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Chaucer’s “holy blissful martyr” is a literary-historical allusion to _____. Joan of Arc Thomas à Becket Pertelote John Donne

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Chaucer’s “holy blissful martyr” is a literary-historical allusion to Thommas a Becket. Option B is correct.

Thomas Becket was Archbishop of Canterbury from 1162 until he was murdered in 1170. He is venerated as a saint and martyr by both the Catholic Church and the Anglican Communion.

He was murdered by followers of king Henry II in Canterbury Cathedral since they were in conflict over the rights and privileges of the Church.

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"And one day those men came again, and said, now for the test, and they took the puppy to the laboratory, and I limped three-leggedly along, too, feeling proud, for any attention shown to the puppy was a pleasure to me, of course. They discussed and experimented, and then suddenly the puppy shrieked, and they set him on the floor, and he went staggering around, with his head all bloody, and the master clapped his hand and shouted: 'There, I've won–confess it! He's blind as a bat!'" "A Dog's Tale." Mark Twain, 1904. This illustrates the ________ in the story. A. style B. allusion C. conflict D. foreshadowing

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“And one day those men came again, and said, now for the test, and they took the puppy to the laboratory, and I limped three-leggedly along, too, feeling proud, for any attention shown to the puppy was a pleasure to me, of course. They discussed and experimented, and then suddenly the puppy shrieked, and they set him on the floor, and he went staggering around, with his head all bloody, and the master clapped his hand and shouted: ‘There, I’ve won–confess it! He’s blind as a bat!'” “A Dog’s Tale.” Mark Twain, 1904. This illustrates the ________ in the story. A. style B. allusion C. conflict D. foreshadowing

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A precise , dictionary-type definition of a word is an? A . allusion. B . metaphor c.denotation d. Connotation

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Related questions


Implied meaning of a word is an?

The implied meaning of a word is the hint gotten from the word context. It is much different than inferring which is to guess. It is much of a safer knowledge.

ANSWERED AT 22/10/2019 – 06:50 AM


QUESTION POSTED AT 22/10/2019 – 06:50 AM


Why is it important to introduce words into your speaking vocabulary

Expansion of knowledge! Your brain works faster when processing word-based information and understands more. It’s also a great way to insult people using words they don’t know like dolt. But knowing more helps you. Especially in the SAT/ACT and all English tests that will come in your life.

ANSWERED AT 20/10/2019 – 08:47 AM


QUESTION POSTED AT 20/10/2019 – 08:47 AM


“Sino” is another word for

The best answer for this question would be “Chinese”

ANSWERED AT 19/10/2019 – 11:19 PM


QUESTION POSTED AT 19/10/2019 – 11:19 PM

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What was Lincoln alluding to (using an Allusion) when he wrote, “It may seem strange that any men should dare to ask a just God’s assistance in wringing their bread from the sweat of other men’s faces…” in his speech?

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Since a tiny tender child of four,
There’s nothing that I dreamt of more,
Than to jump aboard a great big ship,
A telescope, a map, a sword, by my hip,
To feel the sea breeze in my hair,
To stroke my parrot on the wood chair,
To be bold and brave and happy as can be,
To trek and travel and sail the seven seas.

8 lines. Rhyme scheme aabbccdd. If I managed to write that in about 4 minutes, you could write something much better and longer in like 30 minutes. You can use my rubbish poem as inspiration lol. Good luck X

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Shakespeare’s allusion to Hecuba suggests that hamlet

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Some of the literary devices that Shakespeare uses in this passage would be:

Simile: “as swift in motion as a ball”

This is used in order to convey an image of very swift, quick movement. This conveys the idea of desperation, as Juliet cannot wait for the nurse to return.

Allusion: “And therefore hath the wind-swift Cupid wings.”

In these line, Shakespeare makes an allusion to Cupid, a creature from Greek mythology, often associated with love. This highlights the feelings of love that Juliet is experiencing.

Metaphor: “Therefore do nimble-pinion’d doves draw love,”

In this line, Juliet compares the nurse (who is acting as a messenger), and all other messenger that carry a message of love with doves, as they are also known to carry messages.

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What allusion does Dr. King make in paragraph 2 of his famous “I Have a Dream” speech?

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You didn’t give choices, but Hamilton favored a loose interpretation of the Constitution.

Hamilton focused on what has become known as the the “necessary and proper” clause of the United States Constitution.  After enumerating a number of the powers of Congress, including borrowing money, coining money, regulating commerce, etc, Section 8 of Article I of the Constitution closes by saying Congress shall have power “to make all Laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into Execution the foregoing Powers, and all other Powers vested by this Constitution in the Government of the United States, or in any Department or Officer thereof.”  That grants Congress implied powers beyond those listed in the Constitution itself.

An example of the implementation of such implied powers in the Constitution occurred when Alexander Hamilton, as our nation’s first Secretary of the Treasury, argued in favor of establishing a national bank.   Hamilton favored a loose interpretation of the Constitution — in other words, that the Constitution allows for anything that is not strictly forbidden in what it has expressly stated.  A national bank was not strictly listed as something Congress could establish, but there was nothing in the Constitution to prohibit it.  And the “necessary and proper” clause gave leeway to create it, by the implied powers given to Congress.

Thomas Jefferson took a view opposite that of Hamilton.  Jefferson argued against the establishment of a national bank because according to a strict reading or interpretation of the Constitution, no such entity was stipulated in the document.  

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Marissa flopped onto the raft and lay on her little island, warming her back in the sun. Which figure of speech, or literary device, does the author use in the sentence? implied metaphor simile personification allusion

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Marissa flopped onto the raft and lay on her little island, warming her back in the sun. Which figure of speech, or literary device, does the author use in the sentence? implied metaphor simile personification allusion

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The title of Achebe’s Things Fall Apart is an allusion to a(n) _____. Igbo folktale Nigerian short story novel by Joseph Conrad poem by William Butler Yeats

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The correct answer is A) a quote that expresses the writer’s message.

