skeptically. b.)I was confident I’d gotten every question right and handed in my test

asked by somebody help i am new on December 3, 2014
English
If a writer wanted to put emphasis on the person doing an action, which of these statements would be the best choice? A) active voice B) passive voice C) subjunctive mood D) interrogative mood A?

asked by Maya on February 21, 2017
Spanish for Whitney
In case you don’t go back to your other post, I don’t want you to miss what I wrote: It’s new terminology then because for over 70 years I have only heard as verb forms: Seven Simple Tenses: Present Indicative (Presente de Indicativo), Imperfect Indicative

asked by SraJMcGin on December 9, 2010

Language Arts
Can someone check my answers? The book is The Trouble With Television by Robert MacNeil 1. MacNeil asks, “When before in human history has so much humanity collectively surrendered so much if its leisure to one toy, one mass diversion” What is this

asked by R.I.P on February 17, 2018
language arts

  1. In which of the following sentences does the boldfaced word contain the Latin root -lum-? A.The bear tucked into his cave for a long winter’s (slumber). B.Hannah’s face was (luminous) with the soft morning light. *** C.The (plumber) peered into the dark

asked by Anonymous on August 26, 2015
Language Arts

  1. In which of the following sentences does the boldfaced word contain the Latin root -lum-? A.The bear tucked into his cave for a long winter’s (slumber). B.Hannah’s face was (luminous) with the soft morning light. *** C.The (plumber) peered into the dark

asked by Shalee ^~^ on October 28, 2015
Spanish Homework
Hi! Can someone help check these for me? Thanks a bunch! 🙂 Directions: Find the correct verb tense for each sentence. Choose from present, preterite, imperfect, future, conditional, subjunctive, past subjunctive, present perfect, past/preterite perfect,

asked by Gigi on March 20, 2015
french
how do i do subjontive? how do i know that i am doing it right? the endingings : e,es,e,ions,iez,ent – do i use those for every verb i use? for -ir verbs, do i also add -iss, or is that onlyfor imparitive? merci! Thank you for using the Jiskha Homework

asked by MiChElLe! on December 20, 2006
Spanish
I have to write sentences with subjunctive verbs in them, and I’m supposed to remember WEIRDO to help me remember the uses of the subjunctive. I understand Will/Wish and Emotion and Impersonal expressions and Requests and Doubt/Denial, but I don’t

asked by Ausyn on March 31, 2008
English
Thank you Ms. Sue and SraJMMcGin for your help. SraJMMcGin thanks for the verb list. Yeah that’s what I meant, I just need to know out of the verb list you gave me, which are action, linking, auxilary and transitive. visit = verb scare = verb is = verb

asked by Sarah on September 5, 2009
English
Which of the following sentences contains a verb in the imperative mood? The vase was a fine example of Indian stoneware. Myra was ready to go shopping at the mall. I suggest we all take a deep breath and reconsider. Let’s get some ice cream for the

asked by Fading on January 15, 2017
English
WILL GIVE BRAINLIEST 1. (Look) out of the window and tell me what you see. indicative imperative subjunctive 2. Yosemite National Park (is) a national treasure. indicative imperative subjunctive 3. If I (were) you, I’d hike up Bridal Veil Falls.

asked by MSTV on March 3, 2018
ELA
Which description is accurate and true of all three sentences? 1. We struggled to understand the complicated algebraic expressions. 2. We could not wait to hear our grades on the final exam. 3. We failed to demonstrate our knowledge and understanding. A)

asked by p on December 4, 2017

ELA
If I _ the principal, I’d start school later in the day so students could sleep in, Bernardo thought. Which of these correctly forms the subjunctive mood? A) was B) were C) had been D) would have been I think it might b or c.

asked by Zoey on November 1, 2017
Language

  1. Which persuasive technique is used in the following phrase from the selection? This movie was advertised as “full of adventure.” It isn’t. appeal to emotion THIS ONE appeal to reason repetition rhetorical questions 2. Which of the following is an

asked by Enna on December 11, 2018
english

  1. Which of the following sentences contains a helping verb? (1 point) Eduardo looked in the basement, but the puppy wasn’t there. Sakkom hung wind chimes because she loves the sound. Roger has never performed a solo in his life. The leader of the troop

asked by Lisa on January 11, 2012
spanish
lee las siguientes selecciones y completalas con la forma correcta del verbo entre parentesis. Ten mucho cuidado porque vas a necesitar various tiempos del indicativo y various tiempos del subjuntive, The numbers are where you have to conjugate the verb in

asked by samantha on May 10, 2007
english
A transitive verb with a direct object is in the _ voice. a.active. b.passive. c.subjunctive.

asked by derek on January 3, 2011
FRENCH! HELP!
so i have this french test tomorrow on imparitive, and subjonctif. i have had a lot of trouble remembering them, and telling them apart. can anyone help!? that would be fantastic! thank you so much! its urgent! Imperative (note spelling) means giving a

asked by leah on December 20, 2006
Punctuation
Rewrite the following sentences, focusing on the grammar area specified in the left column. — Punctuating 1. With five gallons of gas. 2. The goose bit the mailman on the leg. 3. Because the store was closed. One of these sentences is correct. One

asked by kimba on November 23, 2006
Spanish 2 Present Subjunctive
Please check my answers. I know I’m missing accents. 1. Os recomienda que _ otra llave de recepcion. a) pedis b) pidais*** c) piden d) pida 2. Which of the following sentences is correct? a) Es importante tu estudies mucho. b) Es necesario que hacer

asked by Lucy on December 6, 2016
English
6.)Which of the following sentences contains a verb that is correctly formed in the perfect tense? a.)Susan is spoken at our club before. b.)Desmond has love swimming in the ocean. c.)Desmond has love swimming in the ocean. d.)Jake have painted his room

asked by Cami on November 15, 2015
6th grade grammar
Can you check these sentences? Identify whether each sentence includes an action verb, linking verb, or verb phrase. 1. Celina is coming to my house after dinner. Linking = is verb phrase = is coming 2. The weather was beautiful this past weekend. Linking

asked by Alexis on December 11, 2013

english
I need to find the error in these sentences. 1. They is both happy. It has a subject and a verb. I’m lost. 2. This morning I watch TV before I drove here. .. need to know are they subject-verb agreement, run- on, verb form and tense or fragment. Please

asked by Renee on September 28, 2010
Language Arts
1.) When MacNeil asks, “When before human history has so much humanity collectivity surrendered so much of its leisure to one toy, one mass diversion?” What is this persuasive technique called? A. repetition B. Generalization C. a rhetorical question D. a

asked by Anonymous on November 21, 2015
Language Art’s
1.) When MacNeil asks, “When before human history has so much humanity collectivity surrendered so much of its leisure to one toy, one mass diversion?” What is this persuasive technique called? A. repetition B. Generalization C. a rhetorical question D. a

asked by YRN DJ on November 13, 2015
UNIVERSITY COMPOSITION AND COMMUNICATION I
write 9 sentences about financial planning. Each sentence must demonstrate a different verb tense (so, only use each tense once). For each sentence, identify the subject, the verb, and the verb tense demonstrated. In order to receive full credit, you must

asked by dedo on September 2, 2010
LA check work
Hello could you check my work on these two questions? Question one: How do you form the perfect tense of a verb? A. use the helping verb will and the base form of the verb B. use a form of the verb have and the present particle of the verb C. use a form of

asked by kevin on November 3, 2015
English

  1. What if I ran for Congress? 2. What if I run for Congress? 3. What if you were very rich? 4. What if you are very rich? 5. What if you had been very rich? (Which one is grammatical? Are #1 and #2 in subjunctive mood? Are they talking about the past or

asked by rfvv on December 15, 2011
English
4.)Which word or phrase is closest in meaning to the word unanimous? a.)justifies b.)in agreement c.)divided d.)not accurate 5.)Which word is the best choice to complete the following sentence?She didn’t want to get in trouble for breaking the window, so

asked by Gabriella on October 29, 2014
English
Write the verbs in the following sentences. Then identify each verb as bse form (b), present participle with auxiliary verb (pp), simple past form (past), or past participle with auxiliary very (past p), Some of the sentences have two verbs. First

asked by Cindy on December 4, 2008
english
help me please!!!!! The manner in which action is presented indicates verb: mood. tense. voice.

asked by jordan on January 11, 2011
English
Writing letters that will never be read frees you to say anything at all. You can write to those people whose petty meanness stung you or whose significant cruelties really hurt you. It’s open season on expressing as much rage or sadness or wonder as

asked by Anonymous on December 2, 2013

Spanish writing
Spanish writing – SraJMcGin, Saturday, August 18, 2012 at 8:49pm Just because the directions say to use the Subjunctive, it does NOT mean to use it everywhere! Your first statement is FACT and therefor there is no Subjunctive! hay muchas, etc. The 2nd

asked by raj on August 18, 2012
english
i need 20 nominative sentences now If i’m correct which i’m not 100% sure but if i can remember they are something like this. 1. At the end of the tournament, Tiger Woods was the leader. 2. For many of us on the team,the fans were an ambarrassment. 3.When

asked by mji on January 7, 2007
spanish
we have to conjugate the verbs in () into subjunctive and indicative, are they right? thanks! 6. Soledad hable con su amigo Hugo. Ella acaba de comprar billetes para un concierto fabuloso. Es cierto que Uds (23) (conseguir) billetes ayer para el concierto?

asked by sarah on May 10, 2007
English
I need some help with the answers to these questions, (mainly to see if I’m correct, where I’m wrong and WHY I’m wrong) 1. What is the verb mood of the sentence below? Wear your coat when you are in the school indicative mood imperative mood ***my answer

asked by Riley on January 21, 2016
English

  1. One hundred kg is heavy. 2. One thousand dollars is much. 3. One thoudand km is long. Are all the sentences grammatical? Do we have to use the singular verb ‘is’? What about the plural verb ‘are’?

asked by John on June 30, 2008
Urgent English help
The sentences below have transitive verbs so each verb has a direct object. Read each sentences and underline its direct object. (Underline the subject once, and double underline the action verb and circle the do.) * Some may not have DO* please

asked by Anonymous on September 8, 2014
English
Sorry, I left out a “mood” Read the following sentences from “Five Hours to Simla.” The baby let drop its narcotic rubber teat, delighted. Its eyes grew big and shone at all it saw flowering about it. The little girl was perplexed, wondering what to choose

asked by Sandra on March 18, 2014
english
I need two sentences about the role of education in successful financial planning using a linking verb in one and subject-verb agreement in another. Please highlight the verbs

asked by Dawn on June 20, 2010
English
Can you tell me the grammatical error on the following sentences eg:subject-verb agrrement, run on sentence, verb form and tense, or sentence fragment. Also These sentences need to be re-written. 1. They is both happy. 2. at 3PM I will be feeding the

asked by Tina on July 23, 2011
french- subjontif
ok! i have a huge french test comming up in 2 days and i need help with memorizing the subjontif and imparitif of a verb as well as infinatif. (sorry, i cant spell!) Thank you for using the Jiskha Homework Help Forum. To memorize, you need to analyze what

asked by Leah on January 16, 2007

English Gr.5
Draw one line under each action verb and 2 lines under each linking verb. Sentences with linking verbs, circle the word and the predicate that renames or describes the subject. Write noun pronoun for adjectives in the blank to describe the word. In

asked by English helper on January 28, 2010
language arts
Determine each verb and predicate noun or predicate adjective 1.Each year about ten million people visit Niagara Falls. 2.Many industries also operate close by. 3.To them, businesses ruin the area’s scenic beauty. 4.Rainbow Bridge spans the gorge below

asked by cee on April 2, 2014
French III
How do I put these sentences in the subjunctive tense? Please help me! It is too bad that he died sitting in his chair signing papers in his Cardinal robe.

asked by Laura on December 12, 2010
Spanish
We have to translate the following sentences into spanish [we’re working on subjunctive — adverbial clauses.] He will insist until she accepts. My answer: Insistirá hasta que acepte. Is this right? I know insistir often carries along “en”, but it doesn’t

asked by Christ on January 31, 2007
@SraJMcGin Spanish Check
Hola! SraJMcGin was helping me yesterday with my Spanish sentences,(which was very helpful). Could you please check these last two I had and see if I’m on the right track? Thank you so much! 🙂 Directions: Re-write the Spanish sentences in the present

asked by Gigi on March 6, 2015
English

  1. Wilma tried very hard to succeed as an athlete. 2. Wilma tried to succeed as an athlete very hard. (Do both sentences have the same pattern and the meaning? Is the verb ‘tried’ a transitive verb, and take an object the to infinitive? Or is the verb

asked by rfvv on March 20, 2012
English grammar
The words here and there have generally been labeled as adverbs even though they indicate place. In sentences beginning with here or there, the subject follows the verb. Ex) There (is / are) two pins on the table. In this sentence ‘two pins’ is the subject

asked by John on December 10, 2007
Comm 155
Could you please check these sentences and tell me if they make sense. Write five sentences in which you address changes in your writing. 1. With practice, I have gotten better at grammar and punctuation. 2. Working with a study group has made my sentence

asked by Debbie on March 15, 2011
Languege
Which of the following sentences contains a linking verb? Teresa wore her favorite shoes today. Her shoes look really comfortable. THIS ONE She put them on with striped socks. Teresa walked for hours without a complaint. 2.Which of the following sentences

asked by KYS on December 13, 2017
Educational Technology and online learning
Which of the following is an example of indicative verb mood? a).If his parents let him, he will come outside to play. b).Open the door for the old lady. c).I believe you should have a 60’s themed party d).We had spaghetti for dinner.

asked by cheyann on September 15, 2015

English
Which of the following is an example of indicative verb mood? If his parents let him, he will come outside to play. Open the door for the old lady. How many days are there until your birthday? We had spaghetti for dinner. I think it is d, although I am

asked by Anonymous on September 18, 2013
English / Grammar
I need help with the following grammar exercise. Rewrite the following sentences, focusing on the grammar area specified above the sentence. If the sentence is already correct, write No Change. Punctuating Sentences The goose bit the mailman on the leg.

asked by Lee on June 20, 2007
college
I need to write 5 sentences showing the verb and its tense. The sentences need to be about the role of education in sucessful financial planning. I am so confused

asked by J on September 29, 2010
Spanish Check
Hi! Can someone check my answers to these three Spanish sentences? Thanks! Directions: Re-write the Spanish sentences in the present subjunctive. 1.) I feel that she is honest. My answer: Siento que ella es honesta. 2.) We doubt that the boys clean the

asked by Gigi on March 5, 2015
english
How and when does one use the subjunctive tense(s) in English? In addition, provide a sentence that properly uses the subjunctive tense.

asked by sarah on February 6, 2019
English

  1. When MacNeil asks, “When before human history has so much humanity collectivity surrendered so much of its leisure to one toy, one mass diversion?” What is this persuasive technique called? A. repetition B. Generalization C. a rhetorical question D. a

asked by [._.] on November 20, 2015
English
I feel stupid for not knowing these but I can’t figure it out! So in the sentence we have “underline the verb be (and its various forms) and decide how it’s used. Circle the verb its helping or linking to and Write linking verb or helping verb on the line”

asked by Carly on September 24, 2012
Language Arts
Which verb mood is used in the following sentence from the selection? If you have any sense at all, avoid Storm Fever. A. Indicative B. Sunjunctive C. Conditional D. Imperative Is the answer B?

asked by Callie on December 1, 2014
english
Use the following words in sentences as directet:1-rain(verb)2-water(verb)3-light(adjective)4-trip(noun)5-air(noun)

asked by Paden on March 4, 2012
English
Write five sentences about the role of education in successful financial planning, in which you correctly use a different verb tense in each sentence and identify verb tense used

asked by Anonymous on August 19, 2010

Spanish
For my Spanish class I need to memorize a poem in Spanish that uses mostly subjunctive. It should be 1/4 to 1/2 a page long. I have tried searching for famous Spanish poets and looking through their poems to find subjunctive and have come up empty handed.

asked by Torey on May 13, 2008
Grammar
Linking and action verbs. I have 3 sentences not sure what the verb or linking verb is in them. 1. I am happy for my brother. 2. They are quiet in the library. 3. Aris grows flowers in her backyard.

asked by Kam on April 28, 2011
Language Arts
Which of the following sentences contains a dependent clause? a) My mother, who never wastes anything, rinsed and saved the take-out boxes.* b) We were running late and, we had to skip stopping by the post office. c) I had never been to New York before

asked by Anonymous JAK on May 12, 2016
Grammar
predication 1. The reason for the cat’s illness is because she was allergic to the dog. 2. The driving exam is when one is tested on he rules of the road. The cat’s allegy to the dog caused her illness. Using “is because” and “is when” makes very awkward,

asked by Helen on August 13, 2007
Language arts
How do you form the perfect tense of a verb? A.Use the Helping verb will and the base form of the verb. B.Use a form of the verb be and the last particle of the verb C.Use a form of the verb have and the present participle of the verb. D.Use a form of the

asked by Misty on October 17, 2014
ENGLISH HELP
Half the apples_________ on the floor, but some of them on the table. are, are is is is are, are is We could neet the man who all loans if the manager __ here. approves, was approve, were approve, was approves, were Half the

asked by Kallie on October 14, 2006
Subject Verb agreement.
Which of the following sentences does illustrate subject verb agreement? I think it’s this one, but I’m not sure. Tricia, as well as all her colleagues, are being trained on new equiptment. The subject and verb in that sentence agree. Good job. Each

asked by Patty on December 31, 2006
Language Arts
Hi guys, can someone help me with three questions? 1. Which word best completes the sentence? I am going to _ my chemistry teacher to learn more about careers in science. a. investigate b. discover c. interview d. evaluate Is it d or c? Or neither? 2.

asked by Samantha on December 15, 2015
Language Arts
Hi guys, can someone help me with three questions? 1. Which word best completes the sentence? I am going to _ my chemistry teacher to learn more about careers in science. a. investigate b. discover c. interview d. evaluate 2. Which of the following

asked by Samantha on December 15, 2015
Language Arts 8A
Please help me by checking these answers. It would really help me because I need to get my grade up. I star my answers. 1. When MacNeil asks, “When before human history has so much humanity collectivity surrendered so much of its leisure to one toy, one

asked by Emmy on November 3, 2014

ELA
Underline the verb or verb phrase in each sentence and then identify whether it is an action verb or a linking verb. 1.) The hard-working plumber was early. 2.) Those secretaries appear very busy this afternoon. 3.) The cab driver was driving extremely

asked by Diane on January 26, 2017
german
Think of a funny cartoon that you like. Choose a character or two from that cartoon and write 3-5 sentences telling what those characters did in the cartoon you watched. Use the simple past verb tense to write your sentences. ****I was thinking about doing

asked by BreAnne on October 6, 2012
grammar
• Write five sentences about the role of education in successful financial planning, in which you correctly use a different verb tense in each sentence. • Mark each verb used in bold and, in parentheses, identify the specific tense used.

asked by anna on April 28, 2010
Grammar
Write five sentences about the role of education in successful financial planning, in which you correctly use a different verb tense in each sentence. Mark each verb used in bold and, in parentheses, identify the specific tense used.

asked by Audrey on July 28, 2010
6th grade
Teacher had us to find the verb and/or action verb in sentences. She said there would be either one of each or 2 action verbs in the sentence. What are the verbs/action verbs in these sentences. 1. His car hit a wall in the world’s first car accident. 2.

asked by Traci on May 6, 2009

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an advantage of using an electromagnet shown on the crane

An advantage of using an electromagnet, shown on the crane in the image below, instead of a regular magnet to move cars in a junkyard is that an electromagnet can easily be turned on and off.

0 0 2,874
asked by new moon
May 2, 2018
i think the answer is true 🙂

0 0
posted by new moon
May 2, 2018
yes, generally one wants to release the cars sometimes.

0 0
👨‍🏫
bobpursley
May 2, 2018
so whats all of the answers

0 1
posted by new moon
May 2, 2018

  1. True
  2. B
  3. D
  4. C
  5. A
  6. C
  7. D 52 4
    posted by new moon
    May 3, 2018

new moon is right!

6 0
posted by Connexusboi01
May 3, 2018
new moon is correct, Though i did read and answered these myself then came here to check answers i got 100%

5 0
posted by blessed ghost
May 3, 2018
Beware of pranksters! Don’t assume these answers are right!

1 10
👩‍🏫
Ms. Sue
May 3, 2018
New moon is correct for Connections Academy Gravity Quiz. 100%

5 0
posted by Megan
May 3, 2018
thanks new moon

3 0
posted by Emo Aunt
May 4, 2018

new moon is right thanks new moon.

2 0
posted by ya boi
May 4, 2018
np

3 0
posted by new moon
May 5, 2018
can you help me with the langage arts test

1 0
posted by new moon
May 5, 2018
plz

1 0
posted by new moon
May 6, 2018
hello

1 0
posted by new moon
May 8, 2018

new moon I am here if you need help

1 0
posted by Hello
May 9, 2018
do you have the answers

1 0
posted by new moon
May 9, 2018
What Test are you talking about? Show me the test then show me your answers and I will check them for you! 🙂

1 0
posted by Hello
May 10, 2018
Any answers you get wrong I will help you with, suppose I give hints till it leads up to you getting the final correct answer.

1 0
posted by Hello
May 10, 2018
I will change my name to Ms. Jane

1 0
posted by Hello
May 10, 2018

new moon is correct for Conexus
1.true
2.B
3.D
4.C
5.A
6.C
7.D
thx new moon!!

3 0
posted by bamboo
Nov 12, 2018
New Moon is right

2 0
posted by Anonymous
Nov 12, 2018
God Christ you christians are tickling my pickle

5 1
posted by Ms.Sue is dumb
Nov 14, 2018
I came to double-check my daughter’s answers and they are correct as New Moon’s.

1 0
posted by Peachfirefly920
Feb 20, 2019
@bamboo
@newmoon
Are 100% correct still for 2019!

0 0
posted by Georgia Connection Academy
Feb 20, 2019

  1. True
  2. B
  3. D
  4. C
  5. A
  6. C
  7. D 2 0
    posted by Hal
    Mar 4, 2019
    Yeah 0 0
    posted by Hi
    Mar 26, 2019
    april anyone lol 0 0
    posted by thank you
    Apr 11, 2019
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03.11 defying archetypes

Lesson Summary

Changes occur constantly in all aspects of life; the changing perceptions of women you have explored in theselessons is just one example. For this assessment, you will closely examine another type of change and summarize an article on the topic.

  1. Choose one of these articles to read closely and summarize.
  2. Follow the four-step process outlined in the lesson to closely examine the article. Use the Summarization Graphic Organizer for support.
    • Step 1: Locate Key Points
    • Step 2: Organize the Key Points
    • Step 3: Determine Central Ideas
    • Step 4: Summarize the Article
  3. In a paragraph of eight to 10 sentences, write your complete summary of the article. Include the central ideas and the key points that support those ideas within the article. In the summary you submit, highlight the central ideas you’ve identified in bold and italicize the supporting evidence.
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a model rocket is launched from a roof into a large field

A model rocket is launched from a roof into a large field. The path of the rocket can be modeled by the equation y = –0.06x² 9.6x 5.4 where x is the horizontal distance, in meters, from the
21,723 results
Math
A model rocket is launched from a roof into a large field. The path the rocket can be modeled by the equation y=-0.04x^2+8.3x+4.3 where x is the horizontal distance in meters, from the starting point on the roof and y is the height in meters, of the rocket

asked by Steve on May 25, 2015
Algebra
A model rocket is launched from a roof into a large field. The path of the rocket can be modeled by the equation y = –0.06x² + 9.6x + 5.4 where x is the horizontal distance, in meters, from the starting point on the roof and y is the height, in meters,

asked by Sandra on April 3, 2014
Algebra I
A model rocket is launched from a roof into a large field. The path of the rocket can be modeled by the equation y = –0.02×2 + 2.3x + 6, where x is the horizontal distance, in meters, from the starting point on the roof and y is the height, in meters, of

asked by Sandra on January 25, 2015
math
A model rocket is launched from a roof into a large field. The path of the rocket can be modeled by the equation y = -0.06x^2 + 9.6x + 5.4 where x is the horizontal distance, in meters from the starting point on the roof and y is the height in meters of

asked by nisa on March 28, 2014
Math
a model rocket is launched from roof into a large field the path of the rocket can be modeled by the equation y= -0.02x^2+2.3x+6 where x is the horizontal distance ,in meters,from the starting point on the roof and y is the height in meters,of the rocket

asked by AP on May 27, 2018

Algebra
A model rocket is launched from a roof into a large field. The path of the rocket can be modeled by the equation y = –0.04×2 + 8.3x + 4.3 , where x is the horizontal distance, in meters, from the starting point on the roof and y is the height, in meters,

asked by Cassie on March 11, 2013
Algebra 1B
A model rocket is launched from a roof into a large field. The path of the rocket can be modeled by the equation y = -0.04x^2 + 8.3x + 4.3, where x is the horizontal distance, in meters, from the starting point on the roof and y is the height, in meters,

asked by Abby on December 2, 2016
Algebra 1
A model rocket is launched from a roof into a large field. The path of the rocket can be modeled by the equation- y= -0.04x^2+8.3x,where x is the horizontal distance, in meters, from the starting point on the roof and y is the height, in meters of the

asked by Steve on March 27, 2015
Algebra – help
A model rocket is launched from a roof into a large field. The path of the rocket can be modeled by the equation y = –0.06x² + 9.6x + 5.4 where x is the horizontal distance, in meters, from the starting point on the roof and y is the height, in meters,

asked by Sandra on April 4, 2014
Algebra
please check my answers. 2: how is the graph of y=-6x^2+4 different from the graph of y=6x^2 A: it is shifted 4 units to the left B: it is shifted 4 units to the right C: it is shifted 4 units up**** D:it is shifted 4 units down 3: A model rocket is

asked by Help me plzz on May 5, 2016
alebra
please check my answers. 2: how is the graph of y=-6x^2+4 different from the graph of y=6x^2 A: it is shifted 4 units to the left B: it is shifted 4 units to the right C: it is shifted 4 units up**** D:it is shifted 4 units down 3: A model rocket is

asked by anonymous on May 5, 2016
Math
a model rocket is launched from a roof into a large feild. The path of the rocket can be modeled by the equation y=-0.8x^(2)+12x+25.8 where x is the horizontal distance, in meters, from the starting point on the roof and y is the height in meters of the

asked by on April 12, 2017
Algebra 1 B

  1. How is the graph of y = -6x^2 + 4 different from the graph y = -6x^2? A. It is shifted 4 units to the left. B. It is shifted 4 unites to the right C. It is shifted 4 units up. *** D.It is shifted 4 units down. 3. A model rocket is launched into a large

asked by Abigail on November 30, 2016
Algebra

  1. Graph the function and identify the domain and range. y=-5x^2 oo=infinite A) Domain: (-oo, oo) Range: [0, oo) B) Domain: (-oo, oo) Range: (-oo, 0] C) Domain: (-oo, oo) Range: (-oo, 0] D) Domain: (-oo, oo) Range: [0, oo) 2. How is the graph of y=-6x^2-4

asked by Venus on March 26, 2019
AlgebraB-2
A model rocket is launched from a roof into a large field. The path of the rocket can be modeled by the equation y = 0.04x+ 8.3x + 4.3, where x is the horizontal distance, in meters, from the starting point on the roof and y is the height, in meters, of

asked by Jennifer W. on March 26, 2013

Math
A model rocket is launched from a roof of a building. Its path is described by the relationship h=-5t*2+35t+10, where h is the height in metres and t is the time in seconds. How tall is the building? What is the maximum height that the rocket will reach?

asked by Lorrie on May 26, 2014
pre cal
A toy rocket is launched straight up from the roof of a garage with an initial velocity of 56 feet per second. The height h of the rocket in feet, at t seconds after it was launched, is described by h(t)=−16t2+56t+17. Find the maximum height of the

asked by ari on July 12, 2016
intermediate algebra
A model rocket Is launched from a height of 50ft. The formula h=-16t^2+70t +50 describes the rocket’s height,h,in feet seconds after it was launched. How long will it take the rocket to reach to reachthe ground?

asked by Nellie on November 16, 2014
trig
whats the horizontal distance traveled by a model rocket launched with an intitial speed of 120 feet per second when the rocket is launched at an angle of 60 degrees

asked by hanna tret on September 9, 2011
Physics
A typical model rocket has a mass of 50 g. Similarly, a typical “class C” model rocket engine can produce a total impulse of 10 Newton-seconds. We usually launch model rockets vertically, but if I instead launched this rocket horizontally, how fast would

asked by KK on May 6, 2013
motion,physics
Model rockets are lightweight rockets powered by very small engines. A typical model rocket has a mass of 5g.Similarly, a typical “class C” model rocket engine can produce a total impulse of 10 Newton-seconds. We usually launch model rockets vertically,

asked by Physics on October 11, 2013
PHYSICS
Model rockets are lightweight rockets powered by very small engines. A typical model rocket has a mass of 5g.Similarly, a typical “class C” model rocket engine can produce a total impulse of 10 Newton-seconds. We usually launch model rockets vertically,

asked by boss on October 11, 2013
Intermediate Algebra
A model rocket is launched from a height of 50 feet. the formula: h=-16t^2+70t+50 describes the rocket’s height,h,in feet t seconds after it was launched. how long will it take the rocket to reach the ground.

asked by nicole on November 19, 2012
Algebra: Quadratic Functions
A model rocket is launched with an initial velocity of 128 ft/s from a height of 70 ft. The height of the rocket, in feet, t seconds after it has been launched is given by the function s(t)=−16t^2+128t+70. Determine the time which the rocket reaches its

asked by Isiah on March 18, 2014
Physics
A model rocket has a mass of 0.435 kg. It is mounted vertically and launches directly up with a thrust force of 13.1 N. a) What is the weight of the rocket? b) Determine the net force on the rocket as it is launched. c) What is the acceleration of the

asked by Tom on December 15, 2016

phyicis
Homer Hickham and his buddies launched model rockets in the late 1950’s when the US was trying to get a rocket into space. If homer launches a rocket from rest and its engine delivers a constance acceleration of 8.2 m/s^2 for 5.0seconds after which the

asked by Matt on October 29, 2012
PHYSICS
A model rocket is constructed with a motor that can provide a total impulse of 25.5 N · s. The mass of the rocket is 0.213 kg. What is the speed that this rocket achieves when launched from rest? Neglect the effects of gravity and air resistance.

asked by ZAC on October 21, 2010
physics
A model rocket is constructed with a motor that can provide a total impulse of 25.5 N · s. The mass of the rocket is 0.213 kg. What is the speed that this rocket achieves when launched from rest? Neglect the effects of gravity and air resistance.

asked by josh on October 21, 2010
Check My Math Answers Please!
1) [I don’t need any help with this question.] 2) [I don’t need any help with this question.] 3) A model rocket is launched from a roof into a large field. The path of the rocket can be modeled by the equation y=-0.04x^2+8.3x+4.3, where x is the

asked by Nintendon’t on April 18, 2017
math
A model rocket is launched off the top of a table. The height of the rocket is given by the function, h(t) = – 4.9t2 + 9.5t + 1.2 where h(t) is the height in metres and t is the time in seconds. How long will it take for the rocket to reach the ground?

asked by algebra hard on July 19, 2015
physics
A stationary rocket is launched vertically upward. After 4s, the rocket’s fuel is used up and it is 225.6 m above the ground. At this instant the velocity of the rocket is 112,8 m/s. Then the rocket undergoes free fall. Ignore the effect of the air

asked by clement on March 8, 2014
Physics
A model rocket is launched from rest with an upward acceleration of 6.30 m/s2 and, due to a strong wind, a horizontal acceleration of 1.50 m/s2. How far is the rocket from the launch pad 5.30 s later when the rocket engine runs out of fuel?

asked by Jeff on September 9, 2015
physics
A model rocket is launched from rest with an upward acceleration of 5.50 m/s^2 and, due to a strong wind, a horizontal acceleration of 1.50m/s^2 . How far is the rocket from the launch pad 7.20 later when the rocket engine runs out of fuel?

asked by katelin on September 24, 2012
Math
A model rocket is launched straight upward with initial velocity of 22 m/s. The height of the rocket, h, in metres, can be modelled by h(t) = -5t^2 + 22t, where t is elapsed time in seconds. What is the maximum height the rocket reaches?

