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Which of the following lines is an example of cliché? Every cloud has a silver lining. The mind is its own place. Seasons of mists and mellow fruitfulness, Do not go gentle into that good night.

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Since a tiny tender child of four,
There’s nothing that I dreamt of more,
Than to jump aboard a great big ship,
A telescope, a map, a sword, by my hip,
To feel the sea breeze in my hair,
To stroke my parrot on the wood chair,
To be bold and brave and happy as can be,
To trek and travel and sail the seven seas.

8 lines. Rhyme scheme aabbccdd. If I managed to write that in about 4 minutes, you could write something much better and longer in like 30 minutes. You can use my rubbish poem as inspiration lol. Good luck X

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Read the following exchange between Romeo and Juliet from act I of Romeo and Juliet. What does the excerpt reveal about the love between the two young people? ROMEO: (to JULIET) If I profane with my unworthiest hand This holy shrine, the gentle fine is this: My lips, two blushing pilgrims, ready stand To smooth that rough touch with a tender kiss. JULIET: Good pilgrim, you do wrong your hand too much, Which mannerly devotion shows in this; For saints have hands that pilgrims’ hands do touch, And palm to palm is holy palmers’ kiss. ROMEO: Have not saints lips, and holy palmers too? JULIET: Ay, pilgrim, lips that they must use in prayer. Their love is based on both physical and emotional attraction. Their love is shallow and based on defying their families. Their love is driven by their intellectual needs. Their love is instant and illogical. NextReset

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Answer:

Dogs can be strong companions, but they also have needs that many people forget to address.

Explanation:

The author’s claim is that many people forget to address the needs of their dogs. The author continues to talk about some of those needs, like regular washing and grooming to avoid becoming matted and sick. The author is not simply talking about washing and grooming, but other needs the dogs might have as well. These could include things like walking, a proper diet, or brushing their teeth.

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Which of the following is the correct possessive form of the bold word? The dog groomer handles each persons pet in a gentle, careful manner. A. persons’ B. person’s

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Here are a few pointers; hope this is useful)

Ovation-by definition- is show of appreciation from an audience, for a person’s accomplishments or flaw.

“Everyone deserves a standing ovation because we all overcometh the world.”

A person’s accomplishment could be how they made a positive change in this world, strong leadership- that makes them a effective leader or simply helping others. A person’s flaw- mistakes in life, sin or even guilt should also be considered an appreciation- an ovation for representing mankind’s flaw and that humanity makes mistakes, fulfilling at least one deadly sin such as greed, lust, selfishness etc.

Thus, regardless of a person’s achievement or flaw- a person deserves an applause for, not the least, living in this society and this world that we are all living together and dying together.

That was just the introduction.. the best part is yet to come.. now it’s your turn!!

Here are other pointers to talk about in your essay:

Shakespeare’s famous line “All the World’s a stage. That agrees with your line: “Everybody deserves a standing ovation…”

Shakespeare explains that men and women are like players: they live, and die, some being celebrated and some forever living in solitude till their death. Shakespeare states the world is a “stage” which symbolizes that mankind is in its peak. The world is changing everyday: little by little and humanity is falling behind.
Due to our world turning into machinery: factories, an automotive future: where humans only job to live (entrance) and to die (exit) the famous humans remembered and the flawed not recalled.

This is according to Shakespeare’s imagery.

I don’t know what grade your in, but I think simplifying Shakespeare’s word of mouth in your essay would be handy and useful as it has strong references of your quote, and agrees strongly in your essay.

Hope this helps 🙂

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A trip to the ocean can be a relaxing escape from the everyday pressures of life. A sailboat glistening on the horizon provides a mental escape to faraway places. The rhythm of the ocean beating against the sand is sedating music to a troubled mind. A slow, gentle breeze can relax your tensions. You should always be careful to avoid overexposure to the sun at the beach. 1.a.Write the sentence that is the topic sentence of the paragraph. b.Write the sentence that is unrelated to the topic and can be eliminated. 2.List four things to look for when you’re proofreading. 3.Complete the following two steps: a. Define the term cliché. b. Use a cliché in a sentence that you create. 4.Name and explain two types of prewriting.

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Hey there!

Correct answer is D. Comma or Period Inside Rule

A. Question mark or exclamation point inside: those are not really necessary.

B. Colon or semicolon: not, a semicolon would divide the whole sentence and it would be shorten; a colon would work but after requested, when there is already a comma.

C. Question mark or Exclamation Point Outside Rule: would not work, becase it is an very polite and affirmative sentence.

D: A comma or period inside rule: actually, just a comma would work. Please, Cooper’s dad requested, go… Cooper’s dad requested must be in between commas as it is a vocative.

