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What chronology is described in the excerpt? A. the country’s recovery from the 2004 tsunami. B. the initial successes of World Bike Relief C. a life transformed by bicycle ownership D. a volunteer experience with World Bike ReliefRead this excerpt from Wheels of Change by Sue Macy.In efforts to restart the lives of those devastated by the crushing waves of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, my husband, F. K. Day, and I founded World Bicycle Relief (WBR). WBR works to provide access to independence and livelihood through the power of bicycles. During our work in Sri Lanka in 2005-2006, we put more than 24,000 new bicycles into the hands of those rebuilding their lives. Since 2006, we have moved into Africa where we currently work in Zambia, Zimbabwe, and Kenya addressing oppressive poverty and the AIDS pandemic by mobilizing volunteer caregivers, students, and entrepreneurs with bicycles.

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Answered by answersmine AT 22/10/2019 – 03:02 AM

The chronology that is described in the excerpt Wheels of Change by Sue Macy is a life transformed by bicycle ownership. The answer is letter C. It is shown in the excerpt above that the couple tried their best to help the people in Sri Lanka get on with their lives by helping them own a bicycle which will produce energy at a much lower cost.

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Read the following excerpt taken from the US Supreme Court case Plessy v. Ferguson (1896). The case coming on for a hearing before the Supreme Court, that court was of opinion that the law under which the prosecution had was constitutional, and denied the relief prayed for by the petitioner. Ex parte Plessy, 45 La.Ann. 80. Whereupon petitioner prayed for a writ of error from this court, which was allowed by the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Louisiana. MR. JUSTICE BROWN, after stating the case, delivered the opinion of the court. This case turns upon the constitutionality of an act of the General Assembly of the State of Louisiana, passed in 1890, providing for separate railway carriages for the white and colored races. Acts 1890, No. 111, p. 152. The first section of the statute enacts “that all railway companies carrying passengers in their coaches in this State shall provide equal but separate accommodations for the white and colored races by providing two or more passenger coaches for each passenger train, or by dividing the passenger coaches by a partition so as to secure separate accommodations: Provided, That this section shall not be construed to apply to street railroads. No person or persons, shall be admitted to occupy seats in coaches other than the ones assigned to them on account of the race they belong to.” The Supreme Court’s ruling in Plessy v. Ferguson was problematic because

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In the Plessy v. Ferguson case, the Supreme Court’s ruling of the “separate but equal” law being constitutional was problematic because the “separate but equal” law accepted segregation and the discrimination that were against blacks.

Hope this helps!

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PLEASE HELP Mr. Utterson the lawyer was a man of a rugged countenance, that was never lighted by a smile; cold, scanty and embarrassed in discourse; backward in sentiment; lean, long, dusty, dreary, and yet somehow lovable. At friendly meetings, and when the wine was to his taste, something eminently human beaconed from his eye; something indeed which never found its way into his talk, but which spoke not only in these silent symbols of the after-dinner face, but more often and loudly in the acts of his life. He was austere with himself; drank gin when he was alone, to mortify a taste for vintages; and though he enjoyed the theatre, had not crossed the doors of one for twenty years. But he had an approved tolerance for others; sometimes wondering, almost with envy, at the high pressure of spirits involved in their misdeeds; and in any extremity inclined to help rather than to reprove. "I incline to, Cain's heresy*," he used to say. "I let my brother go to the devil in his quaintly 'own way.'" In this character, it was frequently his fortune to be the last reputable acquaintance and the last good influence in the lives of down-going men. And to such as these, so long as they came about his chambers, he never marked a shade of change in his demeanour. No doubt the feat was easy to Mr. Utterson; for he was undemonstrative at the best, and even his friendship seemed to be founded in a similar catholicity of good-nature. It is the mark of a modest man to accept his friendly circle ready-made from the hands of opportunity; and that was the lawyer's way. His friends were those of his own blood or those whom he had known the longest; his affections, like ivy, were the growth of time, they implied no aptness in the object. Hence, no doubt, the bond that united him to Mr. Richard Enfield, his distant kinsman, the well-known man about town. It was a nut to crack for many, what these two could see in each other, or what subject they could find in common. It was reported by those who encountered them in their Sunday walks, that they said nothing, looked singularly dull, and would hail with obvious relief the appearance of a friend. For all that, the two men put the greatest store by these excursions, counted them the chief jewel of each week, and not only set aside occasions of pleasure, but even resisted the calls of business, that they might enjoy them uninterrupted. *The biblical story of Cain and Abel is a story about two brothers who gave offerings to God. Abel’s offering was accepted by God, but Cain’s was not. Jealous, Cain killed his brother. When God asked Cain where Abel was, Cain said, “Am I my brother’s keeper?” By saying this, Cain implied that what his brother did was his own business. (Genesis 4:1-16) What is significant about “Cain’s heresy” in this passage? A.It shows that Mr. Utterson is a deeply religious and righteous person. B.It shows that Mr. Utterson tries not to judge others or get in their business. C.It shows the Mr. Utterson wants to steal from other people’s businesses. D.It shows that Mr. Utterson does not believe in any kind of religion at all.

