Home / Assignment Help / In a certain computer game, the computer can make 1 of 4 moves, which it chooses randomly. According to the game manual, the probability it will make 1 of the moves is 0.5, the probability it will make 2 of the remaining moves is 0.25, and the probability it will make the last move is unknown, but nonzero. Why can the player immediately know that these probabilities are incorrect?

In a certain computer game, the computer can make 1 of 4 moves, which it chooses randomly. According to the game manual, the probability it will make 1 of the moves is 0.5, the probability it will make 2 of the remaining moves is 0.25, and the probability it will make the last move is unknown, but nonzero. Why can the player immediately know that these probabilities are incorrect?

You cannot make negative cookies so (c(f) and f)≥0.  And since cookies must (or at least should be in the real world) integers, f must be a multiple of 1/24. (otherwise you’d have fractional cookies).  What is a “reasonable” upper bound for c(f) is very subjective, obviously we cannot make an infinite amount of cookies 🙂

Because of this, the designer of this question, did so quite poorly.  Now simplistically we could say that the domain would be [0,+oo) and the range [0,+oo), But this would be ignoring all of the above.  In reality the domain would be [0, 1/24, 2/24, etc n/24]  where n/24 was some real limitation on the amount of flour (and time) that you could possibly have and the range would be [0,1,2,3,…n] where n would be the result of the the limited domain values.  (unless we were making fractional cookies :P)

Sorry, I could not resist, I cringe when I see subjective math problems.  The range and domain I put is what I would call “reasonable” range and domain.  I wonder what the designer of the question thinks is reasonable….

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