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70 POINTS!!! PLEASE HELP!!!WILL GIVE BRAINLIEST!!!!!!!!!!While it is no doubt true that literary analysis is an effective way of understanding a literary work in depth, it can be argued that analyzing a text takes away the enjoyment of reading it. Which mode of reading do you prefer, reading for pleasure without any effort at analysis or analyzing as you read? Or do you prefer some other combination of reading strategies? Explain your preference.

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I prefer reading for pleasure without any effort at analysis. Reading a passage once and looking up words in a dictionary will be a way to know new words and understand the text of the passage more.

Having a literacy device sheet in hand is important to comprehend if the text passage is a metaphor, simile, hyperbole etc and that help understand complex literacy language in poetry, Shakespearean language, and in eulogy themes.

Hope this helps.

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PLEASE HELP Mr. Utterson the lawyer was a man of a rugged countenance, that was never lighted by a smile; cold, scanty and embarrassed in discourse; backward in sentiment; lean, long, dusty, dreary, and yet somehow lovable. At friendly meetings, and when the wine was to his taste, something eminently human beaconed from his eye; something indeed which never found its way into his talk, but which spoke not only in these silent symbols of the after-dinner face, but more often and loudly in the acts of his life. He was austere with himself; drank gin when he was alone, to mortify a taste for vintages; and though he enjoyed the theatre, had not crossed the doors of one for twenty years. But he had an approved tolerance for others; sometimes wondering, almost with envy, at the high pressure of spirits involved in their misdeeds; and in any extremity inclined to help rather than to reprove. "I incline to, Cain's heresy*," he used to say. "I let my brother go to the devil in his quaintly 'own way.'" In this character, it was frequently his fortune to be the last reputable acquaintance and the last good influence in the lives of down-going men. And to such as these, so long as they came about his chambers, he never marked a shade of change in his demeanour. No doubt the feat was easy to Mr. Utterson; for he was undemonstrative at the best, and even his friendship seemed to be founded in a similar catholicity of good-nature. It is the mark of a modest man to accept his friendly circle ready-made from the hands of opportunity; and that was the lawyer's way. His friends were those of his own blood or those whom he had known the longest; his affections, like ivy, were the growth of time, they implied no aptness in the object. Hence, no doubt, the bond that united him to Mr. Richard Enfield, his distant kinsman, the well-known man about town. It was a nut to crack for many, what these two could see in each other, or what subject they could find in common. It was reported by those who encountered them in their Sunday walks, that they said nothing, looked singularly dull, and would hail with obvious relief the appearance of a friend. For all that, the two men put the greatest store by these excursions, counted them the chief jewel of each week, and not only set aside occasions of pleasure, but even resisted the calls of business, that they might enjoy them uninterrupted. *The biblical story of Cain and Abel is a story about two brothers who gave offerings to God. Abel’s offering was accepted by God, but Cain’s was not. Jealous, Cain killed his brother. When God asked Cain where Abel was, Cain said, “Am I my brother’s keeper?” By saying this, Cain implied that what his brother did was his own business. (Genesis 4:1-16) What is significant about “Cain’s heresy” in this passage? A.It shows that Mr. Utterson is a deeply religious and righteous person. B.It shows that Mr. Utterson tries not to judge others or get in their business. C.It shows the Mr. Utterson wants to steal from other people’s businesses. D.It shows that Mr. Utterson does not believe in any kind of religion at all.