asked by Bilal on January 22, 2014
Physics
A model rocket is launched at 62 degrees above the horizontal with an initial speed of 28m/s. the rocket travels for 4.5s along its initial line of motion with a constant acceleration of 13 m/s^2. At this time, the engine of the rocket stops and the rocket

asked by Bethany on September 21, 2016

Science
A model rocket is launched straight upward with an initial speed of 30.0 m/s. It accelerates with a constant upward acceleration of 2.50 m/s2 until its engines stop at an altitude of 160 m. A. what is the maximum height reached by the rocket? B. how long

asked by Taylor on September 4, 2010
Math
A model rocket is shot straight up from the roof of a school. The height at any time t is approximated by the model h=-t^2+3t+28, where h is the height in meters and t is the time in seconds. When does the rocket hit the ground?

asked by Jen on January 24, 2012
algebra
a model rocket is shot straight up from a roof the height at any time t is aproximated by the model h=-t(squared) +3t+28,where h is the height in metres and t is the time in seconds . When does the rocket hit the ground?

asked by Rose on March 12, 2013
Chemistry
A model rocket is launched straight upward with an initial speed of 45.0 m/s. It accelerates with a constant upward acceleration of 1.50 m/s2 until its engines stop at an altitude of 160 m. A. what is the max height reached by the rocket? B. How long after

asked by Lucy on September 10, 2017
NIC
A model rocket is launched straight up from ground level with a speed of 34.2 m/s. Assuming that the only force acting on the rocket after launch is the force of gravity, a. How fast is the rocket going when it reaches a height of 22.5 m? (3 marks) b. How

asked by DEEP on January 13, 2017
physic
Q: a model rocket was launched and measurements of its height and horizontal distances from the launched pad were taken as shown in the table horizontal distance from the launch pad/m : 0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11. vertical distance from the launch pad/m:

asked by Aya Muhammed on November 7, 2014
Physics
A model rocket is launched straight upward with an initial speed of 50 m/s. It accelerates with a constant upward acceleration of 2.00 m/s^2 until its engines stop at an altitude of 150 m. a) What is the max. height reached by the rocket? b) When does the

asked by Lindsay on September 30, 2007
math
A model rocket is launched with an initial velocity of 250 ft/s. The height, h, in feet, of the rocket t seconds after the launch is given by h = −16t2 + 250t. How many seconds after launch will the rocket be 730 ft above the ground? Round to the nearest

asked by sabrina on July 11, 2011
math
A model rocket is launched with an initial velocity of 160 ft/s. The height, h, in feet, of the rocket t seconds after the launch is given by h = −16t2 + 160t. How many seconds after launch will the rocket be 350 ft above the ground? Round to the nearest

asked by sydney on November 22, 2013
math
A model rocket is launched with an initial velocity of 250 ft/s. The height, h, in feet, of the rocket t seconds after the launch is given by h = −16t2 + 250t. How many seconds after launch will the rocket be 730 ft above the ground? Round to the nearest

asked by sabrina on July 11, 2011

Phsyics
A model rocket is launched at an angle of 80 degrees aboce the x axis, with a velocity of 30m/s. How high will the rocket be 5 seconds after launch? ROund your answer to the nearest tenth

asked by Derrick on September 24, 2013
Physics
A model rocket is launched upward with an initial speed of 50 m/s. It accelerates with a net constant upward acceleration of 2.0 m/s^2 until its engines stop at an altitude of 150 m. (a) What is the maximum height reached by the rocket? (b) how long after

asked by Mark on September 24, 2010
physics
A model rocket is launched straight upward with an initial speed of 60.0 m/s. It accelerates with a constant upward acceleration of 2.00 m/s2 until its engines stop at an altitude of 130 m. (a) What is the maximum height reached by the rocket? (b) How long

asked by tommy on September 7, 2010
Physics
A model rocket is launched straight upward with an initial speed of 57.0 m/s. It accelerates with a constant upward acceleration of 1.50 m/s2 until its engines stop at an altitude of 190 m. (a) What is the maximum height reached by the rocket? (b) How long

asked by <3 on September 11, 2013
physics
model rocket is launched straight upward with an initial speed of 50.0 m/s. It accelerates with a constant upward acceleration of 1.00 m/s2 until its engines stop at an altitude of 130 m. (a) What is the maximum height reached by the rocket? m (b) How long

asked by harry on September 8, 2010
physics
A model rocket is launched straight upward with an initial speed of 60.0 m/s. It accelerates with a constant upward acceleration of 2.00 m/s2 until its engines stop at an altitude of 130 m. (a) What is the maximum height reached by the rocket? m (b) How

asked by frank on September 6, 2010
physics
A model rocket is launched straight upward with an initial speed of 30.0 m/s. It accelerates with a constant upward acceleration of 1.50 m/s2 until its engines stop at an altitude of 170 m. (a) What is the maximum height reached by the rocket? (b) How long

asked by ashley on September 15, 2011
Physics
A model rocket is launched straight upward with an initial speed of 46.4 m/s. It accelerates with a constant upward acceleration of 2.18 m/s2 until its engines stop at an altitude of 138 m. What is the maximum height reached by the rocket? How long after

asked by Marty on September 4, 2015
physics
A model rocket is launched straight upward with an initial speed of 30.0 m/s. It accelerates with a constant upward acceleration of 2.50 m/s2 until its engines stop at an altitude of 170 m. (a) What is the maximum height reached by the rocket? m (b) How

asked by desperate help on January 22, 2012
physics
A model rocket is launched straight upward with an initial speed of 50m/s. It acccelerates with a constant upward acceleration of 2m/s^2 until its engines stop at an altitude of 150m. (a)What is the maximum height reached by the rocket? (b)How long after

asked by Anonymous on September 14, 2007

Physics
A model rocket is launched straight upward with an install speed of 57.6 m/s. it accelerates with a constant upward acceleration of 1.70m/s^2 until its engines stop at an altitude of 240m. A. What is the maximum height reached by the rocket? The

asked by Ashley on September 11, 2013
Physics
Can someone help me find Delta Time for the first 150 meters of this question. Everytime I try and get it by using the quadratic formula I get two negative numbers which I don’t think is right. A model rocket is launched straight upward with an initial

asked by Dustin on September 28, 2007
maths
A model rocket is launched with an initial velocity of 250 ft per second. The height h, in feet, of the rocket t seconds after the launch is given by h = −16t2 + 250t. How many seconds after the launch will the rocket be 500 ft above the ground? Round to

asked by jatin on October 8, 2016
Physics
A model rocket is launched straight upward with an initial speed of 58.0 m/s. It accelerates with a constant upward acceleration of 1.50 m/s2 until its engines stop at an altitude of 120 m. (a) What can you say about the motion of the rocket after its

asked by Haroula on February 7, 2012
Math
A rocket is launched from the top of a 50 foot cliff with an initial velocity of 120 feet per second. The height, h, of the rocket after t seconds is given by the equation h=-16t^2 + 120t+ 50. How long after the rocket is launched will it be 10 feet from

asked by Anonymous on April 28, 2016
science
3.A rocket launched accelerates at 3.5m/s^2 in 5.90 secs and2.98m/s^2 in the next 5.98 secs and then experiences a free fall. What time will the rocket be in air? Assume that the rocket is launched from the ground.

asked by mano on July 6, 2016
science
A rocket launched accelerates at 3.5m/s^2 in 5.90 secs and2.98m/s^2 in the next 5.98 secs and then experiences a free fall. What time will the rocket be in air? Assume that the rocket is launched from the ground.

asked by Anonymous on September 2, 2013
Math/calculus
a toy rocket is shot into the air at the top of a building so that its height above the ground t seconds after the rocket is launched is given by the formula h(t)= -3t cubed + 6t squared + 27t feet from liftoff until the rocket crashes into the ground.

asked by lola on July 13, 2012
Math
A model rocket is launched straight upward from the side of a 212-ft cliff. The initial velocity is 86 ft/sec. The height of the rocket h(t) is given by: h(t)=-16t^2+86t+212 where h(t) is measured in feet and t is the time in seconds. Use the quadratic

asked by amy on August 13, 2016
Physics
A toy rocket is launched upwards from rest. The rocket engine will cause the rocket to accelerate at 25 m/s^2 for 3.0 seconds. a) How fast is the rocket moving aft the end of the 3 seconds? b) What is the maximum height reached by the rocket? c) What is

asked by Sam on October 7, 2010

physics
A model rocket is launched straight upward with an initial speed of 60.0 m/s. It accelerates with a constant upward acceleration of 2.00 m/s2 until its engines stop at an altitude of 130 m. (a) What is the maximum height reached by the rocket? Your

asked by jim on September 6, 2010
Math!
Change both measurements to the same unit of measure and find the scale factor. 1) 1ft model of a 1in. fossil 2) 20cm model of a 28m rocket 3) 2ft model of a 30yd sports field 4) 3ft model of a 5yd whale

asked by Person on December 6, 2017
Math
A model rocket is launched vertically upward so that its height (measured in feet) t sec after launch is given by the following. h(t) = -16t2 + 272t + 8 (a) Find the times when the rocket is at a height of 488 ft. t = sec (smaller value) t = sec (larger

asked by Talbert on June 21, 2013
physics
A)A model rocket is launched straight upward with an initial speed of 47.7 m/s. It accelerates with a constant upward acceleration of 2.02 m/s2 until its engines stop at an altitude of 157 m. What is the maximum height reached by the rocket? B)How long

asked by Justin on January 25, 2014
physics
A model rocket is launched straight upward with an initial speed of 47.7 m/s. It accelerates with a constant upward acceleration of 2.02 m/s2 until its engines stop at an altitude of 157 m. What is the maximum height reached by the rocket? How long after

asked by cat on January 23, 2014
physics
A model rocket is launched straight upward with an initial speed of 51.6 m/s. It accelerates with a constant upward acceleration of 1.96 m/s2 until its engines stop at an altitude of 230 m. What is the maximum height reached by the rocket? The acceleration

asked by a on October 12, 2011
physics
Rockets A and B are fired straight upward from rest. Rocket A is launched first and accelerates at 11.2 m/s2. Rocket B is launched 2.10 s after Rocket A and B accelerates at 14.6 m/s2. Solve for the moment in time when the rockets are separated by 484 m.

asked by Haley on October 17, 2010
Physics
A model rocket is launched straight upward with an initial speed of 47.8 m/s. It accelerates with a constant upward acceleration of 1.83 m/s2 until its engines stop at an altitude of 163 m. What is the maximum height reached by the rocket?

asked by Wing on September 14, 2011
physics
A model rocket is launched straight upward with an initial speed of 47.7 m/s. It accelerates with a constant upward acceleration of 2.02 m/s2 until its engines stop at an altitude of 157 m. What is the maximum height reached by the rocket?

asked by sam on January 23, 2014
physics
A model rocket is launched straight upward with an initial speed of 50.2 m/s. It accelerates with a constant upward acceleration of 2.12 m/s2 until its engines stop at an altitude of 167 m. What is the maximum height reached by the rocket?

asked by NICOLE on August 31, 2012

physics
A model rocket is launched straight upward with an initial speed of 51.3 m/s. It accelerates with a constant upward acceleration of 1.82 m/s2 until its engines stop at an altitude of 150 m. What is the maximum height reached by the rocket?

asked by Jasmine on September 19, 2013
math

  1. How is the graph of y = –2x² – 5 different from the graph of y = –2x²? (1 point) It is shifted 5 units up. It is shifted 5 units down. It is shifted 5 units left. It is shifted 5 units right. 3. A model rocket is launched from a roof into a

asked by Anonymous on March 11, 2014
Physics
A model rocket is launched vertically upward from the ground. After 4.3s, its fuel is completely burned. Assume uniform acceleration of 3.0 m/s2 while the fuel is burning. What is the velocity of the rocket at the instant that the fuel is completely

asked by Leasha on January 4, 2012
physics
A model rocket is launched straight upward with an initial speed of 45.6 m/s. It acceler- ates with a constant upward acceleration of 2.88 m/s2 until its engines stop at an altitude of 151.6 m. 1. What is the maximum height reached by the rocket?

asked by Anonymous on September 20, 2014
physics
a rocket is launched from atop a 105-foot cliff with an initial velocity of 156 ft/s.The height of the rocket above the ground at time or t is given by h=-16tsquared+156t+105. When will the rocket hit the ground after it is launched?

asked by Anonymous on May 24, 2011
math
Please explain to work this: A rocket is launched from atop a 105-foot cliff with an initial velocity of 156ft/s. the height of the rocket above the ground at time t is given by h= -16t^2 + 156t + 105. When will the rocket hit the ground after it is

asked by Mary on April 13, 2012
algebra
A model rocket is launched upward with an initial velocity of 200 feet per second. The height, in feet, of the rocket t seconds after the launch is given by h = −16t2 + 200t. How many seconds after the launch will the rocket be 380 feet above the ground?

asked by Nate on September 14, 2014
physics
A model rocket is launched straight upward with an initial speed of 45.4 m/s. It accelerates with a constant upward acceleration of 2.98 m/s 2 until its engines stop at an altitude of 150 m. What is the maximum height reached by the rocket? The

asked by ben on October 3, 2011
Math
A rocket is launched at t=0 seconds. Its height, in feet, above sea-level, as a function of time,t, is given by h(t)=-16t^2+112t+480 When does the rocket hit the ground after it is launched?

asked by Anthony on October 27, 2016
Math
A rocket is launched at t=0 seconds. It’s height, in feet, above sea-level, as a function of time, t, is given by h(t)=-16t2+64t+192 When does the rocket hit the ground after it is launched?

asked by Anthony on October 30, 2016

algebra 2
A model rocket is launched with an initial upward velocity of 164 / ft s . The rocket’s height h (in feet) after t seconds is given by the following. = h − 164 t 16 t 2 Find all values of t for which the rocket’s height is 92 feet. Round your answer(s)

asked by sue on May 22, 2018
algebra
The question I have is to solve the problem. A model rocket is launched from the ground with an initial speed of 50 feet per second. The equation that models its height, h feet, off the ground t seconds after it was fired is h=-16ft^2+50t a)How high is the

asked by Ressie on May 21, 2013
physics
A model rocket is launched straight upward with an initial speed of 51.6 m/s. It acceler- ates with a constant upward acceleration of 1.96 m/s2 until its engines stop at an altitude of 230 m. The acceleration of gravity is 9.81m/s^2. When does the rocket

asked by anonymous on October 15, 2011
Physics
A rocket was launched and it now has an acceleration of 3m pers second squared upwards.the mass of the rocket is 5000kg.calculate the net force acting on the rocket and the upthrust exerted by the exhaust gases on the rocket.

asked by Tshephiso on February 4, 2013
Math
A model rocket is launched with an initial velocity of 164ft/sec. It’s height h, in feet, after t seconds is given by the formula h=164t-16t^2. After how many seconds will the rocket first reach a height of 400ft?

asked by Pam on August 2, 2014
Math
A model rocket is launched with an initial velocity of 212ft/sec. It’s height h, in feet, after t seconds is given by the formula h=212t-16t^2. After how many seconds will the rocket first reach a height of 592ft?

asked by Pam on October 31, 2013
Quadratics
The path of a bottle rocket being launched into the air and falling back to the ground can be modeled by the equation s=1/2 at^2+v_o t+s_o where s is the height of the object, a is the acceleration, vo is the initial velocity, and so is the initial height.

asked by Lost on March 20, 2019
PHYSICS-STUCK
A rectangular field is 1.5 km long and 700 m wide. An asphalt road goes around the outside of the field and a dirt path cuts across the field. A student wants to go from A to B on the field. Path x goes along the road and is shown in red; path y is shown

asked by Anonymous on November 7, 2010
Algebra
A model rocket is launched straight upward from the side of a 256-ft cliff. The initial velocity is 96 ft/sec. The height of the rocket h(t) is given by: h(t) =-16t^2+96t+256 where h(t) is measured in feet and t is the time in seconds. Determine the time

asked by Lia on January 19, 2017
physics
A model rocket is launched straight upward with an initial speed of 52 m/s. It acceler- ates with a constant upward acceleration of 2.6 m/s2 until its engines stop at an altitude of 202.2 m. What is the maximum height reached by the rocket? Answer in units

asked by squires on August 30, 2011

algebra
A launched rocket has an altitude, in meters,give n by the polynomial h+vt-4.9t^2, where h is the height, in meters, from which the rocket is airborne. If a rocket is launched from the top of the tower 90 meters high with an initial upward speed of 50

asked by rr on May 15, 2012
Algebra 1b!
Could you guys check my answers? 1. Graph the function and identify the domaine and range. y=-1.5^2 Domain; (-,+) Range; (-,0) ( my answers.) 2.How is the graph of y=-2x^2-5 different from the graph of y=-2x^2 It is shifted units up it is shifted 5 units

asked by Selena on November 8, 2013
physics
A model rocket is launched straight upward with an initial speed of 45.4 m/s. It accelerates with a constant upward acceleration of 2.98 m/s 2 until its engines stop at an altitude of 150 m. What is the maximum height reached by the rocket? The

asked by ben on October 2, 2011
physics
A model rocket is launched straight upward with an initial speed of 51.6 m/s. It accelerates with a constant upward acceleration of 1.96 m/s2 until its engines stop at an altitude of 230 m. What is the maximum height reached by the rocket? The acceleration

asked by a on October 11, 2011
physiscs
A model rocket is launched straight upward with an initial speed of 53.0 m/s. It acceler- ates with a constant upward acceleration of 3.21 m/s2 until its engines stop at an altitude of 230 m. What is the maximum height reached by the rocket? The

asked by juan on September 29, 2012

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how do cyber communities differ from communities in the real world with regard to behavior

Cyber Community Citizenship

  1. How do cyber communities differ from communities in the real world with regard to behavior?

•It can be more difficult to identify inappropriate behavior in a cyber community.
•They are not different in any important ways
•People behave more appropriately online than offline
•Communities on the real world are more appropriate

  1. Which of the following is a sign that a website is inappropriate?

•It contain information that you find embarrassing
•It advocates for a particular political position in a respectful way. *
•It sells products
•It offer information about current events

  1. Based on the descriptions below, which website is most appropriate?

•A site that asks you to send $10 to help schoolchildren in Uganda
•A site that describes violent behavior*
•A site that asks your personal information to enter a contest for a new bike.
•A site that that gives you factual information sponsored by a government agency

3 2 4,809
asked by Mindy
Mar 6, 2014
Only number 1 is right.

0 0
👩‍🏫
Ms. Sue
Mar 6, 2014

  1. Which of the following is a sign that a website is inappropriate?

•It contain information that you find embarrassing?????? •It advocates for a particular political position in a respectful way. •It sells products •It offer information about current events??????

  1. Based on the descriptions below, which website is most appropriate?

•A site that asks you to send $10 to help schoolchildren in Uganda?????? •A site that describes violent behavior •A site that asks your personal information to enter a contest for a new bike. •A site that that gives you factual information sponsored by a government agency*??????

0 0
posted by Mindy
Mar 6, 2014
Please make sure you understand the meaning of “appropriate.” Then you’ll know which of your answers are correct.

0 6
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Ms. Sue
Mar 6, 2014
so # 2 is correct?

0 3
posted by Mindy
Mar 6, 2014

Which is your answer for 2?

0 3
👩‍🏫
Ms. Sue
Mar 6, 2014
A A D

27 1
posted by idk
Nov 25, 2014
just took this test answers are
a
a
d

48 1
posted by tori
Dec 2, 2014
A
A
D

19 1
posted by I just did it because other people did it HA
Mar 12, 2015
1.A
2.A
3.D
got 100% yesh

19 1
posted by im just a girl that has no friends
Nov 30, 2015

Ok, people idk, tori, I just did it because other people did it HA, and im just a girl that has no friends.
They were all 100% right!!!!!!!
and the answers are
A
A
D
lol

9 1
posted by That Girl
Feb 18, 2016
they are right thx! 🙂

1 1
posted by hello2248
Feb 26, 2016
A
A
D is right

6 1
posted by mista iced
Mar 3, 2016
A
A
D

6 1
posted by fox girl
Mar 10, 2016
aad 100%

3 1
posted by anonymous
Mar 15, 2016

Ok So guys don’t do what i just did.

I put

A
D
D

It was an accident and don’t say my answers are wrong cause i know they are im just saying wat i did cause it is funny lol!

4 3
posted by A person
Apr 11, 2016
Yes AAD

5 0
posted by Someone else
Apr 15, 2016
if you go to connexus
A
A
D

4 0
posted by boo
Oct 17, 2016
The answers for what ever school you go to
A
A
D
Remember appropriate means it OK
and inappropriate means no don’t do it.

3 0
posted by cat367
Jan 18, 2017
A
A
D

2 0
posted by Cat~Lady
Feb 22, 2017

The answers are correct.

2 0
posted by Iko Matzou
Mar 1, 2017
I need the answer to Lesson 3: Cyber Community Connections Education
Educational Technology and Online Learning 6 Unit 6: Internet Safety
6th grade in Connexus Acadamey

0 2
posted by cool
Mar 10, 2017
I am doing great:)

1 0
posted by Royal
Apr 18, 2017
very suspischs

0 1
posted by skillet 1
Nov 4, 2017
Oh and btw guys the answers are
A
A
D

3 0
posted by Parrot
Nov 7, 2017

why is this thread so annoying

a
a
d
is correct btw

3 0
posted by anon
Dec 6, 2017
A
A
D

2 0
posted by AAD`
Dec 21, 2017
A
A
D

100%

3 0
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Feb 12, 2018
hey kids thank u so much for this stuff it really helps me

1 0
posted by lonzo ball
Feb 16, 2018
there are a few who but ADD and think it’s funny, it’s not that funny if you actually have it.

1 thing I can’t stand is that people say that ADHD (or ADD) isn’t real and is an excuse for people to blame their laziness on.

another thing I can’t stand is that people actually do that

having ADHD myself, I have no idea how normal people think and it is a real thing.

adhd stands for Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder btw

2 1
posted by Anonymous
Feb 19, 2018

@idk is correct!

1 0
posted by LittleNoot
Feb 28, 2018
A A D is 100%
Also
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4 0
posted by LaFyEtTe
Mar 7, 2018
1 A
2 A
3 D

1 0
posted by TRUTHFULY
Apr 12, 2018

  1. A
  2. A
  3. D
    :)))))))))))))))))))))) 100 %
    Lgbtq for life 3 1
    posted by Pansexual forlife
    Apr 19, 2018
  4. It can be more difficult….
  5. It contains info……
  6. A site that gives you factual info sponsored by a gov. agency.
  7. A
  8. A
  9. D 3 0
    posted by leave a niqqa leaking Bron
    Apr 19, 2018

it is a d b

0 1
posted by brianna
May 16, 2018
They change it the answers are

  1. A
    2.C
    3.B
    4.D
    5.C
    The right answers 5 2
    posted by Gamer girl
    May 23, 2018
    A
    A
    D IS CORRECT 2 0
    posted by gymnast cheerleader
    Sep 24, 2018
    yeah its
    a
    a
    d 0 0
    posted by 5678
    Oct 20, 2018
    A
    A
    D 1 0
    posted by Anonymous
    Oct 26, 2018

1.A
2.A
3.D

4 0
posted by Anonymous
Nov 1, 2018
1.a
2.a
3.d

1 0
thanks a bundle guys!

0 0
posted by Murasaki
Nov 10, 2018
A A D

0 0
posted by I’m gay for Ashe
Nov 16, 2018
For the Lesson 3: Cyber Community Connections Education
Educational Technology and Online Learning 6 Unit 6: Internet Safety
6th grade in Connexus Acadamey it is:
A
C
B
D
C
GamerGirl was right! 100% 5/5!!! Thx! <3

1 1
posted by Connexusssssssss
Dec 2, 2018

For Lesson 10: Cyber Community Citizenship
Internet Safety 8 Unit 1: Internet Safety
A
A
D is correct

0 0
posted by Woltia
Dec 14, 2018

  1. A
  2. A
  3. D 0 0
    posted by Hal
    Feb 25, 2019
    A.A.D those are the answers and if you subtract one from three you get 2 which is the total amount of genders there are 0 0
    posted by ThereAreOnly2Genders
    Feb 28, 2019
    Yes I agree ^ (btw you should totally go sub to PewDiePie) 0 1
    posted by Sub to pewds
    Feb 28, 2019
    People that said A D D are right 0 1
    posted by Sara
    Apr 1, 2019

look at my name

0 0
posted by a a d connexus students
Apr 8, 2019

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assume 4 molecules of nitrogen and 9 molecules of hydrogen are present.

N2 (g) + 3H2 (g) -> 2NH3 (g)

assume 4 molecules of nitrogen and 9 molecules of hydrogen are present.

after complete reaction, how many molecules of ammonia are produced.

do i go from N to NH3 or H to NH3?

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ammonia: 6 produced
H2: 0 remain since the 3H2 where combined
Moles of N2 remain: 1 since 4-3=1

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select the statements below that are true.

Suppose n is an integer. Select all statements below that are true: (choose 3)

A) n^2 + n is always an even integer* B) n^2 + n is always an even integer when n is even*
C) n^2 + n is always an even integer when n is odd***
D) n^2 + n is never an even integer when n is odd
E) n^2 + n is never an even integer
F) n^2 + n is sometimes an even integer

Please correct my answers. Thanks!

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Mar 8, 2017
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the first three are correct

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A includes B and C.

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which american foreign policy does this quotation from 1823 describe

American Government
“With the existing colonies or dependencies of any European power we have not interfered and shall not interfere….Our policy in regard to Europe…Remains the same, which is, not to interfere in the internal concern of any of its powers…”

1) Which American foreign policy does this quotation from 1823 describe?
A) isolationism
B) internationalism***
C) collective security
D) Manifest Destiny

2) Which of the following correctly states a cause and effect that occurred during World War II?
A) The alliance forged with the soviet union during the war led to the end of the cold war.
B) The end of American isolationism ultimately led to the communist takeover of the Chinese mainland.
C) The need to supply armaments to the Allies transformed the united states into a major military power.***
D) The upheaval caused by the war turned the attention of the united states toward its interest in Latin American.

3) American foreign aid might be used to support which of the following foreign policies?
A) Deterrence
B) Containment
C) Collective Security***
D) Isolationism

0 0 1,258
asked by Juliet
Nov 21, 2016

  1. I disagree; what do you think this phrasing indicates?
    we have not interfered and shall not interfere …not to interfere
  2. I agree.
  3. Probably, but who really knows what happens to the money the US sends to some of the countries. 0 0
    👩‍🏫
    Writeacher
    Nov 21, 2016
    Correct answers:
    1) A
    2) C
    3) B 5 0
    posted by Juliet
    Nov 21, 2016
    Juliet Is correct 0 0
    posted by Mr. Sue
    Nov 22, 2016
    Thanks Juliet 0 0
    posted by yesman
    Jan 6, 2017

thank 100%

0 0
posted by mona
Feb 7, 2017
Juliet is right

1)a isolation
2)c major military power
3)b containment

1 0
posted by u
Mar 1, 2017
Yup,
A
C
B

0 0
posted by Mel
Jul 5, 2017
A
C
C
100% correct on pearson connexus

0 0
posted by cheyenne
Oct 24, 2017
Cheyenne is wrong, listen to juliet, mel, and u

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posted by Whatever
Oct 25, 2017

A
C
B
100%correct
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Oct 30, 2017
Miss Gaylord is correct

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Nov 5, 2017
Thank you Juliet

0 0
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Nov 8, 2017
thanks Juliet! 😀

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Nov 20, 2017
For the CCA quick check, Juliet and the others above are correct.

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posted by Pro answerer
Nov 22, 2017

Oh heck, it’s ACB 🙂

1 0
posted by Thili
Dec 4, 2017
@Thili is right its acb

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Oct 30, 2018

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Multinational Business Finance Fourteenth eD It Ion

A01_MOFF9872_14_SE_FM.indd 1 12/06/15 10:02 pm

Berk/DeMarzo Corporate Finance* Corporate Finance: The Core*

Berk/DeMarzo/Harford Fundamentals of Corporate Finance*

Brooks Financial Management: Core Concepts*

Copeland/Weston/Shastri Financial Theory and Corporate Policy

Dorfman/Cather Introduction to Risk Management and Insurance

Eakins/McNally Corporate Finance Online*

Eiteman/Stonehill/Moffett Multinational Business Finance*

Fabozzi Bond Markets: Analysis and Strategies

Fabozzi/Modigliani/Jones Foundations of Financial Markets and Institutions

Foerster Financial Management: Concepts and Applications*

Frasca Personal Finance

Gitman/Zutter Principles of Managerial Finance* Principles of Managerial Finance—Brief Edition*

Haugen The Inefficient Stock Market: What Pays Off and Why Modern Investment Theory

Holden Excel Modeling in Corporate Finance Excel Modeling in Investments

Hughes/MacDonald International Banking: Text and Cases

Hull Fundamentals of Futures and Options Markets Options, Futures, and Other Derivatives

Keown Personal Finance: Turning Money into Wealth*

Keown/Martin/Petty Foundations of Finance: The Logic and Practice of Financial Management*

Madura Personal Finance*

Marthinsen Risk Takers: Uses and Abuses of Financial Derivatives

McDonald Derivatives Markets Fundamentals of Derivatives Markets

Mishkin/Eakins Financial Markets and Institutions

Moffett/Stonehill/Eiteman Fundamentals of Multinational Finance

Nofsinger Psychology of Investing

Pennacchi Theory of Asset Pricing

Rejda/McNamara Principles of Risk Management and Insurance

Smart/Gitman/Joehnk Fundamentals of Investing*

Solnik/McLeavey Global Investments

Titman/Keown/Martin Financial Management: Principles and Applications*

Titman/Martin Valuation: The Art and Science of Corporate Investment Decisions

Weston/Mitchell/Mulherin Takeovers, Restructuring, and Corporate Governance

The Pearson Series in Finance

*denotes MyFinanceLab titles Log onto www.myfinancelab.com to learn more

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Multinational Business Finance Fourteenth eD It Ion

David K. EiTEMan university of California,

Los Angeles

Arthur I. STonEhill

oregon State university and university

of hawaii at Manoa

Michael H. MoFFETT

thunderbird School of Global Management

at Arizona State university

Boston Columbus Indianapolis New York San Francisco

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Delhi Mexico City Sao Paulo Sydney Hong Kong Seoul Singapore Taipei Tokyo

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Vice President, Business Publishing: Donna Battista Acquisitions Editor: Kate Fernandes Editorial Assistant: Kathryn Brightney Vice President, Product Marketing: Maggie Moylan Director of Marketing, Digital Services and Products:

Jeanette Koskinas Senior Product Marketing Manager: Alison Haskins Executive Field Marketing Manager: Adam Goldstein Team Lead, Program Management: Ashley Santora Program Manager: Kathryn Dinovo Team Lead, Project Management: Jeff Holcomb Project Manager: Meredith Gertz Operations Specialist: Carol Melville Creative Director: Blair Brown Art Director: Jon Boylan Vice President, Director of Digital Strategy and Assessment:

Paul Gentile

Manager of Learning Applications: Paul DeLuca Digital Editor: Megan Rees Director, Digital Studio: Sacha Laustsen Digital Studio Manager: Diane Lombardo Digital Studio Project Manager: Melissa Honig Product Manager: Elizabeth Cameron Digital Content Team Lead: Noel Lotz Digital Content Project Lead: Miguel Leonarte Project Management and Text Design: Gillian Hall Composition and Art Creation: Laserwords Maine Cover Designer: Joyce Wells Cover Art: © iStock by Getty Images/chinaface Printer/Binder: Edwards Brothers Malloy Cover Printer: Phoenix Color/Hagerstown

ISBN-13: 978-0-13-387987-2 ISBN-10: 0-13-387987-9

10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

Copyright © 2016, 2013, 2010 by Pearson Education, Inc. or its affiliates. All Rights Reserved. Manufactured in the United States of America. This publication is protected by copyright, and permission should be obtained from the publisher prior to any prohibited reproduction, storage in a retrieval system, or transmission in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, record- ing, or otherwise. For information regarding permissions, request forms, and the appropriate contacts within the Pearson Education Global Rights and Permissions department, please visit www.pearsoned.com/permissions/.

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Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Eiteman, David K. Multinational business finance / David K. Eiteman, University of California, Los Angeles, Arthur I. Stonehill, Oregon State Univer- sity and the University of Hawaii at Manoa, Michael H. Moffett, Thunderbird School of Global Management.—Fourteenth edition. pages cm Includes index. ISBN 978-0-13-387987-2 1. International business enterprises–Finance. I. Stonehill, Arthur I. II. Moffett, Michael H. III. Title. HG4027.5.E36 2015 658.15’99–dc23 2015020241

A01_MOFF9872_14_SE_FM.indd 4 12/06/15 10:02 pmhttp://www.pearsoned.com/permissions/

Multinational Business Finance, Fourteenth Edition, continues to evolve as the global busi- ness and financial environment it describes evolves. Institutions, markets, and business itself are changing rapidly, challenging many long-held assumptions of financial management. We have chosen to design the content of this edition along three points of emphasis.