Hope this helps

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You're running down the soccer field when you develop a side stitch; what should you do? 1.Slow down, rest, and do gentle stretching activities 2.Lie down and ice the pain until it goes away 3.Keep your upper body elevated and drink lots of water 4.Massage your side slowly until the pain goes away

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You’re running down the soccer field when you develop a side stitch; what should you do? 1.Slow down, rest, and do gentle stretching activities 2.Lie down and ice the pain until it goes away 3.Keep your upper body elevated and drink lots of water 4.Massage your side slowly until the pain goes away

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On november 1, gentle company received a $3,000, 6%, three-month note receivable. the cash to be received by gentle company when the note becomes due is:

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To calculate the maturity of this note,

we use a simple formula first to get the interest which is:

I = Principal (amount owed) X Interest Rate (%) X Time (length of loan)

The days is only divided by only 360 days instead of 365 days. This is because commercial loans often use 360-day calendar years instead of 365-day calendar years. But not all banks used this as their calendar year,

 

I = Prt

= ($80000) (0.05) (120/360)

= ($80000) (0.01666666666)

I = $ 1,333.33

 

To get the maturity value, the formula is: M = Interest + Principal

M = I + P

= $1,333.33 + $80,000

= $81,333.33 or $81,333, letter C

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In “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud,” the speaker is a human, who experiences the startling beauty of nature through the unexpected discovery of an entire sea of daffodils by the water. This poem is pensive and calm, using light, frivolous vocabulary: the daffodils are “fluttering and dancing in the breeze,” and “tossing their heads in sprightly dance.” The waves in the bay, as well, dance and sparkle, and yet the daffodils are more captivating even than the ocean, multitudinous as they are, as the stars in the sky. In Wordsworth’s poem nature is powerful and inviting, exhibiting forces of healing in the form of bright colors and gentle vibes. It is recounted from a comfortable, safe perspective; when the speaker is resting on his safe, warm couch, the memories of his solo walk along the bay …flash upon that inward eye Which is the bliss of solitude; And then my heart with pleasure fills, And dances with the daffodils. These recollections serve as a comfort and pleasure to him, even when he is comfortable in a pleasant environment. Such was the power of the scene. De la Mare’s poem also presents nature as a powerful force, but an impersonal, destructive one. The poem is told from the perspective of sea birds in a storm, and the vocabulary is a violent as Wordsworth’s is serene: “And the wind rose, and the sea rose,/To the angry billows’ roar,” and in the second verse, And the yeasty surf curdled over the sands, The gaunt grey rocks between; And the tempest raved, and the lightning’s fire Struck blue on the spindrift hoar – Here the birds have lost control, and the storm is forcing them onto the shore, waves tossing and wind howling, a wholly different scene than Wordsworth’s happy spring day. Even in the end, when the storm breaks and the sun comes out, we see the lingering effects of the chaos – “the bright green headlands shone/As they’d never shone before,” and yet within this setting we have vast hoards of sea birds breaking this lovely post-storm calm with their “screeching, scolding, [and] scrabbling.” But in the final two lines of the poem, we see also “A snowy, silent, sun-washed drift/Of sea-birds on the shore.” And herein lies the true destruction: while a whole host of birds are tumbling through the sky, another host of birds has been killed by the violence of the storm. Both poems depict the unpredictability of nature, and yet because Wordsworth’s poem is from the point of view of a man, on a bright spring day, his poem is more domestic and simple than that of de la Mare. The latter presents the point of view of nature itself, only to switch to a third person, withdrawn perspective at the end of the poem; humans have no role in the events that unfold. Any humans that exist in the area would have been safely indoors during the storm, away from any danger. We therefore get the rawness of nature where we would normally escape it for our fires and our beds; here is the flip-side of natural beauty – natural destruction. This poem is no walk in the garden, but a story of the wildness of natural processes. I NEED HELP WRITING THIS IN MY OWN WORDS PLEASE HELP

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In “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud,” the speaker is a human, who experiences the startling beauty of nature through the unexpected discovery of an entire sea of daffodils by the water. This poem is pensive and calm, using light, frivolous vocabulary: the daffodils are “fluttering and dancing in the breeze,” and “tossing their heads in sprightly dance.” The waves in the bay, as well, dance and sparkle, and yet the daffodils are more captivating even than the ocean, multitudinous as they are, as the stars in the sky.

In Wordsworth’s poem nature is powerful and inviting, exhibiting forces of healing in the form of bright colors and gentle vibes. It is recounted from a comfortable, safe perspective; when the speaker is resting on his safe, warm couch, the memories of his solo walk along the bay

…flash upon that inward eye
Which is the bliss of solitude;
And then my heart with pleasure fills,
And dances with the daffodils.

