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. 13. How can the reader tell that Goodman Brown has been changed by his experience in the woods, based on the following description: “Turning the corner by the meeting-house, he spied the head of Faith, with the pink ribbons, gazing anxiously forth, and bursting into such joy at the sight of him that she skipped along the street and almost kissed her husband before the whole village. But Goodman Brown looked sternly and sadly into her face, and passed on without a greeting.”

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Answered by answersmine AT 22/10/2019 – 03:46 AM

The reader can tell that Goodman Brown has been changed by his experience in the woods because when he went home and just as his wife kissed him, he just looked sad and just walked away without kissing or greeting his wife back. It is very opposite to what he usually do when he comes home.

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Read this excerpt from Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Masque of the Red Death” and answer the question that follows. Here the case was very different, as might have been expected from the duke’s love of the bizarre. The apartments were so irregularly disposed that the vision embraced but little more than one at a time. There was a sharp turn at every twenty or thirty yards, and at each turn a novel effect. To the right and left, in the middle of each wall, a tall and narrow Gothic window looked out upon a closed corridor which pursued the windings of the suite. These windows were of stained glass whose colour varied in accordance with the prevailing hue of the decorations of the chamber into which it opened. That at the eastern extremity was hung, for example in blue—and vividly blue were its windows. The second chamber was purple in its ornaments and tapestries, and here the panes were purple. The third was green throughout, and so were the casements. The fourth was furnished and lighted with orange—the fifth with white—the sixth with violet. The seventh apartment was closely shrouded in black velvet tapestries that hung all over the ceiling and down the walls, falling in heavy folds upon a carpet of the same material and hue. . . .And thus were produced a multitude of gaudy and fantastic appearances. What kind of writing does the excerpt represent?

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Answered by answersmine AT 22/10/2019 – 04:05 AM

The answer should be D. Argumentative! It makes an argument that also persuades you in a different way but only of the sense that this time it is knocking what argument you made down. Have a good rest of your day! 

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PLEASE HELP Mr. Utterson the lawyer was a man of a rugged countenance, that was never lighted by a smile; cold, scanty and embarrassed in discourse; backward in sentiment; lean, long, dusty, dreary, and yet somehow lovable. At friendly meetings, and when the wine was to his taste, something eminently human beaconed from his eye; something indeed which never found its way into his talk, but which spoke not only in these silent symbols of the after-dinner face, but more often and loudly in the acts of his life. He was austere with himself; drank gin when he was alone, to mortify a taste for vintages; and though he enjoyed the theatre, had not crossed the doors of one for twenty years. But he had an approved tolerance for others; sometimes wondering, almost with envy, at the high pressure of spirits involved in their misdeeds; and in any extremity inclined to help rather than to reprove. "I incline to, Cain's heresy*," he used to say. "I let my brother go to the devil in his quaintly 'own way.'" In this character, it was frequently his fortune to be the last reputable acquaintance and the last good influence in the lives of down-going men. And to such as these, so long as they came about his chambers, he never marked a shade of change in his demeanour. No doubt the feat was easy to Mr. Utterson; for he was undemonstrative at the best, and even his friendship seemed to be founded in a similar catholicity of good-nature. It is the mark of a modest man to accept his friendly circle ready-made from the hands of opportunity; and that was the lawyer's way. His friends were those of his own blood or those whom he had known the longest; his affections, like ivy, were the growth of time, they implied no aptness in the object. Hence, no doubt, the bond that united him to Mr. Richard Enfield, his distant kinsman, the well-known man about town. It was a nut to crack for many, what these two could see in each other, or what subject they could find in common. It was reported by those who encountered them in their Sunday walks, that they said nothing, looked singularly dull, and would hail with obvious relief the appearance of a friend. For all that, the two men put the greatest store by these excursions, counted them the chief jewel of each week, and not only set aside occasions of pleasure, but even resisted the calls of business, that they might enjoy them uninterrupted. *The biblical story of Cain and Abel is a story about two brothers who gave offerings to God. Abel’s offering was accepted by God, but Cain’s was not. Jealous, Cain killed his brother. When God asked Cain where Abel was, Cain said, “Am I my brother’s keeper?” By saying this, Cain implied that what his brother did was his own business. (Genesis 4:1-16) What is significant about “Cain’s heresy” in this passage? A.It shows that Mr. Utterson is a deeply religious and righteous person. B.It shows that Mr. Utterson tries not to judge others or get in their business. C.It shows the Mr. Utterson wants to steal from other people’s businesses. D.It shows that Mr. Utterson does not believe in any kind of religion at all.

