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The main difference between gases and liquids is that in gases A.the molecules are moving faster b.the forces between molecules are greater c.the distance between molecules are greater d.the molecules collide more frequently

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The main difference between gases and liquids is that in gases A.the molecules are moving faster b.the forces between molecules are greater c.the distance between molecules are greater d.the molecules collide more frequently

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PLEASE HELP Mr. Utterson the lawyer was a man of a rugged countenance, that was never lighted by a smile; cold, scanty and embarrassed in discourse; backward in sentiment; lean, long, dusty, dreary, and yet somehow lovable. At friendly meetings, and when the wine was to his taste, something eminently human beaconed from his eye; something indeed which never found its way into his talk, but which spoke not only in these silent symbols of the after-dinner face, but more often and loudly in the acts of his life. He was austere with himself; drank gin when he was alone, to mortify a taste for vintages; and though he enjoyed the theatre, had not crossed the doors of one for twenty years. But he had an approved tolerance for others; sometimes wondering, almost with envy, at the high pressure of spirits involved in their misdeeds; and in any extremity inclined to help rather than to reprove. "I incline to, Cain's heresy*," he used to say. "I let my brother go to the devil in his quaintly 'own way.'" In this character, it was frequently his fortune to be the last reputable acquaintance and the last good influence in the lives of down-going men. And to such as these, so long as they came about his chambers, he never marked a shade of change in his demeanour. No doubt the feat was easy to Mr. Utterson; for he was undemonstrative at the best, and even his friendship seemed to be founded in a similar catholicity of good-nature. It is the mark of a modest man to accept his friendly circle ready-made from the hands of opportunity; and that was the lawyer's way. His friends were those of his own blood or those whom he had known the longest; his affections, like ivy, were the growth of time, they implied no aptness in the object. Hence, no doubt, the bond that united him to Mr. Richard Enfield, his distant kinsman, the well-known man about town. It was a nut to crack for many, what these two could see in each other, or what subject they could find in common. It was reported by those who encountered them in their Sunday walks, that they said nothing, looked singularly dull, and would hail with obvious relief the appearance of a friend. For all that, the two men put the greatest store by these excursions, counted them the chief jewel of each week, and not only set aside occasions of pleasure, but even resisted the calls of business, that they might enjoy them uninterrupted. *The biblical story of Cain and Abel is a story about two brothers who gave offerings to God. Abel’s offering was accepted by God, but Cain’s was not. Jealous, Cain killed his brother. When God asked Cain where Abel was, Cain said, “Am I my brother’s keeper?” By saying this, Cain implied that what his brother did was his own business. (Genesis 4:1-16) What is significant about “Cain’s heresy” in this passage? A.It shows that Mr. Utterson is a deeply religious and righteous person. B.It shows that Mr. Utterson tries not to judge others or get in their business. C.It shows the Mr. Utterson wants to steal from other people’s businesses. D.It shows that Mr. Utterson does not believe in any kind of religion at all.

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PLEASE HELP Mr. Utterson the lawyer was a man of a rugged countenance, that was never lighted by a smile; cold, scanty and embarrassed in discourse; backward in sentiment; lean, long, dusty, dreary, and yet somehow lovable. At friendly meetings, and when the wine was to his taste, something eminently human beaconed from his eye; something indeed which never found its way into his talk, but which spoke not only in these silent symbols of the after-dinner face, but more often and loudly in the acts of his life. He was austere with himself; drank gin when he was alone, to mortify a taste for vintages; and though he enjoyed the theatre, had not crossed the doors of one for twenty years. But he had an approved tolerance for others; sometimes wondering, almost with envy, at the high pressure of spirits involved in their misdeeds; and in any extremity inclined to help rather than to reprove. “I incline to, Cain’s heresy*,” he used to say. “I let my brother go to the devil in his quaintly ‘own way.'” In this character, it was frequently his fortune to be the last reputable acquaintance and the last good influence in the lives of down-going men. And to such as these, so long as they came about his chambers, he never marked a shade of change in his demeanour. No doubt the feat was easy to Mr. Utterson; for he was undemonstrative at the best, and even his friendship seemed to be founded in a similar catholicity of good-nature. It is the mark of a modest man to accept his friendly circle ready-made from the hands of opportunity; and that was the lawyer’s way. His friends were those of his own blood or those whom he had known the longest; his affections, like ivy, were the growth of time, they implied no aptness in the object. Hence, no doubt, the bond that united him to Mr. Richard Enfield, his distant kinsman, the well-known man about town. It was a nut to crack for many, what these two could see in each other, or what subject they could find in common. It was reported by those who encountered them in their Sunday walks, that they said nothing, looked singularly dull, and would hail with obvious relief the appearance of a friend. For all that, the two men put the greatest store by these excursions, counted them the chief jewel of each week, and not only set aside occasions of pleasure, but even resisted the calls of business, that they might enjoy them uninterrupted. *The biblical story of Cain and Abel is a story about two brothers who gave offerings to God. Abel’s offering was accepted by God, but Cain’s was not. Jealous, Cain killed his brother. When God asked Cain where Abel was, Cain said, “Am I my brother’s keeper?” By saying this, Cain implied that what his brother did was his own business. (Genesis 4:1-16) What is significant about “Cain’s heresy” in this passage? A.It shows that Mr. Utterson is a deeply religious and righteous person. B.It shows that Mr. Utterson tries not to judge others or get in their business. C.It shows the Mr. Utterson wants to steal from other people’s businesses. D.It shows that Mr. Utterson does not believe in any kind of religion at all.