■ Organizations of All Kinds. Multinational enterprises (MNEs) applies to organi- zations of all kinds—the publicly traded, the privately held, the state-run, the state- owned organizations—all forms that permeate global business today.

■ Role of Emerging Markets. Firms from all countries and all markets are looking to the economic drivers of the global economy today, the emerging markets, and the many new roles they play in terms of competition and opportunity. These markets present a multitude of specific risks and challenges for multinational business and finance.

■ Financial Leadership. The leaders of MNEs face numerous foreign exchange and political risks. These risks can be daunting but they also present opportunities for creating value if properly understood. These opportunities and risks are most effectively understood in the context of the global business itself, and the ability of management to integrate the strategic and financial challenges that business faces.

New in the Fourteenth Edition The theme for this Fourteenth Edition could in some ways be considered an emerging market strength, weakness, opportunity, threat (SWOT) analysis. A world in which the developed or industrialized countries see slower growth, poorer job opportunities, and a growing insecurity over their competitiveness in the global marketplace, but emerging markets offer promise and risk.

A short overview of the features in the Fourteenth Edition can be segmented into struc- ture and teaching, content and theoretical structures, and new Mini-Case offerings.

Book Structure and Teaching ■ All chapters are structured around a series of pedagogical Learning Objectives

aligned with the MyFinanceLab platform for Multinational Business Finance’s teaching.

■ An increased focus is placed on how multinational firms financially operate similarly/ differently across industrial markets and emerging markets.

■ A new chapter, Chapter 8, is devoted solely to interest rate risk and interest rate risk management, with a focus on the use of interest rate and cross-currency swaps.

■ A multitude of new Mini-Cases explore the current global financial market’s many challenges.

■ End-of-chapter questions and problems are revised throughout, aligned with MyFinanceLab, and cover the gamut of the increasing complexity of how multinational enterprises—for profit and not-for-profit—operate and compete globally.

Preface

v

A01_MOFF9872_14_SE_FM.indd 5 12/06/15 10:02 pm

vi Preface

Content and Theoretical Structures ■ Two-level chapter structure is offered with primary chapter content focused on criti-

cal components of multinational corporate finance. ■ Selected second-level complexity of chapter content is delivered in appendices

devoted to topics such as algebraic derivation of international parity conditions, for- eign currency option pricing theory, advanced topics in transaction exposure hedging, foreign subsidiary funding and capitalization, among others.

■ Use of fundamental theoretical foundations is expanded like that of the foreign cur- rency/interest rate box diagram and the triangular structure of the Impossible Trinity.

■ Selected business and industry practices are delivered in Global Finance in Practice boxes in each chapter that both support and on occasion oppose theoretical prin- ciples in international finance.

New Chapter Mini-Cases Nine of the 18 chapter Mini-Cases in the fourteenth edition are new:

■ Chapter 1 on Multinational Financial Management: Crowdfunding Kenya ■ Chapter 2 on the International Monetary System: Iceland: A Small Country in a

Global Crisis ■ Chapter 5 on the Balance of Payments: Global Remittances ■ Chapter 7 on Foreign Currency Futures and Options: KiKos and the South Korean

Won ■ Chapter 8 on Interest Rate Derivatives and Swaps: Argentina and the Vulture Funds ■ Chapter 9 on Exchange Rate Determination: Russian Ruble Roulette ■ Chapter 10 on Transaction Exposure: China Noah Corporation ■ Chapter 15 on Multinational Tax Management: Apple’s Global iTax Strategy ■ Chapter 18 on Multinational Capital Budgeting and Cross-Border Acquisition: Elan

and Royalty Pharma

A final note on style. International finance is a subject of sophistication, constant change, yet rich in history. We have tried to bridge the past and future with a mix of currency notations and symbols throughout the book, using both the increasingly common three-letter currency codes—USD, CNY, EUR—with the currency symbols of the past—$, ¥, £, €—which live on in modern media.

Audience Multinational Business Finance, Fourteenth Edition, is aimed at university-level courses in international financial management, international business finance, international finance, and similar titles. It can be used at either the undergraduate or graduate level as well as in executive education and corporate learning courses.

A prerequisite course or experience in corporate finance or financial management would be ideal. However, we review the basic finance concepts before we extend them to the multi- national case. We also review the basic concepts of international economics and international business.

Over many years and many editions, as language translations and sales have expanded, we have observed a widening global audience for this book. We continue to try to service this

A01_MOFF9872_14_SE_FM.indd 6 12/06/15 10:02 pm

viiPreface

greater global audience with multicountry companies and markets in theoretical applications, examples, Mini-Cases, and Global Finance in Practice features, as seen in the business and news press (including anecdotes and illustrations).

Organization Multinational Business Finance, Fourteenth Edition, has a number of new subjects, but is also shorter. This has been accomplished by integrating a number of previous topics along finan- cial management threads. The book is in five parts, the parts unified by the common thread of the globalization process by which a firm moves from a domestic to a multinational business orientation.

■ Part 1 introduces the global financial environment ■ Part 2 explains foreign exchange theory and markets ■ Part 3 analyzes foreign exchange exposure ■ Part 4 explores the financing of the global firm ■ Part 5 analyzes foreign investments and operations

Pedagogical Tools To make Multinational Business Finance, Fourteenth Edition, as comprehensible as possible, we use a large number of proven pedagogical tools. Again, our efforts have been informed by the detailed reviews and suggestions of a panel of professors who are recognized individually for excellence in the field of international finance, particularly at the undergraduate level. Among these pedagogical tools are the following:

■ A student-friendly writing style is utilized combined with a structured presentation of material, beginning with learning objectives for each chapter, and ending with a summarization of how those learning objectives were realized.

■ A wealth of illustrations and exhibits provide a visual parallel to the concepts and content presented.

■ A running case on a hypothetical U.S.-based firm, Trident Corporation, provides a cohesive framework for the multifaceted globalization process, and is reinforced in several end-of-chapter problems.

■ A Mini-Case at the end of each chapter illustrates the chapter (18 in all) content and extends it to the multinational financial business environment. And as noted, 9 of the 18 Mini-Cases in the Fourteenth Edition are new.

■ Global Finance in Practice boxes in every chapter illuminate the theory with accounts of actual business practices. These applications extend the concepts without adding to the length of the text itself.

■ The power and resources of the Internet are leveraged throughout the text in a vari- ety of applications. Every chapter has a number of end-of-chapter exercises requiring the use of the Internet, while a variety of Internet references are dispersed through- out the chapters in text and exhibits.

■ A multitude of end-of-chapter questions and problems, which assess the students’ understanding of the course material, are included. All end-of-chapter problems are solved using spreadsheet solutions. Selected end-of-chapter problem answers are included at the back of the book.

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viii Preface

A Rich Array of Support Materials A robust package of materials for both instructor and student accompanies the text to facili- tate learning and to support teaching and testing.

MyFinancelab. Multinational Business Finance, Fourteenth Edition, is now available with MyFinanceLab. MyFinanceLab, a fully integrated homework and tutorial system, solves one of the biggest teaching problems in finance courses: providing students with unlimited practice homework problems along with a structured blueprint for studying the material. MyFinanceLab offers:

■ Textbook problems online ■ Algorithmically generated values for more practice ■ Partial credit ■ Personalized study plans ■ Extra help for students ■ Online gradebook

End-of-chapter Questions and Problems that provide assessment and practice opportunities, are available in MyFinanceLab. Internet exercises, glossary flash cards, and Web links are also available in MyFinanceLab.

online instructor’s Resource Manual. The Online Instructor’s Resource Manual, prepared by the authors, contains complete answers to all end-of-chapter questions, problems, and chap- ter Mini-Cases. All quantitative end-of-chapter problems are solved using spreadsheets, which are also available online.

online Test Bank. The Online Test Bank, prepared by Rodrigo Hernandez, Radford Univer- sity, College of Business and Economics, contains over 1,200 multiple-choice and short-essay questions. The multiple-choice questions are labeled by topic and by category-recognition, conceptual, and analytical types.

Computerized Test Bank. The Test Bank is also available in Pearson Education’s TestGen Software. Fully networkable, it is available for Windows and Macintosh. TestGen’s graphical interface enables instructors to view, edit and add questions; transfer questions to tests; and print different forms of tests. Search-and-sort features enable the instructor to locate questions quickly and arrange them in a preferred order. The TestGen plug-in allows the instructor to administer TestGen tests in CourseCompass QuizMaster, working with your school’s computer network, automatically grades the exams, stores the results on a disk, and allows the instructor to view and print a variety of reports.

online Mini-Case PowerPoint Presentations. A significant addition to the instructor’s resources in this new Fourteenth Edition, each of the 18 Mini-Cases has a stand-alone Power- Point presentation available online.

online PowerPoint Presentation Slides. The extensive set of PowerPoint slides, prepared by Sonya Britt of Kansas State University, provides lecture outlines and selected graphics from the text for each chapter.

All of the teaching resources are available online for download at the Instructor Resource Center at www.pearsonhighered.com and on the catalog page for Multinational Business Finance.

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ixPreface

International Editions Multinational Business Finance has been used throughout the world to teach students of inter- national finance. Our books are published in a number of foreign languages including Chinese, French, Spanish, Indonesian, Portuguese, and Ukrainian.

Acknowledgments The authors are very thankful for the many detailed reviews of previous editions and sug- gestions from a number of colleagues. The final version of Multinational Business Finance, Fourteenth Edition, reflects most of the suggestions provided by these reviewers. The survey reviewers were anonymous, but the detailed reviewers were:

Jennifer Foo, Stetson University John Gonzales, University of San Francisco Delroy M. Hunter, University

of Southern Florida

Chee K. Ng, Fairleigh Dickinson University

Richard L. Patterson, Indiana University, Bloomington

Sanjiv Sabherwal, University of Texas at Arlington

Tzveta Vateva, Kent State University

Special thanks are extended to the reviewers and survey participants of the previous editions:

Otto Adleberger Essen University, Germany

Alan Alford Northeastern University

Stephen Archer Willamette University

Bala Arshanapalli Indiana University Northwest

Hossein G. Askari George Washington University

Robert T. Aubey University of Wisconsin at Madison

David Babbel University of Pennsylvania

James Baker Kent State University

Morten Balling Arhus School of Business, Denmark

Arindam Bandopadhyaya University of Massachusetts at Boston

Ari Beenhakker University of South Florida

Carl Beidleman Lehigh University

Robert Boatler Texas Christian University

Gordon M. Bodnar Johns Hopkins University

Nancy Bord University of Hartford

Finbarr Bradley University of Dublin, Ireland

Tom Brewer Georgetown University

Michael Brooke University of Manchester, England

Robert Carlson Assumption University, Thailand

Kam C. Chan University of Dayton

Chun Chang University of Minnesota

Sam Chee Boston University Metropolitan College

Kevin Cheng New York University

It-Keong Chew University of Kentucky

Frederick D. S. Choi New York University

Jay Choi Temple University

Nikolai Chuvakhin Pepperdine University

Mark Ciechon University of California, Los Angeles

J. Markham Collins University of Tulsa

Alan N. Cook Baylor University

Kerry Cooper Texas A&M University

Robert Cornu Cranfield School of Management, U.K.

Roy Crum University of Florida

Steven Dawson University of Hawaii at Manoa

David Distad University of California, Berkeley

Gunter Dufey University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Mark Eaker Duke University

Rodney Eldridge George Washington University

Imad A. Elhah University of Louisville

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x Preface

Vihang Errunza McGill University

Cheol S. Eun Georgia Tech University

Mara Faccio University of Notre Dame

Larry Fauver University of Tennessee

Joseph Finnerty University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

William R. Folks, Jr. University of South Carolina

Lewis Freitas University of Hawaii at Manoa

Anne Fremault Boston University

Fariborg Ghadar George Washington University

Ian Giddy New York University

Martin Glaum Justus-Lievig-Universitat Giessen, Germany

Deborah Gregory University of Georgia

Robert Grosse Thunderbird

Christine Hekman Georgia Tech University

Steven Heston University of Maryland

James Hodder University of Wisconsin, Madison

Alfred Hofflander University of California, Los Angeles

Janice Jadlow Oklahoma State University

Veikko Jaaskelainen Helsinki School of Economics and Business Administration

Benjamas Jirasakuldech University of the Pacific

Ronald A. Johnson Northeastern University

Fred Kaen University of New Hampshire

John Kallianiotis University of Scranton

Charles Kane Boston College

Robert Kemp University of Virginia

W. Carl Kester Harvard Business School

Seung Kim St. Louis University

Yong Kim University of Cincinnati

Yong-Cheol Kim University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Gordon Klein University of California, Los Angeles

Steven Kobrin University of Pennsylvania

Paul Korsvold Norwegian School of Management

Chris Korth University of South Carolina

Chuck C. Y. Kwok University of South Carolina

John P. Lajaunie Nicholls State University

Sarah Lane Boston University

Martin Laurence William Patterson College

Eric Y. Lee Fairleigh Dickinson University

Yen-Sheng Lee Bellevue University

Donald Lessard Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Arvind Mahajan Texas A&M University

Rita Maldonado-Baer New York University

Anthony Matias Palm Beach Atlantic College

Charles Maxwell Murray State University

Sam McCord Auburn University

Jeanette Medewitz University of Nebraska at Omaha

Robert Mefford University of San Francisco

Paritash Mehta Temple University

Antonio Mello University of Wisconsin at Madison

Eloy Mestre American University

Kenneth Moon Suffolk University

Gregory Noronha Arizona State University

Edmund Outslay Michigan State University

Lars Oxelheim Lund University, Sweden

Jacob Park Green Mountain College

Yoon Shik Park George Washington University

John Petersen, George Mason University

Harvey Poniachek New York University

Yash Puri University of Massachusetts at Lowell

R. Ravichandrarn University of Colorado at Boulder

Scheherazade Rehman George Washington University

Jeff Rosenlog Emory University

David Rubinstein University of Houston

Alan Rugman Oxford University, U.K.

R. J. Rummel University of Hawaii at Manoa

Mehdi Salehizadeh San Diego State University

Michael Salt San Jose State University

Roland Schmidt Erasmus University, the Netherlands

Lemma Senbet University of Maryland

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xiPreface

Alan Shapiro University of Southern California

Hany Shawky State University of New York, Albany

Hamid Shomali Golden Gate University

Vijay Singal Virginia Tech University

Sheryl Winston Smith University of Minnesota

Luc Soenen California Polytechnic State University

Marjorie Stanley Texas Christian University

Joseph Stokes University of Massachusetts-Amherst

Jahangir Sultan Bentley College

Lawrence Tai Loyola Marymount University

Kishore Tandon CUNY—Bernard Baruch College

Russell Taussig University of Hawaii at Manoa

Lee Tavis University of Notre Dame

Sean Toohey University of Western Sydney, Australia

Norman Toy Columbia University

Joseph Ueng University of St. Thomas

Gwinyai Utete Auburn University

Rahul Verma University of Houston-Downtown

Harald Vestergaard Copenhagen Business School

K. G. Viswanathan Hofstra University

Joseph D. Vu University of Illinois, Chicago

Mahmoud Wahab University of Hartford

Masahiro Watanabe Rice University

Michael Williams University of Texas at Austin

Brent Wilson Brigham Young University

Bob Wood Tennessee Technological University

Alexander Zamperion Bentley College

Emilio Zarruk Florida Atlantic University

Tom Zwirlein University of Colorado, Colorado Springs

Industry (present or former affiliation)

Paul Adaire Philadelphia Stock Exchange

Barbara Block Tektronix, Inc.

Holly Bowman Bankers Trust

Payson Cha HKR International, Hong Kong

John A. Deuchler Private Export Funding Corporation

Kåre Dullum Gudme Raaschou Investment Bank, Denmark

Steven Ford Hewlett Packard

David Heenan Campbell Estate, Hawaii

Sharyn H. Hess Foreign Credit Insurance Association

Aage Jacobsen Gudme Raaschou Investment Bank, Denmark

Ira G. Kawaller Chicago Mercantile Exchange

Kenneth Knox Tektronix, Inc.

Arthur J. Obesler Eximbank

I. Barry Thompson Continental Bank

Gerald T. West Overseas Private Investment Corporation

Willem Winter First Interstate Bank of Oregon

A note of thanks is also extended to our accuracy reviewer, Dev Prasad, of the University of Massachusetts Lowell.

We would also like to thank all those with Pearson Education who have worked so dili- gently on this edition: Kate Fernandes, Kathryn Dinovo, and Meredith Gertz. In addition, Gil- lian Hall, our outstanding project manager at The Aardvark Group, deserves much gratitude.

Finally, we would like to dedicate this book to our parents, the late Wilford and Sylvia Eiteman, the late Harold and Norma Stonehill, and Bennie Ruth and the late Hoy K. Moffett, who gave us the motivation to become academicians and authors. We thank our wives, Keng-Fong, Kari, and Megan, for their patience while we were preparing Multinational Business Finance, Fourteenth Edition.

Pacific Palisades, California D.K.E.

Honolulu, Hawaii A.I.S.

Glendale, Arizona M.H.M.

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xii

David K. Eiteman. David K. Eiteman is Professor Emeritus of Finance at the John E. Anderson Graduate School of Management at UCLA. He has also held teaching or research appointments at the Hong Kong University of Science & Technology, Showa Academy of Music (Japan), the National University of Singapore, Dalian University (China), the Helsinki School of Economics and Business Administration (Finland), University of Hawaii at Manoa, University of Bradford (U.K.), Cranfield School of Management (U.K.), and IDEA (Argentina). He is a former president of the International Trade and Finance Association, Society for Economics and Management in China, and Western Finance Association.

Professor Eiteman received a B.B.A. (Business Administration) from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (1952); M.A. (Economics) from the University of California, Berkeley (1956); and a Ph.D. (Finance) from Northwestern University (1959).

He has authored or co-authored four books and twenty-nine other publications. His articles have appeared in The Journal of Finance, The International Trade Journal, Financial Analysts Journal, Journal of World Business, Management International, Business Horizons, MSU Business Topics, Public Utilities Fortnightly, and others.

arthur i. Stonehill. Arthur I. Stonehill is a Professor of Finance and International Business, Emeritus, at Oregon State University, where he taught for 24 years (1966–1990). During 1991–1997 he held a split appointment at the University of Hawaii at Manoa and Copenha- gen Business School. From 1997 to 2001 he continued as a Visiting Professor at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. He has also held teaching or research appointments at the University of California, Berkeley; Cranfield School of Management (U.K.); and the North European Management Institute (Norway). He was a former president of the Academy of International Business, and was a western director of the Financial Management Association.

Professor Stonehill received a B.A. (History) from Yale University (1953); an M.B.A. from Harvard Business School (1957); and a Ph.D. in Business Administration from the University of California, Berkeley (1965). He was awarded honorary doctorates from the Aarhus School of Business (Denmark, 1989), the Copenhagen Business School (Denmark, 1992), and Lund University (Sweden, 1998).

He has authored or co-authored nine books and twenty-five other publications. His articles have appeared in Financial Management, Journal of International Business Studies, California Management Review, Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Journal of International Financial Management and Accounting, International Business Review, European Management Journal, The Investment Analyst (U.K.), Nationaløkonomisk Tidskrift (Denmark), Sosialøkonomen (Norway), Journal of Financial Education, and others.

Michael h. Moffett. Michael H. Moffett is Continental Grain Professor in Finance at the Thunderbird School of Global Management at Arizona State University, where he has been since 1994. He also has held teaching or research appointments at Oregon State University (1985–1993); the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (1991–1993); the Brookings Institution,

about the authors

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xiiiAbout the Authors

Washington, D.C.; the University of Hawaii at Manoa; the Aarhus School of Business (Denmark); the Helsinki School of Economics and Business Administration (Finland), the International Centre for Public Enterprises (Yugoslavia); and the University of Colorado, Boulder.

Professor Moffett received a B.A. (Economics) from the University of Texas at Austin (1977), an M.S. (Resource Economics) from Colorado State University (1979), an M.A. (Economics) from the University of Colorado, Boulder (1983), and Ph.D. (Economics) from the University of Colorado, Boulder (1985).

He has authored, co-authored, or contributed to a number of books, articles, case studies, and other publications. He has co-authored two books with Art Stonehill and David Eiteman, Fundamentals of Multinational Finance, and this book, Multinational Business Finance. His articles have appeared in the Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Journal of Applied Corporate Finance, Journal of International Money and Finance, Journal of International Financial Management and Accounting, Contemporary Policy Issues, Brookings Discussion Papers in International Economics, and others. He has contributed to a number of collected works including the Handbook of Modern Finance, the International Accounting and Finance Handbook, and the Encyclopedia of International Business. He is also co-author of two books in multinational business with Michael Czinkota and Ilkka Ronkainen, International Business (7th Edition) and Global Business (4th Edition), and The Global Oil and Gas Industry: Strategy, Finance, and Management, with Andrew Inkpen.

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PART 1 Global Financial Environment 1 Chapter 1 Multinational Financial Management: Opportunities

and Challenges 2 Chapter 2 The International Monetary System 28 Chapter 3 The Balance of Payments 57 Chapter 4 Financial Goals and Corporate Governance 87

PART 2 Foreign Exchange Theory and Markets 117 Chapter 5 The Foreign Exchange Market 118 Chapter 6 International Parity Conditions 147 Chapter 7 Foreign Currency Derivatives: Futures and Options 181 Chapter 8 Interest Rate Risk and Swaps 209 Chapter 9 Foreign Exchange Rate Determination 241

PART 3 Foreign Exchange Exposure 273 Chapter 10 Transaction Exposure 274 Chapter 11 Translation Exposure 313 Chapter 12 Operating Exposure 331

PART 4 Financing the Global Firm 357 Chapter 13 The Global Cost and Availability of Capital 358 Chapter 14 Raising Equity and Debt Globally 384 Chapter 15 Multinational Tax Management 421 Chapter 16 International Trade Finance 450

PART 5 Foreign Investments and Investment Analysis 477 Chapter 17 Foreign Direct Investment and Political Risk 478 Chapter 18 Multinational Capital Budgeting and Cross-Border Acquisitions 510

Answers to Selected End-of-Chapter Problems 545 Glossary 549 Index 565

Brief Contents

xiv

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Contents PART 1 Global Financial Environment 1

Chapter 1 Multinational Financial Management: opportunities and Challenges 2 Financial Globalization and Risk 3 The Global Financial Marketplace 4 The Theory of Comparative Advantage 11 What Is Different about International Financial Management? 13 Market Imperfections: A Rationale for the Existence of the Multinational Firm 14 The Globalization Process 15 Summary Points 19 MINI-CASE: Crowdfunding Kenya 19 Questions ■ Problems ■ Internet exercises 22

Chapter 2 The international Monetary System 28 History of the International Monetary System 29 IMF Classification of Currency Regimes 33 Fixed versus Flexible Exchange Rates 37 A Single Currency for Europe: The Euro 39 Emerging Markets and Regime Choices 42 Globalizing the Chinese Renminbi 44 Summary Points 48 MINI-CASE: Iceland—A Small Country in a Global Crisis 49 Questions ■ Problems ■ Internet exercises 54

Chapter 3 The Balance of Payments 57 Fundamentals of BOP Accounting 58 The Accounts of the Balance of Payments 60 BOP Impacts on Key Macroeconomic Rates 68 Trade Balances and Exchange Rates 70 Capital Mobility 72 Summary Points 77 MINI-CASE: Global remittances 78 Questions ■ Problems ■ Internet exercises 82

Chapter 4 Financial Goals and Corporate Governance 87 Who Owns the Business? 87 The Goal of Management 90 Publicly Traded versus Privately Held: The Global Shift 96 Corporate Governance 99 Summary Points 107 MINI-CASE: Luxury Wars—LVMh vs. hermès 108 Questions ■ Problems ■ Internet exercises 112

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xvi Contents

PART 2 Foreign Exchange Theory and Markets 117

Chapter 5 The Foreign Exchange Market 118 Functions of the Foreign Exchange Market 119 Structure of the Foreign Exchange Market 119 Transactions in the Foreign Exchange Market 123 Size of the Foreign Exchange Market 126 Foreign Exchange Rates and Quotations 129 Summary Points 138 MINI-CASE: the Venezuelan Bolivar Black Market 139 Questions ■ Problems ■ Internet exercises 142

Chapter 6 international Parity Conditions 147 Prices and Exchange Rates 148 Interest Rates and Exchange Rates 155 Forward Rate as an Unbiased Predictor of the Future Spot Rate 164 Prices, Interest Rates, and Exchange Rates in Equilibrium 165 Summary Points 167 MINI-CASE: Mrs. Watanabe and the Japanese Yen Carry trade 167 Questions ■ Problems ■ Internet exercises 170 Appendix: An Algebraic Primer to International Parity Conditions 177

Chapter 7 Foreign Currency Derivatives: Futures and options 181 Foreign Currency Futures 182 Currency Options 184 Option Pricing and Valuation 192 Advanced Topic: Currency Option Pricing Sensitivity 193 Summary Points 200 MINI-CASE: KiKos and the South Korean Won 200 Questions ■ Problems ■ Internet exercises 203 Appendix: Currency option Pricing theory 207

Chapter 8 interest Rate Risk and Swaps 209 Interest Rate Foundations 210 Interest Rate Risk 217 Interest Rate Futures and FRAs 220 Interest Rate Swaps 222 Cross-Currency Swaps 226 Summary Points 230 MINI-CASE: Argentina and the Vulture Funds 231 Questions ■ Problems ■ Internet exercises 236

Chapter 9 Foreign Exchange Rate Determination 241 Exchange Rate Determination: The Theoretical Thread 242 Currency Market Intervention 247 Disequilibrium: Exchange Rates in Emerging Markets 253 Forecasting in Practice 258 Summary Points 263 MINI-CASE: russian ruble roulette 263 Questions ■ Problems ■ Internet exercises 266

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xviiContents

PART 3 Foreign Exchange Exposure 273

Chapter 10 Transaction Exposure 274 Types of Foreign Exchange Exposure 274 Why Hedge? 275 Ganado’s Transaction Exposure 280 Risk Management in Practice 289 Advanced Topics in Hedging 290 Summary Points 292 MINI-CASE: China noah Corporation 292 Questions ■ Problems ■ Internet exercises 298 Appendix: Complex option hedges 305

Chapter 11 Translation Exposure 313 Overview of Translation 314 Translation Methods 315 Ganado Corporation’s Translation Exposure 318 Managing Translation Exposure 322 Summary Points 325 MINI-CASE: McDonald’s, hoover hedges, and Cross-Currency Swaps 325 Questions ■ Problems ■ Internet exercises 327

Chapter 12 operating Exposure 331 A Multinational’s Operating Exposure 331 Measuring Operating Exposure: Ganado Germany 336 Strategic Management of Operating Exposure 341 Proactive Management of Operating Exposure 344 Summary Points 350 MINI-CASE: toyota’s european operating exposure 350 Questions ■ Problems ■ Internet exercises 353

PART 4 Financing the Global Firm 357

Chapter 13 The Global Cost and availability of Capital 358 Financial Globalization and Strategy 358 International Portfolio Theory and Diversification 361 The Demand for Foreign Securities: The Role of International Portfolio Investors 367 The Cost of Capital for MNEs Compared to Domestic Firms 372 Summary Points 375 MINI-CASE: novo Industri A/S (novo) 376 Questions ■ Problems ■ Internet exercises 379

Chapter 14 Raising Equity and Debt Globally 384 Designing a Strategy to Source Capital Globally 385 Optimal Financial Structure 386 Optimal Financial Structure and the Multinational 387 Raising Equity Globally 389 Depositary Receipts 393 Private Placement 399 Foreign Equity Listing and Issuance 400

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xviii

Raising Debt Globally 403 Summary Points 408 MINI-CASE: Petrobrás of Brazil and the Cost of Capital 409 Questions ■ Problems ■ Internet exercises 412 Appendix: Financial Structure of Foreign Subsidiaries 417

Chapter 15 Multinational Tax Management 421 Tax Principles 422 Multinational Tax Management 429 Tax Havens and International Offshore Financial Centers 435 Google: An Illustrative Case of Profit Repositioning 437 Corporate Inversion 439 Summary Points 440 MINI-CASE: Apple’s Global itax Strategy 441 Questions ■ Problems ■ Internet exercises 445

Chapter 16 international Trade Finance 450 The Trade Relationship 450 Benefits of the System 453 Key Documents 455 Government Programs to Help Finance Exports 462 Trade Financing Alternatives 463 Forfaiting: Medium- and Long-Term Financing 466 Summary Points 468 MINI-CASE: Crosswell International and Brazil 469 Questions ■ Problems ■ Internet exercises 472

PART 5 Foreign Investments and Investment Analysis 477

Chapter 17 Foreign Direct investment and Political Risk 478 Sustaining and Transferring Competitive Advantage 479 The OLI Paradigm and Internationalization 481 Deciding Where to Invest 483 Modes of Foreign Investment 484 Illustrative Case: Corporate Competition from the Emerging Markets 488 Predicting Political Risk 490 Country-Specific Risk: Transfer Risk 496 Country-Specific Risk: Cultural and Institutional Risk 499 Global-Specific Risk 502 Summary Points 505 MINI-CASE: Strategic Portfolio theory, Black Swans, and [Avoiding] Being the turkey 506 Questions ■ Internet exercises 508

Contents

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Chapter 18 Multinational Capital Budgeting and Cross-Border acquisitions 510 Complexities of Budgeting for a Foreign Project 511 Illustrative Case: Cemex Enters Indonesia 514 Real Option Analysis 527 Project Financing 528 Cross-Border Mergers and Acquisitions 529 Summary Points 535 MINI-CASE: elan and royalty Pharma 535 Questions ■ Problems ■ Internet exercises 539

Answers to Selected End-of-Chapter Problems 545

Glossary 549

Index 565

Contents

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1

Part 1 Global Financial Environment

Chapter 1 Multinational Financial Management: Opportunities and Challenges

Chapter 2 The International Monetary System

Chapter 3 The Balance of Payments

Chapter 4 Financial Goals and Corporate Governance

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The subject of this book is the financial management of multinational enterprises (MNEs)— multinational financial management. MNEs are firms—both for-profit companies and not- for-profit organizations—that have operations in more than one country and conduct their business through branches, foreign subsidiaries, or joint ventures with host country firms. That conduct of business comes with challenges as suggested by the following news release from Procter & Gamble Co. (P&G), an American multinational consumer goods company:

“The October–December 2014 quarter was a challenging one with unprecedented cur- rency devaluations,” said Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer A.G. Lafley. “Virtually every currency in the world devalued versus the U.S. dollar, with the Russian Ruble leading the way. While we continue to make steady progress on the strategic

■ Understand the complexity of risks associated with financial globalization ■ Explore how global capital markets are critical for the exchange of products, services,

and capital in the execution of global business ■ Consider how the theory of comparative advantage establishes the foundations for

the justification for international trade and commerce ■ Discover what is different about international financial management, and which

market imperfections give rise to the multinational enterprise ■ Examine how imperfections in global markets translate into opportunities for multi-

national enterprises ■ Consider how the globalization process moves a business from a purely domestic

focus in its financial relationships and composition to one truly global in scope

Multinational Financial Management: Opportunities and Challenges The objects of a financier are, then, to secure an ample revenue; to impose it with judgment and equality; to employ it economically; and, when necessity obliges him to make use of credit, to secure its foundations in that instance, and for ever, by the clearness and candor of his proceedings, the exactness of his calculations, and the solidity of his funds.

—Edmund Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France, 1790, p. 467.

Chapter 1

Learning Objectives

2

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3Multinational Financial Management: Opportunities and Challenges CHAPTER 1

transformation of the company—which focuses P&G on about a dozen core categories and 70 to 80 brands, on leading brand growth, on accelerating meaningful product inno- vation and increasing productivity savings—the considerable business portfolio, product innovation, and productivity progress was not enough to overcome foreign exchange.”

—P&G News Release, January 27, 2015.