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PLEASE HELP Mr. Utterson the lawyer was a man of a rugged countenance, that was never lighted by a smile; cold, scanty and embarrassed in discourse; backward in sentiment; lean, long, dusty, dreary, and yet somehow lovable. At friendly meetings, and when the wine was to his taste, something eminently human beaconed from his eye; something indeed which never found its way into his talk, but which spoke not only in these silent symbols of the after-dinner face, but more often and loudly in the acts of his life. He was austere with himself; drank gin when he was alone, to mortify a taste for vintages; and though he enjoyed the theatre, had not crossed the doors of one for twenty years. But he had an approved tolerance for others; sometimes wondering, almost with envy, at the high pressure of spirits involved in their misdeeds; and in any extremity inclined to help rather than to reprove. “I incline to, Cain’s heresy*,” he used to say. “I let my brother go to the devil in his quaintly ‘own way.'” In this character, it was frequently his fortune to be the last reputable acquaintance and the last good influence in the lives of down-going men. And to such as these, so long as they came about his chambers, he never marked a shade of change in his demeanour. No doubt the feat was easy to Mr. Utterson; for he was undemonstrative at the best, and even his friendship seemed to be founded in a similar catholicity of good-nature. It is the mark of a modest man to accept his friendly circle ready-made from the hands of opportunity; and that was the lawyer’s way. His friends were those of his own blood or those whom he had known the longest; his affections, like ivy, were the growth of time, they implied no aptness in the object. Hence, no doubt, the bond that united him to Mr. Richard Enfield, his distant kinsman, the well-known man about town. It was a nut to crack for many, what these two could see in each other, or what subject they could find in common. It was reported by those who encountered them in their Sunday walks, that they said nothing, looked singularly dull, and would hail with obvious relief the appearance of a friend. For all that, the two men put the greatest store by these excursions, counted them the chief jewel of each week, and not only set aside occasions of pleasure, but even resisted the calls of business, that they might enjoy them uninterrupted. *The biblical story of Cain and Abel is a story about two brothers who gave offerings to God. Abel’s offering was accepted by God, but Cain’s was not. Jealous, Cain killed his brother. When God asked Cain where Abel was, Cain said, “Am I my brother’s keeper?” By saying this, Cain implied that what his brother did was his own business. (Genesis 4:1-16) What is significant about “Cain’s heresy” in this passage? A.It shows that Mr. Utterson is a deeply religious and righteous person. B.It shows that Mr. Utterson tries not to judge others or get in their business. C.It shows the Mr. Utterson wants to steal from other people’s businesses. D.It shows that Mr. Utterson does not believe in any kind of religion at all.

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I have travelled the length and breadth of Alabama, Mississippi and all the other southern states. On sweltering summer days and crisp autumn mornings I have looked at her beautiful churches with their spires pointing heavenward. I have beheld the impressive outlay of her massive religious education buildings. Over and over again I have found myself asking: “Who worships here? Who is their God? Where were their voices when the lips of Governor Barnett dripped with words of interposition and nullification? Where were their voices of support when tired, bruised, and weary Negro men and women decided to rise from the dark dungeons of complacency to the bright hills of creative protest?” What is the main idea of the paragraph?

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Here are a few pointers; hope this is useful)

Ovation-by definition- is show of appreciation from an audience, for a person’s accomplishments or flaw.

“Everyone deserves a standing ovation because we all overcometh the world.”

A person’s accomplishment could be how they made a positive change in this world, strong leadership- that makes them a effective leader or simply helping others. A person’s flaw- mistakes in life, sin or even guilt should also be considered an appreciation- an ovation for representing mankind’s flaw and that humanity makes mistakes, fulfilling at least one deadly sin such as greed, lust, selfishness etc.