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PLEASE HELP Mr. Utterson the lawyer was a man of a rugged countenance, that was never lighted by a smile; cold, scanty and embarrassed in discourse; backward in sentiment; lean, long, dusty, dreary, and yet somehow lovable. At friendly meetings, and when the wine was to his taste, something eminently human beaconed from his eye; something indeed which never found its way into his talk, but which spoke not only in these silent symbols of the after-dinner face, but more often and loudly in the acts of his life. He was austere with himself; drank gin when he was alone, to mortify a taste for vintages; and though he enjoyed the theatre, had not crossed the doors of one for twenty years. But he had an approved tolerance for others; sometimes wondering, almost with envy, at the high pressure of spirits involved in their misdeeds; and in any extremity inclined to help rather than to reprove. “I incline to, Cain’s heresy*,” he used to say. “I let my brother go to the devil in his quaintly ‘own way.'” In this character, it was frequently his fortune to be the last reputable acquaintance and the last good influence in the lives of down-going men. And to such as these, so long as they came about his chambers, he never marked a shade of change in his demeanour. No doubt the feat was easy to Mr. Utterson; for he was undemonstrative at the best, and even his friendship seemed to be founded in a similar catholicity of good-nature. It is the mark of a modest man to accept his friendly circle ready-made from the hands of opportunity; and that was the lawyer’s way. His friends were those of his own blood or those whom he had known the longest; his affections, like ivy, were the growth of time, they implied no aptness in the object. Hence, no doubt, the bond that united him to Mr. Richard Enfield, his distant kinsman, the well-known man about town. It was a nut to crack for many, what these two could see in each other, or what subject they could find in common. It was reported by those who encountered them in their Sunday walks, that they said nothing, looked singularly dull, and would hail with obvious relief the appearance of a friend. For all that, the two men put the greatest store by these excursions, counted them the chief jewel of each week, and not only set aside occasions of pleasure, but even resisted the calls of business, that they might enjoy them uninterrupted. *The biblical story of Cain and Abel is a story about two brothers who gave offerings to God. Abel’s offering was accepted by God, but Cain’s was not. Jealous, Cain killed his brother. When God asked Cain where Abel was, Cain said, “Am I my brother’s keeper?” By saying this, Cain implied that what his brother did was his own business. (Genesis 4:1-16) What is significant about “Cain’s heresy” in this passage? A.It shows that Mr. Utterson is a deeply religious and righteous person. B.It shows that Mr. Utterson tries not to judge others or get in their business. C.It shows the Mr. Utterson wants to steal from other people’s businesses. D.It shows that Mr. Utterson does not believe in any kind of religion at all.

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Read the excerpt from "The Most Dangerous Game." "Life is for the strong, to be lived by the strong, and, if needs be, taken by the strong. The weak of the world were put here to give the strong pleasure. I am strong. Why should I not use my gift? If I wish to hunt, why should I not? I hunt the sc*m of the earth—sailors from tr*mp ships—lascars, blacks, Chinese, whites, mongrels—a thoroughbred horse or hound is worth more than a score of them." What does this piece of dialogue reveal about Zaroff’s character? a) He feels he is entitled to practice his cruel sport. b) He would never hunt another member of the upper class. c) He is getting bored with the idea of hunting people. d) He believes that Rainsford feels the same way he does

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Read the excerpt from “The Most Dangerous Game.” “Life is for the strong, to be lived by the strong, and, if needs be, taken by the strong. The weak of the world were put here to give the strong pleasure. I am strong. Why should I not use my gift? If I wish to hunt, why should I not? I hunt the sc*m of the earth—sailors from tr*mp ships—lascars, blacks, Chinese, whites, mongrels—a thoroughbred horse or hound is worth more than a score of them.” What does this piece of dialogue reveal about Zaroff’s character? a) He feels he is entitled to practice his cruel sport. b) He would never hunt another member of the upper class. c) He is getting bored with the idea of hunting people. d) He believes that Rainsford feels the same way he does

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According to freud, our adult personality is determined by: the resolution of adult realities versus childhood fantasies. the way we resolve conflicts between home life and professional life. the way we resolve conflicts between sources of pleasure at each stage and the demands of reality. the way we maintain a balance between family and friends.

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1. The answer is “C”.

“Identical twins” who have been raised apart are typically more similar in intelligence level than biological siblings raised together because they have been born with the same genetic code.

Identical twins originate from a single fertilized egg that parts into two. Before it parts, it is either male or female. After it parts, there are either two guys or two females. The two sections of the fertilized egg embed in the uterus and every create one of the twins.  

Identical twins have the equivalent hereditary source. No immediate reason for monozygotic twinning has been resolved; it isn’t innate. Monozygotic twins speak to around 33% all things considered. They may look strikingly comparative, and it might be hard to reveal to them separated.

2. The answer is “A”.

Lawrence Kohlberg felt that one of the only ways individuals will accomplish the objectives in each of his six stages was to participate in “consensus democracy” in small group settings.

Lawrence Kohlberg felt that the best way to support development through these stages was by discourse of good problems and by investment in consensus democracy inside small groups. Consensus democracy was rule by understanding of the gathering, not larger part rule. This would invigorate and widen the reasoning of youngsters and grown-ups, enabling them to advance starting with one phase then onto the next.

3. The answer is “D.  showing a learner how to correct common mistakes”.

The term scaffolding alludes to a procedure in which instructors display or exhibit how to take care of an issue, and afterward venture back, offering support as required. Analyst and instructional architect Jerome Bruner first utilized the term ‘scaffolding’ in this setting, harking back to the 1960s. The hypothesis is that when understudies are given the help they require while discovering some new information, they stand a superior possibility of utilizing that learning freely. Bruner suggests positive association and three methods of portrayal amid educating: activities, pictures, and dialect.  

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In literature, what can stimulate sensations traveling from pleasure to pain?

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1. Did the authors have similar or opposing views?

