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Match the description to the term. 1. a medieval play dramatizing biblical events allegory 2. words or actions whose meanings are recognized by the audience but unrecognized by the characters chorus 3. a story in which characters represent parts of a teaching, having both a literal and a figurative meaning mystery play 4. a medieval play dramatizing incidents in the lives of saints morality play 5. a medieval dramatized allegory in which virtues and vices appear to struggle for man’s soul miracle play 6. group commenting on the action in ancient Greek drama dramatic irony

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1) Mystery play: A medieval play dramatizing biblical events

Part of the vernacular drama, they developed from plays represented in Latin by the churchmen, thay usually refered to the creation, Adam and Eve, the mirder of Abel and the final judgment.

2) Dramatic irony: words or actions whose meanings are recognized by the audience but unrecognized by the character.

Usually found in plays, movies, theatres and sometimes in poetry, it is used to create intense suspence and humor.

3) Allegory: A story in which characters represent parts of a teaching, having both a literal and figurative meaning.

Usually refered to as a symbolic representation.

4) Miracle play: A medievla play dramatizing incidents in the lives of saints.

Part of the vernacular drama, it evolved from liturgical offices of the 10th and 11th century, by the 13th century it was fully developed.

5) Morality play: A medieval dramatized allegory in which virtues and vices appear to struggle for man’s soul.

Pat of the vernacular drama, was popular in Europe in the 15th and 16th centuries. It is centered on a here which weaknesses’s are attacked by evil forces, choosing redemption and God.

6) Chorus: Group commenting on the action in ancient Greek drama.

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What is a stanza? A. a pattern of rhyme at the ends of poetic lines B. a repeated grouping of two or more lines in a poem that often share a pattern of rhythm and rhyme C. descriptive language that creates vivid impressions D. a regularly repeated line or group of lines, like a chorus in a song

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Since a tiny tender child of four,
There’s nothing that I dreamt of more,
Than to jump aboard a great big ship,
A telescope, a map, a sword, by my hip,
To feel the sea breeze in my hair,
To stroke my parrot on the wood chair,
To be bold and brave and happy as can be,
To trek and travel and sail the seven seas.

8 lines. Rhyme scheme aabbccdd. If I managed to write that in about 4 minutes, you could write something much better and longer in like 30 minutes. You can use my rubbish poem as inspiration lol. Good luck X

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This political cartoon is from 1915: A political cartoon shows a political boss conducting a chorus with a woman wearing a dress labeled anti. She stands before a group of men in the choir wearing clothing labeled procurer, divekeeper, child labor employer, grafter, cadet, and sweat shop owner. The caption reads, I did not raise my girl to be a voter. Soprano solo with vociferous supporting chorus of male voices. © 2012 Library of Congress [Illus. in AP101.P7 1915] What does the cartoonist imply about political bosses and the issue of women’s suffrage? Political bosses were against women’s suffrage because they feared women might use their votes to end corruption. Political bosses were against women’s suffrage because they knew that most women wanted the right to vote. Political bosses favored women’s suffrage because it would provide more votes for the political machine to control. Political bosses were favored women’s suffrage because they would control women’s votes.

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Here are the following effects of loose money and tight
money policies on the actions being listed.

A. A loose money policy
is usually implemented as an effort to encourage economic growth.
This can lead to inflation when uncontrolled. The effects are:

1. Borrowing becomes easy

2. Consumer buys more

3. Since more people are willing to buy,
businesses expand

4. Employment rate increases due to
expansion of businesses

5. Since more people are employed, thus
production also increases

 

B. A tight money policy is a course of action to restrict spending
in an economy that is growing too quickly or to hold back inflation when it is
rising too fast. This can lead to recession when uncontrolled. The
effects are:

1. Borrowing becomes difficult

2. Consumer buys less

3. Since people don’t have a lot of
money, business don’t expand

4. Unemployment rate increases due to businesses
slowing down

5. Production decreases

 