Thus, regardless of a person’s achievement or flaw- a person deserves an applause for, not the least, living in this society and this world that we are all living together and dying together.

That was just the introduction.. the best part is yet to come.. now it’s your turn!!

Here are other pointers to talk about in your essay:

Shakespeare’s famous line “All the World’s a stage. That agrees with your line: “Everybody deserves a standing ovation…”

Shakespeare explains that men and women are like players: they live, and die, some being celebrated and some forever living in solitude till their death. Shakespeare states the world is a “stage” which symbolizes that mankind is in its peak. The world is changing everyday: little by little and humanity is falling behind.
Due to our world turning into machinery: factories, an automotive future: where humans only job to live (entrance) and to die (exit) the famous humans remembered and the flawed not recalled.

This is according to Shakespeare’s imagery.

I don’t know what grade your in, but I think simplifying Shakespeare’s word of mouth in your essay would be handy and useful as it has strong references of your quote, and agrees strongly in your essay.

Hope this helps 🙂

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What type of noun is the word in bold? samuel looked for an answer to the problem by reading his textbook. a. proper?

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Here are a few pointers; hope this is useful)

Ovation-by definition- is show of appreciation from an audience, for a person’s accomplishments or flaw.

“Everyone deserves a standing ovation because we all overcometh the world.”

A person’s accomplishment could be how they made a positive change in this world, strong leadership- that makes them a effective leader or simply helping others. A person’s flaw- mistakes in life, sin or even guilt should also be considered an appreciation- an ovation for representing mankind’s flaw and that humanity makes mistakes, fulfilling at least one deadly sin such as greed, lust, selfishness etc.

Thus, regardless of a person’s achievement or flaw- a person deserves an applause for, not the least, living in this society and this world that we are all living together and dying together.

That was just the introduction.. the best part is yet to come.. now it’s your turn!!

Here are other pointers to talk about in your essay:

Shakespeare’s famous line “All the World’s a stage. That agrees with your line: “Everybody deserves a standing ovation…”

Shakespeare explains that men and women are like players: they live, and die, some being celebrated and some forever living in solitude till their death. Shakespeare states the world is a “stage” which symbolizes that mankind is in its peak. The world is changing everyday: little by little and humanity is falling behind.
Due to our world turning into machinery: factories, an automotive future: where humans only job to live (entrance) and to die (exit) the famous humans remembered and the flawed not recalled.

This is according to Shakespeare’s imagery.

I don’t know what grade your in, but I think simplifying Shakespeare’s word of mouth in your essay would be handy and useful as it has strong references of your quote, and agrees strongly in your essay.

Hope this helps 🙂

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A car crash woke john from his afternoon nap. when he looked out of his apartment window, he saw several people milling around two smashed cars. he decided not to dial 911 because he assumed someone had already called. john’s reaction is an example of

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The Contribution Margin per unit (CM) can be calculated
from the difference of Selling Price per unit (SP) and Total Expenses per unit
(TE).

 

First, let’s calculate the value of SP:

SP = Sales / Units sold

SP = $1,043,400 / 22,200 units sold

SP = $47

 

Second, calculate all expenses:

Direct materials per unit = $234,948 / 27,970 units
manufactured = $8.4

Direct labor per unit = $131,459 / 27,970 units
manufactured = $4.7

Variable manufacturing overhead per unit = $240,542 / 27,970
units manufactured = $8.6

Variable selling expenses per unit = $113,220 / 22,200
units sold = $5.1

TE = $26.8

 

Therefore the CM is:

CM = SP – TE

CM = $47 – $26.8

CM = $20.2 per unit

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Read the scenario below and answer the question that follows. Hope knew how desperate Hayley was to make it on the baseball team. Hope had seen Hayley’s grandparents cheering at the game last year. They just looked so happy. The baseball team was the only thing that was going well in Hayley’s life. Yet, Hope knew that she was a better player than Hayley. After baseball camp, there was really no competition. What was Hope to do? Here she was at tryouts, and it was too late to drop out. There was one more spot on the team. She believed strongly that she should always do her best, but she didn’t want to break Hayley’s heart. Which statement describes the main plot of the scenario above best? A. Hope has an external conflict due to competition with Hayley. B. Hope has an internal conflict due to a moral dilemma. C. Hope has an internal conflict due to her negative feelings toward Hayley. D. Hope has an external conflict due to her missing baseball camp.