These recollections serve as a comfort and pleasure to him, even when he is comfortable in a pleasant environment. Such was the power of the scene.

De la Mare’s poem also presents nature as a powerful force, but an impersonal, destructive one. The poem is told from the perspective of sea birds in a storm, and the vocabulary is a violent as Wordsworth’s is serene: “And the wind rose, and the sea rose,/To the angry billows’ roar,” and in the second verse,

And the yeasty surf curdled over the sands,
The gaunt grey rocks between;
And the tempest raved, and the lightning’s fire
Struck blue on the spindrift hoar –

Here the birds have lost control, and the storm is forcing them onto the shore, waves tossing and wind howling, a wholly different scene than Wordsworth’s happy spring day. Even in the end, when the storm breaks and the sun comes out, we see the lingering effects of the chaos – “the bright green headlands shone/As they’d never shone before,” and yet within this setting we have vast hoards of sea birds breaking this lovely post-storm calm with their “screeching, scolding, [and] scrabbling.” But in the final two lines of the poem, we see also “A snowy, silent, sun-washed drift/Of sea-birds on the shore.” And herein lies the true destruction: while a whole host of birds are tumbling through the sky, another host of birds has been killed by the violence of the storm.

Both poems depict the unpredictability of nature, and yet because Wordsworth’s poem is from the point of view of a man, on a bright spring day, his poem is more domestic and simple than that of de la Mare. The latter presents the point of view of nature itself, only to switch to a third person, withdrawn perspective at the end of the poem; humans have no role in the events that unfold. Any humans that exist in the area would have been safely indoors during the storm, away from any danger. We therefore get the rawness of nature where we would normally escape it for our fires and our beds; here is the flip-side of natural beauty – natural destruction. This poem is no walk in the garden, but a story of the wildness of natural processes.

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Reread Lines 146 to 203 and check three questions Everyman asks Death to answer. May he come back from his pilgrimage? What judgment awaits him? May he have someone to go with him? Where can he go to escape endless sorrow? For Adam’s sin must die of nature. 145 EVERYMAN. Death, if I should this pilgrimage take, And my reckoning surely make, Show me, for saint charity, Should I not come again shortly? DEATH. No, Everyman; and thou be once there, 150 Thou mayest never more come here, Trust me verily. EVERYMAN. O gracious God, in the high seat celestial, Have mercy on me in this most need! Shall I have no company from this vale terrestrial Of mine acquaintance that way me to lead? 155 DEATH. Yea, if any be so hardy, That would go with thee and bear thee company. Hie thee that thou were gone to God’s magnificence, Thy reckoning to give before his presence. What! weenest ° thou thy life is given thee, 160 °think And thy worldly goods also? EVERYMAN. I had weened so, verily. DEATH. Nay, nay; it was but lent thee; For, as soon as thou art gone, Another a while shall have it, and then go therefrom 165 Even as thou hast done. Everyman, thou art mad! Thou hast thy wits five, And here on earth will not amend thy life; For suddenly I do come. EVERYMAN. O wretched caitiff! whither shall I flee, 170 That I might ‘scape endless sorrow? Now, gentle Death, spare me till tomorrow, That I may amend me With good advisement. ° °warning DEATH. Nay, thereto I will not consent, 175 Nor no man will I respite, But to the heart suddenly I shall smite Without any advisement. And now out of thy sight I will me hie; See thou make thee ready shortly, 180 For thou mayst say this is the day That no man living may ‘scape away. (Exit DEATH.) EVERYMAN. Alas! I may well weep with sighs deep. Now have I no manner of company To help me in my journey and me to keep; 185 And also my writing is full unready. How shall I do now for to excuse me? I would to God I had never been get! To my soul a full great profit it had be, For now I fear pains huge and great. 190 The time passeth; Lord, help, that all wrought. For though I mourn it availeth naught. The day passeth, and is almost a-go; I wot ° not well what for to do. °know To whom were I best my complaint to make? 195 What if I to Fellowship thereof spake, And showed him of this sudden chance? For in him is all mine affiance, ° °trust We have in the world so many a day Been good friends in sport and play. 200 I see him yonder, certainly: I trust that he will bear me company; Therefore to him will I speak to ease my sorrow.

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Answer:

3. There is within me (and with sadness I have watched it in others) a knot of cruelty borne by the stream of love, much as our blood sometimes bears the seed of our destruction, and at times I was mean to Doodle.

Explanation:

This is the statement that most foreshadows the fact that the narrator will feel regret for something that he has done to Doodle. In this excerpt, the narrator tells us that he believes there is some element of cruelty within him, and that at times, this cruelty was shown in his dealings with Doodle, as he could be mean to him. This suggest that the author will be cruel to Doodle later in the story.

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