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Which sentence uses italics or quotation marks correctly? A. O. Henry’s short story “The Cop and the Anthem” is both funny and sad. B. Amigo Brothers has been included in this collection of short stories. C. They enjoyed reading Thank You, M’am, a short story by Langston Hughes. D. “Seventh Grade” by Gary Soto is a short story about the first day of school. Which sentence uses italics or quotation marks correctly? A. In 1883, the “Orient Express” began railroad trips from Paris to Istanbul. B. I have a ticket for the Crescent passenger train, which will take me all the way to New Orleans. C. The “Flying Scotsman” was a luxury express train with a restaurant and a cinema coach. D. Beginning in 1936, the Super Chief passenger train ran from Chicago to Los Angeles. Which sentence uses italics or quotation marks correctly? A. As Mom cooks breakfast, she hums one of her favorite songs, Oh, What a Beautiful Mornin’. B. My baby brother already knows songs like “Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star.” C. I really like that song called “Do You Believe in Magic?” D. Dad makes me laugh when he sings the Elvis Presley song “Hound Dog.” Which sentence uses italics or quotation marks correctly? A. Even though it made him sad, he enjoyed reading Hans Christian Andersen’s short story The Little Match Girl. B. In April 1912, the Titanic struck an iceberg and sank in the North Atlantic Ocean. C. Here is the current issue of the magazine Sports Illustrated for Kids. D. The main newspaper in New Orleans is called “The Times-Picayune.” Which sentence uses italics or quotation marks correctly? A. My little brother just saw the movie “101 Dalmatians” for the first time. B. This sports magazine has a funny article titled “Top Ten Team Mascots.” C. In the chorus concert, we’re singing the song titled Don’t Fence Me In. D. The first spacecraft to travel to Saturn was the Pioneer 11 in 1979. Which sentence uses italics or quotation marks correctly? A. I really enjoyed reading Lewis Carroll’s book Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. B. Who painted “Starry Night,” Van Gogh or Cezanne? C. Suzanne recited Winter Time, a short poem by Robert Louis Stevenson. D. My parents saw the Metropolitan Opera Company perform The Magic Flute on Saturday night. Which sentence uses italics or quotation marks correctly? A. Clément Ader piloted his steam-engine powered airplane named “Éole.” B. I don’t read all the newspaper, but I do read the editorials in the Washington Post. C. Ms. Franz recommends Walter Lord’s book titled “A Night to Remember.” D. One of Michelangelo’s most famous sculptures is the Pieta. Which sentence uses italics or quotation marks correctly? A. Vanessa looked up several articles in the Journal of the American Medical Association. B. I get a peaceful feeling when I look at Monet’s painting titled Water Lilies. C. Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet” is a play that has been made into a movie and an opera. D. I was inspired by the story told in this book, “Washington at Valley Forge.” Which sentence uses italics or quotation marks correctly? A. Composers Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein wrote the music for the Broadway play The Sound of Music. B. My favorite song from the musical is Do-Re-Mi, which is sung by Maria and all of the von Trapp children. C. The musical is based on Maria von Trapp’s book, The Story of the Trapp Family Singers. D. The Academy Award for Best Picture in 1965 went to the musical movie “The Sound of Music.”

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March 4, 1933, was perhaps the Great Depression’s darkest hour. The stock market had plunged 85% from its high in 1929, and nearly one-fourth of the workforce was unemployed. In the cities, jobless men were lining up for soup and bread. In rural areas, farmers whose land was being foreclosed were talking openly of revolution. The crowd that gathered in front of the Capitol that day to watch Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Inauguration had all but given up on America. They were, a reporter observed, “as silent as a group of mourners around a grave.”
Roosevelt’s Inaugural Address was a pitch-perfect combination of optimism (“The only thing we have to fear is fear itself”), consolation (the nation’s problems “concern, thank God, only material things”) and resolve (“This nation asks for action, and action now”). The speech won rave reviews. Even the rock-ribbed Republican Chicago Tribune lauded its “dominant note of courageous confidence.” F.D.R. had buoyed the spirits of the American people — and nearly 500,000 of them wrote to him at the White House in the following week to tell him so.
Hours after the Inauguration, Roosevelt made history in a more behind-the-scenes way. He gathered his Cabinet in his White House office and had Justice Benjamin Cardozo swear them in as a group, the first time that had ever been done. F.D.R. joked that he was doing it so they could “receive an extra day’s pay,” but the real reason was that he wanted his team to get to work immediately.
And that team came through brilliantly. In the next 100 days — O.K., 105, but who’s counting? — his Administration shepherded 15 major bills through Congress. It was the most intense period of lawmaking ever undertaken by Congress — a “presidential barrage of ideas and programs,” historian Arthur Schlesinger Jr. observed, “unlike anything known to American history.”

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