The author had opposing views, because one author said that traveling and studying Mars is important and beneficial to us humans. The other author though, says that Mars investigations are a waste of money and too dangerous.

2. Did the authors use the same points of comparison? Explain with examples.

Yes, the authors did use the same point of comparison. One would be about the radiation being either too dangerous or harmless to us humans. Another would be building architecture on mars such as domes and houses, being either too expensive or useful to study.

3. Did the authors support their views in the same or different ways?

It was different in all areas. One author used facts and studies to prove his point, while the other author used mostly onions and not much resilient on facts to prove a true point.

4. Did both focus most on appeals to logic or to emotion?

One author focused on logic, with explanations and studies on why colonizing Mars would be a good thing. The other author used more emotion and was less focused on logic, with strong, opinionative claims using fear and excitement in his statements.

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"And one day those men came again, and said, now for the test, and they took the puppy to the laboratory, and I limped three-leggedly along, too, feeling proud, for any attention shown to the puppy was a pleasure to me, of course. They discussed and experimented, and then suddenly the puppy shrieked, and they set him on the floor, and he went staggering around, with his head all bloody, and the master clapped his hand and shouted: 'There, I've won–confess it! He's blind as a bat!'" "A Dog's Tale." Mark Twain, 1904. This illustrates the ________ in the story. A. style B. allusion C. conflict D. foreshadowing

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“And one day those men came again, and said, now for the test, and they took the puppy to the laboratory, and I limped three-leggedly along, too, feeling proud, for any attention shown to the puppy was a pleasure to me, of course. They discussed and experimented, and then suddenly the puppy shrieked, and they set him on the floor, and he went staggering around, with his head all bloody, and the master clapped his hand and shouted: ‘There, I’ve won–confess it! He’s blind as a bat!'” “A Dog’s Tale.” Mark Twain, 1904. This illustrates the ________ in the story. A. style B. allusion C. conflict D. foreshadowing

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Read the excerpt from “The Most Dangerous Game.” “Nonsense,” laughed Rainsford. “This hot weather is making you soft, Whitney. Be a realist. The world is made up of two classes—the hunters and the huntees. Luckily, you and I are the hunters. Do you think we’ve passed that island yet?” Read the excerpt of Zaroff speaking from “The Most Dangerous Game.” “Life is for the strong, to be lived by the strong, and, if needs be, taken by the strong. The weak of the world were put here to give the strong pleasure. I am strong. Why should I not use my gift? If I wish to hunt, why should I not? I hunt the sc*m of the earth—sailors from tr*mp ships—lascars, blacks, Chinese, whites, mongrels—a thoroughbred horse or hound is worth more than a score of them.” How do these excerpts show the difference between Rainsford and Zaroff? a) Rainsford believes that animals are inferior to humans and therefore deserve to be hunted, while Zaroff feels this way about other humans. b) Rainsford has a deep feelings and sympathy for the prey he hunts, while Zaroff has no feelings or sympathy for his prey at all. c) Rainsford believes that it is acceptable to hunt all things as long as they are weaker, while Zaroff hunts only human beings. d) Rainsford hunts for pure amusement, while Zaroff believes he is performing a service by hunting the “sc*m of the earth.”

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Hey there!

Correct answer is D. Comma or Period Inside Rule

A. Question mark or exclamation point inside: those are not really necessary.

B. Colon or semicolon: not, a semicolon would divide the whole sentence and it would be shorten; a colon would work but after requested, when there is already a comma.

C. Question mark or Exclamation Point Outside Rule: would not work, becase it is an very polite and affirmative sentence.

D: A comma or period inside rule: actually, just a comma would work. Please, Cooper’s dad requested, go… Cooper’s dad requested must be in between commas as it is a vocative.

Hope this helps

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This philosophy believed pleasure was the greatest aim in life was called Stoicism Platonism Epicureanism Cynicism

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This philosophy believed pleasure was the greatest aim in life was called Stoicism Platonism Epicureanism Cynicism