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Rey always has panic attacks when he is in crowds. lately, they occur so frequently and unexpectedly that he avoids any place or situation where he expects to be among large groups of people. rey is most likely to be diagnosed with ________.

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Rey always has panic attacks when he is in crowds. lately, they occur so frequently and unexpectedly that he avoids any place or situation where he expects to be among large groups of people. rey is most likely to be diagnosed with ________.

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Lobotomies are used frequently by modern therapists to treat mental disorders. true false

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Lobotomies are used frequently by modern therapists to treat mental disorders. true false

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How did the scientific revolution affect societies between the 17th and 19th centuries? A)Before the scientific revolution, scientists did not have basic scientific equipment, but afterward, they had gyroscopes, anemometers, and compasses. B)Before the scientific revolution, scientists mainly studied biology and physics, but afterward, they mainly studied geology and astronomy. C)Before the scientific revolution, scientists rarely shared their discoveries outside their own country, but afterward, they frequently published books and papers. D) Before the scientific revolution, scientists typically relied on religious traditions, but afterward, they followed an established method of observation.

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Answer:( NOT SURE)

President Theodore Roosevelt was very concerned that all people should be treated fairly. When businesses acted in their self-interest and put the public’s interests in danger, he wasn’t afraid to act. This idea of treating everybody fairly was known as the Square Deal.

President Roosevelt used the Sherman Antitrust Act to deal with businesses that were only focused on their own self-interest. When the creation of the Northern Securities Company nearly led to an economic crisis, President Roosevelt filed suit against the company. The Supreme Court ruled the company had to dissolve. In 1902 when the owners of the coal mines refused to make any compromises to the workers as a way to resolve the coal strike, President Roosevelt threatened to have the government run the mines. He was concerned the public wouldn’t have enough coal to heat their homes as the strike dragged on and as winter approached. Eventually, arbitration was used to end the strike.

President Roosevelt took other actions to be sure businesses were acting fairly. The Bureau of Corporations was established to monitor businesses. The Hepburn Act gave the Interstate Commerce Commission the power to set railroad rates. The Meat Inspection Act and the Pure Food and Drug Act were laws passed to protect consumers. Meat would have to be inspected before it could be sold. It was illegal to falsely label food and medicines.

President Roosevelt believed all people should be treated fairly. His Square Deal programs and policies reflected that belief.

Explanation:

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During meiosis, homologous chromosomes frequently exchange portions of their DNA. This process increases the number of different genotypes that an offspring can inherit. What is the name of this process?

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Answer:

Answer:

The process of DNA replication, in order for cells to divide, is a pretty complex process that requires several enzymes to work. One such enzyme is polymerase, without which the process of DNA replication would not take place. It is polymerase that ensures the creation of a new DNA strand from a template strang, and also, it ensures that coding errors and joining errors, are corrected before a mutated DNA strand in released. Thus, the answers to the questions are as follows:

1. Besides replicating DNA, the other function of DNA polymerase is: B: Correcting errors. Polymerase is the one that adds nucleotides to the formed strands, but also reads the strand to correct errors in the coding system.

2. The polymerase prevents mutation of the DNA because it is able to: B: Repair the DNA by removing the error and then correcting it with new nucleotides.

3. The gene that is responsible for tumor suppression, among the many, is: B: p53. This gene produces protein p53, which prevents the formation of cancerous tumors and also, when it is missing it can lead to cancers such as colon, or leykemia.

4. In the genetical play of replication, the correct steps will always be: DNA, to RNA, to protein. Therefore, the answer here is: C: DNA codes for RNA, which codes for protein.

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