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CAPULET: Go, be gone. (Exit Second Servant) We shall be much unfurnished for this time. What, is my daughter gone to Friar Laurence? NURSE: Ay, forsooth. CAPULET: Well, he may chance to do some good on her: A peevish self-will'd harlotry it is. NURSE: See where she comes from shrift with merry look. (Enter JULIET) CAPULET: How now, my headstrong! where have you been gadding? JULIET: Where I have learn'd me to repent the sin Of disobedient opposition To you and your behests, and am enjoin'd By holy Laurence to fall prostrate here, And beg your pardon: pardon, I beseech you! Henceforward I am ever ruled by you. CAPULET: Send for the county; go tell him of this: I'll have this knot knit up to-morrow morning. JULIET: I met the youthful lord at Laurence' cell; And gave him what becomed love I might, Not step o'er the bounds of modesty. CAPULET: Why, I am glad on't; this is well: stand up: This is as't should be. Let me see the county; Ay, marry, go, I say, and fetch him hither. Now, afore God! this reverend holy friar, Our whole city is much bound to him. JULIET: Nurse, will you go with me into my closet, To help me sort such needful ornaments As you think fit to furnish me to-morrow? LADY CAPULET: No, not till Thursday; there is time enough. CAPULET: Go, nurse, go with her: we'll to church to-morrow. In this passage from act IV of Romeo and Juliet, Lord Capulet is preparing for Juliet’s wedding after threatening to disown her if she refuses to marry Paris. Which statement best describes the character of Lord Capulet? A. He is vulgar and foolish. b. He is oppressive and controlling. c. He is careless and neglectful. d. He is caring and headstrong.

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CAPULET: Go, be gone. (Exit Second Servant) We shall be much unfurnished for this time. What, is my daughter gone to Friar Laurence? NURSE: Ay, forsooth. CAPULET: Well, he may chance to do some good on her: A peevish self-will’d harlotry it is. NURSE: See where she comes from shrift with merry look. (Enter JULIET) CAPULET: How now, my headstrong! where have you been gadding? JULIET: Where I have learn’d me to repent the sin Of disobedient opposition To you and your behests, and am enjoin’d By holy Laurence to fall prostrate here, And beg your pardon: pardon, I beseech you! Henceforward I am ever ruled by you. CAPULET: Send for the county; go tell him of this: I’ll have this knot knit up to-morrow morning. JULIET: I met the youthful lord at Laurence’ cell; And gave him what becomed love I might, Not step o’er the bounds of modesty. CAPULET: Why, I am glad on’t; this is well: stand up: This is as’t should be. Let me see the county; Ay, marry, go, I say, and fetch him hither. Now, afore God! this reverend holy friar, Our whole city is much bound to him. JULIET: Nurse, will you go with me into my closet, To help me sort such needful ornaments As you think fit to furnish me to-morrow? LADY CAPULET: No, not till Thursday; there is time enough. CAPULET: Go, nurse, go with her: we’ll to church to-morrow. In this passage from act IV of Romeo and Juliet, Lord Capulet is preparing for Juliet’s wedding after threatening to disown her if she refuses to marry Paris. Which statement best describes the character of Lord Capulet? A. He is vulgar and foolish. b. He is oppressive and controlling. c. He is careless and neglectful. d. He is caring and headstrong.

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In Book 9 of the Odyssey, Ulysses saves himself and his men by blinding Polyphemus. Which lines reflect the Cyclops's disappointment at being defeated by guile and not by strength? Oh heavens! oh faith of ancient prophecies! This, Telemus Eurymedes foretold (The mighty seer who on these hills grew old; Skill'd the dark fates of mortals to declare, And learn'd in all wing'd omens of the air); Long since he menaced, such was Fate's command; And named Ulysses as the destined hand. I deem'd some godlike giant to behold, Or lofty hero, haughty, brave, and bold; Not this weak pigmy wretch, of mean design, Who, not by strength subdued me, but by wine. But come, accept our gifts, and join to pray Great Neptune's blessing on the watery way; For his I am, and I the lineage own; The immortal father no less boasts the son.

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In Book 9 of the Odyssey, Ulysses saves himself and his men by blinding Polyphemus. Which lines reflect the Cyclops’s disappointment at being defeated by guile and not by strength? Oh heavens! oh faith of ancient prophecies! This, Telemus Eurymedes foretold (The mighty seer who on these hills grew old; Skill’d the dark fates of mortals to declare, And learn’d in all wing’d omens of the air); Long since he menaced, such was Fate’s command; And named Ulysses as the destined hand. I deem’d some godlike giant to behold, Or lofty hero, haughty, brave, and bold; Not this weak pigmy wretch, of mean design, Who, not by strength subdued me, but by wine. But come, accept our gifts, and join to pray Great Neptune’s blessing on the watery way; For his I am, and I the lineage own; The immortal father no less boasts the son.

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