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Hey there!

Correct answer is D. Comma or Period Inside Rule

A. Question mark or exclamation point inside: those are not really necessary.

B. Colon or semicolon: not, a semicolon would divide the whole sentence and it would be shorten; a colon would work but after requested, when there is already a comma.

C. Question mark or Exclamation Point Outside Rule: would not work, becase it is an very polite and affirmative sentence.

D: A comma or period inside rule: actually, just a comma would work. Please, Cooper’s dad requested, go… Cooper’s dad requested must be in between commas as it is a vocative.

Hope this helps

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HELP PLEASE: Read the sentence: The men were lined up in formation along the wall, and it occurred to me that they looked very tired. Choose the group of words that signal the use of the first-person point of view in the sentence above. Select one: a. men; it b. it; me c. occurred; me d. men; tired –

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The function of the noun clause in this sentence is a subject.

A noun clause is a group of words working together as a noun. These clauses are always dependent clauses so that, they do not form a complete sentence. Noun clauses are used to name something when a single word isn’t enough. These can be noticed by seeing the following words: How, that, what, who, why, whoever, whatever, when, where, wether, which, whichever, who, whoever, whom.

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Which description of Ulysses S. Grant is correct? A. He came from a famous family and looked very distinguished. B. He was successful in every enterprise that he undertook during his life. C. He had been commandant at West Point and was an expert on military theory. D. He was willing to outlast the enemy even at the cost of high casualties.

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Llegal immigration to the United States is the violation of United States immigration laws by foreign nationals who enter the country without government permission (i.e., a visa) or, after lawful admittance, remain within the country beyond their period of authorized admission.

The United States Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has estimated that 11.4 million illegal immigrants lived in the United States
in January 2012. According to DHS estimates, “the number of illegal
immigrants peaked around 12 million in 2007 and has gradually declined
to closer to 11 million.”[1] The DHS estimate “is in the same ballpark as several independent organizations that study illegal immigration, including Pew Research Center
(11.3 million); the Center for Migration Studies (11 million), which
studies migration and promotes policies that safeguard the rights of
migrants, and the Center for Immigration Studies, which advocates for low levels of legal immigration (11–12 million).”[1]

For the fiscal year 2015, DHS reported that the number of new visa overstays (not counting late departures) was 527,127.[2] For that period, DHS conducted a total of 462,463 removals and returns.[3] For the same time period, ICE removed or returned 235,413 individuals.[3] According to ICE, 166 people died while detained between 2003 and 2016.[4] As of 2015, illegal immigration to the United States continued to decline in comparison to its peak in the year 2000.[3]

In 2012, 52% were from Mexico, 15% from Central America, 12% from Asia, 6% from South America, 5% from the Caribbean, and another 5% from Europe and Canada.[5] Economic reasons are the most popular motivation for people to illegally immigrate to the United States.[6][7][8]