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In “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud,” the speaker is a human, who experiences the startling beauty of nature through the unexpected discovery of an entire sea of daffodils by the water. This poem is pensive and calm, using light, frivolous vocabulary: the daffodils are “fluttering and dancing in the breeze,” and “tossing their heads in sprightly dance.” The waves in the bay, as well, dance and sparkle, and yet the daffodils are more captivating even than the ocean, multitudinous as they are, as the stars in the sky. In Wordsworth’s poem nature is powerful and inviting, exhibiting forces of healing in the form of bright colors and gentle vibes. It is recounted from a comfortable, safe perspective; when the speaker is resting on his safe, warm couch, the memories of his solo walk along the bay …flash upon that inward eye Which is the bliss of solitude; And then my heart with pleasure fills, And dances with the daffodils. These recollections serve as a comfort and pleasure to him, even when he is comfortable in a pleasant environment. Such was the power of the scene. De la Mare’s poem also presents nature as a powerful force, but an impersonal, destructive one. The poem is told from the perspective of sea birds in a storm, and the vocabulary is a violent as Wordsworth’s is serene: “And the wind rose, and the sea rose,/To the angry billows’ roar,” and in the second verse, And the yeasty surf curdled over the sands, The gaunt grey rocks between; And the tempest raved, and the lightning’s fire Struck blue on the spindrift hoar – Here the birds have lost control, and the storm is forcing them onto the shore, waves tossing and wind howling, a wholly different scene than Wordsworth’s happy spring day. Even in the end, when the storm breaks and the sun comes out, we see the lingering effects of the chaos – “the bright green headlands shone/As they’d never shone before,” and yet within this setting we have vast hoards of sea birds breaking this lovely post-storm calm with their “screeching, scolding, [and] scrabbling.” But in the final two lines of the poem, we see also “A snowy, silent, sun-washed drift/Of sea-birds on the shore.” And herein lies the true destruction: while a whole host of birds are tumbling through the sky, another host of birds has been killed by the violence of the storm. Both poems depict the unpredictability of nature, and yet because Wordsworth’s poem is from the point of view of a man, on a bright spring day, his poem is more domestic and simple than that of de la Mare. The latter presents the point of view of nature itself, only to switch to a third person, withdrawn perspective at the end of the poem; humans have no role in the events that unfold. Any humans that exist in the area would have been safely indoors during the storm, away from any danger. We therefore get the rawness of nature where we would normally escape it for our fires and our beds; here is the flip-side of natural beauty – natural destruction. This poem is no walk in the garden, but a story of the wildness of natural processes. I NEED HELP WRITING THIS IN MY OWN WORDS PLEASE HELP

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In “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud,” the speaker is a human, who experiences the startling beauty of nature through the unexpected discovery of an entire sea of daffodils by the water. This poem is pensive and calm, using light, frivolous vocabulary: the daffodils are “fluttering and dancing in the breeze,” and “tossing their heads in sprightly dance.” The waves in the bay, as well, dance and sparkle, and yet the daffodils are more captivating even than the ocean, multitudinous as they are, as the stars in the sky.

In Wordsworth’s poem nature is powerful and inviting, exhibiting forces of healing in the form of bright colors and gentle vibes. It is recounted from a comfortable, safe perspective; when the speaker is resting on his safe, warm couch, the memories of his solo walk along the bay

…flash upon that inward eye
Which is the bliss of solitude;
And then my heart with pleasure fills,
And dances with the daffodils.

These recollections serve as a comfort and pleasure to him, even when he is comfortable in a pleasant environment. Such was the power of the scene.

De la Mare’s poem also presents nature as a powerful force, but an impersonal, destructive one. The poem is told from the perspective of sea birds in a storm, and the vocabulary is a violent as Wordsworth’s is serene: “And the wind rose, and the sea rose,/To the angry billows’ roar,” and in the second verse,

And the yeasty surf curdled over the sands,
The gaunt grey rocks between;
And the tempest raved, and the lightning’s fire
Struck blue on the spindrift hoar –

Here the birds have lost control, and the storm is forcing them onto the shore, waves tossing and wind howling, a wholly different scene than Wordsworth’s happy spring day. Even in the end, when the storm breaks and the sun comes out, we see the lingering effects of the chaos – “the bright green headlands shone/As they’d never shone before,” and yet within this setting we have vast hoards of sea birds breaking this lovely post-storm calm with their “screeching, scolding, [and] scrabbling.” But in the final two lines of the poem, we see also “A snowy, silent, sun-washed drift/Of sea-birds on the shore.” And herein lies the true destruction: while a whole host of birds are tumbling through the sky, another host of birds has been killed by the violence of the storm.

Both poems depict the unpredictability of nature, and yet because Wordsworth’s poem is from the point of view of a man, on a bright spring day, his poem is more domestic and simple than that of de la Mare. The latter presents the point of view of nature itself, only to switch to a third person, withdrawn perspective at the end of the poem; humans have no role in the events that unfold. Any humans that exist in the area would have been safely indoors during the storm, away from any danger. We therefore get the rawness of nature where we would normally escape it for our fires and our beds; here is the flip-side of natural beauty – natural destruction. This poem is no walk in the garden, but a story of the wildness of natural processes.

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According to Bacon, people should read for — a. laughter and excitement c. enlightenment and spiritual knowledge b. pleasure and education d. wealth and power

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According to Bacon, people should read for — a. laughter and excitement c. enlightenment and spiritual knowledge b. pleasure and education d. wealth and power
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