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Read the excerpt from Cristina Garcia’s Dreaming in Cuban. My father knew I understood more than I could say. He told me stories about Cuba after Columbus came. He said that the Spaniards wiped out more Indians with smallpox than with muskets. Which best describes an element of magic realism used by Garcia in this excerpt? She shows the close relationship that Pilar had with her father. She connects the events to the colonial history of Latin America. She is a modern writer developing a story about Spanish history. She characterizes Columbus’s discovery as an extraordinary event.

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Read the excerpt from Cristina Garcia’s Dreaming in Cuban. My father knew I understood more than I could say. He told me stories about Cuba after Columbus came. He said that the Spaniards wiped out more Indians with smallpox than with muskets. Which best describes an element of magic realism used by Garcia in this excerpt? She shows the close relationship that Pilar had with her father. She connects the events to the colonial history of Latin America. She is a modern writer developing a story about Spanish history. She characterizes Columbus’s discovery as an extraordinary event.

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Which development most aided explorers in their ability to sail the oceans to discover the new world during the age of discovery? A. Map making advances B. Fictional travel accounts C. Waterproof sails D. The printing press

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I believe the correct answer is D. Day in, day out, on the road.
This sentence shows a routine and repetitiveness that is not often appreciated in the modern world. People generally wake up, eat, go to work, then return home, rest, and go to sleep, and when they wake up the next day, the whole routine is repeated. This is what Kafka also wanted to portray in his work, which is why I believe D is the correct answer.

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Which development most aided explorers in their ability to sail the oceans to discover the New World during the Age of Discovery? a.Smaller ships b.Waterproof sails c.The magnetic compass d.Morse code

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Which development most aided explorers in their ability to sail the oceans to discover the New World during the Age of Discovery? a.Smaller ships b.Waterproof sails c.The magnetic compass d.Morse code

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According to a relatively recent discovery, which planet has one satellite?

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1. As far as I remember, the answer should be: Elliptical galaxies have no spiral arms. Elliptical galaxy has a shape of ellipsoid, every massive elliptical galaxy contains a supermassive black hole at the center. And unlike the spiral galaxy, it has no spiral arms.

2. If my memory serves me well, Hubble’s law is used to determine distances between galaxies. Hubble’s law describes how far the galaxies move away from each other and from the Earth. It means that Universe is expanding.

3. I am completely sure that top-down theory suggests that galaxies formed when massive protogalactic clouds fragmented into smaller gas clouds that then formed into individual galaxies. 

4. I think that correct answer looks like this: Astronomers’ ever­expanding knowledge of the universe has coincided with the development of the cosmic distance scale, a collection of indirect distance measurement techniques.

5. I am definitely sure that barred spiral galaxies are characterized by a long stretch of stars that extends out beyond the galactic disk. Barred spiral galaxies have big spiral arms which are formed because of the strong compression wave which triggers star formation on the edge of the spiral arms.

6. In my opinion the answer is: The recessional motions of the galaxies prove that the cosmos is not steady and unchanging. It leads us to Hubble’s law that I’ve mentioned before. It proves that galaxies are always in motion.

7. Astronomers are able to measure changes in the rate of universe expansion by observing distant supernovae. In a simple words, supernova is a big explosion of a massive star. After that new bright star appears.

8. According to its definition, protogalactic clouds that have large amounts of angular momentum may develop into spiral galaxies. There are a huge concentration of the stars and gas clouds in the spiral arm. So it’s logical that protogalactic clouds can develop in to spiral galaxies because of certain conditions.

9. According to what I have mentioned before about Hubble’s law, the answer should be: The galaxy clusters distances are expanding. Universe is constantly expanding because of the galaxies’ movement.

10. The Milky Way is an example of spiral galaxies. Our galaxy has several spiral arms and we can see that there are the stars and the gas clouds concentrated in these arms. It’s the main characteristic of spiral galaxy.