P&G is not alone. New MNEs are appearing all over the world every day, while many of the older and established ones (like P&G) are struggling to survive. Businesses of all kinds are seeing a very different world than in the past. Today’s MNEs depend not only on the emerging markets for cheaper labor, raw materials, and outsourced manufacturing, but also increasingly on those same emerging markets for sales and profits. These markets—whether they are emerging, less developed, or developing, or are BRIC (Brazil, Russia, India, and China), BIITS (Brazil, India, Indonesia, Turkey, South Africa, which are also termed the Fragile Five), or MINT (Mexico, Indonesia, Nigeria, Turkey)—represent the majority of the earth’s population and, therefore, the majority of potential customers. And adding market complexity to this changing global landscape is the risky and challenging international macroeconomic environment, both from a long-term and short-term perspective. The global financial crisis of 2008–2009 is already well into the business past, and capital is flowing again—although both into and out of economies—at an ever-increasing pace.

How to identify and navigate these risks is the focus of this book. These risks may all occur on the playing field of the global financial marketplace, but they are still a question of management—of navigating complexity in pursuit of the goals of the firm.

Financial Globalization and risk Back in the halcyon pre-crisis days of the late 20th and early 21st centuries, it was taken as self evident that financial globalization was a good thing. But the subprime crisis and eurozone dramas are shaking that belief. . . . what is the bigger risk now—particularly in the eurozone—is that financial globalization has created a system that is interconnected in some dangerous ways.

—“Crisis Fears Fuel Debate on Capital Controls,” Gillian Tett, Financial Times, December 15, 2011.

The theme dominating global financial markets today is the complexity of risks associated with financial globalization—far beyond whether it is simply good or bad, but how to lead and manage multinational firms in the rapidly moving marketplace. The following is but a sampling of this complexity of risks.

■ The international monetary system, an eclectic mix of floating and managed fixed exchange rates, is under constant scrutiny. The rise of the Chinese renminbi is chang- ing much of the world’s outlook on currency exchange, reserve currencies, and the roles of the dollar and the euro (see Chapter 2).

■ Large fiscal deficits, including the current eurozone crisis, plague most of the major trading countries of the world, complicating fiscal and monetary policies, and ulti- mately, interest rates and exchange rates (see Chapter 3).

■ Many countries experience continuing balance of payments imbalances, and in some cases, dangerously large deficits and surpluses—whether it be the twin surpluses enjoyed by China, the current account surplus of Germany amidst a sea of euro- zone deficits, or the continuing current account deficit of the United States, all will inevitably move exchange rates (see Chapter 3).

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4 CHAPTER 1 Multinational Financial Management: Opportunities and Challenges

■ Ownership, control, and governance vary radically across the world. The publicly traded company is not the dominant global business organization—the privately held or family-owned business is the prevalent structure—and goals and measures of per- formance vary dramatically between these business models (see Chapter 4).

■ Global capital markets that normally provide the means to lower a firm’s cost of capital, and even more critically, increase the availability of capital, have in many ways shrunk in size and have become less open and accessible to many of the world’s organizations (see Chapter 2).

■ Today’s emerging markets are confronted with a new dilemma: the problem of first being the recipients of capital inflows, and then of experiencing rapid and massive capital outflows. Financial globalization has resulted in the ebb and flow of capital into and out of both industrial and emerging markets, greatly complicating financial management (Chapters 5 and 8).

This first chapter is meant only as an introduction and a taste of the complexity of risks associated with financial globalization. The Mini-Case at the end of this first chapter, Crowd- funding Kenya, is intended to push you in your thinking about how and why money moves across the globe today.

the Global Financial Marketplace Business—domestic, international, global—involves the interaction of individuals and indi- vidual organizations for the exchange of products, services, and capital through markets. The global capital markets are critical for the conduct of this exchange. The global financial crisis of 2008–2009 served as an illustration and a warning of how tightly integrated and fragile this marketplace can be.

assets, Institutions, and Linkages Exhibit 1.1 provides a map of the global capital markets. One way to characterize the global financial marketplace is through its assets, institutions, and linkages.

Assets. The assets—financial assets—at the heart of the global capital markets are the debt securities issued by governments (e.g., U.S. Treasury Bonds). These low-risk or risk-free assets form the foundation for the creation, trading, and pricing of other financial assets like bank loans, corporate bonds, and equities (stock). In recent years, a number of additional securities have been created from existing securities—derivatives, the value of which is based on mar- ket value changes of the underlying securities. The health and security of the global financial system relies on the quality of these assets.

Institutions. The institutions of global finance are the central banks, which create and control each country’s money supply; the commercial banks, which take deposits and extend loans to businesses, both local and global; and the multitude of other financial institutions created to trade securities and derivatives. These institutions take many shapes and are subject to many different regulatory frameworks. The health and security of the global financial system relies on the stability of these financial institutions.

Linkages. The links between the financial institutions—the actual fluid or medium for exchange—are the interbank networks using currency. The ready exchange of currencies in the global marketplace is the first and foremost necessary element for the conduct of financial trading, and the global currency markets are the largest markets in the world. The exchange of currencies, and the subsequent exchange of all other securities globally via currency, is the

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5Multinational Financial Management: Opportunities and Challenges CHAPTER 1

international interbank network. This network, whose primary price is the London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR), is the core component of the global financial system.

The movement of capital across currencies and continents for the conduct of business has existed in many different forms for thousands of years. Yet, it is only within the past 50 years that these capital movements have started to move at the pace of an electron in the digital marketplace. And it is only within the past 20 years that this market has been able to reach the most distant corners of the earth at any moment of the day. The result has been an explosion of innovative products and services—some for better and some for worse. And as illustrated by Global Finance in Practice 1.1, conditions and markets can change—often quickly.

the Market for Currencies The price of any one country’s currency in terms of another country’s currency is called a foreign currency exchange rate. For example, the exchange rate between the U.S. dollar ($ or USD) and the European euro (€ or EUR) may be stated as “1.0922 dollar per euro” or simply abbre- viated as $1.0922/€. This is the same exchange rate as when stated “EUR1.00 = USD1.0922.” Since most international business activities require at least one of the two parties in a business transaction to either pay or receive payment in a currency that is different from their own, an understanding of exchange rates is critical to the conduct of global business.

Currency Symbols. As noted, USD and EUR are often used as the symbols for the U.S.  dollar and the European Union’s euro. These are the computer symbols (ISO-4217 codes) used today on the world’s digital networks. The field of international finance, however, has a rich history of using a variety of different symbols in the financial press, and a variety of different

Bank

Mortgage Loan

Corporate Loan

Corporate Bond

Bank

Interbank Market (LIBOR )

Bank

Public Debt

Private Debt

Private Equity

Central Banks Institutions

Currency Currency Currency

The global capital market is a collection of institutions (central banks, commercial banks, investment banks, not-for- profit financial institutions like the IMF and World Bank) and securities (bonds, mortgages, derivatives, loans, etc.), which are all linked via a global network—the Interbank Market. This interbank market, in which securities of all kinds are traded, is the critical pipeline system for the movement of capital.

The exchange of securities—the movement of capital in the global financial system—must all take place through a vehicle—currency. The exchange of currencies is itself the largest of the financial markets. The interbank market, which must pass-through and exchange securities using currencies, bases all of its pricing through the single most widely quoted interest rate in the world—LIBOR (the London Interbank Oƒered Rate).

exhibit 1.1 Global Capital Markets

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6 CHAPTER 1 Multinational Financial Management: Opportunities and Challenges

The Swiss franc has been fighting its appreciation against the European euro for years. While it is not a member of the European Union and while its currency has been one of the world’s most stable for over a century, Switzerland is an economy and a currency completely encased within the Eurozone.

In 2011, in an attempt to stop the Swiss franc from con- tinuing to grow in value against the euro (to stop its appre- ciation), the Swiss Central Bank announced a “floor” on its value against the euro of 1.20 Swiss francs to one euro. To preserve this value, the Bank would intervene in the market by buying euros with Swiss francs anytime the market exchange rate threatened to hit the floor. As illustrated in Exhibit A, the Bank had to intervene only a few select times in the past three years—until early 2015.

In early 2015, the markets continued to apply upward pressure on the Swiss franc’s value against the euro (which means pushing its exchange value to less than 1.20 Swiss francs per euro). The Swiss Central Bank continued to intervene, buying euros with Swiss francs and accumulat- ing more and more euros in its reserves of foreign currency. The Bank also set central bank interest rates at negative

levels—yes, negative. This meant that the Bank charged depositors to hold Swiss franc deposits, an effort to dis- suade investors from exchanging any currency, including the euro, for Swiss francs.

But the European Union’s economies continued to struggle in 2014, and early reports of economic activ- ity  in 2015 were showing further slowing. Investors wished to exit  the euro fearing its future fall in value. The European  Central Bank added to investor anxiety when it announced that it would be undertaking expansionary government debt purchases—quantitative easing—(expan- sionary monetary policy) to kick-start the sluggish EU economy.

On the morning of January 15, 2015, the Swiss Cen- tral Bank shocked the markets by announcing that it was abandoning the 1.20 floor and cutting interest rates further (more negative). It had concluded that with the forthcom- ing monetary expansion from the ECB, there was no longer any way to keep the flood gates closed. The Swiss franc, as illustrated in Exhibit B, appreciated against the euro within minutes. For two of the world’s major currencies, it was a very eventful day.

gLObaL Finance in Practice 1.1

the rocketing Swiss Franc

1.1

1.2

1.3

1.4

1.5

1.6

1.7

1/1 /20

06

3/1 /20

06

5/1 /20

06

7/1 /20

06

9/1 /20

06

11 /1/

20 06

1/1 /20

07

3/1 /20

07

5/1 /20

07

7/1 /20

07

9/1 /20

07

11 /1/

20 07

1/1 /20

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3/1 /20

08

5/1 /20

08

7/1 /20

08

9/1 /20

08

11 /1/

20 08

1/1 /20

09

3/1 /20

09

5/1 /20

09

7/1 /20

09

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11 /1/

20 09

1/1 /20

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3/1 /20

10

5/1 /20

10

7/1 /20

10

9/1 /20

10

11 /1/

20 10

1/1 /20

11

3/1 /20

11

5/1 /20

11

7/1 /20

11

9/1 /20

11

11 /1/

20 11

1/1 /20

12

3/1 /20

12

5/1 /20

12

7/1 /20

12

9/1 /20

12

11 /1/

20 12

1/1 /20

13

3/1 /20

12

5/1 /20

13

7/1 /20

13 9/1

/13

11 /1/

20 13

1/1 /20

14

3/1 /20

14

05 /1/

20 14

7/1 /20

14

9/1 /20

14

11 /1/

20 14

1/1 /20

15

Swiss Central Bank sets a “floor” of 1.20 Swiss francs = 1 euro in 2011

Swiss francs (CHF) = 1 European euro (EUR)

exhibit a Swiss Franc–euro exchange rate

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7Multinational Financial Management: Opportunities and Challenges CHAPTER 1

abbreviations are commonly used. For example, the British pound sterling may be £ (the pound symbol), GBP (Great Britain pound), STG (British pound sterling), ST£ (pound ster- ling), or UKL or UK£ (United Kingdom pound). This book uses both the simpler common symbols—the $ (dollar), the € (euro), the ¥ (yen), the £ (pound)—and the three letter ISO codes throughout. And as Global Finance in Practice 1.2 describes, this would include BTC, the three-letter digital code for Bitcoin.

exhibit b

0.85

0.90

0.95

1.00

1.05

1.10

1.15

1.25

1.20

Swiss francs (CHF) = 1 European euro (EUR)

Morning of 15 January 2015 (Zurich)

Swiss floor at 1.20 At 9:25 am on Jan 15, 2015, in a surprise move, the Swiss Central

Bank announces it is “discontinuing the minimum exchange rate of 1.20

per euro”

At 9:53 am Swiss franc hits 0.887, then falls back

(+26.14% in 28 minutes)

Stabilizes at CHF1.04 = EUR1.00 30 minutes later

= +26.14% against the euro CHF 1.210 – CHF 0.887

CHF 1.210

Closing rate on Jan 15, 2015, is CHF 1.024 = EUR 1.00, a 14.74%

appreciation of the Swiss franc versus the euro in one trading day

8:5 0

8:5 4

8:5 7

9:0 0

9:0 4

9:0 8

9:1 1

9:1 4

9:2 5

9:2 8

9:3 2

9:3 5

9:3 9

9:4 3

9:4 6

9:5 0

9:5 3

9:5 7 10

:00 10

:04 10

:08 10

:11 10

:15 10

:18 10

:22 10

:25 10

:29 10

:33 10

:36 10

:40 10

:43 10

:45 10

:50 10

:54 10

:58 11

:01

Swiss Franc’s appreciation by the Minute . . . January 2015

The difference is that established fiat currencies—ones where the bills and coins, or their digital versions, get their value by dint of regulation or law—are underwritten by the state which is, in principle at least, answerable to its citizens. Bitcoin, on the other hand, is a community currency. It requires self-policing on the part of its users. To some, this is a feature, not a bug. But, in the grand scheme of things, the necessary open-source engage- ment remains a niche pursuit.

—“Bits and bob,” The Economist, June 13, 2011.

Bitcoin is an open-source, peer-to-peer, digital currency. It is a cryptocurrency, a digital currency that is created and

managed using advanced encryption techniques known as cryptography. And it may be the world’s first completely decentralized digital-payments system. But is Bitcoin a true currency?

Bitcoin was invented in 2009 by a man calling himself Satoshi Nakamoto. Nakamoto published, via the Internet, a nine-page paper outlining how the Bitcoin system would work. He also provided the open-source code needed to both pro- duce the digital coins (mine in Bitcoin terminology) and trade Bitcoins digitally as money. (Nakamoto is not thought to be a real person, likely being a nome de plume for some relatively small working group.)

gLObaL Finance in Practice 1.2

Bitcoin-Cryptocurrency or Commodity?

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8 CHAPTER 1 Multinational Financial Management: Opportunities and Challenges

Exchange Rate Quotations and Terminology. Exhibit 1.2 lists currency exchange rates for December 31, 2014, as would be quoted in New York or London. The exchange rate listed is for a specific country’s currency—for example, the Argentina peso is Peso 8.7851 = 1.00 U.S. dollar, is Peso 9.5990 = 1.00 Euro, and Peso 13.1197 = 1.00 British pound. The rate listed is termed a “mid-rate” because it is the middle or average of the rates at which currency traders buy currency (bid rate) and sell currency (offer rate).

The U.S. dollar has been the focal point of most currency trading since the 1940s. As a result, most of the world’s currencies have been quoted against the dollar—Mexican pesos per dollar, Brazilian real per dollar, Hong Kong dollars per dollar, etc. This quotation conven- tion is also followed against the world’s major currencies, as listed in Exhibit 1.2. For example, the Japanese yen is commonly quoted against the dollar, euro, and pound, as in ¥119.765/$, ¥130.861/€, and ¥178.858/£.

Quotation Conventions. Several of the world’s major currency exchange rates, however, fol- low a specific quotation convention that is the result of tradition and history. The exchange rate between the U.S. dollar and the euro is always quoted as “dollars per euro” or $/€. For example, $1.0926 listed in Exhibit 1.2 under “United States.” Similarly, the exchange rate between the U.S. dollar and the British pound is always quoted as “dollars per pound” or $/£. For example, $1.4934 listed under “United States” in Exhibit 1.2. In addition, countries that were formerly members of the British Commonwealth will often be quoted against the U.S. dollar, as in U.S. dollars per Australian dollar or U.S. dollars per Canadian dollar.

Mining of Bitcoins is a mathematical process. The miner must find a sequence of data (called a block) that produces a particular pattern when the Bitcoin hash algorithm is applied to it. When a match is found, the miner obtains a bounty—an allocation—of Bitcoins. This repetitive guessing, conducted by increasingly complex computers, is called hashing. The moti- vation for mining is clear: to make money.

The Bitcoin software system is designed to release a 25-coin reward to the miner in the worldwide network who succeeds in solving the mathematical problem. Once solved, the solution is broadcast network-wide, and competition for the next 25-coin reward begins. The system’s protocol is designed to release a new block of Bitcoins every 10 minutes until all 21 million are released. The difficulty of the search con- tinually increases over time with mining. This causes increasing scarcity over time, similar to what many believe about gold when gold was the basis of currency values. But ultimately the Bitcoin system is limited in both time (every 10 minutes) and total issuance (21 million). Theoretically the last of the 21 million Bitcoins would be mined in 2140. Once mined, Bit- coins are considered a pseudonymous—nearly anonymous— cryptocurrency. Owners can buy things with Bitcoins or sell Bitcoins to non-miners who wish to use digital currency for purchases or speculate on its future value.

Ownership of each and every coin is verified and regis- tered through a digital chain timestamp across the thousands of network nodes. Like cash, this prevents double spending, since every Bitcoin exchange is authenticated across the

decentralized Bitcoin network (currently estimated at 20,000 nodes). Unlike cash, every transaction that has ever occurred in the Bitcoin system is recorded in terms of the two public keys (the transactors, the Bitcoin addresses) in the system. This record, called the block chain, includes the time, amount, and the two near-anonymous IP addresses (public keys are not tied to any person’s identity).

Traditional currencies are issued by governments, which regulate the growth and supply of the currency, while implicitly guaranteeing the currency’s value. Bitcoin has no such guar- antor, no insurer, and no lender-of-last-resort. A gold standard like that used in the first part of the twentieth century, is a sys- tem based on specie; it has some fixed link to a scarce metal of some intrinsic value. Bitcoins have no intrinsic value; they are not composed of a precious metal; they are nothing more than digital code. Their value reflects the supply and demand by those in the marketplace who believe in their value. This makes Bitcoin a fiat currency similar to major currencies today. Their value has been quite volatile.

The ability of Bitcoin to bypass authorities has led to con- cerns about the potential use of Bitcoin for illicit trade, the laundering of money associated with illegal drugs and other illegal business activity globally. One low was seen when Bit- coin became the primary currency for sales on Silk Road, an underground Web site for illegal drug trafficking. Although eventually shut down by the U.S. government, Bitcoin’s poten- tial use for illegal activities has impacted the public’s percep- tion of its potential. Others, however, see promise.

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9Multinational Financial Management: Opportunities and Challenges CHAPTER 1

March 23, 2015 Country Currency Symbol Code

Currency equal to 1 Dollar

Currency equal to 1 euro

Currency equal to 1 pound

Argentina peso Ps ARS 8.7851 9.5990 13.1197 Australia dollar A$ AUD 1.2744 1.3924 1.9032 Brazil real R$ BRL 3.1610 3.4538 4.7206 Canada dollar C$ CAD 1.2516 1.3676 1.8691 Chile peso $ CLP 625.98 683.97 934.84 China yuan ¥ CNY 6.2160 6.7919 9.2830 Czech Republic koruna Kc CZK 25.0240 27.3424 37.3710 Denmark krone Dkr DKK 6.8243 7.4566 10.1915 Egypt pound £ EGP 7.6301 8.3369 11.3948 Euro euro € EUR 0.9152 1.0000 1.3668 India rupee Rs INR 62.2650 68.0336 92.9870 Indonesia rupiah Rp IDR 13,019.50 14,225.70 19,443.41 Israel shekel Shk ILS 3.9655 4.3329 5.9221 Japan yen ¥ JPY 119.765 130.861 178.858 Kenya shilling KSh KES 91.90 100.41 137.24 Malaysia ringgit RM MYR 3.6950 4.0373 5.5181 Mexico new peso $ MXN 14.9583 16.3441 22.3387 New Zealand dollar NZ$ NZD 1.3120 1.4335 1.9593 Nigeria naira NGN 199.700 218.201 298.233 Norway krone NKr NOK 7.8845 8.6149 11.7747 Philippines peso PHP 44.7900 48.9396 66.8897 Poland zloty — PLN 3.7600 4.1084 5.6153 Russia ruble R RUB 58.7450 64.1875 87.7302 Singapore dollar S$ SGD 1.3671 1.4938 2.0416 South Africa rand R ZAR 11.9100 13.0134 17.7865 South Korea won W KRW 1,114.65 1,217.92 1,664.63 Sweden krona SKr SEK 8.5016 9.2892 12.6963 Switzerland franc Fr. CHF 0.9669 1.0565 1.4440 Taiwan dollar T$ TWD 31.4350 34.3473 46.9452 Thailand baht B THB 32.5450 35.5601 48.6029 Turkey lira YTL TRY 2.5477 2.7837 3.8048 United Kingdom pound £ GBP 0.6696 0.7316 1.0000 Ukraine hrywnja — UAH 22.6500 24.7484 33.8257 Uruguay peso $U UYU 25.5300 27.8952 38.1267

United States dollar $ USD 1.0000 1.0926 1.4934

Venezuela Bolivar fuerte Bs VEB 6.2935 6.8766 9.3988

Vietnam dong d VND 21,525.00 23,519.23 32,145.66

Special Drawing Right

— — SDR 0.7199 0.7867 1.0752

Note that a number of different currencies use the same symbol (for example, both China and Japan have traditionally used the ¥ symbol, yen or yuan, meaning round or circle). All quotes are mid-rates, and are drawn from the Financial Times.

exhibit 1.2 Selected Global Currency exchange rates

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10 CHAPTER 1 Multinational Financial Management: Opportunities and Challenges

eurocurrencies and LIBOr One of the major linkages of global money and capital markets is the eurocurrency market and its interest rate, LIBOR. Eurocurrencies are domestic currencies of one country on deposit in a second country for a period ranging from overnight to more than a year or longer. Certificates of deposit are usually for three months or more and in million-dollar increments. A eurodollar deposit is not a demand deposit—it is not created on the bank’s books by writing loans against required fractional reserves, and it cannot be transferred by a check drawn on the bank hav- ing the deposit. Eurodollar deposits are transferred by wire or cable transfer of an underlying balance held in a correspondent bank located within the United States. In most countries, a domestic analogy would be the transfer of deposits held in nonbank savings associations. These are transferred when the association writes its own check on a commercial bank.

Any convertible currency can exist in “euro” form. Note that this use of “euro” prefix should not be confused with the European currency called the euro. The eurocurrency mar- ket includes eurosterling (British pounds deposited outside the United Kingdom); euroeuros (euros on deposit outside the eurozone); euroyen (Japanese yen deposited outside Japan) and eurodollars (U.S. dollars deposited outside the U.S.). Eurocurrency markets serve two valuable purposes: (1) eurocurrency deposits are an efficient and convenient money market device for holding excess corporate liquidity; and (2) the eurocurrency market is a major source of short- term bank loans to finance corporate working capital needs, including the financing of imports and exports. Banks in which eurocurrencies are deposited are called eurobanks. A eurobank is a financial intermediary that simultaneously bids for time deposits and makes loans in a currency other than that of its home currency. Eurobanks are major world banks that conduct a eurocurrency business in addition to all other banking functions. Thus, the eurocurrency operation that qualifies a bank for the name eurobank is, in fact, a department of a large com- mercial bank, and the name springs from the performance of this function.

The modern eurocurrency market was born shortly after World War II. Eastern European holders of dollars, including the various state trading banks of the Soviet Union, were afraid to deposit their dollar holdings in the United States because those deposits might be attached by U.S. residents with claims against communist governments. Therefore, Eastern European holders deposited their dollars in Western Europe, particularly with two Soviet banks: the Mos- cow Narodny Bank in London and the Banque Commerciale pour l’Europe du Nord in Paris. These banks redeposited the funds in other Western banks, especially in London. Additional dollar deposits were received from various central banks in Western Europe, which elected to hold part of their dollar reserves in this form to obtain a higher yield. Commercial banks also placed their dollar balances in the market because specific maturities could be negotiated in the eurodollar market. Such companies found it financially advantageous to keep their dollar reserves in the higher-yielding eurodollar market. Various holders of international refugee funds also supplied funds.

Although the basic causes of the growth of the eurocurrency market are economic efficien- cies, many unique institutional events during the 1950s and 1960s contributed to its growth.

■ In 1957, British monetary authorities responded to a weakening of the pound by imposing tight controls on U.K. bank lending in sterling to nonresidents of the United Kingdom. Encouraged by the Bank of England, U.K. banks turned to dollar lending as the only alternative that would allow them to maintain their leading position in world finance. For this they needed dollar deposits.

■ Although New York was “home base” for the dollar and had a large domestic money and capital market, international trading in the dollar centered in London because of that city’s expertise in international monetary matters and its proximity in time and distance to major customers.

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11Multinational Financial Management: Opportunities and Challenges CHAPTER 1

■ Additional support for a European-based dollar market came from the balance of payments difficulties of the U.S. during the 1960s, which temporarily segmented the U.S. domestic capital market.

Ultimately, however, the eurocurrency market continues to thrive because it is a large international money market relatively free from governmental regulation and interference.

Eurocurrency Interest Rates. The reference rate of interest in the eurocurrency market is the London Interbank Offered Rate, or LIBOR. LIBOR is the most widely accepted rate of interest used in standardized quotations, loan agreements, or financial derivatives valuations. The use of interbank offered rates, however, is not confined to London. Most major domes- tic financial centers construct their own interbank offered rates for local loan agreements. Examples of such rates include PIBOR (Paris Interbank Offered Rate), MIBOR (Madrid Interbank Offered Rate), SIBOR (Singapore Interbank Offered Rate), and FIBOR (Frankfurt Interbank Offered Rate), to name just a few.

The key factor attracting both depositors and borrowers to the eurocurrency loan market is the narrow interest rate spread within that market. The difference between deposit and loan rates is often less than 1%. Interest spreads in the eurocurrency market are small for many reasons. Low lending rates exist because the eurocurrency market is a wholesale market where deposits and loans are made in amounts of $500,000 or more on an unsecured basis. Borrow- ers are usually large corporations or government entities that qualify for low rates because of their credit standing and because the transaction size is large. In addition, overhead assigned to the eurocurrency operation by participating banks is small.

Deposit rates are higher in the eurocurrency markets than in most domestic currency markets because the financial institutions offering eurocurrency activities are not subject to many of the regulations and reserve requirements imposed on traditional domestic banks and banking activities. With these costs removed, rates are subject to more competitive pressures, deposit rates are higher, and loan rates are lower. A second major area of cost avoided in the eurocurrency markets is the payment of deposit insurance fees (such as the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, FDIC) and assessments paid on deposits in the United States.

the theory of Comparative advantage The theory of comparative advantage provides a basis for explaining and justifying international trade in a model world assumed to enjoy free trade, perfect competition, no uncertainty, cost- less information, and no government interference. The theory’s origins lie in the work of Adam Smith, and particularly with his seminal book, The Wealth of Nations, published in 1776. Smith sought to explain why the division of labor in productive activities, and subsequently interna- tional trade of those goods, increased the quality of life for all citizens. Smith based his work on the concept of absolute advantage, with every country specializing in the production of those goods for which it was uniquely suited. More would be produced for less. Thus, with each coun- try specializing in products for which it possessed absolute advantage, countries could produce more in total and trade for goods that were cheaper in price than those produced at home.

In his work, On the Principles of Political Economy and Taxation, published in 1817, David Ricardo sought to take the basic ideas set down by Adam Smith a few logical steps further. Ricardo noted that even if a country possessed absolute advantage in the production of two goods, it might still be relatively more efficient than the other country in one good’s production than the production of the other good. Ricardo termed this comparative advantage. Each country would then possess comparative advantage in the production of one of the two products, and both countries would then benefit by specializing completely in one product and trading for the other.

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indirect perception checking

COM 100: FINAL EXAM

1) Communication is a social process in which individuals employ symbols to establish and interpret meaning in their environment.

_____ True ___X__ False

2) Environments in which communication takes place and which provide clarity are called:

_____ a. cybernetics

_____ b. contexts

_____ c. adaptors

_____ d. roles

3) All humans share the same set of ethics.

_____ True _____ False

4) Physical and sexual attraction:

_____ a. are the same thing

_____ b. are not influenced by culture

_____ c. remain fairly constant over time

_____ d. are different kinds of appeal

5) Instead of one person encoding a message and then the receiver decoding it, meaning is co-created simultaneously. This is called the transactional model of communication.

_____ True _____ False

6) If you don’t say anything, you are not communicating.

_____ True __X___ False

7) The four stages of group development are:

a)___________________________

b)___________________________

c)___________________________

d)___________________________

8) Sex-based expectations and conditioning start practically from birth.

_____ True _____ False

9) The Johari Window is a useful model that (mark all that apply):

___X__ a. shows how self-disclosure varies in different relationships

___X__ b. reflects degrees of self-awareness

___X__ c. helps us see others’ perceptions of us

10) William James said that the self had three components. What are they?

a. Material Self__________________

b. Social Self__________________

c. _Spiritual Self_________________

11) Self-esteem decreases between elementary school and high school.

_____ True ___X__ False

12) “When you talk to me like that, it makes me feel depressed. I don’t know if you are having a bad day or you don’t feel well or I’ve done something to upset you. What is the reason?” This is an example of:

_____ a. indirect perception checking

_____b. intrapersonal communication

_____c. self-talk

_____d. direct perception checking

_____ e. taking the bull by the horns

13) Self-reflexiveness means that we are able to think about what we’re doing while we are doing it.

__X___ True _____ False

14) Three strategies for enhancing self-esteem are

_________________________________

_________________________________

_________________________________

15) The “model trap” is a preferable form of social comparison.

_____ True _____ False

16) When in a conflict situation, separate behaviors from persons in order to create a supportive climate.

_____ True _____ False

17) Words have the power to create or destroy relationships.

_____ True _____ False

18) The perception process consists of which of the following stages?

_____ a. attention and selection, organization, interpretation

_____b. organization, visualization, interpretation

_____ c. attribution, organization, selection

_____ d. attention and selection, reframing, closure

19) Approaches to “knowing”, called theories, include these three components. Match them with their definitions.

_____ ontology a. gathering data; how we know things

_____ axiology b. questions about truth; the nature of reality

_____ epistemology c. values; what is worth knowing

20) According to the textbook, visualization occurs when we see ourselves failing.

_____ True _____ False

21) What you say is who you are.

____ True _____ False

22) When the sender’s and receiver’s meanings are not the same because words mean different things to different people, the communication problem is called ________________.

23) Match the following:

_____ gunny-sacking a. nonverbal behaviors that contradict, accent, or complement the message

_____ artifacts b. help us satisfy a personal need or change to meet the immediate situation

_____ kinesics c. nonverbal cues that have widely understood meanings in a particular culture

_____ emblems d human movements, gestures, and posture

_____ illustrators e. nonverbal cues that communicate emotion

_____ affect displays f. dredging up someone’s past mistakes and linking them to the current situation

_____ adaptors g. displays of culture

24) When Ron was growing up, he heard his parents talking with others about being a Democrat. When Ron was older, he voted Democrat in every election. His self-concept is being influenced by his:

_____ a. assumed role

_____ b. self-label

_____ c. intrapersonal communications

_____ d. stereotyping

_____ e. association with groups

25) People tend to use words involuntarily, without really thinking about them.

_____ True _____ False

26) When two people in a relationship use nicknames, such as “my little pookie” or “snuggle-buns”, they are using language to:

_____ a. shape a culture of two people

_____ b. bring fantasy into a relationship

_____ c. create experience

_____ d. eradicate noise in a communication

27) People who are opposites or significantly different in dispositions and preferences may intrigue each other and teach each other something, but they don’t typically maintain a long-term relationship.

_____ True _____ False

28) Match the following:

_____ connotative a. I share, you share

_____ denotative b. cannot be perceived with one of our five senses

_____ abstract c. conveys feelings

_____ reciprocity d. me, me, and me

_____ conversational narcissism e. literal meaning

29) Words have two types of meanings:

_____ a. differential and referential

_____ b. denotative and connotative

_____c. sticks and stones

_____d. culture and context

30) Recent interviews with employers show that they are concerned about college graduates’ lack of language skills.

_____ True _____ False

31) Someone who constantly uses the same pick-up lines is violating which principle of communication?

_____ a. Principle 1

_____ b. Principle 2

_____ c. Principle 4

_____ d. Principle 5

32) Ty and Victoria are having an argument. Ty says to Victoria, “I see you crossing your arms and rolling your eyes. When I try to talk to you, you turn your head and sigh loudly. You do this all the time, and then wonder why people don’t like you. That’s why Makayla doesn’t like you anymore, and you know it. That’s why you keep ending up alone.” Ty has violated which of Gibbs’ recommendations?

_____ a. Be descriptive rather than evaluative.

_____ b. Solve problems rather than control others.

_____ c. Empathize rather than remain detached from others.

_____ d. Avoid gunny-sacking.

33) Austin is a skillful communicator. His logic is hard to argue with. But his nonverbal communication indicates something different than what he is saying. Which will people believe more?

_____ what he says _____ what he does

34) The Johari Window uses a model of five squares to help a person know himself or herself better.

