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PLEASE HELP Mr. Utterson the lawyer was a man of a rugged countenance, that was never lighted by a smile; cold, scanty and embarrassed in discourse; backward in sentiment; lean, long, dusty, dreary, and yet somehow lovable. At friendly meetings, and when the wine was to his taste, something eminently human beaconed from his eye; something indeed which never found its way into his talk, but which spoke not only in these silent symbols of the after-dinner face, but more often and loudly in the acts of his life. He was austere with himself; drank gin when he was alone, to mortify a taste for vintages; and though he enjoyed the theatre, had not crossed the doors of one for twenty years. But he had an approved tolerance for others; sometimes wondering, almost with envy, at the high pressure of spirits involved in their misdeeds; and in any extremity inclined to help rather than to reprove. "I incline to, Cain's heresy*," he used to say. "I let my brother go to the devil in his quaintly 'own way.'" In this character, it was frequently his fortune to be the last reputable acquaintance and the last good influence in the lives of down-going men. And to such as these, so long as they came about his chambers, he never marked a shade of change in his demeanour. No doubt the feat was easy to Mr. Utterson; for he was undemonstrative at the best, and even his friendship seemed to be founded in a similar catholicity of good-nature. It is the mark of a modest man to accept his friendly circle ready-made from the hands of opportunity; and that was the lawyer's way. His friends were those of his own blood or those whom he had known the longest; his affections, like ivy, were the growth of time, they implied no aptness in the object. Hence, no doubt, the bond that united him to Mr. Richard Enfield, his distant kinsman, the well-known man about town. It was a nut to crack for many, what these two could see in each other, or what subject they could find in common. It was reported by those who encountered them in their Sunday walks, that they said nothing, looked singularly dull, and would hail with obvious relief the appearance of a friend. For all that, the two men put the greatest store by these excursions, counted them the chief jewel of each week, and not only set aside occasions of pleasure, but even resisted the calls of business, that they might enjoy them uninterrupted. *The biblical story of Cain and Abel is a story about two brothers who gave offerings to God. Abel’s offering was accepted by God, but Cain’s was not. Jealous, Cain killed his brother. When God asked Cain where Abel was, Cain said, “Am I my brother’s keeper?” By saying this, Cain implied that what his brother did was his own business. (Genesis 4:1-16) What is significant about “Cain’s heresy” in this passage? A.It shows that Mr. Utterson is a deeply religious and righteous person. B.It shows that Mr. Utterson tries not to judge others or get in their business. C.It shows the Mr. Utterson wants to steal from other people’s businesses. D.It shows that Mr. Utterson does not believe in any kind of religion at all.

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PLEASE HELP Mr. Utterson the lawyer was a man of a rugged countenance, that was never lighted by a smile; cold, scanty and embarrassed in discourse; backward in sentiment; lean, long, dusty, dreary, and yet somehow lovable. At friendly meetings, and when the wine was to his taste, something eminently human beaconed from his eye; something indeed which never found its way into his talk, but which spoke not only in these silent symbols of the after-dinner face, but more often and loudly in the acts of his life. He was austere with himself; drank gin when he was alone, to mortify a taste for vintages; and though he enjoyed the theatre, had not crossed the doors of one for twenty years. But he had an approved tolerance for others; sometimes wondering, almost with envy, at the high pressure of spirits involved in their misdeeds; and in any extremity inclined to help rather than to reprove. “I incline to, Cain’s heresy*,” he used to say. “I let my brother go to the devil in his quaintly ‘own way.'” In this character, it was frequently his fortune to be the last reputable acquaintance and the last good influence in the lives of down-going men. And to such as these, so long as they came about his chambers, he never marked a shade of change in his demeanour. No doubt the feat was easy to Mr. Utterson; for he was undemonstrative at the best, and even his friendship seemed to be founded in a similar catholicity of good-nature. It is the mark of a modest man to accept his friendly circle ready-made from the hands of opportunity; and that was the lawyer’s way. His friends were those of his own blood or those whom he had known the longest; his affections, like ivy, were the growth of time, they implied no aptness in the object. Hence, no doubt, the bond that united him to Mr. Richard Enfield, his distant kinsman, the well-known man about town. It was a nut to crack for many, what these two could see in each other, or what subject they could find in common. It was reported by those who encountered them in their Sunday walks, that they said nothing, looked singularly dull, and would hail with obvious relief the appearance of a friend. For all that, the two men put the greatest store by these excursions, counted them the chief jewel of each week, and not only set aside occasions of pleasure, but even resisted the calls of business, that they might enjoy them uninterrupted. *The biblical story of Cain and Abel is a story about two brothers who gave offerings to God. Abel’s offering was accepted by God, but Cain’s was not. Jealous, Cain killed his brother. When God asked Cain where Abel was, Cain said, “Am I my brother’s keeper?” By saying this, Cain implied that what his brother did was his own business. (Genesis 4:1-16) What is significant about “Cain’s heresy” in this passage? A.It shows that Mr. Utterson is a deeply religious and righteous person. B.It shows that Mr. Utterson tries not to judge others or get in their business. C.It shows the Mr. Utterson wants to steal from other people’s businesses. D.It shows that Mr. Utterson does not believe in any kind of religion at all.