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PLEASE HELP Mr. Utterson the lawyer was a man of a rugged countenance, that was never lighted by a smile; cold, scanty and embarrassed in discourse; backward in sentiment; lean, long, dusty, dreary, and yet somehow lovable. At friendly meetings, and when the wine was to his taste, something eminently human beaconed from his eye; something indeed which never found its way into his talk, but which spoke not only in these silent symbols of the after-dinner face, but more often and loudly in the acts of his life. He was austere with himself; drank gin when he was alone, to mortify a taste for vintages; and though he enjoyed the theatre, had not crossed the doors of one for twenty years. But he had an approved tolerance for others; sometimes wondering, almost with envy, at the high pressure of spirits involved in their misdeeds; and in any extremity inclined to help rather than to reprove. “I incline to, Cain’s heresy*,” he used to say. “I let my brother go to the devil in his quaintly ‘own way.'” In this character, it was frequently his fortune to be the last reputable acquaintance and the last good influence in the lives of down-going men. And to such as these, so long as they came about his chambers, he never marked a shade of change in his demeanour. No doubt the feat was easy to Mr. Utterson; for he was undemonstrative at the best, and even his friendship seemed to be founded in a similar catholicity of good-nature. It is the mark of a modest man to accept his friendly circle ready-made from the hands of opportunity; and that was the lawyer’s way. His friends were those of his own blood or those whom he had known the longest; his affections, like ivy, were the growth of time, they implied no aptness in the object. Hence, no doubt, the bond that united him to Mr. Richard Enfield, his distant kinsman, the well-known man about town. It was a nut to crack for many, what these two could see in each other, or what subject they could find in common. It was reported by those who encountered them in their Sunday walks, that they said nothing, looked singularly dull, and would hail with obvious relief the appearance of a friend. For all that, the two men put the greatest store by these excursions, counted them the chief jewel of each week, and not only set aside occasions of pleasure, but even resisted the calls of business, that they might enjoy them uninterrupted. *The biblical story of Cain and Abel is a story about two brothers who gave offerings to God. Abel’s offering was accepted by God, but Cain’s was not. Jealous, Cain killed his brother. When God asked Cain where Abel was, Cain said, “Am I my brother’s keeper?” By saying this, Cain implied that what his brother did was his own business. (Genesis 4:1-16) What is significant about “Cain’s heresy” in this passage? A.It shows that Mr. Utterson is a deeply religious and righteous person. B.It shows that Mr. Utterson tries not to judge others or get in their business. C.It shows the Mr. Utterson wants to steal from other people’s businesses. D.It shows that Mr. Utterson does not believe in any kind of religion at all.

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Ernesto read a play about a king who returns home after many years and finds a strange man exiting his wife’s bedroom. The king curses the man and orders that he be executed, but later he learns that the stranger was his grown son, who he had not recognized. Although the play ends badly for the king and his family, a few points of humor in the play break up the tension. Which of the following is a term to describe those moments of humor? A. tragedy B. comic relief C. satire D. farce

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Here are a few pointers; hope this is useful)

Ovation-by definition- is show of appreciation from an audience, for a person’s accomplishments or flaw.

“Everyone deserves a standing ovation because we all overcometh the world.”

A person’s accomplishment could be how they made a positive change in this world, strong leadership- that makes them a effective leader or simply helping others. A person’s flaw- mistakes in life, sin or even guilt should also be considered an appreciation- an ovation for representing mankind’s flaw and that humanity makes mistakes, fulfilling at least one deadly sin such as greed, lust, selfishness etc.

Thus, regardless of a person’s achievement or flaw- a person deserves an applause for, not the least, living in this society and this world that we are all living together and dying together.

That was just the introduction.. the best part is yet to come.. now it’s your turn!!

Here are other pointers to talk about in your essay:

Shakespeare’s famous line “All the World’s a stage. That agrees with your line: “Everybody deserves a standing ovation…”

Shakespeare explains that men and women are like players: they live, and die, some being celebrated and some forever living in solitude till their death. Shakespeare states the world is a “stage” which symbolizes that mankind is in its peak. The world is changing everyday: little by little and humanity is falling behind.
Due to our world turning into machinery: factories, an automotive future: where humans only job to live (entrance) and to die (exit) the famous humans remembered and the flawed not recalled.

This is according to Shakespeare’s imagery.

I don’t know what grade your in, but I think simplifying Shakespeare’s word of mouth in your essay would be handy and useful as it has strong references of your quote, and agrees strongly in your essay.