_____ True _____ False

35) Which of the following is the most abstract:

_____ baked potato

_____ dinner

_____ grilled cheese

_____ food

36) When receiving a compliment, it is best to

_____ a. just say “thank you”

_____ b. agree with the compliment

_____ c. attempt to show modesty by disagreeing with the complimenter

_____ d. always give a compliment in return, even if you have to search for something

37) One leading researcher said that _________ is the largest single factor determining the kinds of relationship we have with others.

_____ a. relationships with childhood friends

_____ b. the type of books we read

_____ c. what we think about

_____ d. family relationships

38) Cara wondered if her boyfriend wanted to break up with her. She didn’t come right out and ask him, but she paid close attention to how he looked at her, what he said to her, and how he acted when they were with friends. What method was Cara using to check her perception of her boyfriend?

_____ a. active perception checking

_____ b. direct perception checking

_____c. avoidant perception checking

_____d. indirect perception checking

39) The touch ethic you have as an adult was most likely formed during your early family experiences.

_____ True _____ False

40) Match the following:

_____ polarization a. language used just to impress others or project an image

_____allness b. when words reflect unqualified generalizations of others

_____ exclusive c. describing things in extremes with any middle ground

_____ trigger words d. language that arouses strong emotion in listeners

_____ bafflegab e. favors one sex over/against another

41) Your Learning Team values team collaboration. This is part of:

_____ a. an individualistic culture

_____ b. intercultural communication

_____ c. a collectivistic culture

_____ d. a high-context culture

42) Joachim and Robert were best friends. They did everything together. But after Robert moved to another city, they have not been as close. Joachim’s friend Angela doesn’t understand what the problem is. She tells Joachim she has had no problem staying close to her friends after they moved. This difference is because men build closeness through:

_____ a. low disclosure

_____ b. high disclosure

_____ c. shared activities

_____ d. talking

43) A group with a strong, highly credible leader is less likely to engage in group-think.

_____ True _____ False

44) In U.S. culture, people do not think in neuter, but rather in terms of male or female.

_____ True _____ False

45) A language is a system of _____ structured by _____ and _____ common to a _____ of people.

_____ a. words, experience, syntax, community

_____ b. symbols, grammar, syntax, community

_____ c. symbols, grammar, rules, community

_____ d. words, grammar, rules, community

46) What you say is more believable than what you do.

_____ True _____ False

47) What are two ways to communicate emotion in email?

_______________________________ _______________________________

48) Americans make judgments about a person, especially concerning trustworthiness and sincerity, based on whether or not they make or avoid eye contact.

_____ True _____ False

49)_____ is the study of human touch.

_____ a. massage therapy

_____ b. retail therapy

_____ c. response latency

_____ d. haptics

50) We have expectations for appropriate nonverbal behavior based on:

_____ a. self-talk and perception checking

_____ b. our cultural background, personal experience, and knowledge of the person

_____ c. parental expectations

_____ d. indirect perception checking, attention, and syntax

51) We hear over one billion words each year, but we only understand 3/4ths of them.

_____ True _____ False

52) What are the four types of listening styles described in the COM/100 textbook?

____________________________

____________________________

____________________________

____________________________

53) Jerome wants to impress a young lady he met, so he buys her flowers. He wants to sit and have a conversation with her, but is worried about misinterpreting her messages and ruining a relationship with her. Jerome is suffering from:

_____ a. perception checking

_____ b. empathy

_____ c. receiver apprehension

_____ d. quasi-courtship

54) Match the following:

_____ kinesics a. study of how near or far we stand from someone while speaking to that person

_____ response latency b. pitch, rate, and volume at which you speak

_____ proximics c. amount of time it takes someone to answer a question

_____paralanguage d. study of human movement, gesture, and posture

55) Focusing on the thoughts of another, as opposed to one’s own thoughts, is called decentering.

_____ True _____ False

56) When you are presented with information that is inconsistent with your current thinking

or feelings, you experience a kind of mental discomfort called:

_____ a. emotional distress

_____ b. ethical imbalance

_____ c. cognitive dissonance

_____ d. self-actualization disharmony

57) Masculine cultures value relationships, while female cultures value achievement.

_____ True _____ False

58) Match the following:

_____Ethnocentrism a. focused on ourselves and our importance

_____Stereotyping b. judgment based on the assumption that we already know everything we need about a person

_____Prejudice c. placing someone in an inflexible, all-encompassing category

_____Egocentric d. the attitude that our own cultural approaches are superior to those of other cultures

59) North Americans tend to have a low-context culture.

_____ True _____ False

60) Feeling the emotional reaction that the other person may be experiencing is called sympathy. Telling others that you are sorry that they feel what they are feeling is called empathy.

_____ True _____ False

61) You will most likely interact with people from different cultural backgrounds because of increased interconnectedness. This is called:

_____ a. culture shock

_____ b. University of Phoenix learning teams

_____ c. decentralized values

_____ d. globalization

62) The matching hypothesis states that we seek out individuals:

_____ a. at the same level of physical attractiveness as we view ourselves

_____ b. from the same culture

_____ c. whose values are the same as ours

_____ d. who are shorter than we are, if we’re male, and taller than we are, if we’re female

63) What are the five steps of relational escalation?

______________________

______________________

______________________

______________________

______________________

64) Charlene and friend went to a seminar together. When they entered the auditorium, Charlene looked around at the other attendees and whispered to her friend, “I’d feel strange trying to talk to anyone else here. They’re from all different, interesting places and I’m sure they all speak English. But there’s really nothing we can talk about.” Charlene’s dilemma can best be ascribed to:

_____ a. different communication codes

_____ b. assuming differences

_____ c. prejudice

_____ d. decentering

65) When you try to understand someone from another culture by remembering how that person has responded in similar situations, you are:

_____ a. practicing mindfulness

_____ b. tolerating ambiguity

_____ c. practicing social decentering

_____ d. asking questions

66) Match the following:

______ Generation X a. born after 2002

______ Baby Boomers b. born between 1982-2002

______ Post millennials/Digital Natives/Gen Z c. born between 1943-1960

______ Silent Generation d. born between 1925-1942

______ Millennials/Peter Pan Generation e. born between 1961-1981

67) Globalization, the integration of economics and technology that is contributing

to a worldwide, interconnected business environment, is changing the way we work

and relate to people around the world.

_____ True _____ False

68) Match the following:

_____ operationalize a. the study of what is worth knowing/values

_____ ontology b. researchers immerse themselves in study subjects’ lives to discover culturally distinct patterns of communication

_____ epistemology c. making an abstract concept measureable and observable

_____ axiology d. what is human nature

_____ ethnography e. the study of how we know what we know

69) Wynn is worried about sales in her business, along with a rise in supply prices. She needs to reduce costs by 10%. Wynn is deciding whether to lay off two of her 15 employees, ask employees to agree to a 7% reduction in pay, find other suppliers, or let employees know she will no longer be able to provide health benefits. This process, where different alternatives are considered to reach the same goal, is an example of:

_____ a. deductive reasoning

_____ b. inductive reasoning

_____ c. equifinality

_____ d. positivistic theory

70) A concept used in groups to help them reach shared understanding of important issues is called:

_____ a. the Delphi technique

_____ b. concept attainment

_____ c. reflection zone

_____ d. Johari window

Each answer is worth 1.4 points out of 100.

Categories
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faw phoenix ecampus

ONLINE ACADEMIC CATALOG

Volume 50 July 1, 2016 through June 30, 2017 catalog

With Updates Added: March 1, 2017

(see addenda pages for a summary of updates added by month)

“As we move to meet the educational needs of working adults in a mobile society, our conception of the university must extend beyond place and embrace process. An adult university cannot be campus bound, rather its borders must be defined by the lives of

its students.”

Dr. John G. Sperling

Founder

Information contained in this catalog is subject to change at the discretion of the University of Phoenix without prior notification.

Unless specifically stated otherwise in a particular Catalog policy, in the event of any inconsistency or conflict between the informa- tion contained in this catalog and any other material, the information contained in the catalog shall take precedence.

The University of Phoenix is not responsible for information or claims made by individuals not affiliated with the University that is contrary to University of Phoenix published material.

Annual Security Report Notice

The University of Phoenix annual security report includes statistics for the previous three years concerning reported crimes that occurred on campus, in certain off-campus buildings or property owned or controlled by the University, and on public property

within, or immediately adjacent to and accessible from, the campus. The report also includes the sex offender registry, institutional policies concerning alcohol and drug use, crime prevention, the reporting of crimes, sexual assault, and other related matters. You

can obtain a copy of this report by contacting your local Campus Security Authority or by accessing the following Web site: http://www.phoenix.edu/about_us/campus-safety.html.

University of Phoenix is authorized by the Washington Student Achievement Council and meets the requirements and minimum educational standards established for degree-granting institutions under the Degree-Granting Institutions Act. This authorization is subject to periodic review and authorizes University of Phoenix to offer specific degree programs. The Council may be contacted for a list of currently authorized programs. Authorization by the Council does not carry with it an endorsement by the Council of the institution or its programs. Any person desiring information about the requirements of the act or the applicability of those require-

ments to the institution may contact the Council at P.O Box 43430, Olympia, WA 98504-3430.

University of Phoenix is authorized by the Tennessee Higher Education Commission. This authorization must be renewed each year and is based on an evaluation by minimum standards concerning quality of education, ethical business practices, health

and safety, and fiscal responsibility.

University of Phoenix is registered with the Minnesota Office of Higher Education pursuant to Minnesota Statutes sections 136A.61 to 136A.71. Registration is not an endorsement of the institution. Credits earned at the institution may not transfer to all other institutions. Minnesota residents may enroll in the following programs: Associate of Arts/Concentration in General Stud- ies, Associate of Arts/Concentration in Communications, Associate of Arts/Concentration in Accounting, Associate of Arts/Con-

centration in Hospitality, Travel and Tourism, Associate of Arts/Concentration in Foundations of Business, Associate of Arts/ Concentration in Accounting, Associate of Arts/Concentration in Hospitality, Travel and Tourism, Associate of Arts/Concentra- tion in Human Services Management, Associate of Arts in Psychology, Associate of Arts/Concentration in Health Care Adminis-

tration, Associate of Arts/Concentration in Health Care Administration/Medical Records, Associate of Arts/Concentration in Criminal Justice, Associate of Arts/Concentration in Information Technology, Associate of Arts/Concentration in Information

Technology/Networking, Associate of Arts/Concentration in Information Technology/Programming, Associate of Arts/Concen- tration in Information Technology/Web Design, Associate of Arts/Concentration in Information Technology/Information Tech-

nology Support, Bachelor of Science in Communication, Bachelor of Arts in English, Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science, Bachelor of Science in Psychology, Bachelor of Science in Health Administration, Bachelor of Science in Criminal Jus-

tice Administration, Bachelor of Science in Organizational Security and Management, The Bachelor of Science in Business, Bachelor of Science in Management, Bachelor of Science in Management Concentration in Manufacturing Sector, Bachelor of Science in Accounting, Bachelor of Science in Information Technology, Bachelor of Science in Nursing, Master of Science in

Psychology, Master of Health Administration, Master of Health Administration Bridge, Master of Health Administration/Edu- cation, Master of Health Administration/Education Bridge, Master of Health Administration/Gerontology, Master of Health

Administration/Gerontology Bridge, Master of Health Administration/Informatics, Master of Health Administration/Informat- ics Bridge, Master of Science/Administration of Justice and Security, Master of Science/Administration of Justice and Security

Bridge, Master of Business Administration, Master of Public Administration, Master of Management, Master of Science in Accountancy, Master of Science in Nursing, Master of Science in Nursing/Specialization in Nursing/Health Care Education,

Master of Science in Nursing/Specialization in Informatics, Master of Science in Nursing and Master of Health Administration, Doctor of Management in Organizational Leadership, Doctor of Management in Organizational Leadership with a specializa-

tion in Information Systems and Technology, Doctor of Health Administration, Visual Communication Certificate, Information Systems Security Certificate, APLUS Fundamentals Certificate, Information Systems Security Minor, Multimedia and Visual Communication Minor, Graduate Health Care Informatics Certificate, Gerontology Health Care Certificate, Graduate Certifi-

cate in Human Resources Management, Graduate Accounting Certificate, Graduate Marketing Certificate

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. ADDENDUM – SUMMARY OF POLICY UPDATES ADDED TO THE CATALOG ON MARCH 1, 2017 ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. GENERAL POLICY UPDATES

• The Consumer Information section was updated. (see CONSUMER INFORMATION)

• The eCampus: Student and Faculty Portal section was updated. (see THE UNIVERSITY’S TEACHING AND LEARNING MODEL)

• The University of Phoenix Board of Trustees and the University of Phoenix Senior Administration were updated. (see UNIVERSITY ADMINISTRATION)

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. PROGRAM POLICY UPDATES

• The Additional Admission Requirements section of the CERT/G-HCS was updated. (see PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS)

• The Additional Admission Requirements section of the GHC was updated. (see PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS)

• The Additional Admission Requirements section of the HCI was updated. (see PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS)

University of Phoenix, 2016-2017

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. TABLE OF CONTENTS

ADDENDUM – SUMMARY OF POLICY UPDATES ADDED TO THE CATALOG ON MARCH 1, 2017 …. iii GENERAL POLICY UPDATES……………………………………………………………………………………………. iii PROGRAM POLICY UPDATES…………………………………………………………………………………………… iii

UNIVERSITY OF PHOENIX ………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 1 Official School Colors ………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 1 Ownership Information……………………………………………………………………………………………………… 1 Our Mission Statement …………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 1 Our Purpose …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 1 Accreditation and Affiliations……………………………………………………………………………………………… 2 Academic Programs ………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 2 Enrollment and Student Profile ………………………………………………………………………………………….. 2 University Library …………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 3 Current Resources of the University Library………………………………………………………………………… 3

THE UNIVERSITY’S TEACHING AND LEARNING MODEL……………………………………………………………… 5 Active Learning ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 5 Collaboration…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 5 Emphasis on Application and Relevance ……………………………………………………………………………. 5 University-Wide Learning Goals ………………………………………………………………………………………… 5 Curriculum ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 5 Awarding Credit Hours……………………………………………………………………………………………………… 5 Access and Convenience of Time and Place ………………………………………………………………………. 6 Program Format………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 6 Class Size………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 6 Learning Teams………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 6 Faculty …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 7 Staff Screening ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 7 Student Technology Recommendations and Competencies………………………………………………….. 7 eCampus: Student and Faculty Portal ………………………………………………………………………………… 8 Classroom Recording Policy……………………………………………………………………………………………… 8

UNIVERSITY POLICIES……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 9 Calendar ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 9 Course Equivalencies ………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 9 Course Cancellation ………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 9 Directed Study ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 9 Concurrent Enrollment……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 10 Multiple University Degrees …………………………………………………………………………………………….. 10 Maximum Credit Limits …………………………………………………………………………………………………… 10 Course Credits………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 10 Student Identification Numbers………………………………………………………………………………………… 10 Name and Social Security Number Changes …………………………………………………………………….. 11 Letter Request ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 11 Forms…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 11

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University of Phoenix, 2016-2017

Record Maintenance………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 11 Duplication of Credit……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 11 Course Audit Policy………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 11 Servicemember Readmission ………………………………………………………………………………………….. 11 Military Deployment ……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 12 Transient Student Policy …………………………………………………………………………………………………. 13 Acceptable Transfer Activity ……………………………………………………………………………………………. 13 Evaluation of Transfer Activity …………………………………………………………………………………………. 14 Servicemembers Opportunity College ………………………………………………………………………………. 15 Nondiscrimination Policy…………………………………………………………………………………………………. 15 Harassment Policy …………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 15 Disability Services………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 16 Student Organizations ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 16 Acceptable Use of University Computing and Communication Resources …………………………….. 18 Do Not Call Policies ……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 19 Institutional Review Board ………………………………………………………………………………………………. 20 Research, Scholarship, and Surveys………………………………………………………………………………… 20

CONSUMER INFORMATION ……………………………………………………………………………………………………… 23 ABOUT UNIVERSITY OF PHOENIX ………………………………………………………………………………….. 23

Accreditation, Licensures, Reviews and Approvals …………………………………………………………….. 23 Academic Programs, Facilities and Instructional Personnel Information ………………………………… 24 Articulation Agreements………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 25 Credit Transfer ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 25 Disability Services………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 25 General Contact Information……………………………………………………………………………………………. 25 Student Borrowing …………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 25 Graduation Rates…………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 25 Retention Rates …………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 26 Student Diversity……………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 27 Title II of Higher Education Act-Academic Year 2014-2015………………………………………………….. 28 Federal Financial Aid Application Process…………………………………………………………………………. 29 Statement of Educational Purpose …………………………………………………………………………………… 30 Federal, State and Institutional Financial Aid Programs ………………………………………………………. 30 Grant Programs …………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 30 Scholarships …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 33 Loans …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 33 Financial Aid Awarding …………………………………………………………………………………………………… 35 Verification ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 36 Cost of Attendance Policy……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 37 Grade-Level Determination……………………………………………………………………………………………… 39 Conflicting Information ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 40 Other Resources……………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 40 Satisfactory Academic Progress ………………………………………………………………………………………. 40 Professional Judgment …………………………………………………………………………………………………… 43 Determining Enrollment at the University…………………………………………………………………………… 43 Course Attendance Policy……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 43 Leave of Absence ………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 44

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University of Phoenix, 2016-2017

Financial Aid Disbursements …………………………………………………………………………………………… 46 Federal Financial Aid Counseling …………………………………………………………………………………….. 47 Federal Loan Repayment ……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 47 Military Benefits …………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 48 Student Financial Responsibilities, Policies and Options …………………………………………………….. 50 Withdrawing from the University ………………………………………………………………………………………. 51 Return of Title IV Policy ………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 52 Tuition Refund Policy……………………………………………………………………………………………………… 52 Consumer Policies and Codes of Conduct ………………………………………………………………………… 55 Solomon Act …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 58 Gainful Employment Disclosures……………………………………………………………………………………… 58 Student Loan Code of Conduct ……………………………………………………………………………………….. 58 Consumer Privacy Policy………………………………………………………………………………………………… 59 State Authorization and Contact Information for Filing Complaints ……………………………………….. 60 Copyright Infringement and Peer-to-Peer File Sharing Policy ………………………………………………. 61 Digital Millennium Copyright Act Policy (DMCA) ………………………………………………………………… 63 Vaccinations and Immunizations ……………………………………………………………………………………… 63 Register to Vote …………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 64 Campus Safety and Security …………………………………………………………………………………………… 64 Campus Crime Statistics ………………………………………………………………………………………………… 64

APPENDIX- FINANCIAL AID POLICIES……………………………………………………………………………… 67 Academic Year Definition Policy………………………………………………………………………………………. 67 Advancing Programs Policy…………………………………………………………………………………………….. 67 Allowable Charges Policy ……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 68 Campus-Based Programs Policy……………………………………………………………………………………… 69 Cost of Attendance Policy……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 71 Consortium Agreements Policy ……………………………………………………………………………………….. 72 Direct Loan Policy………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 72 Disbursements Policy …………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 74 External Transfer Policy………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 76 Federal Financial Aid Credit Balance Policy………………………………………………………………………. 78 Federal Pell Grant-IASG Policy ……………………………………………………………………………………….. 79 Financial Aid Counseling Policy……………………………………………………………………………………….. 80 HEROES Act Policy……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 82 Leave of Absence Policy ………………………………………………………………………………………………… 83 Overawards and Overpayments Policy …………………………………………………………………………….. 84 Packaging Policy …………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 86 Private Loan Policy ………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 87 Professional Judgement Policy………………………………………………………………………………………… 87 Program Changes Policy ………………………………………………………………………………………………… 88 Re-Entry Policy ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 90 Return of Title IV Policy ………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 91 Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) Policy……………………………………………………………………. 94 Student Parent Eligibility Policy ……………………………………………………………………………………….. 97 Subsequent ISIRs Policy ………………………………………………………………………………………………. 100 TEACH Grant Program Policy ……………………………………………………………………………………….. 100 Verification Policy ………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 101 Withdrawal Policy ………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 106

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University of Phoenix, 2016-2017

STUDENTS’ RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES ………………………………………………………………………… 109 Policy on Nursing Ethics and Professional Competence ……………………………………………………. 109 Students’ Right to Privacy……………………………………………………………………………………………… 109

STUDENT CODE OF CONDUCT …………………………………………………………………………………….. 110 Code of Academic Integrity……………………………………………………………………………………………. 111 Student Records Violations……………………………………………………………………………………………. 113 Title IX and Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) Policy………………………………………………….. 114 University of Phoenix Professional Standards for Candidates in the School of Nursing …………. 116 University of Phoenix Supplemental Standards for Candidates in College of Social Sciences Counseling and Human Services Programs ………………………………………………………. 118 University of Phoenix Supplemental Standards for Candidates in College of Education Programs ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 119 University of Phoenix Supplemental Standards for Students/Candidates in School of Advanced Studies Programs …………………………………………………………………………………………. 119

DISPUTE RESOLUTION POLICY AND PROCEDURES …………………………………………………….. 120 Step One: Internal Resolution………………………………………………………………………………………… 120 Step Two: Mediation …………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 121 Step Three: Binding Arbitration………………………………………………………………………………………. 121 Complaints to the Texas Education Agency …………………………………………………………………….. 121

ACADEMIC POLICIES …………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 123 Academic Advisement ………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 123 Registration…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 123 Admission Statuses ……………………………………………………………………………………………………… 123 Student Academic Standing…………………………………………………………………………………………… 124 Program Academic Standing …………………………………………………………………………………………. 125 Course Statuses ………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 125 Candidacy Statuses ……………………………………………………………………………………………………… 125 Enrollment Status…………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 126 Student Falsification of Information…………………………………………………………………………………. 126 On-Camera Conduct Policy …………………………………………………………………………………………… 126 General Grievances ……………………………………………………………………………………………………… 126 Academically-Related Appeals – Student Appeals Center (SAC) ………………………………………… 127 Grading Procedures……………………………………………………………………………………………………… 127 Program and Cumulative Grade Point Average………………………………………………………………… 128 Grade Reports and Transcripts………………………………………………………………………………………. 128 Grade Disputes and Grade Corrections…………………………………………………………………………… 129 Program Changes………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 129 Graduation Application and Credential Conferral ……………………………………………………………… 129 Braille Embossed Diplomas …………………………………………………………………………………………… 129 Posthumous Degrees …………………………………………………………………………………………………… 129 Degree Posting ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 129 Graduation with Honors ………………………………………………………………………………………………… 129 Participation in Commencement Ceremony …………………………………………………………………….. 129 Program Completion Deadlines ……………………………………………………………………………………… 130 Disclaimer on Job Placement ………………………………………………………………………………………… 130

ACADEMIC QUALITY AND OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT ……………………………………………………………. 131

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University of Phoenix, 2016-2017

Academic Quality and Outcomes Assessment-Ensuring Consistent Quality ………………………… 131 Academic Quality Improvement and Outcomes-based Assessment……………………………………. 131

UNIVERSITY OF PHOENIX ALUMNI ASSOCIATION ………………………………………………………………….. 133

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS……………………………………………………………………………………………… 135 Admission Procedures………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 135 Undergraduate Admission Requirements………………………………………………………………………… 136 Residency Requirements and Course Waivers for Bachelor Programs ……………………………….. 138 Residency Requirements and Course Waivers for Associate Programs………………………………. 138 University Orientation Workshops ………………………………………………………………………………….. 139 Risk Free Period Policy ………………………………………………………………………………………………… 139 Academic Progression Requirements …………………………………………………………………………….. 139 Waivers………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 140 General Education ……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 140 Prior Learning Assessment……………………………………………………………………………………………. 142 Program Length …………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 143

COLLEGE OF HUMANITIES AND SCIENCES ………………………………………………………………….. 145 Associate of Arts/Professional Focus ……………………………………………………………………………… 145 Associate of Arts/Professional Focus (Minnesota) ……………………………………………………………. 147 Bachelor of Science in Communication …………………………………………………………………………… 149 Bachelor of Arts in English…………………………………………………………………………………………….. 152 Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science ………………………………………………………………… 156

COLLEGE OF SECURITY AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE ………………………………………………………… 161 Associate of Arts in Criminal Justice……………………………………………………………………………….. 161 Associate of Arts in Criminal Justice (Minnesota)……………………………………………………………… 163 Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice Administration……………………………………………………… 166 Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice Administration (Maryland-Online) …………………………… 170 Bachelor of Science in Public Administration …………………………………………………………………… 173

COLLEGE OF SOCIAL SCIENCES………………………………………………………………………………….. 177 Bachelor of Science in Correctional Program Support Services …………………………………………. 177

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS………………………………………………………………………………………………… 181 Associate of Arts/Concentration in Accounting Fundamentals ……………………………………………. 181 Associate of Arts/Concentration in Accounting Fundamentals (Minnesota) ………………………….. 183 Associate of Arts/Concentration in Accounting Fundamentals (Certificate Track) …………………. 184 Associate of Arts/Concentration in Accounting Fundamentals (Certificate Track) (Minnesota) .. 187 Associate of Arts/Concentration in Business Fundamentals ………………………………………………. 189 Associate of Arts/Concentration in Business Fundamentals (Minnesota) …………………………….. 191 The Bachelor of Science in Business ……………………………………………………………………………… 193 The Bachelor of Science in Business (Maryland-Online) …………………………………………………… 196 Bachelor of Science in Management ………………………………………………………………………………. 202 Bachelor of Science in Management Concentration in Manufacturing Sector……………………….. 204 Bachelor of Science in Management Emphasis in Manufacturing Sector (Maryland-Online) ….. 207 Bachelor of Science in Accounting …………………………………………………………………………………. 209 Bachelor of Science/Concentration in Accounting (Ohio)…………………………………………………… 212

COLLEGE OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND TECHNOLOGY …………………………………………. 217 Associate of Arts/Concentration in Information Technology ……………………………………………….. 217 Associate of Arts/Emphasis in Information Technology (Maryland-Online) …………………………… 219

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Associate of Arts/Concentration in Information Technology (Minnesota) ……………………………… 221 Associate of Arts in Security Management ………………………………………………………………………. 224 Associate of Arts in Security Management (Minnesota) …………………………………………………….. 226 Bachelor of Science in Security Management ………………………………………………………………….. 229 The Bachelor of Science in Organizational Security and Management………………………………… 232 Bachelor of Science in Information Technology………………………………………………………………… 235

COLLEGE OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS ………………………………………………………………………….. 239 School of Health Services Administration ………………………………………………………………………….. 239

The Bachelor of Science in Health Administration…………………………………………………………….. 239 The Bachelor of Science in Health Administration (Maryland-Online) ………………………………….. 243 The Bachelor of Science in Health Administration (Certificate Track) (Maryland-Online) ……….. 246

School of Nursing …………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 249 Accreditation- School of Nursing Programs ……………………………………………………………………… 249 International Nursing Honor Society ……………………………………………………………………………….. 249 Academic Progression Requirements for all Current Nursing Programs (excluding BSN/I) …….. 249 Bachelor of Science in Nursing………………………………………………………………………………………. 251 Bachelor of Science in Nursing/International ……………………………………………………………………. 253 Bachelor of Science in Nursing Partner …………………………………………………………………………… 256 Bachelor of Science in Nursing Partner (California) ………………………………………………………….. 259

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION (Online)………………………………………………………………………………… 263 Admission Requirements for University of Phoenix …………………………………………………………… 263 Bachelor of Science in Education/Elementary Education …………………………………………………… 265 Bachelor of Science in Education/Elementary Education (Hawaii) ………………………………………. 270 Bachelor of Science in Liberal Studies (California)……………………………………………………………. 274 Bachelor of Science in Education/Early Childhood Education…………………………………………….. 279 Bachelor of Science in Education/Educational Studies ……………………………………………………… 284 Bachelor of Science in Education/Elementary Education (Florida)………………………………………. 285

GRADUATE PROGRAMS………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 291 Admission Procedures ………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 291 Graduate Admission Requirements ………………………………………………………………………………… 292 Program Length …………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 294

COLLEGE OF SECURITY AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE…………………………………………………………. 295 Master of Science/Administration of Justice and Security ………………………………………………….. 295 Master of Public Administration ……………………………………………………………………………………… 296

COLLEGE OF SOCIAL SCIENCES………………………………………………………………………………….. 299 Master of Science in Counseling Clinical Mental Health Counseling……………………………………. 299 Master of Science in Counseling Clinical Mental Health Counseling (Utah)………………………….. 301 Master of Science in Counseling Clinical Mental Health Counseling (Nevada)……………………… 304 Master of Science in Psychology ……………………………………………………………………………………. 306 Master of Science in Psychology Concentration in Industrial-Organizational Psychology ………. 308

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ………………………………………………………………………………………………… 311 Master of Business Administration………………………………………………………………………………….. 311 Master of Business Administration (Certificate Track) ……………………………………………………….. 314 Master of Management …………………………………………………………………………………………………. 317 Master of Science in Accountancy………………………………………………………………………………….. 318

COLLEGE OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND TECHNOLOGY …………………………………………. 321 Master of Information Systems ……………………………………………………………………………………… 321

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COLLEGE OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS ………………………………………………………………………….. 323 School of Health Services Administration ………………………………………………………………………….. 323

Master of Health Administration……………………………………………………………………………………… 323 Master of Health Administration Concentration in Education ……………………………………………… 325 Master of Health Administration Concentration in Gerontology…………………………………………… 326 Master of Health Administration Concentration in Informatics…………………………………………….. 328 Master of Health Administration Concentration in Sustainability Management ……………………… 330 Dual Degree in Master of Health Administration/Master of Business Administration ……………… 332

School of Nursing …………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 334 Accreditation- School of Nursing Programs……………………………………………………………………… 334 International Nursing Honor Society ……………………………………………………………………………….. 334 Academic Progression Requirements for all Current Nursing Programs (excluding BSN/I)…….. 334 Master of Science in Nursing Concentration in Informatics ………………………………………………… 336 Master of Science in Nursing Concentration in Informatics Bridge………………………………………. 338 Master of Science in Nursing Concentration in Nurse Administration ………………………………….. 340 Master of Science in Nursing Concentration in Nurse Administration Bridge………………………… 342 Master of Science in Nursing Concentration in Nurse Administration-International ……………….. 345 Master of Science in Nursing Concentration in Nurse Education ………………………………………… 347 Master of Science in Nursing Concentration in Nurse Education Bridge………………………………. 349 Master of Science in Nursing Concentration in Nurse Education-International ……………………… 352

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION (Online) ……………………………………………………………………………….. 355 Admission Requirements………………………………………………………………………………………………. 355 Master of Arts in Education/Administration and Supervision ………………………………………………. 357 Master of Arts in Education/Administration and Supervision (Utah) …………………………………….. 359 Master of Arts in Education/Administration and Supervision (California) ……………………………… 362 Master of Arts in Education/Adult Education and Training …………………………………………………. 364 Master of Arts in Education/Elementary Teacher Education ………………………………………………. 366 Master of Arts in Education/Secondary Teacher Education ……………………………………………….. 370 Master of Arts in Education/Elementary Teacher Education (Hawaii) ………………………………….. 373 Master of Arts in Education/Secondary Teacher Education (Hawaii) …………………………………… 377 Master of Arts in Education/Elementary Teacher Education (California)………………………………. 380 Master of Arts in Education/Secondary Teacher Education (California)……………………………….. 384 Master of Arts in Education/Elementary Teacher Education (Utah) …………………………………….. 389 Master of Arts in Education/Secondary Teacher Education (Utah) ……………………………………… 392 Master of Arts in Education/Special Education (Hawaii)…………………………………………………….. 396 Master of Arts in Education/Special Education (Utah)……………………………………………………….. 399 Master of Arts in Education/Special Education…………………………………………………………………. 403 Master of Arts in Education/Educational Studies………………………………………………………………. 407 Master of Arts in Education/Curriculum and Instruction……………………………………………………… 408 Master of Arts in Education/Administration and Supervision (Florida)………………………………….. 409 Master of Arts in Education/Elementary Teacher Education (Florida)………………………………….. 412 Master of Arts in Education/Secondary Teacher Education (Florida) …………………………………… 415

SCHOOL OF ADVANCED STUDIES………………………………………………………………………………… 419 Admission Requirements………………………………………………………………………………………………. 419 Program Length …………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 420 Educational Specialist…………………………………………………………………………………………………… 421 Doctor of Education in Educational Leadership/Higher Education Administration …………………. 422 Doctor of Management in Organizational Leadership ……………………………………………………….. 425