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Dragged ya down below Down to the devil’s show To be his guest forever (Peace of mind is less than never) Hate to twist your mind But God ain’t on your side And old acquaintance severed (Burn the world your last endeavor) What is the name of this song and when was it made?

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Answer:

Propaganda is a form of communication that aims to influence the attitude of a community regarding some cause or position, presenting only one side or aspect of an argument. Propaganda is usually repeated and disseminated in a wide variety of media in order to obtain the desired result in the attitude of the audience.

During Nazi Germany, Adolf Hitler sought to modify the pejorative sense that the term propaganda had acquired in the years after World War I. In this sense, his first propagandistic action was to imbue the German people with a positive concept of propaganda. Joseph Goebbels was in charge of promoting or publicizing government notices, using what is now known as social marketing, extolling feelings of pride, promoting hatreds and sometimes lying and convincing things away from reality. He also had other techniques and methods such as making the German public wait for the news in times of victory to create a strong suspense and make the joy more lasting when they receive the good news.

The ideological propaganda during World War II and the evaluation of its effects, confirmed the effectiveness of the mechanisms of persuasion, making the ideological war a primordial component in subsequent armed conflicts.

In the Cold War, the interests of the United States and the Soviet Union prevented a direct confrontation between the two powers. Therefore, the development of that period was specifically marked by the symbolic and rhetorical combat promoted by the leaders of each of the blocks in question. In this way, the propaganda would charge a special value.

In the case of the Americans, the Voice of America, an example of white propaganda, operated as the government’s official radio station. Thanks to the control of this means of communication, the executive could issue his speech in a way that reached the bulk of the population. Later, the abuse of this channel would be considered by some critics as a violation of popular sovereignty. The use of gray propaganda would take place outside the territory, especially in the USSR and Eastern Europe, where news and entertainment programs inserted American ideology through two radio stations controlled by the CIA, Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty.

As for the Soviets, they put in place strategies similar to those of the Americans. The Communist ideologues also made use of an official station that broadcast their official discourses, Radio Moscow. In turn, they used gray propaganda in US territory through radio stations Radio Peace and Freedom. But the Soviets, in the framework of their statist system, also used the school as a means to display their anti-American propaganda. It was intended to create a bad image in children about the American way of life and make believe that the USSR was a power with many more resources and wealth.

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Reread Lines 146 to 203 and check three questions Everyman asks Death to answer. May he come back from his pilgrimage? What judgment awaits him? May he have someone to go with him? Where can he go to escape endless sorrow? For Adam’s sin must die of nature. 145 EVERYMAN. Death, if I should this pilgrimage take, And my reckoning surely make, Show me, for saint charity, Should I not come again shortly? DEATH. No, Everyman; and thou be once there, 150 Thou mayest never more come here, Trust me verily. EVERYMAN. O gracious God, in the high seat celestial, Have mercy on me in this most need! Shall I have no company from this vale terrestrial Of mine acquaintance that way me to lead? 155 DEATH. Yea, if any be so hardy, That would go with thee and bear thee company. Hie thee that thou were gone to God’s magnificence, Thy reckoning to give before his presence. What! weenest ° thou thy life is given thee, 160 °think And thy worldly goods also? EVERYMAN. I had weened so, verily. DEATH. Nay, nay; it was but lent thee; For, as soon as thou art gone, Another a while shall have it, and then go therefrom 165 Even as thou hast done. Everyman, thou art mad! Thou hast thy wits five, And here on earth will not amend thy life; For suddenly I do come. EVERYMAN. O wretched caitiff! whither shall I flee, 170 That I might ‘scape endless sorrow? Now, gentle Death, spare me till tomorrow, That I may amend me With good advisement. ° °warning DEATH. Nay, thereto I will not consent, 175 Nor no man will I respite, But to the heart suddenly I shall smite Without any advisement. And now out of thy sight I will me hie; See thou make thee ready shortly, 180 For thou mayst say this is the day That no man living may ‘scape away. (Exit DEATH.) EVERYMAN. Alas! I may well weep with sighs deep. Now have I no manner of company To help me in my journey and me to keep; 185 And also my writing is full unready. How shall I do now for to excuse me? I would to God I had never been get! To my soul a full great profit it had be, For now I fear pains huge and great. 190 The time passeth; Lord, help, that all wrought. For though I mourn it availeth naught. The day passeth, and is almost a-go; I wot ° not well what for to do. °know To whom were I best my complaint to make? 195 What if I to Fellowship thereof spake, And showed him of this sudden chance? For in him is all mine affiance, ° °trust We have in the world so many a day Been good friends in sport and play. 200 I see him yonder, certainly: I trust that he will bear me company; Therefore to him will I speak to ease my sorrow.

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3. There is within me (and with sadness I have watched it in others) a knot of cruelty borne by the stream of love, much as our blood sometimes bears the seed of our destruction, and at times I was mean to Doodle.

Explanation:

This is the statement that most foreshadows the fact that the narrator will feel regret for something that he has done to Doodle. In this excerpt, the narrator tells us that he believes there is some element of cruelty within him, and that at times, this cruelty was shown in his dealings with Doodle, as he could be mean to him. This suggest that the author will be cruel to Doodle later in the story.

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