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PLZZ HELP FASSSSST 1. Which of the following eyects would you expect if red blood cells were shaped like neurons? (1 point) They would not be able to move as easily through capillaries. They would more easily carry out gas exchange in the alveoli. They would not need to be transported through the body. They would become more eyective at picking up urea discarded by body cells. 2. Which of the following is not a function of the skeletal system? (1 point) supports the body works with other body systems to allow movement manufactures new blood cells sends signals to the brain 3. Which of the following body systems are involved in the first line of defense of the immune system against infection? (1 point) integumentary, digestive, respiratory nervous, circulatory, skeletal muscular, endocrine, urinary urinary, skeletal, integumentary 4. Which of the following sets of structures would be involved in ridding the body of unwanted urea? (1 point) sensory neuron, interneuron, spinal cord alveoli, atrium, cilia capillary, nephron, ureter brain, esophagus, small intestine 5. An infectious disease is a disease that (1 point) is caught because the weather turns cold. is caused by pathogens. can be spread only by bacteria. cannot be cured. 6. Which of the following statements is true regarding infectious agents? (1 point) Infectious agents are all too small to be seen without a microscope, and none can be classified as living. All infectious agents are living because they are all classified as microorganisms. Of all the infectious agents, only viruses are considered living because they actively inject their DNA or RNA into host cells. Viruses cannot be treated with antibiotics because they are not living organisms. 7. Which discovery in the 1800s led to the development of germ theory? (1 point) Vaccines could prevent a disease. Antibiotics exist that can be given to counteract an infection. Infection rates decline when health care professionals wash their hands in between seeing patients. Some diseases, such as cancer, are caused by chemical factors. 8. Follow a carbon atom in a piece of bread eaten by a boy. Which of the following describes a path that this atom could take? (1 point) mouth esophagus stomach large intestine blood body cell mouth esophagus stomach small intestine blood body cell mouth large intestine esophagus stomach blood body cell mouth esophagus small intestine stomach blood body cell 9. Which of the following sets of structures is innervated by the somatic nervous system? (1 point) esophagus, stomach, small intestine atrium, ventricle, arteries biceps, triceps, quadriceps diaphragm, bladder, large intestine 10. Which of the following cell types would you expect to increase in number azer a person becomes infected with a pathogen? (1 point) sensory neurons white blood cells epidermal cells red blood cells

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There are four variables which govern changes in population size.
births
deaths
immigration
emigration

A population gains individuals by birth and immigration and loses individuals by death and emigration.

Biotic Potential
Populations vary in their capacity to grow. The maximum rate at which a
population can increase when resources are unlimited and environmental
conditions are ideal is termed the population’s biotic potential. Each
species will have a different biotic potential due to variations in
the species’ reproductive span (how long an individual is capable of reproducing)
the frequency of reproduction (how often an individual can reproduce)
“litter size” (how many offspring are born each time)
survival rate (how many offspring survive to reproductive age)

There are always limits to population growth in nature. Populations
cannot grow exponentially indefinitely. Exploding populations always
reach a size limit imposed by the shortage of one or more factors such
as water, space, and nutrients or by adverse conditions such as disease,
drought and temperature extremes. The factors which act jointly to
limit a population’s growth are termed the environmental resistance. The interplay of biotic potential and density-dependent environmental resistance keeps a population in balance.
Carrying Capacity
For a given region, carrying capacity is the maximum number of
individuals of a given species that an area’s resources can sustain
indefinitely without significantly depleting or degrading those
resources. Determining the carrying capacities for most organisms is
fairly straightforward. For humans carrying capacity is much more
complicated. The definition is expanded to include not degrading our
cultural and social environments and not harming the physical
environment in ways that would adversely affect future generations.

For populations which grow exponentially, growth starts out slowly,
enters a rapid growth phase and then levels off when the carrying
capacity for that species has been reached. The size of the population
then fluctuates slightly above or below the carrying capacity.
Reproductive lag time may cause the population to overshoot the carrying
capacity temporarily. Reproductive lag time is the time required for
the birth rate to decline and the death rate to increase in response to
resource limits. In this scenario, the population will suffer a crash
or dieback to a lower level near the carrying capacity unless a large
number of individuals can emigrate to an area with more favorable
conditions. An area’s carrying capacity is not static. The carrying
capacity may be lowered by resource destruction and degradation during
an overshoot period or extended through technological and social
changes.

An example of dieback occurred in Ireland after a fungus infection
destroyed the potato crop in 1845. During this potato famine
approximately 1 million people died and 3 million people emigrated to
other countries. Increased food production due to improved agricultural
practices, control of many diseases by modern medicine and the use of
energy to make historically uninhabitable areas of Earth inhabitable are
examples of things which can extend carrying capacity. The question is
how long will we be able to keep increasing our population on a planet
with finite size and resources?