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Doctor of Management in Organizational Leadership with a Specialization in Information Systems and Technology………………………………………………………………………………………………. 428 Doctor of Business Administration ………………………………………………………………………………….. 431 Doctor of Health Administration ……………………………………………………………………………………… 434 Doctor of Education in Educational Leadership ………………………………………………………………… 437 Doctor of Education in Educational Leadership/Curriculum and Instruction ………………………….. 439 Doctor of Education in Educational Leadership/Educational Technology……………………………… 442

PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS …………………………………………………………………………………………………. 447 CREDIT-BEARING CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS ……………………………………………………………….. 447

Admission Requirements ………………………………………………………………………………………………. 447 Program Length …………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 449

CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS FOR SCHOOL OF BUSINESS – UNDERGRADUATE……………….. 449 Business Analytics Certificate (Undergraduate) ……………………………………………………………….. 449 Hospitality Management Certificate (Undergraduate)………………………………………………………… 450 Retail Fundamentals Certificate (Undergraduate) …………………………………………………………….. 452 Hospitality Fundamentals Certificate (Undergraduate) ………………………………………………………. 453 Supply Chain Management Certificate (Undergraduate) ……………………………………………………. 455 Small Business Management and Entrepreneurship Certificate (Undergraduate) …………………. 456 Operations Management Certificate (Undergraduate)……………………………………………………….. 457 Marketing Certificate (Undergraduate)…………………………………………………………………………….. 459 Human Resource Management Certificate (Undergraduate) ……………………………………………… 460 General Management Certificate (Undergraduate)……………………………………………………………. 461 Project Management Certificate (Undergraduate) …………………………………………………………….. 463 Bookkeeping Fundamentals Certificate (Undergraduate)…………………………………………………… 464 Digital Marketing Certificate (Undergraduate)…………………………………………………………………… 466 Financial Planning Certificate (Undergraduate) ………………………………………………………………… 467

CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS FOR SCHOOL OF BUSINESS – GRADUATE…………………………… 469 Graduate Human Resource Management Certificate………………………………………………………… 469 Graduate Accounting Certificate …………………………………………………………………………………….. 470 Graduate Marketing Certificate ………………………………………………………………………………………. 471 Graduate CPA Bridge Certificate ……………………………………………………………………………………. 472 Graduate Project Management Certificate……………………………………………………………………….. 474

CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS FOR THE SCHOOL OF HEALTH SERVICES ADMINISTRATION. 475 Long Term Care Certificate Program………………………………………………………………………………. 475 Graduate Health Care Sustainability Management Certificate ……………………………………………. 476 Graduate Health Care Informatics Certificate …………………………………………………………………… 477 Gerontology Health Care Certificate Program ………………………………………………………………….. 478 Health Management Certificate Program…………………………………………………………………………. 479 Health and Wellness Administration Foundations Certificate (Undergraduate)……………………… 481 Electronic Health Records Fundamentals Certificate (Undergraduate) ………………………………… 482 Medical Records Certificate (Undergraduate)…………………………………………………………………… 484

CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS FOR THE SCHOOL OF NURSING ………………………………………… 486 Academic Progression Requirements for all Current Nursing Programs (excluding BSN/I) …….. 486 Post Master’s Certificate in Nurse Administration ……………………………………………………………… 487 Post Master’s Certificate in Nurse Administration International …………………………………………… 489 Post Master’s Certificate in Nurse Education……………………………………………………………………. 490 Post Master’s Certificate in Nurse Education International …………………………………………………. 492

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CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS FOR THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION……………………………………. 494 Alternative Pathway/Elementary Education (Hawaii)…………………………………………………………. 494 Alternative Pathway/Secondary Education (Hawaii)………………………………………………………….. 496 Alternative Pathway/Special Education (Hawaii) ………………………………………………………………. 498 Alternative Pathway/Elementary Education (Florida) ………………………………………………………… 500 Alternative Pathway/Secondary Education (Florida) …………………………………………………………. 501 Principal Licensure Certificate Program (Utah) ………………………………………………………………… 503

CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS FOR THE COLLEGE OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND TECHNOLOGY ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 505

Storage Management Certificate (Undergraduate)……………………………………………………………. 505 Advanced Cyber Security Certificate (Undergraduate)………………………………………………………. 507 Advanced Software Developer Certificate (Undergraduate)……………………………………………….. 508 Programming Certificate (Undergraduate)……………………………………………………………………….. 509 Advanced Networking Certificate (Undergraduate) …………………………………………………………… 511 Advanced Multimedia Development Certificate (Undergraduate)………………………………………… 512 Database Administration Certificate (Undergraduate) ……………………………………………………….. 514 Information Assurance and Security Certificate (Undergraduate) ……………………………………….. 515 Multimedia Development Certificate (Undergraduate)……………………………………………………….. 516 Cisco Networking Certificate (Undergraduate) …………………………………………………………………. 517 Desktop Support Certificate (Undergraduate) ………………………………………………………………….. 519 Network Support Certificate (Undergraduate) ………………………………………………………………….. 520 A+ Fundamentals Certificate …………………………………………………………………………………………. 521 Network+ Technologies Certificate ……………………………………………………………………………….. 522 Cisco Networking Fundamentals ……………………………………………………………………………………. 523 Graduate Cyber Security Certificate ……………………………………………………………………………….. 523 Graduate Business Analytics Certificate………………………………………………………………………….. 525 Graduate Information Systems Management Certificate……………………………………………………. 526 Enterprise Security Administration Certificate (Undergraduate) ………………………………………….. 527 Physical Security Operations Certificate (Undergraduate) …………………………………………………. 528 Critical Incident Response Certificate (Undergraduate) …………………………………………………….. 529 Asset Protection/Loss Prevention Certificate (Undergraduate) …………………………………………… 531 Certificate Awards………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 532 Accreditation and Affiliations………………………………………………………………………………………….. 532

NONCREDIT-BEARING PROGRAMS………………………………………………………………………………. 533

TUITION AND FEES – ONLINE RATES………………………………………………………………………………………. 535 UNDERGRADUATE TUITION PER CREDIT (ONLINE)………………………………………………………. 536 GRADUATE TUITION PER CREDIT (ONLINE) …………………………………………………………………. 538 FEES (Online) ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 539

FACILITIES …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. A-1

UNIVERSITY ADMINISTRATION ………………………………………………………………………………………………. A-5 University of Phoenix Board of Trustees…………………………………………………………………………….. A-5 University of Phoenix Senior Administration ……………………………………………………………………….. A-5 Enrollment Services Administration……………………………………………………………………………………. A-6 Operational Services ……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. A-6 Campus Administration ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. A-6

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FACULTY……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. A-9 COLLEGE OF HUMANITIES AND SCIENCES …………………………………………………………………… A-9

Assistant Dean……………………………………………………………………………………………………………… A-9 Dean of Faculty…………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. A-9 Dean of Assessment……………………………………………………………………………………………………… A-9 Campus College Chairs …………………………………………………………………………………………………. A-9 Program Managers ……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. A-9 Campus Area Chairs……………………………………………………………………………………………………… A-9

COLLEGE OF SECURITY AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE………………………………………………………….. A-9 Executive Dean…………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. A-9 Dean of Assessment……………………………………………………………………………………………………… A-9 Program Dean………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. A-9 Academic Dean…………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. A-9 Dean of Faculty…………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. A-9 Dean of Specialized Programs ……………………………………………………………………………………….. A-9 Assistant Dean of Specialized Programs………………………………………………………………………….. A-9 Dean of Operations……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. A-9 Assistant Dean of Operations …………………………………………………………………………………………. A-9 Campus College Chairs …………………………………………………………………………………………………. A-9 Program Managers ……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. A-9 Campus Area Chairs……………………………………………………………………………………………………… A-9

COLLEGE OF SOCIAL SCIENCES…………………………………………………………………………………… A-9 Executive Dean…………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. A-9 Regulatory Dean …………………………………………………………………………………………………………… A-9 Assistant Regulatory Dean …………………………………………………………………………………………….. A-9 Dean of Operations……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. A-9 Campus College Chairs …………………………………………………………………………………………………. A-9 Program Managers ……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. A-9 Campus Area Chairs…………………………………………………………………………………………………… A-10

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ……………………………………………………………………………………………….. A-11 Executive Dean…………………………………………………………………………………………………………… A-11 Academic Dean…………………………………………………………………………………………………………… A-11 Dean of Assessment……………………………………………………………………………………………………. A-11 Dean of Specialized Programs ……………………………………………………………………………………… A-11 Dean of Faculty…………………………………………………………………………………………………………… A-11 Dean of Operations……………………………………………………………………………………………………… A-11 Campus College Chairs ……………………………………………………………………………………………….. A-11 Program Managers ……………………………………………………………………………………………………… A-11 Campus Area Chairs……………………………………………………………………………………………………. A-11

COLLEGE OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND TECHNOLOGY ………………………………………… A-11 Executive Dean…………………………………………………………………………………………………………… A-11 Academic Dean…………………………………………………………………………………………………………… A-11 Dean of Faculty…………………………………………………………………………………………………………… A-11 Dean of Assessment……………………………………………………………………………………………………. A-11 Dean of Operations……………………………………………………………………………………………………… A-11 Dean of Specialized Programs ……………………………………………………………………………………… A-11 Assistant Dean of Specialized Programs………………………………………………………………………… A-11 Program Dean…………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. A-11 Assistant Dean of Operations ……………………………………………………………………………………….. A-11

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Dean of Technology…………………………………………………………………………………………………….. A-11 Campus College Chairs……………………………………………………………………………………………….. A-11 Campus Area Chairs …………………………………………………………………………………………………… A-11

COLLEGE OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS …………………………………………………………………………. A-11 Deans ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. A-11 School of Nursing Deans ……………………………………………………………………………………………… A-12 School of Nursing Program Managers……………………………………………………………………………. A-12 School of Nursing Campus College Chairs …………………………………………………………………….. A-12 School of Health Services Administration Deans …………………………………………………………….. A-12 School of Health Services Administration Campus College Chairs…………………………………….. A-12 School of Public Health Deans ……………………………………………………………………………………… A-12 Campus Area Chairs …………………………………………………………………………………………………… A-12

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION …………………………………………………………………………………………… A-13 Executive Dean…………………………………………………………………………………………………………… A-13 Dean of Operations……………………………………………………………………………………………………… A-13 Program Dean ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………. A-13 Regional Assistant Dean ……………………………………………………………………………………………… A-13 Dean of Assessment……………………………………………………………………………………………………. A-13 Dean of Faculty…………………………………………………………………………………………………………… A-13 Academic Dean ………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. A-13 Assistant Program Dean………………………………………………………………………………………………. A-13 Assistant Dean Regulatory Affairs …………………………………………………………………………………. A-13 Assistant Dean of Specialized Programs………………………………………………………………………… A-13 Campus College Chairs……………………………………………………………………………………………….. A-13 Program Managers ……………………………………………………………………………………………………… A-13 Campus Area Chairs ………………………………………………………………………………………………….. A-13

SCHOOL OF ADVANCED STUDIES……………………………………………………………………………….. A-13 Executive Dean…………………………………………………………………………………………………………… A-13 Dean of Assessment……………………………………………………………………………………………………. A-13 Associate Dean of Instruction ……………………………………………………………………………………….. A-13 Dean of Instruction………………………………………………………………………………………………………. A-13 Dean of Operations……………………………………………………………………………………………………… A-13 Program Dean ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………. A-13 Campus College Chairs……………………………………………………………………………………………….. A-13 Campus Area Chairs …………………………………………………………………………………………………… A-13

COURSE GUIDE- COURSE DESCRIPTIONS……………………………………………………………………………… B-1

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……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. UNIVERSITY OF PHOENIX

Beginnings — A Brief History In 1976, the leading edge of the Baby Boom generation was just turning 30. That same year saw the introduction of the first per- sonal computer, the Apple I — an event that signaled the birth of a new economic system in which intellectual capital would eventu- ally supplant industrial might as the dominant economic force. These milestones marked the beginning of a sea of change in higher education, though many (perhaps even most) within that system did not recognize it at the time. Considered together, these phenomena suggested that the jobs that would make up the workforce of the future were only just begin- ning to be created or imagined. In order to fill those jobs, the bulk of the new workforce would require higher-level knowledge and skills than those needed in a manufacturing economy. At the same time, the largest-ever age cohort of the population, adult learners, would be going through the stages of life during which they would be most affected by the coming economic dislocation and would need advanced education to adapt to these changes. It was in this historical context in 1976 that Dr. John Sperling, a Cambridge-educated economist and professor-turned-entrepre- neur, founded University of Phoenix. Sperling anticipated the con- fluence of technological, economic, and demographic forces that would in a very short time herald the return of ever larger numbers of adult learners to formal higher education. In the early 1970s, at San Jose State University in San Jose, Califor- nia, Sperling and several associates conducted field-based research in adult education. The focus of the research was to explore teach- ing/learning systems for the delivery of educational programs and services to adult learners who wished to complete or further their education in ways that complemented both their experience and current professional responsibilities. At that time colleges and uni- versities were organized primarily around serving the needs of the 18-22 year-old undergraduate student. That is not all that surpris- ing, given that the large majority of those enrolled were residential students of traditional college age, just out of high school. Accord- ing to Sperling adult learners were invisible on the traditional cam- pus and were treated as second-class citizens. Other than holding classes at night (and many universities did not even do this), no efforts were made to accommodate their needs. No university offices or bookstores were open at night. Students had to leave work during the day to enroll, register for classes, buy books or consult with their instructors and advisors. Classes were held two or three nights per week and parking was at the periph- ery of a large campus. The consequence, according to Dr. Sperling was that most adult learners were unable to finish a four-year pro- gram in less than eight years, or a two-year program in less than four years (Tucker, 1996, p. 5). Sperling’s research convinced him not only that these underserved learners were interested in furthering their educational goals, but also that this group differed from their more traditional counter- parts in significant ways. He saw a growing need for institutions that were sensitive to and designed around the learning character- istics and life situations of a different kind of learner population. He suggested ways for institutions to pioneer new approaches to curricular and program design, teaching methods, and student ser- vices. These beliefs eventually resulted in the creation of University of Phoenix, and they continue to this day to inspire the University’s mission, purpose, and strategies. As an institution, University of

Phoenix is unique in its single-minded commitment to the educa- tional needs of non-traditional students, who in fact today make up the majority (73 percent) of all college enrollees. This focus informs the University’s teaching and learning model approach to designing and providing student services, and academic and administrative structure. It also guides the institution as it plans and prepares to meet the needs of the next generation of learners. Over the last three and a half decades, the University of Phoenix has been cause-driven working to build an institution with the agility to address directly the shifting economic and academic chal- lenges that many students face. Dr. Sperling’s predictions concern- ing the innovations higher education would be required to make have come to pass. Today roughly 45 percent of all college students work at least part-time and approximately one quarter of all stu- dents have dependent children. The educational tenets set forth by Dr. Sperling in 1976 now apply to the majority of college students in the United States. The University’s growth has been fueled by constant innovation, and ongoing efforts to improve the learning experience through advanced technology. The University has grown from a degree- completion institution serving an audience of mostly middle man- agers wishing to complete their education and excel in the work- place, to a comprehensive university serving students of all ages from the associate through the doctoral degree levels.

……………………………………………………………………………….Official School Colors

University of Phoenix Official School Colors are University of Phoenix Red and University of Phoenix Platinum. These are custom colors and proprietary to the University.

……………………………………………………………………………….Ownership Information

University of Phoenix, Inc. is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Apollo Education Group, Inc. (the “Parent”). The Parent’s voting stock (Class B Common Stock) is 100 percent held by management. The Parent has one class of non-voting stock (Class A Common Stock) which is publicly traded on the NASDAQ Stock Exchange under the symbol “APOL”. The Parent files quarterly and annual finan- cial statements with the Securities and Exchange Commission and these are available to the general public. The University’s central administration offices are located in Phoenix, Arizona.

……………………………………………………………………………….Our Mission Statement

University of Phoenix provides access to higher education oppor- tunities that enable students to develop knowledge and skills nec- essary to achieve their professional goals, improve the performance of their organizations, and provide leadership and service to their communities.

……………………………………………………………………………….Our Purpose

• To facilitate cognitive and affective student learning-knowledge, skills, and values- and to promote use of that knowledge in the student’s workplace.

• To develop competence in communication, critical thinking, collaboration, and information utilization, together with a commitment to lifelong learning for enhancement of students’ opportunities for career success.

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University of Phoenix, 2016-2017

• To provide instruction that bridges the gap between theory and practice through faculty members who bring to their classroom not only advanced academic preparation, but also the skills that come from the current practice of their professions.

• To provide General Education and foundational instruction and services that prepare students to engage in a variety of university curricula.

• To use technology to create effective modes and means of instruction that expand access to learning resources and that enhance collaboration and communication for improved student learning.

• To assess student learning and use assessment data to improve the teaching/learning system, curriculum, instruction, learning resources, counseling, and student services.

• To be organized as a private institution in order to foster a spirit of innovation that focuses on providing academic quality, service, excellence, and convenience to the working student.

……………………………………………………………………………….Accreditation and Affiliations

Regional Accreditation University of Phoenix is accredited by The Higher Learning Com- mission (http://hlcommission.org).

The Higher Learning Commission 230 South LaSalle Street, Suite 7-500,

Chicago, Illinois 60604-1413 Phone: 800.621.7440 | 312.263.0456 | Fax: 312.263.7462

http://hlcommission.org

Program Accreditation School of Business and Business Programs University of Phoenix is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP) to offer business degrees in Associate of Arts/Concentration in Business Founda- tions, Associate of Arts/Concentration in Accounting Foundations, Bachelor of Science in Business, Bachelor of Science in Accounting, Master of Business Administration, Master of Management, Master of Science in Accountancy, Doctor of Business Administration, and Doctor of Management.

Accreditation Council for Business Schools & Programs (ACBSP) 11520 W. 119th Street

Overland Park, KS 66213 (913) 339-9356

http://www.acbsp.org

School of Nursing Programs The Bachelor of Science in Nursing and Master of Science in Nurs- ing programs are accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE).

CCNE One Dupont Circle, NW, Suite 530

Washington, DC 20036 (202) 887-6791

http://www.aacn.nche.edu/accreditation/

College of Education and Education Programs The College of Education has approval for education programs

through the following state agencies: • Arizona Department of Education • California Commission on Teacher Credentialing • Colorado Department of Education • Florida Department of Education • Hawaii Teacher Standards Board • Indiana Department of Education • Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education • New Mexico Public Education Department • Nevada Department of Education • Texas Education Agency • Utah State Office of Education Programs vary by state. Not all programs are approved in all states. The University also maintains voluntary memberships with numerous educational organizations, including the American Council on Education, the Association of American Colleges, the American Association for Adult and Continuing Education, the American Association for Higher Education, National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration, the Council for Adult and Experiential Learning, the College and University Per- sonnel Association, the Pacific Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers, the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers, the Independent Colleges and Universities of Arizona, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, National League for Nursing, the National Board for Cer- tified Counselors, the National Association for Foreign Student Admissions, Association of International Educators, the National Association of Veterans Program Administrators, the Service Mem- bers Opportunity College, and Defense Activity for Non–Tradi- tional Support. Additionally, the University maintains memberships in various professional, program specific organiza- tions.

……………………………………………………………………………….Academic Programs

Undergraduate and graduate programs at University of Phoenix are offered in business and management, nursing and health sci- ences, education, criminal justice, social sciences, natural sciences, humanities, and information technology. Undergraduate students are required to complete general education requirements that are distributed across traditional liberal arts categories and interdisci- plinary components. General Education requirements are described in greater detail in the Undergraduate Programs section of the catalog. Not all programs are offered at all campuses. Spe- cific programs offered are listed later in this catalog.

……………………………………………………………………………….Enrollment and Student Profile

As of the fourth quarter ending August 31, 2016, University of Phoenix had an enrollment of 142,500 students and had expanded to in excess of 125 campuses and learning centers in 36 U.S. States as well as locations in the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. Additionally, University of Phoenix offers degree programs glob- ally through its online delivery system. According to students responding to a registration survey during fiscal year 2015, the average student is in his or her mid-thirties. Gender of entering students is approximately 66 percent female and 34 percent male. Approximately 48 percent of entering stu- dents reporting belonged to an ethnic minority.

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University of Phoenix, 2016-2017 UNIVERSITY OF PHOENIX

……………………………………………………………………………….University Library

The University of Phoenix Approach to Library Services As busy working professionals, our students and faculty members know how difficult it can be to travel to a distant library and match their schedules to library building hours. To accommodate student and faculty needs, University of Phoenix offers library services online. This online distribution of information is well suited to the needs of today’s “knowledge workers” and offers a functional ver- sion of the types of information systems University of Phoenix stu- dents and faculty will be expected to use throughout their careers. The core of our library web site is a collection of digital resources available to all students and faculty at any time and from virtually any location where an Internet connection is available. In addition to our University Library, the library maintains selected links to other worthwhile sites on the web and provides user education and research assistance. The online distribution of information is not only optimally matched to the needs of working professionals, but also allows for equitable sharing of library resources among students and faculty members at all University of Phoenix learning centers and in our distance education programs. Instead of encountering disparities in library resources between large and small learning centers and between on-campus and online students, all library users enjoy access to the same broad spectrum of resources regardless of where and how they attend class. For more information, please see your Library Handbook or con- tact the University Library at library@phoenix.edu. What is in the University Library? Access to hundreds of thousands of eBooks, reference materials, scholarly journals, and periodicals all selected for their relevance to each University of Phoenix degree program are contained in the University Library’s resources. Financial reports on over 10,000 public companies and a variety of directories and other reference publications are also available. In addition, the University Library has a collection of multimedia available, including videos, images, and audio files, on a variety of topics. Many of the resources found in the University Library are academic products made available through license agreements with content providers and are not accessible to the general public like web pages found through an Internet search engine. Getting Started with the University Library To get started using the University Library, students and faculty members should follow these steps: • Visit the student and faculty website https://

ecampus.phoenix.edu/ • This is the same website used to obtain course modules,

grades, and other University of Phoenix resources and services.

• After logging into the student and faculty website, select the Library tab and then the University Library link to enter the University Library.

• Select an appropriate resource and begin research. Electronic Reserve Readings In addition to the University Library resources for research by topic, University Library staff members also maintain Electronic Reserve Readings for individual courses. These pages provide links to materials relevant to the course curriculum. Links to Elec- tronic Reserve Readings, when available, are listed on course pages within eCampus.

Additional Resources for Help • Reference services allow users to receive direct and in-depth

reference assistance from accredited librarians. • Interlibrary loan and documents retrieval services allow users to

request a document or book not available in the University Library. Specific timelines and rules apply to this service.

• Video based research tutorials provide users with timely information which build research skills.

• Resource recommendations by subject can be found by utilizing our Choose Resources by Subject and Subject Guides on the library homepage.

• The FAQs on the homepage of the University Library contain answers to “Frequently Asked Questions” received by the library.

• The Library Handbook includes detailed information on the library collection as well as helpful tips on conducting research.

How to Contact the University Library Student Technical Support 1-877-832-4867 Email library@phoenix.edu International students and faculty can reach Tech Support at 1-602- 387-2222. Callers should identify themselves as international stu- dents or faculty and give a call back number. Tech Support will call back to minimize phone charges.

……………………………………………………………………………….Current Resources of the University Library

For a current list of resources in the University Library, please refer to the Library Handbook. Students, staff, and faculty can also view the full listing of the University Library’s resources by clicking the View All Resources Alphabetically link on the University Library homepage.

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University of Phoenix, 2016-2017

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University of Phoenix, 2016-2017 THE UNIVERSITY’S TEACHING AND LEARNING MODEL

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………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. THE UNIVERSITY’S TEACHING AND LEARNING MODEL

The mission of University of Phoenix is to provide access to higher education opportunities that enable students to develop the knowl- edge and skills necessary to achieve their professional goals. As a result, the University’s teaching and learning model is grounded in the theoretical and empirical literature of learning and cognitive psychology. The University employs best practice from recent edu- cation literature, as well as best service practices that enhance the academic experience for students who are new to higher educa- tion. This combination increases student retention and successful degree completion.

……………………………………………………………………………….Active Learning

The model is based first on the assumption that the learner’s active involvement in the learning process is essential to good practice. Thus, in all modalities University of Phoenix classrooms are intended to be dynamic learning spaces. Instructors are expected to serve as facilitators of learning who manage the learning process by engaging learners in a variety of activities (lectures being but one) that lead students to an understanding of course content and the development of academic and professional competence. By involving students in a variety of learning activities, respect is demonstrated for diverse ways of learning and knowing. Interac- tion and participation in classes and Learning Teams is expected of those students in the bachelor and master degree programs. Stu- dents pursuing an associate degree online (excluding AACR & AAPF) are involved in collaborative learning activities, and a small number of courses may require participation in formal Learning Teams.

……………………………………………………………………………….Collaboration

The effectiveness of cooperation and collaboration in enhancing learning is well and widely documented. Structures that encourage and facilitate collaboration are central to the University’s teaching and learning model. Working students frequently come to formal learning activities with greater life and work experience. This means that learners themselves can be invaluable resources in enhancing their own and others’ learning. Traditional pedagogy emphasizes a top-down, vertical transfer of information. Students with rich and varied experience find benefit in instructional prac- tices that encourage collaboration. This adds a robust horizontal dimension to the learning exchange as students teach and learn from one another. Good practice in education capitalizes on this dimension to the students’ advantage.

……………………………………………………………………………….Emphasis on Application and Relevance

There is wide agreement in the literature that students learn best when bridges are built between new knowledge and the learners’ experience. Practices that encourage reflection and application are based on the recognition that a learner’s experience provides a con- text through which he or she is more able to construct meaning from new information. It also makes learning relevant to the learn- ers. In University of Phoenix courses, students’ experiences and current circumstances are interwoven with subject matter in class discussions as well as in individual, team and other collaborative assignments. Real-world relevance is critical to basic comprehen- sion as well as to maintaining student interest. Students very often say they are able to apply at work the next day what they learned in class the night before.

……………………………………………………………………………….University-Wide Learning Goals

The University’s faculty leadership has established five broad learning goals that guide curriculum development, instruction, learning assessment, and program evaluation and improvement. The University Learning Goals are: 1. Professional Competence and Values 2. Critical Thinking and Problem Solving 3. Communication 4. Information Utilization 5. Collaboration The intent is to help all University graduates attain levels of theo- retical and practical disciplinary knowledge appropriate to the lev- els of degrees or credentials they are earning, while developing competence in essential intellectual and social processes that will enable graduates to practice their professions successfully.

……………………………………………………………………………….Curriculum

The University’s curriculum is faculty-developed and centrally managed by a team of college staff and instructional designers with objectives and outcomes that are carefully defined. Individual instructors have the responsibility to expand and enhance the basic curriculum by augmenting it with current resources and practices. The curriculum is under continual content and quality review.

……………………………………………………………………………….Awarding Credit Hours

Credit hours are awarded in accordance with common practice among institutions of higher education. Course content and out- comes are determined by faculty and are delivered in a format informed by adult learning principles and aligned to Carnegie unit guidelines. One Carnegie hour is defined as 50 minutes of faculty directed or student directed activities. Achievement of outcomes related to the awarding of credit hours is measured using standard national benchmarks. The curriculum at University of Phoenix is faculty-developed and centrally managed. Instructional strategies include the use of syn- chronous and asynchronous activities inside and outside the online and/or physical classroom and are designed to be outcome focused and engaging. To ensure the appropriate level of curricu- lum coverage and rigor, students are required to participate in weekly classroom-based learning activities including direct faculty instruction and collaborative activities, and/or additional hours of faculty-directed student engagement using a variety of instruc- tional strategies and online learning activities, which are designed to support the course topics and objectives. The table below summarizes the minimum required number of hours of faculty-directed (instruction) and student directed (home- work) learning activity engagement for each credit award value at all credential levels. Additionally, the table includes the minimum course duration (in weeks) for each credit value necessary for fac- ulty to effectively cover course content, and for students to reason- ably assimilate the information, based upon federal guidelines and commonly accepted practices in higher education. All courses which award college credit shall conform to these minimum required hours.

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University of Phoenix, 2016-2017

University of Phoenix College Credit Bearing Course Recommendations

*Average hours per week, assumes student is generally taking one class at a time Doctoral residencies, laboratory work, internships, practica, studio work, student teaching, clinical hour, and other course formats as established by the University may deviate from the minimum required duration of a course in total weeks. However, alternatives of these course types leading to the award of credit hours must still reflect at least an equivalent amount of work (i.e., time on task) as outlined in policy. Program length is determined by faculty in accordance with com- mon practice among institutions of higher education. The follow- ing list reflects the minimum number of credits generally required at each credential level. Degree Level & Minimum Total Semester Credits: • Associate Degree: 60 credits • Bachelor Degree: 120 credits • Master’s Degrees: minimum 30 credits beyond the Bachelor

Degree • Ph.D. or Applied Doctorate: minimum 30 credits beyond the

Master’s Degree

……………………………………………………………………………….Access and Convenience of Time and Place

The University’s goal is to make access to programs and services available to all those who wish to avail themselves of them and to work to completion of a degree program. University of Phoenix campus-based programs are offered at times and in places that are convenient to adult learners. Classes are held primarily in the evening and on weekends when learners are most likely to need access. Wherever possible, campuses and learning centers are located at strategic locations near major freeways and thoroughfares that permit convenient access. Access in the 21st Century means many different things. To the stu- dent in rural America or the working parent with children at home, access may be possible only through an Internet connection. Those students usually work toward their degrees through courses offered online or via FlexNet®, a combination of classroom and online learning.

……………………………………………………………………………….Program Format

University of Phoenix is a non-term institution and does not oper- ate according to a traditional academic calendar. New student cohorts can begin at any time. Typically, graduate courses at Uni- versity of Phoenix meet for six consecutive weeks and undergradu- ate courses meet for five weeks. Classes delivered via the online modality meet asynchronously throughout each course week. Campus-based classes meet once per week for four (4) hours. When a course ends, the next course usually begins the following week. This intensive calendar allows students to achieve their edu- cational goals in a more time-efficient manner. The University’s low student/faculty ratio and class size that averages 13-15 stu- dents facilitate active learning and collaboration and encourage time-on-task. As a rule, bachelor and graduate degree seeking stu- dents take only one course at a time. This allows them to focus attention and resources on one subject, a structure that enhances learning and helps students balance ongoing professional and per- sonal responsibilities.

……………………………………………………………………………….Class Size

Minimum and maximum class size may vary by college, course, and location. Some Schools and Colleges may determine a specific minimum and maximum class size given the curriculum and learn- ing model.

……………………………………………………………………………….Learning Teams

In addition to regular course instructional sessions, bachelor’s and master’s level students work in Learning Teams. Learning Teams are small groups of three to six students drawn from within the larger cohort. Learning Teams are an essential design element in the University’s teaching and learning model through which stu- dents develop the ability to collaborate — an ability expected of employees in information-age organizations and one of the Univer- sity’s primary learning goals. Due to the unique teaching and learning model and objectives, students enrolled in an associate degree program at online (excluding AACR & AAPF) usually do not participate in Learning Teams, but are encouraged to collaborate and participate in classroom assignments.

Credits **Minimum required faculty-directed classroom-based hours

**Minimum faculty recommended hours for student-directed homework (includes reading, research, study time, and assignment development)

**Minimum hours Minimum required duration of course in total weeks

1 15 30 45 2 (*22.5/week)

2 30 60 90 4 (*22.5/week)

3 45 90 135 5 (*27/week) 6 (*22.5/week)

4 60 120 180 7 (*26/week)

5 75 150 225 9 (*25/week)

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University of Phoenix, 2016-2017 THE UNIVERSITY’S TEACHING AND LEARNING MODEL

All students enrolled in degree programs and/or designated certif- icate programs using the learning team model must meet learning team attendance policies. Teams may meet in person or via telecon- ference, real-time electronic conferencing, or asynchronous meet- ing in the classroom team forums. Students must indicate their participation in the learning team meetings and/or assignment deliverables. Students are expected to actively participate in the team’s activities. Students attending a local campus must acknowl- edge participation in their learning team each week in the Assign- ments section of eCampus. At the end of each course, students are given the opportunity to evaluate the contributions of each team member to the accomplishment of team goals.

……………………………………………………………………………….Faculty

University of Phoenix faculty members are accomplished manag- ers, technology leaders, professional educators, corporate execu- tives, financial officers, healthcare and human services professionals and leaders in other professional arenas. A listing of faculty may be obtained at each local campus and/or in the appen- dix pages at the end of this catalog. Faculty Lists are also published for each college and school on www.phoenix.edu.

