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PLEASE HELP Mr. Utterson the lawyer was a man of a rugged countenance, that was never lighted by a smile; cold, scanty and embarrassed in discourse; backward in sentiment; lean, long, dusty, dreary, and yet somehow lovable. At friendly meetings, and when the wine was to his taste, something eminently human beaconed from his eye; something indeed which never found its way into his talk, but which spoke not only in these silent symbols of the after-dinner face, but more often and loudly in the acts of his life. He was austere with himself; drank gin when he was alone, to mortify a taste for vintages; and though he enjoyed the theatre, had not crossed the doors of one for twenty years. But he had an approved tolerance for others; sometimes wondering, almost with envy, at the high pressure of spirits involved in their misdeeds; and in any extremity inclined to help rather than to reprove. "I incline to, Cain's heresy*," he used to say. "I let my brother go to the devil in his quaintly 'own way.'" In this character, it was frequently his fortune to be the last reputable acquaintance and the last good influence in the lives of down-going men. And to such as these, so long as they came about his chambers, he never marked a shade of change in his demeanour. No doubt the feat was easy to Mr. Utterson; for he was undemonstrative at the best, and even his friendship seemed to be founded in a similar catholicity of good-nature. It is the mark of a modest man to accept his friendly circle ready-made from the hands of opportunity; and that was the lawyer's way. His friends were those of his own blood or those whom he had known the longest; his affections, like ivy, were the growth of time, they implied no aptness in the object. Hence, no doubt, the bond that united him to Mr. Richard Enfield, his distant kinsman, the well-known man about town. It was a nut to crack for many, what these two could see in each other, or what subject they could find in common. It was reported by those who encountered them in their Sunday walks, that they said nothing, looked singularly dull, and would hail with obvious relief the appearance of a friend. For all that, the two men put the greatest store by these excursions, counted them the chief jewel of each week, and not only set aside occasions of pleasure, but even resisted the calls of business, that they might enjoy them uninterrupted. *The biblical story of Cain and Abel is a story about two brothers who gave offerings to God. Abel’s offering was accepted by God, but Cain’s was not. Jealous, Cain killed his brother. When God asked Cain where Abel was, Cain said, “Am I my brother’s keeper?” By saying this, Cain implied that what his brother did was his own business. (Genesis 4:1-16) What is significant about “Cain’s heresy” in this passage? A.It shows that Mr. Utterson is a deeply religious and righteous person. B.It shows that Mr. Utterson tries not to judge others or get in their business. C.It shows the Mr. Utterson wants to steal from other people’s businesses. D.It shows that Mr. Utterson does not believe in any kind of religion at all.

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PLEASE HELP Mr. Utterson the lawyer was a man of a rugged countenance, that was never lighted by a smile; cold, scanty and embarrassed in discourse; backward in sentiment; lean, long, dusty, dreary, and yet somehow lovable. At friendly meetings, and when the wine was to his taste, something eminently human beaconed from his eye; something indeed which never found its way into his talk, but which spoke not only in these silent symbols of the after-dinner face, but more often and loudly in the acts of his life. He was austere with himself; drank gin when he was alone, to mortify a taste for vintages; and though he enjoyed the theatre, had not crossed the doors of one for twenty years. But he had an approved tolerance for others; sometimes wondering, almost with envy, at the high pressure of spirits involved in their misdeeds; and in any extremity inclined to help rather than to reprove. “I incline to, Cain’s heresy*,” he used to say. “I let my brother go to the devil in his quaintly ‘own way.'” In this character, it was frequently his fortune to be the last reputable acquaintance and the last good influence in the lives of down-going men. And to such as these, so long as they came about his chambers, he never marked a shade of change in his demeanour. No doubt the feat was easy to Mr. Utterson; for he was undemonstrative at the best, and even his friendship seemed to be founded in a similar catholicity of good-nature. It is the mark of a modest man to accept his friendly circle ready-made from the hands of opportunity; and that was the lawyer’s way. His friends were those of his own blood or those whom he had known the longest; his affections, like ivy, were the growth of time, they implied no aptness in the object. Hence, no doubt, the bond that united him to Mr. Richard Enfield, his distant kinsman, the well-known man about town. It was a nut to crack for many, what these two could see in each other, or what subject they could find in common. It was reported by those who encountered them in their Sunday walks, that they said nothing, looked singularly dull, and would hail with obvious relief the appearance of a friend. For all that, the two men put the greatest store by these excursions, counted them the chief jewel of each week, and not only set aside occasions of pleasure, but even resisted the calls of business, that they might enjoy them uninterrupted. *The biblical story of Cain and Abel is a story about two brothers who gave offerings to God. Abel’s offering was accepted by God, but Cain’s was not. Jealous, Cain killed his brother. When God asked Cain where Abel was, Cain said, “Am I my brother’s keeper?” By saying this, Cain implied that what his brother did was his own business. (Genesis 4:1-16) What is significant about “Cain’s heresy” in this passage? A.It shows that Mr. Utterson is a deeply religious and righteous person. B.It shows that Mr. Utterson tries not to judge others or get in their business. C.It shows the Mr. Utterson wants to steal from other people’s businesses. D.It shows that Mr. Utterson does not believe in any kind of religion at all.