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Which sentence uses italics or quotation marks correctly? A. O. Henry’s short story “The Cop and the Anthem” is both funny and sad. B. Amigo Brothers has been included in this collection of short stories. C. They enjoyed reading Thank You, M’am, a short story by Langston Hughes. D. “Seventh Grade” by Gary Soto is a short story about the first day of school. Which sentence uses italics or quotation marks correctly? A. In 1883, the “Orient Express” began railroad trips from Paris to Istanbul. B. I have a ticket for the Crescent passenger train, which will take me all the way to New Orleans. C. The “Flying Scotsman” was a luxury express train with a restaurant and a cinema coach. D. Beginning in 1936, the Super Chief passenger train ran from Chicago to Los Angeles. Which sentence uses italics or quotation marks correctly? A. As Mom cooks breakfast, she hums one of her favorite songs, Oh, What a Beautiful Mornin’. B. My baby brother already knows songs like “Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star.” C. I really like that song called “Do You Believe in Magic?” D. Dad makes me laugh when he sings the Elvis Presley song “Hound Dog.” Which sentence uses italics or quotation marks correctly? A. Even though it made him sad, he enjoyed reading Hans Christian Andersen’s short story The Little Match Girl. B. In April 1912, the Titanic struck an iceberg and sank in the North Atlantic Ocean. C. Here is the current issue of the magazine Sports Illustrated for Kids. D. The main newspaper in New Orleans is called “The Times-Picayune.” Which sentence uses italics or quotation marks correctly? A. My little brother just saw the movie “101 Dalmatians” for the first time. B. This sports magazine has a funny article titled “Top Ten Team Mascots.” C. In the chorus concert, we’re singing the song titled Don’t Fence Me In. D. The first spacecraft to travel to Saturn was the Pioneer 11 in 1979. Which sentence uses italics or quotation marks correctly? A. I really enjoyed reading Lewis Carroll’s book Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. B. Who painted “Starry Night,” Van Gogh or Cezanne? C. Suzanne recited Winter Time, a short poem by Robert Louis Stevenson. D. My parents saw the Metropolitan Opera Company perform The Magic Flute on Saturday night. Which sentence uses italics or quotation marks correctly? A. Clément Ader piloted his steam-engine powered airplane named “Éole.” B. I don’t read all the newspaper, but I do read the editorials in the Washington Post. C. Ms. Franz recommends Walter Lord’s book titled “A Night to Remember.” D. One of Michelangelo’s most famous sculptures is the Pieta. Which sentence uses italics or quotation marks correctly? A. Vanessa looked up several articles in the Journal of the American Medical Association. B. I get a peaceful feeling when I look at Monet’s painting titled Water Lilies. C. Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet” is a play that has been made into a movie and an opera. D. I was inspired by the story told in this book, “Washington at Valley Forge.” Which sentence uses italics or quotation marks correctly? A. Composers Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein wrote the music for the Broadway play The Sound of Music. B. My favorite song from the musical is Do-Re-Mi, which is sung by Maria and all of the von Trapp children. C. The musical is based on Maria von Trapp’s book, The Story of the Trapp Family Singers. D. The Academy Award for Best Picture in 1965 went to the musical movie “The Sound of Music.”

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March 4, 1933, was perhaps the Great Depression’s darkest hour. The stock market had plunged 85% from its high in 1929, and nearly one-fourth of the workforce was unemployed. In the cities, jobless men were lining up for soup and bread. In rural areas, farmers whose land was being foreclosed were talking openly of revolution. The crowd that gathered in front of the Capitol that day to watch Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Inauguration had all but given up on America. They were, a reporter observed, “as silent as a group of mourners around a grave.”
Roosevelt’s Inaugural Address was a pitch-perfect combination of optimism (“The only thing we have to fear is fear itself”), consolation (the nation’s problems “concern, thank God, only material things”) and resolve (“This nation asks for action, and action now”). The speech won rave reviews. Even the rock-ribbed Republican Chicago Tribune lauded its “dominant note of courageous confidence.” F.D.R. had buoyed the spirits of the American people — and nearly 500,000 of them wrote to him at the White House in the following week to tell him so.
Hours after the Inauguration, Roosevelt made history in a more behind-the-scenes way. He gathered his Cabinet in his White House office and had Justice Benjamin Cardozo swear them in as a group, the first time that had ever been done. F.D.R. joked that he was doing it so they could “receive an extra day’s pay,” but the real reason was that he wanted his team to get to work immediately.
And that team came through brilliantly. In the next 100 days — O.K., 105, but who’s counting? — his Administration shepherded 15 major bills through Congress. It was the most intense period of lawmaking ever undertaken by Congress — a “presidential barrage of ideas and programs,” historian Arthur Schlesinger Jr. observed, “unlike anything known to American history.”

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The king is not to be trusted without being looked after , or in other words , that a thrist for absolute power is the natural disease of monarchy . what writer of common sense is this ?

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Answer 1:

Correct answer is D.