Hope this helps 🙂

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Read the excerpt from Brown v. Board of Education. In each of the cases other than the Delaware case, a three-judge federal district court denied relief to the plaintiffs on the so-called “separate but equal” doctrine announced by this Court in Plessy v. Ferguson, 163 U.S. 537. The Supreme Court cites these cases because it seeks to A.describe the unique situation in Delaware courts. B. illustrate the racial biases of federal court judges. C. establish the existing legal standard for education. D. share the unique differences between the given cases.

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Answer:

The sentence above is a compound-complex sentence.

Explanation:

A compound-complex sentence is made from two independent clauses and at least one dependent clause. The sentence above contains two independent clauses and two dependent clauses. The difference between an independent clause and a dependent one is that the former can stand on its own as a complete sentence because it represents a complete thought, while the latter can’t (see 1 & 2).

1) To cope with their burgeoning populations

2) Most of whom were unskilled workers looking for jobs in factories

1 and 2 are dependent clauses. As such, they can’t stand alone as complete sentences, they depend on the main clause.

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President Hoover’s main weakness in dealing with the Depression was his trust in which of the following? governmental relief programs the creation of a New Deal the private sector an increase of foreign trade

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Correct answer choice for question 1 is :

C) Muslims made Arabic the regions educational system

Explanation:

The success of the Maghreb began in 647 and achieved in 709 with the Byzantine Roman Empire failing its last surviving refugees to the then-Umayyad Caliphate. All further Muslim victories were soon discontinued, however, by a civil war among rival Arab clans that ended in the murder of Caliph Uthman in 656. He was succeeded by Ali, who in turn was assassinated in 661. The Umayyad Caliphate of large temporal and genetic Arab caliphs then set itself at Damascus and Caliph Muawiyah I began joining the empire from the Aral Sea to the western border of Egypt. He put a governor in place in Egypt at al-Fustat, creating a lower seat of power that would remain for the next two centuries.

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Correct answer choice for question 2 is:

B) They set up an effective trade network linked to India and China.

Explanation:

The Islamic Empire’s great efforts and progress in trade certified to be a major advantage to the Muslims, as well as to the rest of the world. International trade expanded and continued development of the empire. Materials for making purposes, leisure, and food were in great need and supply among the people. The flow of goods taken in for sale at the lowest possible prices increased the income of merchants, improved the speed of import, and raised the importance of traders internationally. Major countries such as India and China exported pepper, spices, valued stones, fine cloth, and ceramics to the Muslims, in exchange for coral ivory, and textiles.

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Correct answer choice for question 3 is :

A) As in the larger kingdoms, farming and trading were key to prosperity.

Explanation:

Agriculture takes the African tale like no other financial project both the ties and traditions of the past and the hope of a bright future. Cut in our history, farming draws us back to the land in our villages while giving the promise of a modern, vibrant and flourishing future. There are many various sorts of exports that come out of Western Africa. The most popular crops are peanuts, sorghum, cotton, rice, cassava, coffee, and livestock. One of the most significant crops for countries like Cote d’Ivoire and Ghana is cacao, which is produced in the productive soil of the wet areas.

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The audience knows Juliet isn’t dead, so the Capulets, the nurse, and Paris grieving over her death is an example of _____. A.comic relief B.juxtaposition C.personification D.dramatic irony

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Here is My Answer Sorry if i get off topic A Little

Interestingly, this old expression originates from the New Testament.When a man wished to follow Jesus and become a disciple, he asked if he could first bury his father, who had just died. But, Jesus replied,

Let the dead bury their own dead, but you go and proclaim the kingdom of God [Luke 9: 59-60]

This response’s meaning is that the man must not put earthly duties before spiritual ones. After the children are attacked by the reprobate Bob Ewell and Jem left arm is seriously injured, Atticus discusses the matter with Sheriff Tate, alluding to Jem’s having to go to court and testify to what has occurred.

“Mr. Finch, do you think Jem killed Bob Ewell? Do you think that?”

In the ensuing argument between the two men, Heck Tate explains that Bob Ewell fell upon his own knife because he disbelieves what Atticus proposes, that Jem stabbed Ewell; furthermore, he sees no need to involve Jem in this matter of the death of the despicable Ewell. The honorable Atticus does not want Jem to lose respect for his father if he covers the truth for his son. But, Tate insists on giving his report of the incident. He tells Atticus that this is his town, and he knows everything that goes on.

“There’s a black boy dead for no reason, and the man responsible for it’s dead. Let the dead bury the dead this time, Mr. Finch. Let the dead bury the dead.”

In other words, let Tom Robinson “bury” Bob Ewell as an act of poetic justice, and the incident will be taken care of; in this way, Boo Radley with his “shy ways” will not be exposed to the gossip and cruelties of the public. The town can “move on” from the repercussions of the trial as all the injustice connected to it will finally end. The dead will take care of the dead, and the living will go on living in their own ways. Otherwise, it would be like killing a mockingbird to bring Boo to court.

Atticus finally understands the wisdom of Sheriff Tate and agrees with him.

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