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(Informational Response) Review the excerpt above. Answer the following question in a well-developed paragraph. How does the excerpt prepare the reader for the last line? What details and descriptions prepare the reader for the change in tone and mood in that final line? **Be sure to re-state the question in your topic sentence and use specific examples and details from the story to support your answers. Proofread your work before submitting. Chapter I, The Beginning of Things They were not railway children to begin with. I don’t suppose they had ever thought about railways except as a means of getting to Maskelyne and Cook’s, the Pantomime, Zoological Gardens, and Madame Tussaud’s. They were just ordinary suburban children, and they lived with their Father and Mother in an ordinary red-brick-fronted villa, with coloured glass in the front door, a tiled passage that was called a hall, a bath-room with hot and cold water, electric bells, French windows, and a good deal of white paint, and ‘every modern convenience’, as the house-agents say. There were three of them. Roberta was the eldest. Of course, Mothers never have favourites, but if their Mother HAD had a favourite, it might have been Roberta. Next came Peter, who wished to be an Engineer when he grew up; and the youngest was Phyllis, who meant extremely well. Mother did not spend all her time in paying dull calls to dull ladies, and sitting dully at home waiting for dull ladies to pay calls to her. She was almost always there, ready to play with the children, and read to them, and help them to do their home-lessons. Besides this she used to write stories for them while they were at school, and read them aloud after tea, and she always made up funny pieces of poetry for their birthdays and for other great occasions, such as the christening of the new kittens, or the refurnishing of the doll’s house, or the time when they were getting over the mumps. These three lucky children always had everything they needed: pretty clothes, good fires, a lovely nursery with heaps of toys, and a Mother Goose wall-paper. They had a kind and merry nursemaid, and a dog who was called James, and who was their very own. They also had a Father who was just perfect—never cross, never unjust, and always ready for a game—at least, if at any time he was NOT ready, he always had an excellent reason for it, and explained the reason to the children so interestingly and funnily that they felt sure he couldn’t help himself. You will think that they ought to have been very happy. And so they were, but they did not know HOW happy till the pretty life in the Red Villa was over and done with, and they had to live a very different life indeed. The dreadful change came quite suddenly.

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Answer:

D) I drove them, all three wailing, to the ships,

Explanation:

Odysseus chooses to do battle with the Greeks despite the fact that he wouldn’t like to leave his wife and child. Being a decent pioneer he will be, he sets aside his own wants and unselfishly offers himself to fighting for his nation.

During the war with Troy, he is splendid in fighting. He thinks of the possibility of the Trojan Horse. At the point when the Trojans open their doors and get the Trojan Horse, Odysseus and the Greeks get inside the city of Troy. Odysseus drives his men to triumph.  

During his trek home from the war, Odysseus drives his men through numerous obstructions. He is brave even with beasts and hazardous ladies, for example, Circe and Calypso. Odysseus never surrenders in attempting to protect his men. Despite the fact that he loses men, he is crushed by the way that he couldn’t spare every one of his men.

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In addition to traditional events like bake sales and car washes, young activists have raised money through more creative means. Many use special occasions, such as birthdays and bar or bat mitzvahs, to ask their friends and families to donate money to animal rights, rather than give gifts. Why does the author most likely include these details? to illustrate that young activists pressure others to donate money to show that young activists are more generous than non-activists to emphasize the dedication and generosity of young activists to highlight that young activists are irresponsible with money

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Whether or not you agree or disagree, I do not know. But I will give you my opinion and if you need me to come up with another paragraph, just ask.

Mankind has come a very far way with technology development, so far in fact, driverless cars are beginning to come about. But whether this new form of transport is safe for us or not: that is the question. From my point of view, driverless cars may look and seem safe from the outside, but as that popular saying goes: “Don’t judge a book by its cover.”. I have to disagree with this new form of technology, mostly due to the fact that it is a huge advancement from the cars that we have to steer ourselves. Simply putting in your destination for the car to take you there does not seem very safe at all, or even trustworthy for that matter. What if some controls that cause the car to steer itself just so happen to malfunction? What if it takes you to a completely different destination than the one you were originally going to? What if you had to get to that specific destination at a certain time? You could get in trouble if you were late to such an event, or even your job. Plus, you need to consider the fact that this driverless car needs to know its surroundings at all times. What if it just so happens to go through a red light, and cause a car accident? What if it doesn’t recognize the pedestrian jaywalking across the street, and hits him? What if you’re driving on the highway, and the car goes over the speed limit? A police officer could catch that and pull you over, y’know. You need to make sure at all times that there is nothing wrong with your driverless car, especially if it has something to do with recognizing its surroundings, because it could just cause an accident at any moment, and you would be put to blame for it. My final point is that considering the fact that driverless cars are a huge technology development, they will cost a hefty price. If someone is considering buying one of these vehicles, they would have to consider the pros and cons of buying one, and whether it is really worth it or not. And having to get something repaired on it could also come at a big price, especially if one of the main features of the car is broken. To conclude my opinion, I believe that driverless cars may not be so safe, smart, and reliable as they may look from the outside. The manufacturers will have to run many experiments on them and to make sure the car itself and all of its features work properly before putting it out on the market. So, let’s stick with the cars we can control ourselves for now until mankind is certain that they will have the capability of owning driverless cars.

I hope this helps you! (And I hope it’s not too long, either… I’m known for getting carried away with writing! xD)

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