D = 4

As it is 4NaCl, it means that there are four molecules of sodium chloride so one molecule of sodium chloride contain 1 chlorine atom so 4 molecules contain 4 molecules of chlorine.

Answer 2:

Correct answer is B.

B = law of conservation of mass

As it has the same amount of atoms of each element on both sides of reaction, so it means the mass on the both sides of equation is same or conserved. So, it will obey law of conservation of mass.

Answer 3:

Correct answer is D.

D = 5

This is according to the law of conservation of mass. So, if at the start of reaction we have 5 grams of substrate we will get the 5 grams of product. Because mass remain conserved during a reaction.

Answer 4:

Correct option is C.

C = 3

In the given reaction, there should be 3 molecules of water in product to balance the equation on both sides. So, the correct option is C.

Answer 5:

Correct option is C.

C = oxygen

In the above given options only oxygen is element. All the other are not elements except Oxygen. So, the correct option is C.

Answer 6:

Correct option is D.

D = apple juice

Homogeneous mixture is the mixture that has the same composition through out the mixture. So, in the given options only apple juice is the homogeneous mixture.

Answer 7:

Correct option is B.

B = It is uniform in composition.

The significant properties of a homogeneous mixture is that it has the same chemical composition throughout the mixture. It is uniform in composition. So, option C is correct.

Answer 8:

Correct answer is A.

A = salt

In a solution of salt and water, salt is solute. Solute is the minor component of solution that dissolve in solvent.

Answer 9:

Correct option is B

B = compound

Compound is the substance made of the atoms of different elements combined together in definite proportions. So, the pure substance from the following is B.

Answer 10:

Correct option is A

A = heterogeneous mixtures

The substance that is not uniform in appearance and each part of the mixture contains a combination of different ingredients in different ratios. so this is definitely a heterogeneous mixture.

Answer 11:

Correct option is D.

D = chocolate chip cookies

All of the above are compounds except chocolate chip coolies. Salt, sugar, water are compounds but chocolate chip cookies.

Answer 12:

Correct option is D

D = brewed tea

All of the above are homogeneous mixture except Saline solution. Brewed tea is not a homogeneous mixture but a heterogeneous solution.

Answer 13:

Correct option is B.

B = A compound is a pure substance, but a mixture is not.

The one of the difference between a compound and mixture is a compound is a pure substance, but a mixture is not. So, the correct option is B

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“Simile” by N. Scott Momaday What did we say to each other that now we are as the deer who walk in single file with heads high with ears forward with eyes watchful with hooves always placed on firm ground in whose limbs there is latent flight Source: Momaday, N. Scott. “Simile.” The Language of Literature. New York: McDougal Littell, 2006. 265. Print. Which of the following techniques does this poem use? I. simile II. sensory imagery III. allusion I and II I and III II and III I only[i and ii ] is the answer just doing this so people know that answer when they are looked up

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|Q| Why did people trust Bernie Madoff? |A| Our research suggests that Madoff may have deliberately or inadvertently taken advantage of the automatic trust process regardless of whether his family members and business associates were victims or confederates. Even if he didn’t seem trustworthy, the fact that his closest relatives and associates invested with him could have provided a subtle, non-conscious signal that he was actually trustworthy. After all, foxes never prey near their dens, and thieves only steal far from their homes. Additionally, the constant associations of Madoff’s name with all sorts of philanthropic works, and other subtle cues, may also have encouraged people to trust when they shouldn’t have.

To explore trust, we did an experiment that used common cues naturally associated with people’s previous trusting or distrusting relationships–the names of their friends. We used the names of our research participants’ friends (or enemies) to subliminally prime them before they had a chance to trust or not trust someone they had never met.

In our simulation, the participants saw their friends’ names repeatedly, for fractions of a second, so briefly that they could not recognize them, before they played the classic Trust Game. In the game, they each started with $5 and could send any part of it, from nothing to all $5, to another participant whom they would never meet. The ”receiver” (who didn’t actually exist) would have full knowledge of the sender’s endowment and the amount the sender had sent.