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In “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud,” the speaker is a human, who experiences the startling beauty of nature through the unexpected discovery of an entire sea of daffodils by the water. This poem is pensive and calm, using light, frivolous vocabulary: the daffodils are “fluttering and dancing in the breeze,” and “tossing their heads in sprightly dance.” The waves in the bay, as well, dance and sparkle, and yet the daffodils are more captivating even than the ocean, multitudinous as they are, as the stars in the sky. In Wordsworth’s poem nature is powerful and inviting, exhibiting forces of healing in the form of bright colors and gentle vibes. It is recounted from a comfortable, safe perspective; when the speaker is resting on his safe, warm couch, the memories of his solo walk along the bay …flash upon that inward eye Which is the bliss of solitude; And then my heart with pleasure fills, And dances with the daffodils. These recollections serve as a comfort and pleasure to him, even when he is comfortable in a pleasant environment. Such was the power of the scene. De la Mare’s poem also presents nature as a powerful force, but an impersonal, destructive one. The poem is told from the perspective of sea birds in a storm, and the vocabulary is a violent as Wordsworth’s is serene: “And the wind rose, and the sea rose,/To the angry billows’ roar,” and in the second verse, And the yeasty surf curdled over the sands, The gaunt grey rocks between; And the tempest raved, and the lightning’s fire Struck blue on the spindrift hoar – Here the birds have lost control, and the storm is forcing them onto the shore, waves tossing and wind howling, a wholly different scene than Wordsworth’s happy spring day. Even in the end, when the storm breaks and the sun comes out, we see the lingering effects of the chaos – “the bright green headlands shone/As they’d never shone before,” and yet within this setting we have vast hoards of sea birds breaking this lovely post-storm calm with their “screeching, scolding, [and] scrabbling.” But in the final two lines of the poem, we see also “A snowy, silent, sun-washed drift/Of sea-birds on the shore.” And herein lies the true destruction: while a whole host of birds are tumbling through the sky, another host of birds has been killed by the violence of the storm. Both poems depict the unpredictability of nature, and yet because Wordsworth’s poem is from the point of view of a man, on a bright spring day, his poem is more domestic and simple than that of de la Mare. The latter presents the point of view of nature itself, only to switch to a third person, withdrawn perspective at the end of the poem; humans have no role in the events that unfold. Any humans that exist in the area would have been safely indoors during the storm, away from any danger. We therefore get the rawness of nature where we would normally escape it for our fires and our beds; here is the flip-side of natural beauty – natural destruction. This poem is no walk in the garden, but a story of the wildness of natural processes. I NEED HELP WRITING THIS IN MY OWN WORDS PLEASE HELP

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In “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud,” the speaker is a human, who experiences the startling beauty of nature through the unexpected discovery of an entire sea of daffodils by the water. This poem is pensive and calm, using light, frivolous vocabulary: the daffodils are “fluttering and dancing in the breeze,” and “tossing their heads in sprightly dance.” The waves in the bay, as well, dance and sparkle, and yet the daffodils are more captivating even than the ocean, multitudinous as they are, as the stars in the sky.

In Wordsworth’s poem nature is powerful and inviting, exhibiting forces of healing in the form of bright colors and gentle vibes. It is recounted from a comfortable, safe perspective; when the speaker is resting on his safe, warm couch, the memories of his solo walk along the bay

…flash upon that inward eye
Which is the bliss of solitude;
And then my heart with pleasure fills,
And dances with the daffodils.

These recollections serve as a comfort and pleasure to him, even when he is comfortable in a pleasant environment. Such was the power of the scene.

De la Mare’s poem also presents nature as a powerful force, but an impersonal, destructive one. The poem is told from the perspective of sea birds in a storm, and the vocabulary is a violent as Wordsworth’s is serene: “And the wind rose, and the sea rose,/To the angry billows’ roar,” and in the second verse,

And the yeasty surf curdled over the sands,
The gaunt grey rocks between;
And the tempest raved, and the lightning’s fire
Struck blue on the spindrift hoar –

Here the birds have lost control, and the storm is forcing them onto the shore, waves tossing and wind howling, a wholly different scene than Wordsworth’s happy spring day. Even in the end, when the storm breaks and the sun comes out, we see the lingering effects of the chaos – “the bright green headlands shone/As they’d never shone before,” and yet within this setting we have vast hoards of sea birds breaking this lovely post-storm calm with their “screeching, scolding, [and] scrabbling.” But in the final two lines of the poem, we see also “A snowy, silent, sun-washed drift/Of sea-birds on the shore.” And herein lies the true destruction: while a whole host of birds are tumbling through the sky, another host of birds has been killed by the violence of the storm.

Both poems depict the unpredictability of nature, and yet because Wordsworth’s poem is from the point of view of a man, on a bright spring day, his poem is more domestic and simple than that of de la Mare. The latter presents the point of view of nature itself, only to switch to a third person, withdrawn perspective at the end of the poem; humans have no role in the events that unfold. Any humans that exist in the area would have been safely indoors during the storm, away from any danger. We therefore get the rawness of nature where we would normally escape it for our fires and our beds; here is the flip-side of natural beauty – natural destruction. This poem is no walk in the garden, but a story of the wildness of natural processes.

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