The statement that would be a supporting detail when analyzing the theme of a story is a quote that expresses the writer’s message.

When you analyze the theme of any story you have to have in mind the opinion, the beliefs, the thoughts, the ideas, or the moment when the story was written. Remember that the theme is the main reason for the story. It’s the main message. That is why a quote from the author could be very helpful when analyzing the theme of the story. This could sever as a reference that indicates reasons or motives that the author had when writing the story.

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Each of the following lines from “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” contains allusion except A. “I am no prophet—and here’s no great matter;”B. “To say: I am Lazarus, come from the dead,”C. “No! I am not Prince Hamlet, nor was meant to be;”D. “I shall wear white flannel trousers, and walk upon the beach.”Read the following lines from “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock.” And when I am formulated, sprawling on a pin, When I am pinned and wriggling on the wall Then how should I begin To spit out the butt-ends of my days and ways?

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The correct answer is B) Digression.

The passage is an example of the Epic convention called Digression.

When the narrative contains some interruptions that distract the reader. It is a stylistic device that writers use to deviate from the main theme or subject of the story. It can be used to explain something that happened before the present time of the story or describing the personalities of the characters.  

In this case, the author does so when he writes “Melampus, who lived in Pylos, mother of flocks, some years ago”. Or in the case of “…Neleus, most imperious man alive, who commandeered his vast state and held it down by force for one entire year…”

The other options of the question were, a) lengthy speech, c) epic smile, and d) divine intervention.

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“Simile” by N. Scott Momaday What did we say to each other that now we are as the deer who walk in single file with heads high with ears forward with eyes watchful with hooves always placed on firm ground in whose limbs there is latent flight Source: Momaday, N. Scott. “Simile.” The Language of Literature. New York: McDougal Littell, 2006. 265. Print. Which of the following techniques does this poem use? I. simile II. sensory imagery III. allusion I and II I and III II and III I only[i and ii ] is the answer just doing this so people know that answer when they are looked up

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|Q| Why did people trust Bernie Madoff? |A| Our research suggests that Madoff may have deliberately or inadvertently taken advantage of the automatic trust process regardless of whether his family members and business associates were victims or confederates. Even if he didn’t seem trustworthy, the fact that his closest relatives and associates invested with him could have provided a subtle, non-conscious signal that he was actually trustworthy. After all, foxes never prey near their dens, and thieves only steal far from their homes. Additionally, the constant associations of Madoff’s name with all sorts of philanthropic works, and other subtle cues, may also have encouraged people to trust when they shouldn’t have.

To explore trust, we did an experiment that used common cues naturally associated with people’s previous trusting or distrusting relationships–the names of their friends. We used the names of our research participants’ friends (or enemies) to subliminally prime them before they had a chance to trust or not trust someone they had never met.

In our simulation, the participants saw their friends’ names repeatedly, for fractions of a second, so briefly that they could not recognize them, before they played the classic Trust Game. In the game, they each started with $5 and could send any part of it, from nothing to all $5, to another participant whom they would never meet. The ”receiver” (who didn’t actually exist) would have full knowledge of the sender’s endowment and the amount the sender had sent.

The participants understood that the receiver would be getting three times the amount they sent and would then freely choose how much of the tripled amount to return to the senders. The receiver could send back anything from nothing to the entire tripled amount. In this boiled-down interaction, sending money was risky but increased joint gain; this accorded with the common definition of trusting behavior–a willingness to accept vulnerability based on positive expectations of another’s intention or behavior that is not under one’s control.

The results were stunning. After seeing subliminal presentations of names of people they liked or people they trusted, our participants trusted anonymous strangers by sending them an average of nearly 50% more than people who saw similar presentations of names of people they didn’t like.

In addition, nearly 50% of the participants who saw–albeit unconsciously–names they liked or trusted sent their entire endowments to strangers, compared with 15% of the participants who were subliminally primed with names of people they distrusted. These subliminal cues also increased their expectations that the stranger would reciprocate their trust by responding in ways that would best serve their interest.

The automatic trust process that this reveals has important implications for investors, consumers and business executives. Business relationships form at an increasingly rapid pace, and trust-related choices, such as financial investment decisions, can be made with the click of a mouse. People who can gain financially from others’ trust can deliberately or inadvertently take advantage of this process.

This same process can also increase expectations of reciprocity. People in our studies who were subliminally primed by trust-related cues also expected that their interaction partners would be more trusting in return. Thus if you take advantage of the automatic trust process, you may be penalized in the future if you don’t meet the higher, subliminally induced expectations of those who trust you. It seems clear, even without addressing the potential moral issues that arise, that people who try to stimulate automatic trust for their own benefit should ensure that they have the means and the desire to reciprocate if they want to enjoy long-term success.In some situations, everyone can benefit from an automatic trust. When subliminally activated trust is not intentionally exploited, it can lead to an increase in the likelihood of mutually beneficial trust, much like a self-fulfilling prophecy. In a classic 1977 experiment conducted by the social psychologist Mark Snyder and his colleagues, participants behaved in a more friendly and trustworthy manner after they interacted with others who had been led to believe that they were friendly and trustworthy. Thus, the subliminally activated trust may help boost the mutual trust development process and lead to mutual benefits that wouldn’t be attained without it. Put simply, our findings suggest that trust may not always develop via an incremental, evaluative process. Social and relational cues may have a strong but subtle impact on people’s important financial and management choices. Understanding the non-conscious nature of this process can help you take advantage of its benefits while avoiding its downsides–and avoiding the next Bernie Madoff, too.

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