……………………………………………………………………………….Staff Screening

All external candidates must have a new background check sub- mitted each time they are being considered for a position with the University. The background check must be completed prior to the start date. Student Technology Recommendations and ……………………………………………………………………………….Competencies

In an effort to assist students with adequate preparation for their course work at the University of Phoenix, technology recommen- dations and competencies have been established. These recommen- dations and competencies are in effect for the School of Advanced Studies, School of Business, College of Education, College of Infor- mation Systems and Technology, College of Health Professions, College of Security and Criminal Justice, College of Humanities and Sciences, College of Social Sciences, and the School of Continu- ing Education. To that end, students will need to access and use the hardware and software as described below. Additional recommen- dations and competencies may be required for particular courses/ programs. Students using software and hardware other than that recommended must still meet the technology competencies. Please note that due to the rapid rate of change in information technology, hardware and software competencies will be updated on a regular basis. Some courses in the College of Information Systems and Technology may require additional software. Technology Recommendations Hardware and Peripherals You need access to a computer with the following. • A processor of 2 GHz or faster • 4 GB RAM or greater • A high speed internet connection with a connection speed of 1.5

MB/s or better. • The use of satellite and cellular connections may result in

slowness or errors (timeouts, access problems) when accessing the classroom and course materials

• The use of public access computers and internet (for example, at restaurants and public institutions such as libraries) may result in slowness or errors (timeouts or access problems) when accessing the classroom and course materials. Public access computers may not permit any access to certain course materials or systems due to security limitations.

• Monitor and video card with 1024×768 or greater resolution • Speakers/Headphones and Microphone

• Public access computers may not permit usage of speakers, headphones or microphones.

• A web camera capable of video web conferencing • Public access computers may not permit usage of web

cameras. A DVD/CD-ROM drive may be needed to install software in select courses Software and Applications You need access to and familiarity with the following items.

Some courses may utilize software that requires a Windows computer or a Mac with a Windows partition.

Please note that newer browser versions incorporate security fixes and newer technologies, which may often lead to a better user experience.

Operating System

Minimum Recommended

Microsoft® Win- dows®

Windows 7 Windows 8 or higher

Apple® MacOSx

MacOSx 10.9 MacOSx 10.10 or higher

Web Browser

Windows

Browser Minimum Recommended

Internet Explorer

10 or higher 11 or higher

Google Chrome 35 or higher 39 or higher

Mozilla Firefox 31 or higher 34 or higher or 31 ESR

Mac OSx

Browser Minimum Recommended

Apple Safari 7 or higher 8 or higher

Google Chrome 35 or higher 39 or higher

Mozilla Firefox 31 or higher 34 or higher or 31 ESR

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University of Phoenix, 2016-2017

Current browser versions are recommended when the option is available. Additional Software • Microsoft® Office 2010 or later for a personal computer (PC),

Microsoft® Office 2011 for a Mac. • An up to date installation of Adobe® Reader • An up to date installation of the Adobe® Flash plug-in • An up to date installation of Java® may be required for some

courses • A system enabled to allow installation of browser plug-ins as

required • Local administrative privileges to operating system may be

required • A current antivirus application (updated regularly) Some courses may require the purchase of additional software including • Microsoft® Visio • Microsoft® Project Mobile Devices Students are required to have access to a PC or Mac but may use a mobile device such as a phone or tablet as a secondary means of access with the University of Phoenix mobile app. Access to website functionality and required course materials may be limited on mobile devices. College Specific Requirements The College of Information Systems and Technology The College of Information Systems and Technology may require access to additional software. Software currently provided by the University on the student website is subject to change and may require students to purchase or obtain access to the software. Please look for updated software requirements in your course. Students must have access to a Mac computer to complete iOS mobile coursework or the latest Windows operating system to complete Windows mobile coursework. These courses are options in the BSIT/Mobile Development concentration and the Advanced Mobile Development Certificate and as individual courses as elec- tives. School of Advanced Studies The School of Advanced Studies requires doctoral learners to bring a laptop computer to residencies. College of Education The College of Education may require access to additional software and hardware for the purpose of meeting individual state man- dates. You may be required to submit video clips during your pro- gram to meet assignment requirements, during the student teaching or practicum experience (if applicable) to meet assessment requirements, and near the end of your program to meet licensure requirements. You may be required to purchase or obtain access to relevant software and hardware. Please look for updated soft- ware/hardware requirements in your courses. A minimum Internet upload speed of 2Mbps is recommended to help facilitate the video uploads.

……………………………………………………………………………….eCampus: Student and Faculty Portal

eCampus is a secure multifunctional electronic gateway to student services, the University Library, class schedules, course materials, the electronic class environment, assignment feedback and grade reports, as well as transcripts. eCampus is accessible 24/7 and

requires no special software. Students can login to eCampus from any computer and Internet Service Provider. Student resources on eCampus include the University Library, eBooks, Media Library, Center for Writing Excellence, Center for Mathematics Excellence, student workshops, Life Resource Center, and Phoenix Career Ser- vices. Changes made at the institution are provided to students through catalog updates and other communications available through eCampus. When students are admitted to a program, they are provided with all the information needed to connect to eCampus. This electronic class environment is where assignments are turned in and exams are completed. Each student’s eCampus login credentials are unique; students must not share their login credentials with any- one. University of Phoenix students attend class on-campus, online, or in a hybrid modality known as FlexNet®. Regardless of modality, all students use the same materials for a specific course, have access to all student resources available on eCampus, and turn in assignments by accessing assignment links on eCampus. Discussions and participation during online class weeks are asyn- chronous, so there is no need to be online at a specific time during each online class week. Class discussions are private, limited to members of the class. University of Phoenix authorizes Directors of Academic Affairs, Campus Academic Directors, Campus College Chairs, and certain university administrators as well as certain faculty to review sub- missions to the electronic class environment and to assignment links to assist in the resolution of grade disputes, grievances, and charges of academic dishonesty, as well as to confirm and/or investigate other academic-related issues as necessary.

……………………………………………………………………………….Classroom Recording Policy

Students may only make audio and/or video recordings of Univer- sity of Phoenix class presentations, activities, and discussions if they meet one or more of the following criteria: • the recording occurs with the prior written consent of the faculty

teaching the class and of all students in the class at the time of the recording

• there is a documented University of Phoenix Disabilities Service Office authorized accommodation requiring recording of specific parts of a class session.

Faculty wishing to make audio or video recordings of class presen- tations, activities, and/or discussions must obtain prior written permission of the campus Director of Academic Affairs and of all students in the class at the time of the recording. If a class recording is made with appropriate authorization, unless there is clear and unambiguous prior written approval to the con- trary, the recording must not be copied or shared with others, posted on a website to which others have access, or disseminated in any other manner, but shall be used for personal class-related study purposes only by the individual who made the recording.

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University of Phoenix, 2016-2017 UNIVERSITY POLICIES

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………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. UNIVERSITY POLICIES

……………………………………………………………………………….Calendar

The educational mission of the University of Phoenix is to provide access to higher education opportunities that enable students to develop the knowledge and skills necessary to achieve their profes- sional goals, improve the productivity of their organizations, and provide leadership and service to their communities. A student could begin a degree program in virtually any month of the year. This calendar allows the adult student to balance the demands of career, family, and education. Students qualifying for financial aid may receive a new award each academic year. An academic year is defined as the period of time in which a student completes at least 24 credit hours and 30 weeks of instructional time. Therefore, students may have their eligibility assessed for grants and/or loans several times during their pro- gram of study. The average processing time for financial aid is 90 days. Students should reapply for financial aid prior to the start of each new academic year.

……………………………………………………………………………….Course Equivalencies

Equivalent courses are University approved courses that act as an acceptable alternative to a required course, as determined by the College and may apply to a program in place of a required course. Courses must have substantially similar content, course objectives, and/or learning outcomes. The equivalencies are subject to change based on program update or College need. Equivalent courses must be an equal level or higher, and have the same number of credit hours or higher. Combination equivalencies are used when the content of two or more courses taken together are deemed to have substantially sim- ilar content, course objectives, and/or learning outcomes to the content of one course. Unless stated, when a combination of multi- ple courses is used to satisfy an equivalency with a course, the excess credits from the combination may apply towards the Addi- tional Liberal Arts, Interdisciplinary, and/or Elective requirements for the program. If all courses needed to satisfy a combination equivalency are not completed, the equivalency will not be satisfied. Students should complete the required course as outlined in the program policy. When two equivalent courses are completed, only the most recent course completed will be counted for credit and grade point aver- age calculations. The College may also provide course options which are not direct equivalencies to the required course, but which the College has determined to be acceptable alternatives to a required course for a specific program.

……………………………………………………………………………….Course Cancellation

The University of Phoenix may be required to cancel courses or programs when necessary. In addition, courses or programs may not begin on their scheduled start dates in the event of certain cir- cumstances, such as faculty unavailability or insufficient enroll- ment. In such situations, the University will work with students in an effort to provide them with the opportunity to reschedule or to transfer to a comparable University course or program if available. Any payments made for cancelled courses will be refunded or applied to another University course or program. All attempts will be made to address such cancellations with registered students as early as possible.

……………………………………………………………………………….Directed Study

With approval of the Campus Director of Academic Affairs or des- ignated appointee, students may complete Dean approved courses, as available, via Directed Study delivery as outlined below: • Degree program enrollment: a maximum of twelve (12)

completed credits in the program • Credit bearing certificate program enrollment consisting of four

or more courses: a maximum of three (3) completed credits in the program.

• Deployed active duty military students: a maximum of (15) completed credits per academic year upon providing official documentation of the deployment timeframe to their local campus.

2016-2017 Online Holiday Calendar

4th of July July 4, 2016

Labor Day September 5, 2016

Winter Break December 19, 2017 – December 31, 2017

Martin Luther King Jr Day

January 16, 2017

President’s Day February 20, 2017

Good Friday April 14, 2017

Easter April 16, 2017

Memorial Day May 29, 2017

2016-2017 Online Associates Holiday Calendar

4th of July July 4, 2016

Labor Day September 5, 2016

Winter Break December 19, 2017 – December 31, 2017

Martin Luther King Jr Day

January 16, 2017

President’s Day February 20, 2017

Good Friday April 14, 2017

Easter April 16, 2017

Memorial Day May 29, 2017

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University of Phoenix, 2016-2017

……………………………………………………………………………….Concurrent Enrollment

Concurrent enrollment is defined as simultaneous enrollment. This refers to enrollment in any two University courses. Students enrolled in courses outside the University are excluded from the definition. Courses will be considered concurrent when start and/ or end dates overlap. • Students enrolled in an undergraduate or graduate degree

program may not enroll in more than two credit bearing courses concurrently.

• Students enrolled in an Online Associate degree program may not enroll in more than three credit bearing courses concurrently.

• Concurrent enrollment in the first four courses is prohibited for all new students.

……………………………………………………………………………….Multiple University Degrees

Students may earn multiple credentials from the University of Phoenix. The following policies apply: • Only one degree in a specific discipline may be earned at each

program level (i.e. bachelor and/or graduate); however, students can earn multiple degrees in different disciplines.

• Students may earn only one certificate in a specific discipline at each course level (lower division, upper division, graduate).

• Programmatic residency must be met for each credential through the completion of a prescribed minimum number of unique University of Phoenix credits. • Graduate degree-seeking students must complete a

minimum of 18 credits toward an additional degree. Exceptions are outlined within programmatic policies.

• Bachelor degree-seeking students must complete a minimum of 30 unique credits of the additional degree’s required course of study in order to meet residency.

• Residency requirements that do not fall within the above guidelines are outlined in specific program policies.

Students may only earn one associate degree. Students may not complete more than one program from the School of Advanced Studies with the exception of Educational Spe- cialist (EdS) graduates who may return and receive the Doctor of Education in Educational Leadership (EDD) or Doctor of Educa- tion in Educational Leadership/Curriculum and Instruction (EDD/CI). Unless otherwise stated within a program policy, students may receive a certificate in the same area of focus as the specialization, concentration, or emphasis in their degree program. Students cannot earn a certificate if all of the required courses were completed prior to the certificate being approved and available to be offered in their state or jurisdiction.

……………………………………………………………………………….Maximum Credit Limits

The University has identified the maximum number of credits a student may complete during a 12-month period. This limit is determined based on from the student’s actual start date in their program at the University. The number of credits completed within a 12 month period is limited by the program level of study the stu- dent is actively pursuing. • All undergraduate students may complete a maximum of 45

UOPX credits in a 12 month period. • Graduate students may complete a maximum of 39 UOPX

graduate credits in a 12 month period. Students who are enrolled in both graduate and undergraduate programs are limited by the undergraduate credit maximum.

……………………………………………………………………………….Course Credits

All credits issued for successfully completed University of Phoenix course work are in semester credits. Courses numbered 100-299 carry undergraduate, lower division credit. Courses numbered 300-499 carry undergraduate, upper division credit. Courses num- bered 500-599 carry graduate credit. Professional courses num- bered 600-699 may be applied to either undergraduate or graduate credit requirements. Courses numbered 700-799 carry doctoral credit. Most courses are three semester credits. In a typical three-credit course, and consistent with federal and accreditation requirements regarding the award of college credit, students can expect to engage in a minimum of 45 hours of faculty directed learning activ- ities including classroom-based instruction/discussion, learning team projects, and/or additional learning activities (e.g., simula- tions, tutorials, videos, etc.). Additionally, students can expect to engage in a minimum of 90 hours of faculty recommended home- work (i.e., reading, research, assignment development, and class preparation). These faculty-directed and student-directed expecta- tions are intended to ensure a minimum level of content coverage and overall curriculum rigor is achieved in addressing the course objectives.

……………………………………………………………………………….Student Identification Numbers

All students are assigned a unique student identifier called an Indi- vidual Record Number (IRN). This is the primary number students use to obtain campus, web and voice response services. A letter and ID card will be mailed upon request.

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University of Phoenix, 2016-2017 UNIVERSITY POLICIES

……………………………………………………………………………….Name and Social Security Number Changes

The University requires documentation of legal name and social security number changes. The following primary forms of identifi- cation will be accepted for a legal name change:

These forms must illustrate the name exactly how it is requested on the Name Change form. A signed social security card issued by the Social Security Administration is required for changes in social security numbers.

……………………………………………………………………………….Letter Request

All student letter request must be processed by the Registrar’s Office. Students may contact the Admissions and Records Service Center (ARSC) to request letters and will be required to verify their identity per FERPA guidelines. Directory information requests do not require a FERPA release form. 3rd Party Requests – A FERPA release is required if the letter is to be faxed, mailed, or encrypted emailed to a third party for non- directory information. Student Requests – A FERPA release form may be required if the letter containing non-directory information is to be faxed, mailed, or encrypted emailed to the student and the student does not have the fax number, mailing address, or email address listed on the offi- cial student record. The Registrar’s Office is unable to provide letters of recommenda- tion or assist with scholarship letters or scholarship nominations. Students who are requesting letters of recommendation or nomina- tions regarding scholarships should contact scholarships@phoe- nix.edu for assistance. In lieu of providing a letter of recommendation, the Registrar’s Office can provide a University of Phoenix approved letter or a customized letter based on information in the student’s record that can be validated by a member of the Registrar’s Office. Students may call the National Student Clearinghouse at (703)742- 4200 to verify information related to their enrollment. If the National Student Clearinghouse has sent information to lenders within the last 30 days, an enrollment verification letter is not required by the lender.

……………………………………………………………………………….Forms

The Registrar’s Office is the University’s designated department to review and route forms requiring a school official’s signature. If the Registrar’s Office cannot complete a form, the form will be re- routed to the appropriate department for completion. University of Phoenix cannot comply with or complete certain forms. Directory information requests do not require a FERPA release form. 3rd Party Requests – A FERPA release is required if the form is to be faxed, mailed, or encrypted emailed to a third party for non-direc- tory information. Student Requests – A FERPA release form may be required if the form containing non-directory information is to be faxed, mailed, or encrypted emailed to the student and the student does not have the fax number, mailing address, or email address listed on the offi- cial student record.

……………………………………………………………………………….Record Maintenance

University of Phoenix requires students to complete and sign all student-related documents in connection with their education record. Nobody other than the student may sign forms (wet signa- ture or e-signature) on behalf of a student.

……………………………………………………………………………….Duplication of Credit

Duplication occurs when students take the same course more than once or take a course that duplicates the content of a satisfactorily completed course. The grade and credit earned for the most recently completed course will apply toward academic standing and the total number of credits required for degree completion. The previously completed course will remain on the permanent transcript, but will not be applied toward academic standing or the total number of credits required for degree completion.

……………………………………………………………………………….Course Audit Policy

With approval of the Campus Director of Academic Affairs or des- ignated appointee, students may register for and audit University courses. Auditing students are passive participants in the class and are not held accountable for Study Group Task/Team work nor for assign- ment submission unless otherwise negotiated with the faculty member. Auditing students are governed by all University policies and pro- cedures that apply to non-auditing students. Auditing students who have met the minimum attendance require- ments for the course will receive a grade of “AU” on their perma- nent record which will not carry any academic credit. Students who have selected to audit a course may not change their auditing status after the start of the course.

……………………………………………………………………………….Servicemember Readmission

The Higher Education Opportunity Act (HEOA) provides that an institution may not deny admission or readmission to a person who is a member of, applies to be a member of, performs, has per- formed, applies to perform, or has an obligation to perform, service in the uniformed services on the basis of that membership, applica- tion for membership, performance of service, application for ser- vice, or obligation to perform service. This applies to service in the uniformed services, whether voluntary or involuntary, on active duty in the Armed Forces, on active duty for training, and full-time National Guard duty under Federal authority for a period of more than 30 consecutive days under a call or order to active duty of

List A or List B and List C

Court Ordered Name Change

State ID Marriage License

Social Security card

Driver’s License Divorce Decree

Passport/ Passport Card

Voter’s Registration Card

U.S. Citizen ID Card

Permanent Resident Card

Certificate of Naturalization

11

University of Phoenix, 2016-2017

more than 30 consecutive days. A call/order to active duty includes state-side deployment of active duty military personnel and deployment outside of the country. This does not include National Guard service under authority of State law.

The Military Deployment and Servicemember Readmission poli- cies will also apply to servicemembers and reservists that are tem- porarily unable to attend class for between 15-30 days due to a military service obligation.

Any student whose absence from the University is necessitated by reason of service in the uniformed services is entitled to readmis- sion if all of the following criteria are met:

The student (or an appropriate officer of the Armed Forces or offi- cial of the Department of Defense) should give advanced verbal or written notice to Student Services as far in advance as I reason- able under the circumstances of the student’s upcoming deploy- ment. No advance notice by the student is required if the giving of such notice is precluded by military necessity (e.g. a mission, operation exercise, or requirement that is classified, or a pending or ongoing mission, operation, exercise or requirement that may be compromised or otherwise adversely affected by public knowledge). In addition, any student (or appropriate officer of the Armed Forces or official of the Department of Defense) who did not give advance notice of service to the appropriate official at the University may meet the notice requirements by submitting, at the time the student seeks readmission, documentation (e.g. deployment paperwork or a letter from the student’s command- ing officer) to confirm that military duty was the reason for the student’s absence. The cumulative length of the absence and of all previous absences from the University by reason of service in the uniformed services does not exceed five years The student must give oral or written notice of her intent to return to the school within three years after the completion of the period of service.

• A student who is hospitalized or convalescing due to an illness or injury incurred or aggravated during the performance of service must notify the school within two years after the end of the period needed for recovery from the illness or injury.

If the student does not submit a notification of intent to reenroll within the time limits or documentation sufficient to establish the student’s eligibility for readmission, the student is subject to the University established leave of absence policy and general prac- tices. A student’s eligibility for readmission under this section by reason of such student’s service in the uniformed services terminates upon the occurrence of any of the following events:

1. A separation of such person from the Armed Forces (including the National Guard and Reserves) with a dishonorable or bad conduct discharge, 2. A dismissal of such person permitted under section 1161(a) of Title 10, USC, 3. A dropping of such person from the roles pursuant to section 1161(b) of Title 10, USC.

Provided a student meets the readmission criteria, the University must promptly readmit the student to his/her program by assist- ing the student in enrolling in the next available class or classes in his/her program unless the student requests a later date of read- mission or unusual circumstances require the University to admit the student at a later date. Unusual circumstances may include the length of any necessary retraining or intervening changes in the circumstances of the University.

When providing readmission to a servicemember, the University must readmit the servicemember with the same academic status as when the student was last admitted. This includes those students who were admitted but did not begin attendance because of ser- vice in the uniformed services. The student will be considered to be enrolled with the same academic status as long as the University admits the student:

1. To the same program to which he or she was last admitted or, if that exact program is no longer offered, the program that is most similar, unless the student requests or agrees to admission to a different program. 2. At the same enrollment status that the student last held, unless the student requests or agrees to admission at a different enroll- ment status. 3. With the same number of credit hours completed previously by the student, unless the student is readmitted to a different pro- gram or program version to which the completed credit hours are not transferable. 4. With the same academic standing in terms of satisfactory aca- demic progress (SAP) the student previously had. 5. If the student is readmitted to the same program, the student will be assessed the same tuition and fee charges for the first aca- demic year of return that he/she would have been assessed dur- ing the academic year when the student left the university. However, if the student’s veteran’s education benefits or other service member education benefits will pay the higher tuition and fee charges that other students in the program are paying for the year, the school will assess those charges to the student as well. For subsequent academic years, a student admitted to the same program will be charged no more than the institutional charges that other students in the program are assessed for that academic year. 6. If the student is admitted to a different program he/she will be charged no more than the tuition and fee charges that other stu- dents in the program are assessed for that academic year.

If the student is not prepared to resume the program at the point where he/she left off, or will not be able to complete the program, the University will make reasonable efforts to help the student become prepared to enable the student to complete the program including, but not limited to, providing refresher courses at no extra cost and allowing the student to retake a pretest at no extra cost. If after reasonable efforts, the student is still not prepared to resume the program at the point he or she left off, the University determines that the student is unable to complete the program, or the University determines that there are no reasonable efforts that can be taken to prepare the student to resume the program at the point he or she left off or to enable the student to complete the pro- gram, the University is not required to readmit the student.

……………………………………………………………………………….Military Deployment

The University of Phoenix adheres to the Higher Education Oppor- tunity Act (HEOA) to support the educational needs of service- member students who are deployed. At the time a student learns he or she will be deployed, students are advised to notify Student Services either orally or in writing. It is recommended that documents sufficient to show the student will be deployed, such as, but not limited to, a copy of the military deployment paperwork or a signed official letter from the com- manding officer, be submitted to the student’s campus. Although this formal documentation is not required at the time of deploy-

12

University of Phoenix, 2016-2017 UNIVERSITY POLICIES

ment, students should be advised that it will be necessary in order to be readmitted. If documentation is provided, the campus must fax the documents to eXp for inclusion in the student’s file for future reference. The University is unable to coordinate decisions regarding the stu- dent’s record or take action on the student’s record through a third party without appropriate authorization granted through a Power of Attorney. Students enrolled in a course at the time of deployment are eligible to receive excused absences in accordance with the excused absences policy. Campuses should use discretion and take such action only if the excused absences would benefit the student by allowing the student the opportunity to complete the course instead of being automatically dropped from the course for not meeting the University course attendance requirement. If the student will be unable to complete the course due to military deployment, the student may drop from the course and receive a full refund of tuition and mandatory fees for the course and a with- drawal “W” grade may be issued. If the student would like an opportunity to complete the course while deployed, an incomplete “I” grade can be issued instead of a “W” grade. The “I” grade may be issued with an initial extension of six (6) weeks beyond the traditional five (5) week extension. The campus practice of requiring final grades to be lowered by one full letter grade as a result of the incomplete “I” grade shall be waived for deployed students. Students scheduled to be deployed for active military duty are advised to contact their campus Financial Representative regard- ing the status of their account and/or financial aid. • If documentation is provided at the time of deployment, the

campus may place the student in the military forbearance status. The military forbearance status ensures students do not continue to incur tuition charges and that current tuition charges are placed on hold for payment until the student returns from deployment.

In the event the student wishes to re-enter following deployment, the University’s Servicemember Readmission policy will apply.

……………………………………………………………………………….Transient Student Policy

A transient student is an individual who is enrolled in a degree program at an outside institution but is approved to complete non- degree coursework at University of Phoenix (UOPX) to fulfill pro- gram requirements at their home institution. Prior to being scheduled for coursework at UOPX, Transient stu- dents must have an approved transient student request form on file. Students attending the University as transient students: • Will be held accountable for, and be governed by, all University

classroom, conduct, and other associated policies regarding student behavior and academic progression as set forth in the University’s Academic Catalog.

• Will not be reviewed for the specific University admission requirements as a degree-seeking student.

• Are held to their home institution’s academic preparedness requirements and will not be individually reviewed for satisfying University pre-requisite requirements for the courses they are entering.

……………………………………………………………………………….Acceptable Transfer Activity

The following completed transfer activity types will be reviewed for transfer into the university: 1. Coursework which was completed at an institution that offers associate degrees or higher, which was accredited, or a candidate for accreditation at the time the student attended, by a regional or approved national accrediting body, or a foreign institution recog- nized/authorized by the country’s Ministry of Education, will be reviewed for transfer into the University. The current listing of regional and national accrediting bodies is maintained by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation. In addition, graduate level coursework from institutions that hold accreditation through the ABA (American Bar Association) or that have been provision- ally approved for accreditation may also be reviewed for transfer into the University. Coursework from ABA accredited institutions that is not from a Graduate level program will not be accepted. JD, LLB, LLM are considered graduate level programs. 2. American Council on Education credit recommendations 3. National testing program credit earned from:

a. College Level Examination Program (CLEP®) b. Excelsior c. Berlitz d. National League of Nursing Exams (NLN) e. Advanced Placement Examinations (AP) f. Defense Language Proficiency Tests (DLPT) g. College Level General Education Development (GED) h. DSST Exams (previously DANTES and USAFI)

4. Prior learning that has been assessed for credit-worthiness by either the Prior Learning Assessment department or by one of the University’s Colleges, Schools, or Provost’s Office. To evaluate previously completed transfer activity, the University must receive transcripts, mark sheets, and documents that are originals from the issuing institution. Documents from Canada or the United States and its territories must be submitted in a sealed envelope or via an approved alternative means such as fax, Escrip, or EDI directly to the University of Phoenix. Applicants with academic records from colleges or universities in other countries: The University will accept copies of academic records issued from international institutions with no time of issue limitations. If official academic records are received directly from the institution in a sealed envelope, no verification will be required. Students with International credentials will be placed on an Admissions status of RI (Registered International Credentials) until either the verification or official document is received from the issuing institution.

CLEP® is a registered trademark of the College Entrance Examination Board, registered in the U.S. and/or other countries

13

University of Phoenix, 2016-2017

……………………………………………………………………………….Evaluation of Transfer Activity

Only transfer activity evaluations performed by the University’s Office of Admissions & Evaluation (OAE) or their approved desig- nee are official. Any preliminary reviews by campus personnel or OAR are unofficial, not binding, and subject to change. The fol- lowing criteria are applied to the evaluation of all transfer credit: 1. Credit-bearing coursework in which students earn a minimum grade of “C-” or grades of credit, pass or satisfactory may be accepted towards student’s degree requirements. 2. Acceptable transfer activities will be transferred as semester hour credit. 3. The University will accept courses that are numbered as non- remedial, college level, transferable, or degree applicable, as deter- mined by the issuing institutions transcript key. 4. Lower and upper division credit is transferred as awarded by the issuing institution. 5. Physical Education activity credits are limited to four credits. 6. Application of transferable credit and limitations are deter- mined by program requirements and by state or jurisdiction of the student’s residence.

Specific regulatory requirements regarding credit limit applications are listed in the grid below and apply to residents regardless of modality of study (unless otherwise stated in the grid below). Use this grid for the given states only.

Coursework earned in the following manners will not be accepted in direct transfer towards University degree requirements: 1. Credit is not awarded for transfer activity that duplicates or is regressive to previously completed transfer activities, either at the same or a different transferring institution. If a transcript is received by the University following initial evaluation that shows that a transfer activity duplicates an activity that has already been accepted in transfer, only the credit awarded to the initial transfer activity will be accepted and reviewed for applicability to the stu- dent’s program. 2. Professional development level or vocational courses as deter- mined by the issuing institution’s transcript key or program description.

Associate degree transfer policy: Students transferring to Univer- sity of Phoenix into an undergraduate bachelor degree program (excluding BSN, LPN/BSN, LVN/BSN, P/VN/BSN, BSLS, BSED, BS/BIO, BA/ENG, BS/EVS, BS/HIS, BS/HST, and BSIT {all con- centrations}) with a previously completed regionally accredited Associate of Arts degree from a Community College will be con- sidered as satisfying their lower division elective and general edu- cation requirements making the student Required Course of Study ready at University of Phoenix. Students utilizing this policy will still need to meet all pre-requisite or state specific content require- ments as outlined in the Academic Progression and General Educa- tion Requirements policy sections for their chosen program. California block transfer policy: Students transferring to Univer- sity of Phoenix into an undergraduate baccalaureate degree pro- gram (excluding BSN, LPN/BSN, LVN/BSN, P/VN/BSN, BSLS, BSED, BS/BIO, BA/ENG, BS/EVS, BS/HIS, BS/HST, and BSIT {all concentrations} or students residing in Arkansas, Nevada, Oregon, Puerto Rico) with a previously completed CSU (California State University) or IGETC (Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum) certification from a regionally accredited California College or University will be considered as satisfying their General Education liberal arts component for their degree program. Stu- dents utilizing this policy will still need to meet all pre-requisite or state specific content requirements as outlined in the Academic Progression and General Education Requirements policy sections for their chosen program NOTICE CONCERNING TRANSFERABILITY OF CREDITS AND CREDENTIALS EARNED AT OUR INSTITUTION The transferability of credits you earn at University of Phoenix is at

State Total Credit Awards

Area Restricted

Washington 30 for Bache- lors programs

15 for Associate programs

• National Testing Programs

• Military • Professional Training • Experiential Essays

Oregon Resi- dents

30 for Bache- lors programs

15 for Associate programs

• National Testing Programs

*Effective 9/1/2005, the following areas added: • Military • Professional Training • Experiential Essays

Arkansas Resi- dents

30 for Bachelor Programs

30 for Associate programs

• Professional Training • Experiential Essays

Georgia Resi- dents

No more than 25% of the degree can be earned using any one spe- cific award type. Students can- not exceed 50% of their degree being earned using a combi- nation of these award types.

• Credit by Exam • Professional Training • Experiential Essays • Military • National Testing

Programs

State Total Credit Awards

Area Restricted

14

University of Phoenix, 2016-2017 UNIVERSITY POLICIES

the complete discretion of an institution to which you may seek to transfer. Acceptance of the degree, diploma, or certificate you earn is also at the complete discretion of the institution to which you may seek to transfer. If the credits or degree, diploma, or certificate that you earn at this institution are not accepted at the institution to which you seek to transfer, you may be required to repeat some or all of your coursework at that institution. For this reason you should make certain that your attendance at this institution will meet your educational goals. This may include contacting an insti- tution to which you may seek to transfer after attending University of Phoenix to determine if your credits or degree, diploma or certif- icate will transfer.

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how do the 2s and 3p orbitals differ from the 1s and 2p orbitals?

How would the 2s and 3p orbitals differ from the 1s and 2p orbitals? Check all that apply.

possible answers
The and orbitals would have more nodes than and orbitals.
The orbital would be the same shape as the orbital but would be smaller in size.
The and orbitals would have more nodes than and orbitals.
The orbitals would have the same shape as the orbitals but would be smaller in size.
The orbital would be the same shape as the orbital but would be larger in size.
The orbitals would have the same shape as the orbitals but would be larger in size.

0 0 850
asked by kdb
Dec 1, 2012
You have typed all of the possible choices for answers and omitted (left blank spaces I suppose) for 1s, 2s 2p, 3p where ever they appear in the choice. Can’t help you.

0 0
posted by DrBob222
Dec 1, 2012
The orbitals 2s and 3p would be the same shape as the 1s and 2p, but would be larger in size.

0 0
posted by KC
Jan 31, 2015
The 1s orbital is a sphere and the 2p orbital is made up of three dumbbells oriented in the x, y and z direction. The 2s orbital would be the same shape as the 1s orbital, but would be larger in size and the 3p orbital would have the same shape as the 2p orbitals bout would be larger in size. Also, the 2s and 3p orbitals would have more nodes.