The participants understood that the receiver would be getting three times the amount they sent and would then freely choose how much of the tripled amount to return to the senders. The receiver could send back anything from nothing to the entire tripled amount. In this boiled-down interaction, sending money was risky but increased joint gain; this accorded with the common definition of trusting behavior–a willingness to accept vulnerability based on positive expectations of another’s intention or behavior that is not under one’s control.

The results were stunning. After seeing subliminal presentations of names of people they liked or people they trusted, our participants trusted anonymous strangers by sending them an average of nearly 50% more than people who saw similar presentations of names of people they didn’t like.

In addition, nearly 50% of the participants who saw–albeit unconsciously–names they liked or trusted sent their entire endowments to strangers, compared with 15% of the participants who were subliminally primed with names of people they distrusted. These subliminal cues also increased their expectations that the stranger would reciprocate their trust by responding in ways that would best serve their interest.

The automatic trust process that this reveals has important implications for investors, consumers and business executives. Business relationships form at an increasingly rapid pace, and trust-related choices, such as financial investment decisions, can be made with the click of a mouse. People who can gain financially from others’ trust can deliberately or inadvertently take advantage of this process.

This same process can also increase expectations of reciprocity. People in our studies who were subliminally primed by trust-related cues also expected that their interaction partners would be more trusting in return. Thus if you take advantage of the automatic trust process, you may be penalized in the future if you don’t meet the higher, subliminally induced expectations of those who trust you. It seems clear, even without addressing the potential moral issues that arise, that people who try to stimulate automatic trust for their own benefit should ensure that they have the means and the desire to reciprocate if they want to enjoy long-term success.In some situations, everyone can benefit from an automatic trust. When subliminally activated trust is not intentionally exploited, it can lead to an increase in the likelihood of mutually beneficial trust, much like a self-fulfilling prophecy. In a classic 1977 experiment conducted by the social psychologist Mark Snyder and his colleagues, participants behaved in a more friendly and trustworthy manner after they interacted with others who had been led to believe that they were friendly and trustworthy. Thus, the subliminally activated trust may help boost the mutual trust development process and lead to mutual benefits that wouldn’t be attained without it. Put simply, our findings suggest that trust may not always develop via an incremental, evaluative process. Social and relational cues may have a strong but subtle impact on people’s important financial and management choices. Understanding the non-conscious nature of this process can help you take advantage of its benefits while avoiding its downsides–and avoiding the next Bernie Madoff, too.

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He had come out of the war with five inestimable blessings—his head, his wife Maria’s head and the heads of three out of their four children. As a bonus he also had his old bicycle—a miracle too but naturally not to be compared to the safety of five human heads. . . . It was unbelievable. He rubbed his eyes and looked again and it was still standing there before him. But, needless to say, even that monumental blessing must be accounted also totally inferior to the five heads in the family. This newest miracle was his little house in Ogui Overside. Which claim could use the excerpts given above as textual support? A. Although the civil war is over, the new “civil peace” is just as violent. B. Jonathan understands that he can live without things, but he cannot live without his family. C. Although Jonathan is glad the war is over, he would have been happier if it never happened. D. Jonathan optimistically expected his entire family to come out of the war uninjured.

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The correct answer is B. Jonathan understands that he can live without things, but he cannot live without his family.

Explanation:

In the text provided the narrator describes the way in which the character called Jonathan goes back home after the war has finished and he recognizes he feels lucky for having all the members of his family including himself alive and also, he finds his old bicycle has also survived the war. But this object does not compare to his family and because of this the narrator uses expressions such as “a miracle too but naturally not to be compared to the safety of five human heads” and “must be accounted also totally inferior to the five heads in the family” that show the most important is the well being of the family and not the bicycle.

On the other hand, a claim is a statement that expresses a position someone has towards some topic or issue; additionally, this claim needs to be supported by evidence that shows what is being claim is valid and logical, considering this, if the information of the text could be used to support a claim the most suitable claim will be “Jonathan understands that he can live without things, but he cannot live without his family” because this claim is connected to the main idea of the text and therefore the text can be used to support this statement as Jonathan behavior portrays the importance of family over things.

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