MASTERING CHEM SAYS THIS IS CORRECT

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posted by Eric
Nov 25, 2016

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a filibuster to block a vote on a bill is possible

A filibuster to block a vote on a bill is possible a.Only in the house, which is almost unrestrained. b.Only in the senate, which is almost unrestrained. c.Mostly in the house, but occasionally in the senate. d.Mostly in the senate,
12,639 results
American government
A filibuster to block a vote on a bill is possible a.Only in the house, which is almost unrestrained. b.Only in the senate, which is almost unrestrained. c.Mostly in the house, but occasionally in the senate. d.Mostly in the senate, but occasionally in the

asked by Gisselle on September 25, 2017
politics
Which of the following could be used by a Republican senator to block a bill proposed by the Democratic majority in the Senate? A. Rule 22 B. The Rules Committee C. The cloture vote D. The filibuster D?

asked by bev on May 27, 2017
american government

  1. which of the following reflects a difference between debate on the House and the Senate floors? A. debate in the senate has very few restraints B. the minority party in the senate manages debate on the floor. C. representatives in the house may

asked by Leslie on September 25, 2016
GA State History

  1. appropriations and higher education are examples of what type of committee A. standing ** B. ad hoc C. conference D. interim study 10. if a bill goes to committee hoq can the committee kill the bill without asking for the General Assembly to vote on it

asked by Wes on January 26, 2017
government
the main way to end a filibuster is by a. a two thirds vote of the senate b. invoking the cloture rule c. convening a conference committee d. voting the filibuster out of office d.

asked by jere on January 15, 2008

History
I need help with these two questions, (it’s talking about South Carolina) 1. A two-thirds vote of both houses will pass a bill over the governors veto. true or false 2. If the house makes changes, the bill goes back to the original house for a vote. true

asked by HI there on June 3, 2016
history
(south Carolina) 1. a two-thirds vote of both houses will pass a bill over the governor’s veto. True** false 2. if the house make changes, the bill goes back to the original house for a vote. true false**

asked by mehhhhhh202 on May 2, 2017
Social Studies

  1. Laws begin with ideas that come from Representatives or from a ordinary citizen. Then the citizen writes to their local senator or rep. 2. The bill goes to the Senate were they do a discussion and vote. If more than half of the Senate approves the bill

asked by Daisy205 on December 21, 2015
history
a two-third vote of both houses will pass a bill over the governor’s veto true false ** if the house make changes the bill goes back to the original house for a vote true ** false

asked by please help on June 2, 2016
civics

  1. Every month congress passes public work bills. I put true 2.In a roll call vote,is a speaking vote to decide if a bill should be added. I put false 3.A standing vote is when those in favor of a bill stand up and explain why they think it should be

asked by ga on March 12, 2014
math
im having problems with these word problems. A bill is sent to the President of the United States when it has passed both houses of Congress. A majority vote in both the House of Representatives (435 members) and the Senate (100 members) is needed for the

asked by smmer on September 2, 2009
social studies
which is not necessary in order for a bill to become a law ? a) the governor must sign the bill b) a majority vote is needed in the house c) the majority of vote is needed in the senate d) the same version of the bill must be passes

asked by victoria on February 20, 2014
English/Writing Help Please?
Help with sentence structure…. In a response to the uproar on January 30, 2017 legislation presented the House with the HB 631 bill which will forbid a wholesale distributor from increasing a price on vital medication, under definite statuses. Stages of

asked by Jennifer Haley on November 24, 2017
Social Studies

  1. A two thirds majority vote of both houses will pass a bill over to the governor’s veto. A. True B. False 2. If the house makes changes, the bill goes back to the original house for a veto. A. True B. False 3. Which action does not occur in a committee?

asked by Tori on June 1, 2016
Civics
Who gave the longest filibuster in the U.S Senate? How long was the filibuster? What year was it and what was the filibuster about?

asked by nunu on March 8, 2009

American Government
Which statement is false? 1.)Most bills may originate in either house of Congress. 2.)To introduce a bill in the house, a representative drops a copy of the bill into a box called the hopper. 3.)After a bill is introduced, it can sit for weeks at a time

asked by Mackenzie on March 5, 2012
TX history
10.a committee may take all of the following actions Except -passing a bill into law -recommending a bill for further consideration -not recommending the bill* -listening to testimony about a bill 5.the leader of the house of representatives is the?

asked by coolguy321 on March 5, 2016
political science
Where might a member of Congress hold the floor indefinitely and thereby delay a vote on a bill which he or she objects (aka fillibuster)? The House The Senate Both the House and Senate Parliament

asked by ryan on March 27, 2016
Government Writing
Help with sentence organization & Structure. I need help informing this information into complete sentences. Committee(s): Health and Government Operations Committee Hearning Economic Matters On April 10, 2017 House Concurrence Vote Passed. April 7, 2017

asked by Gwen on November 25, 2017
history
Which of the following accurately characterizes a difference in the way the House and Senate operate? (Points : 1) The House is more formal than the Senate. The Senate leadership is more powerful than the House leadership. 1 Authority in the Senate is

asked by CARNITA on November 11, 2010
Government
A bill has been approved in the House and Senate, albeit in slightly different versions. The bill now goes to A) the president for her/his veto or signature. B) a conference committee. C) the standing committees in the House and Senate where the bill

asked by Mini on February 20, 2011
Civics
“Every bill which shall have passed the House of Representatives and the senate, shall, before it became law, be presented to the president of the united states: If he approval he shall sign it, but if he shall not return it, with his objections to that

asked by jeje on January 19, 2015
Check PLZZ History

  1. The legislature’s most important task is to make state laws. * override the governor’s veto. assign legislators to committees. remove government officials for misconduct. 2. A committee may take all of the following actions EXCEPT passing a bill

asked by YOLO on May 23, 2015
Ap govt.
Please check my answers and help me with those that are wrong. Which of the following forms of government most clearly bases power on the consent of the governed? A. aristocracy B. totalitarian regime C. Oligarchy D. Anarchy E. Republic I put A All of the

asked by Sam on July 21, 2016
Social Studies
!. how is the size of a legislative district determined A. by geographical boundaries B. by city limits *** C. by the apportioned population D. by county boundaries 2. the term bicameral legislature refers to two of what A. chambers of the General Assembly

asked by homework on February 20, 2015

HISTORY
how is the size of a legislative district determined A. by geographical boundaries B. by city limits C. by the apportioned population D. by county boundaries*** 2. the term bicameral legislature refers to two of what A. chambers of the General Assembly ***

asked by HELP ME PLEASE on February 26, 2015
Social Studies help!!!!
Which step in the process of a bill becoming a law, is NOT a “floor action”? A. A bill is referred to Senate committee B. The House and Senate reach a compromise on a bill. C. The Senate debates and passes its form of a bill. D. The House and Senate

asked by callie on November 20, 2014
English
How to re-word this please? The Emmett Till Unsolved Civil Rights Crimes Reauthorization Act of 2016 will be considered by the House on Wednesday, December 7. under the rules. S. 2854 was proposed on April 26, 2016, by Senator. Richard Burr Republican of

asked by Sara on November 8, 2017
american government
A bill has been approved in the House and Senate, albeit in slightly different versions. The bill now goes to the president for her/his veto or signature. a conference committee. the standing committees in the House and Senate where the bill originated.

asked by vedrana on July 2, 2010
Civics
If the president has vetoed a bill passed by congress, what can congress do about it? Appeal to the supreme court to override the president’s veto *** Encourage the American people to vote that bill onto law at the next decision. Override the veto with a

asked by jeje on January 19, 2015
American Government
A _ can only be ended with _. 1.)cloture, filibuster 2.)cloture, debate 3.)filibuster, cloture 4.)filibuster, an amendment

asked by Mackenzie on March 5, 2012
Grammar
Finance, Health, and Government Operations made amendments and voted according, the bill -House Committee Health and Government Vote – House – Committee – Health and Government Operations, Vote – Senate – Committee – Finance, Vote – House Floor – Third

asked by Fish on November 28, 2017
history
what is the path a bill must take to become a law? A.) the house or senate introduces a bill, and if both houses approve it and the president signs it, the bill becomes a law. B.) the president proposes a bill, and if the house approves and signs it, the

asked by Anonymous on September 21, 2017
government
the house rules committee may do all of the following except a. set conditions for considering a bill b. speed up consideration of a bill c. prevent consideration of a bill d. attach amendments to a bill c.

asked by jere on January 15, 2008
check my work (american goverment)

  1. What best describes a faithless elector? (1 point) an elector who cheated to become an elector an elector who fails to vote an elector who votes for a non­Christian

asked by Anonymous on October 20, 2016

Math repost
At a business meeting at panera bread company the bill for two cappuccinos and there house lattes was $14.55. At another table the bill for one cappuccino and two house lattes was $8.77. How much did each type of beverage cost? I’m not sure how this would

asked by Anonymous on February 21, 2014
government
the chairmen of congressional committees are chosen by a. the vote of committee members b. seniority c. the vote of the majority party d. the speaker of the house b

asked by jere on January 11, 2008
English
Help Putting in sentences Please!. Vote – Senate – Committee – Finance, Vote – House Floor – Third Reading Passed (137-4) – March 17, 2017, Vote – House Floor – Third Reading Passed (137-2) – April 02, 2017, Vote – Senate Floor – Floor Amendment

asked by Jennifer Haley on November 24, 2017
government
the purpose of deciding important bills by a committee of the whole is to a. ensure that every member of the house has a chance to speak about the bill b. talk the bill to death c. speed up the floor debate d. make sure that both houses pass the same

asked by jere on January 11, 2008
Physics
A 0.400 kg block of wood hangs from the ceiling by a string, and a 0.0700 kg wad of putty is thrown straight upward, striking the bottom of the block with a speed of 6.40 m/s. The wad of putty sticks to the block. How high does the putty-block system rise

asked by Physics on April 29, 2010
Math
Bill and Joe leave their house at the same time heading in opposite directions. If Bill is driving three times faster than Joe and it takes them three hours to be 120 miles apart, how fast is Bill driving?

asked by Hanna on October 14, 2017
SOCIAL STDIES HELP! 8th
Which is not necessary in order for a bill to become a law? (1 point) The governor must sign the bill. A majority vote is needed in the House. A majority vote is needed in the Senate. The same version of the bill must be passed.*** In order to be governor

asked by XenaGonzalez on March 11, 2015
Criminal Justice/Judical System
A federal judge can be removed from the bench via: A. public vote. B. impeachment in the House of Representatives and conviction by the Senate. C. discretion by the president of the United States. D. a majority vote by other federal judges. I think it’s

asked by Pat on February 8, 2015
Government
A bill has been approved in the House and Senate, albeit in slightly different versions. The bill now goes to ??

asked by Margaret on December 13, 2010
Government
the role of the house rules committee is played in the senate by the a. president pro tempore b. president of the senate c. whip d. majority floor leader House leaders may use any of these calendars to schedule debate on a bill except: A)Union Calendar

asked by MM on May 10, 2012

government
the votes of the electorate are called the a. electoral college vote b. direct vote c. popular vote d. primary vote a.

asked by jere on January 15, 2008
History (continued)
1.The group that has the sole powerto begin impeachment hearings is A. Senate B. Supreme court C. House of representatives D. The president’s cabinet Answer: C 2. All of the followig are powers of the president execpt: A. Declaring war B. Giving the state

asked by Spongebob on January 19, 2009
Civics

  1. Suppose Bill HR612 is currently in Congress. One thing you know about this bill is that it A. originated in the House of Representatives. B. has been vetoed by the president. C. has no riders attached. D. is currently in committee. A?

asked by Sarah on March 29, 2015
politics
Which of the following is NOT true about the electoral college? A. Except for Maine and Nebraska, the states appoint their members of the electoral college on a “winner-take-all” basis. B. A presidential candidate needs 270 electoral votes to win

asked by bev on May 27, 2017
English
How can I re-word this to start my summary ? On Wednesday, December 7, 2016, the House will consider S. 2854, the Emmett Till Unsolved Civil Rights Crimes Reauthorization Act of 2016, under suspension of the rules. S. 2854 was introduced on April 26, 2016,

asked by Sara on November 8, 2017
U.S. Government

  1. Amendment — gave all men the right to vote regardless of race. – 15? 2. People who believe voting is important have high political —-c-c-. – efficacy? 3. It is an essential part of democracy in action, for the people to —e. – vote? 4. The age

asked by Allison on June 27, 2013
My last three questions. please.
opposition to the constitution came from substantial majorities in which of the following three states populous states? A) North Carolina, Virginia and Pennsylvania b) Virginia, Massachusetts, New York c) Massachusetts, pennsylvania, georgia d) North

asked by Anyone who is good in history? on March 22, 2013
American Goverment
The Connecticut Plan was called the Great Compromise because (Points : 1) it allowed states with larger populations to have more representatives in the House and each state to have the same number of votes in the Senate. it allowed slave states to keep

asked by Christopher on May 4, 2015
Civics
To become a law, typically a bill must be approved by: a. The House of Representatives, the Senate, and the President b. The House of Representatives c. The Senate d. The Supreme Court I chose Letter A, but someone how my teacher said it was incorrect. I

asked by Dave on July 19, 2016
History
To become a law, typically a bill must be approved by: a. The House of Representatives, the Senate, and the President b. The House of Representatives c. The Senate d. The Supreme Court I chose Letter A, but someone how my teacher said it was incorrect. I

asked by Dave on July 18, 2016

eNGLISH
HELP-REWORD!!! OF DOES IT SOUND CLEAR? Although I am not part of the LGBTQ community, as an outsider, I personally know someone that this bill would relate to. People not in the LGTQQ community may not understand the political forces that impact people in

asked by BOB on November 12, 2017
American Government
Check answers? 1) What is the main difference between the formal and informal qualifications for the House of Representatives? A) Formal qualifications are outlined in the Constitution**** B) Formal qualifications do not have to be followed C) Informal

asked by Mary on October 7, 2016
Government
Which of the following statements about congress is not true? a.) in the senate, seniority still plays a role as to who is appointed committee chairpeople b.) in the house, rules on debate are more restrictive than in the senate c.) senators have more

asked by Raichel on November 12, 2016
US Gov help URGENT
I’m very ignorant when it comes to politics. I had to write a summary on Shutdown looms: Spotlight now on Senate after Boehner wrangled House GOP votes If you go to google and type that in it’s the first link.. Can someone give me some key pointers as to

asked by Harold on September 28, 2011
st anns
from linear equation if the total bill of a house in delhi is rs 4000 for a month assuming that the consumption is x units as per delhi tariff slabs shown in the actual bill math otba solution

asked by faisal on April 2, 2016
physics
A 3 kg block (block A) is released from rest at the top of a 20 m long frictionless ramp that is 5 m high. At the same time, an identical block (block B) is released next to the ramp so that it drops straight down the same 5 m. Find the values for each of

asked by Katelyn on November 2, 2016
physics
3 kg block (block A) is released from rest at the top of a 20 m long frictionless ramp that is 5 m high. At the same time, an identical block (block B) is released next to the ramp so that it drops straight down the same 5 m. Find the values for each of

asked by Katelyn on October 25, 2016
Civics
What must be true of a bill which has become law at a federal level? It must have been signed by the president It must be in the best interest of all Americans It must have passed both the house and the senate*** It must have been introduced into the

asked by jeje on January 18, 2015
civics
What must be true of a bill which has become law at a federal level? It must have been signed by the president. It must be in the best interest of all Americans. It must have passed both the House and the Senate. It must have been introduced into the

asked by bcbd on January 3, 2017
American Government

  1. What is the only official role of the vice president? A. Lead the national committee on the president’s party. B. Organize presidential commissions. C. Preside over the Senate. D. Vote in case of a tie in the Supreme Court. 7. What best describes a

asked by Hannah on November 8, 2016

Civics
To become a law, typically a bill must be approved by: a. The House of Representatives, the Senate, and the President b. The House of Representatives c. The Senate d. The Supreme Court I chose Letter A, but someone how my teacher said it was incorrect. I

asked by Dave on July 18, 2016
US government
How is debate handled in the Senate? How is debate handled in the House? someone please answer it. anything you know about it. PLEASE!! Since this is not my area of expertise, I searched Google under the key words “US senate house debate rules” to get

asked by cc on December 13, 2006
eng
hello, thanks gain for helping me. i just had a few doubts. you said “Puff Diddly is a hip-hop star no doubt, and Bill Gates is giving away his fortune to others in need or sick. I am not certain if Bill Gates worries about being rejected by society.” my

asked by To BobPursely– yesudas on September 1, 2011
Government

  1. The U.S. Constitution’s Article I, Section 1 created the office for the U.S. president. A) True B) False 2. The term of office for a House member is two years. A) True B) False 3. Two requirements for members of the House are that they must be 25 years

asked by Allison on July 9, 2013
social stuides
What was the purpose of Jim crow laws in south Carolina? a. To stop African Americans from voting ** b. To stop poor whites from voting c. To take land for African Americans d. To help African Americans gain jobs What was the purpose of the freedmen’s

asked by UNKNOWN on March 22, 2016
American Goverment
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania was NOT _. the location the 1787 Constitutional Convention. the city where the Declaration of Independence was signed the childhood home of Thomas Jefferson and John Adams an important city in colonial America 22. For the

asked by Miranda on August 24, 2013
Civics
The president signs a new bill into law. Some people believe the new bill is unconstitutional. According to the system of checks and balances, what can be done? 1. The Supreme Court can enact a new law to cancel the old. 2. The country can vote to overturn

asked by Emma on September 28, 2018
Government
The votes of the electorate are caled the b. direct vote c.popular vote d.primary vote C

asked by jere on January 20, 2008
us government
if the house can muster only the minimum requirement for a quorum, what number of votes would be needed to pass a bill? the constitution specifies a 3/4’s majority for just one process. what is it? The majority of those present will pass a bill.

asked by angie on April 5, 2007
English

  1. What do you think of a solar house? – I think the solar house makes money for us. – I think the solar house makes energy from the sun. – I think the solar house uses the sun to make energy. – I think the solar house uses the sun to make electricity. – I

asked by rfvv on November 18, 2009

Social studies
how was south carolina constitution of 1868 different from earlier versions? A. Representation was based on wealth and population B. Property owners alone could vote C. All men were given the right to vote D. Women were given the right to vote Is it A:)

asked by Anonymous on April 17, 2015
Social studies
which of the following is necessary to propose a new amendment to the Constitution a. approve by a popular vote held in every state b. approve by two thirds of the house and senate c. approve by three quarters of the house and senate d. approve by the

asked by Lana on October 5, 2016
S.S.

  1. which of the following is necessary to propose a new amendment to the constitution? A. approval by a popular vote held in every state. B. approval by two-thirds of the house and senate. C. approval by three-quarters of the house and senate. D.

asked by Chase on August 30, 2017
Math 7th
Ms.Anderson took a walk down her street. She noticed on her walk that her house is 2 blocks south of the post office, the grocery store is 1 block north of her house and her house is the midpoint between the post office and the video store. Which best

asked by Anonymous on April 17, 2011
Government
Which scenario best illustrates how the power to make treaties in the united states constitution provides for checks and balances among the three branches of government ? A. the president must sign an executive agreement without the senate, but must have

asked by Alice Keign on November 15, 2016
Canadian Government
When an individual, non-cabinet member, proposes a bill. Terms I have are: Cabinet Civil Servant NDP Representative Democracy Three First 19 Party Communist Municipal Patronage Private members bill Speaker of the House Order paper I have all these terms

asked by Anonymous on September 27, 2011
American government
Which scenario best illustrates how the power to make treaties in the united states constitution provides for checks and balances among the three branches of government ? A. the president must sign an executive agreement without the senate, but must have

asked by Leslie on September 30, 2016
Social Studies-Check my answers

  1. Why was the Declaration of Independence so important? (Select 2) a. it set up the U.S government* b. it explained the ideals of liberty, justice, and equality c. it announced that American colonies were separate from great Britain* d. it gave

asked by Bailey on September 15, 2017
goverment
Which term is applied to a legislator who introduces a bill? president pro tempore sponsor of the bill proponent of the bill director of the bill B OR d

asked by jimm on March 26, 2015
6th grademath
this is a word problem:the country of hoffnemath is holding its presidential election this week. there three candidates(a,b,c,) and each eligible voter can vote for two of them. the candidate with the most total votes wins the election. here is a summary

asked by jason on October 9, 2008

Algebra
Tom has a $20 bill, a $10 bill, a $5 bill, and $1 bill. List the total costs possible for items he could buy if he receives no change.

asked by George on February 1, 2015
social studies
Which of the following statements best describes the role of a Georgia representative at the Constitutional Convention? A. William Pierce cast a vote, breaking a tie over the Bill of Rights. B. William Few voted with the large states, leading to the

asked by Joseph on August 22, 2018
English

  1. “He is very nice,” said Bill. 2. ” How nice he is!” Bill said. 3. “How are you?” he said. 4. “Go away,” said he. 5. “Shall we go there?” said Bill. 11. Bill said, “He is very nice.” 22. Bill said, ” How nice he is!” 33. He said, “How are you?” 44. He

asked by rfvv on April 19, 2010
History (continued)

  1. What is the main idea of the preamble? A. To state the purpose of the constitution B. To set limits on the authority of the federal government C. To establish the relationship of the branches of government D. To explain the reasoning behind the break

asked by Spongebob on January 19, 2009
English
Need help changing passive voice to an active one…. Iowa’s state lottery bill was approved by the Senate in a close vote taken this morning.

asked by Jackson on February 24, 2014
English

  1. The drinks are on the house. 2. Beer is on the house. 3. You meal is on the house. 4. Dinner is on the house. 5. The pie is on the house. ————————— Are they all grammatical? Why do you use ‘house’? Don’t you use ‘restaurant’?

asked by rfvv on March 22, 2017
government
the best example of the use of random sampling to determine who will be elected as your school president would involve a. asking each student in your class whom he or she would vote for b. asking one student in each classroom whom he or she would vote for

asked by jere on December 27, 2007
gvernemnt
purpose of a filibuster is to

asked by candice on November 26, 2012
American Government
the filibuster is a procedure used only in ?

asked by keona smith on October 17, 2014
physics
Karen and Bill are rearranging furniture in their house, but they don’t always agree on where all the items should go. At one instant, Karen pushes a large chest of drawers (mass of 20kg) horizontally to the right with a force of 35N, while Bill pushes

asked by juanpro on July 6, 2014

Government
What are examples of influences that could cause a member of the House to vote in opposition to the citizens of his/her district?

asked by Anonymous on November 11, 2009
Trig
House B is located at a bearing of N67°E from house A. House C is 370 meters from house A at a bearing of S68°E. House B is located at a bearing of N11°W from house C. Find the distance from house A to house B. (Round your answer to two decimal places.)

asked by Kate on November 8, 2014
Math
If you have one $50 bill, one $20 bill, one $10 bill and one $100 bill, how many possible sums of money consisting of three bills each, can be formed?

asked by Therese on February 22, 2013
governmnent
the framers of the constitution favored bicameralism because a. two houses could block the acts of a single president b. it allowed for fair and equal representation of he states at the national level c. great britain had only one house of parliament d.

asked by jere on January 14, 2008
government
all treaties must be approved by a two thirds vote of a. the senate b. the house c. both houses of congress d. the supreme court a.

asked by jere on January 14, 2008

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due to the drivers not paying attention a small car and a big truck collide

i know this might seem kind of long. but if you could please help me, i’d greatly appreciate it.

a. suppose you have a tug of war with a friend who is the same size and weight as you are. You both pull as hard as you can, but neither of you seems to be winning. You move a little one way or the other, but mostly you are just at rest (although sweating some). Compare the magnitude of the force exerted by you on your friend, with the magnitude of the force exerted by your friend on you. Are they the same or different? If they are not the same, which is larger? Why or why not?

b. Now you have a tug of war with your kid sister (who is much smaller and lighter than you). Again you both pull hard but end in a standoff with neither of you moving much. Compare the magnitude of the force exerted by you on your sister, with the magnitude of the force she exerts on you. Are they the same or different? If they are not the same, which is larger? Why or why not?

c. The next tug of war is still with your kid sister but she is now standing on her skateboard. You can now make her roll across the floor (with constant speed) when you pull hard. In this situation compare the magnitude of the force exerted by you on your sister, with the magnitude of the force she exerts on you. Are they the same or different? If they are not the same, which is larger? Why or why not?

d. Now you pull your sister across the floor so that she moves with increasing speed (accelerates). Compare the magnitude of the force exerted by you on your sister, with the magnitude of the force she exerts on you. Are they the same or different? If they are not the same, which is larger? Why or why not?

e. Due to the drivers not paying attention, a small car and a big truck collide, both are initially moving at 5mph towards each other. Compare the magnitude of the force the truck exerts on the car to the magnitude of the force the car exerts on the truck. Which vehicle would you rather ride in? Describe why you made your choice.

i know a and b are equal.
but for c-e. some ppl say they are all equal because newton’s third law says so.

but some say they are not equal.
for example for e. the force is going towards the car because the truck has a greater force.

can someone please help me.

0 0 183
asked by Tony
Oct 25, 2008
In all cases they are equal and opposite. In some of your cases, the force causes one or in e, both to accelerate. That does not mean the magnitude of the force is different on each. The force just has a different effect on each.
In part e, the car acceleration is much greater than the truck acceleration for the same force on both, so ride in the truck.

0 0
posted by Damon
Oct 25, 2008
You posted this twice. I answered already, attempting to get you to learn how Newton’s Third Law applies, and I agree with Damon.

0 0
posted by drwls
Oct 25, 2008
okay. but for D. there is acceleration. can you explain.

0 0
posted by Tony
Oct 25, 2008
seriously dude i need to finish this prelab

0 0
posted by bn
Oct 27, 2008

remember, even if F is the same (which it always is in a collision), mass and acceleration may not be. smaller mass = greater acceleration because F = F and
ma = ma, so if one mass is smaller, its a must be larger to equalize with the other side.

0 0
posted by bn
Oct 27, 2008
A 4.2 kilo b
Bag of surgar is on a counter how much work is required to put the bag on a shelf a distance of 0.60 m above the counter. J

0 0
posted by Cynthia
Feb 13, 2016

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which of the following statements about radioactive decay is true

Which of the following statements about radioactive dating is true?

a. Radioactive decay is the rate at which new atoms form.
b. During radioactive decay, atoms break down, releasing particles or energy.
c. The rate of decay of a radioactive element cannot be approximated.
d. The number of radioactive atoms in a sample will always remain constant.

B

Geologists use radioactive dating to:

a. determine the relative age of rock layers.
b. tell the difference between molds and casts.
c. tell where one soil horizon ends and the next one begins.
d. determine the absolute age of rocks.

D

If the half-life of a 20.0 g sample is known to be 24 minutes, how long will it take for only 5.0 grams of the sample to remain?

a. 6 minutes
b. 24 minutes
c. 48 minutes
d. 96 minutes

C

0 0 3,407
asked by Anonymous
Oct 10, 2013
looks good to me.

0 0
posted by Steve
Oct 10, 2013
Connections Academy?

5 3
posted by Rainshine
Jan 14, 2014
1- B
2- D
3- D
4- C

39 2
posted by Emz
Oct 4, 2015
Emz answers are correct. I got a 5/5 100% A.

5 2
posted by yo
Oct 20, 2015

EMZ Is correct, I got 4/4.

2 0
posted by Anonymous
Oct 25, 2015
1- B
2- D
3- D
4- C
100%

6 1
posted by Shawn Mendes is bae
Nov 2, 2015
1.B
2.D
3.D
4.C

4/4 (100%)

3 1
posted by Avery
Dec 8, 2015
This is wrong

1 5
posted by dathyjmn
Dec 16, 2015
nvm i wasn’t

1 1
posted by dathyjmn
Dec 16, 2015

Ms. Sue how would you know that you diarrhea is delicious, you wouldhave tried it yourself.

1 2
posted by Me
Jan 28, 2016
Thank you so much Emz, because of you i got 100% 😉 Love You!

0 2
posted by Cutie
Mar 2, 2016
100% love yalll! avery is wrong it is
a
b
b
d
trust me!100% i got

1 7
posted by j
Mar 4, 2016
B. D. D. C. All corect!! 😉

1 1
posted by fox girl
Mar 5, 2016
b d d c is right

1 1
posted by yoyoyo
Mar 9, 2016

BDDC IS RIGHT YALL

0 1
posted by LaTisha
Mar 21, 2016
Bddc is 100% correct for connections grade 7b unit 3 lesson 3

0 0
posted by Phoenix
May 10, 2016
B
D
D
C

1000% RIGHT

0 1
posted by Anonymous
Sep 22, 2016
B
D
D
C

0 1
posted by Remy
Oct 11, 2016
Yes, the correct answers are B,D,D,C. Please try this on your own next time though. You will learn much more!

0 2
posted by Ms.Amy
Oct 18, 2016

B
D
D
C

0 1
posted by U.K.
Oct 24, 2016
B
D
D
C
Trust me 100%

0 1
posted by Anonymous
Nov 10, 2016
B
D
D
C
Thanks jiskha fam

0 1
posted by Helping you
Nov 22, 2016
Thanks y’all! I got 100% <3

0 1
posted by Jennifer
Nov 28, 2016
yep its correct

0 0
posted by helpmeh
Jan 27, 2017

B
D
D
C

is correct! Thanks!

0 0
posted by Anonymous
Mar 6, 2017
B
B
C
D
is the correct answers

0 1
posted by Nashi Dragneel
Sep 11, 2017
no

0 1
posted by celia
Oct 5, 2017
yes all correct

1 1
posted by I am so mad that Ms sue is fake
Nov 10, 2017
B
D
D
C
is correct

1 0
posted by jacob sartorius & cole sprouse are ma daddies.
Feb 14, 2018

hi im dead

0 4
posted by xxxtentacion
Aug 28, 2018
the right answer is b,d,d,c got a 4/4

0 0
posted by I NEED ANSWERS
Aug 29, 2018
Right answers are B D D C, but please just use answers to check your work !

0 0
posted by Vixen – Connexus
Aug 29, 2018
Its wrong i got 2/4

0 1
posted by marlo
Sep 7, 2018
b
d
d
c

1 0
posted by jamar
Sep 27, 2018

B D D C

3 0
posted by Ragene (raygen pronounced)
Oct 24, 2018
BDDC is correct!!!!!!!!

0 0
posted by kk
Nov 7, 2018
drugs are bad kids

except me

2 4
posted by crystal meth 😵
Nov 16, 2018
k

0 3
posted by crystal meth 😵
Nov 16, 2018
um ok

0 1
posted by umok
Nov 21, 2018

EMZ I HOPE YOU ARE RIGHT I AM SUBMITING MY TEST……………..
YAAAAAAAAAAA YOU WERE CORRECT THANK YOU!!!!!!

0 0
posted by alone forever
Dec 4, 2018
Yes, indeed. Everyone is right except for j, he is absolutely incorrect.

The correct answers are the following:

B) During radioactive decay, atoms break down, releasing particles or energy

D) half-life

D) determine the absolute age of rocks

C) 48 minutes

Just as everyone else is saying, these are the correct answers.

2 0
posted by Woah, dude
Dec 4, 2018
ABBD is Incorrect DOn’t worry I didn’t try it I did BDDC BDDC is correct.

2 0
posted by Tr1ffy
Dec 4, 2018
Are you guys from Connections Academy? I am. Like if you are. Here are the answers for the whole assessment:

  1. B
  2. D
  3. D
  4. C 2 0
    posted by MarineCat6
    Dec 4, 2018
  5. B- During radioactive decay, atoms break down, releasing particles or energy.
  6. D- half-life
  7. D- determine the absolute age of rocks.
  8. C- 48 minutes 0 0
    posted by …
    Dec 19, 2018

WHERE THE HELL IS HALF LIFE 3 AT

0 0
posted by where
Mar 13, 2019
B
D
D
C

Correct Me If I am Wrong! (Please X3)

0 0
posted by TheMidnightFox65YT
Apr 10, 2019

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which of the following anions act as weak bases in solution?

Which of the following anions act as weak bases in solution?
ClO4-
ClO-
C2H3O2-
Cl-

I think its ClO4- and Cl-

0 0 468
asked by Anonymous
Oct 23, 2010
HClO_4 and HCl are strong acids

all of those with an -OH would be weak bases

Strong bases:
LiOH, NaOH, KOH, Ca(OH)_2, Sr(OH)_2, Ba(OH)_2

0 0
posted by Anonymous
Oct 23, 2010