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Which one of the following would you be most comfortable doing? introducing yourself to a stranger calling a friend to ask a favor standing to speak at a meeting with a large audience making a complaint to an executive or politician returning a call to an angry customer very comfortable doing any of these would not be comfortable doing any of these has to be 1 question answered applying for a job

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The most comfortable thing that I would do among the choices is
introducing myself to a stranger

There’s no harm in approaching someone and telling them your name and asking for theirs. This is much easier when what you have in mind is purely introducing yourself and asking for other person’s name. After that, you can choose to do whatever you want, either start a conversation with a topic or end it at just knowing each other’s names.

The other choices involve some form of conflict or negative emotions which is why they’re harder to do.

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Read the sentence. upon returning to athens after defeating the minotaur in crete, theseus replaced king aegeus, leading athens into a new era of success. which part of theseus does the sentence best summarize? -the main resolution -the main setting -the main conflict -the main character

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Hey there!

Correct answer is D. Comma or Period Inside Rule

A. Question mark or exclamation point inside: those are not really necessary.

B. Colon or semicolon: not, a semicolon would divide the whole sentence and it would be shorten; a colon would work but after requested, when there is already a comma.

C. Question mark or Exclamation Point Outside Rule: would not work, becase it is an very polite and affirmative sentence.

D: A comma or period inside rule: actually, just a comma would work. Please, Cooper’s dad requested, go… Cooper’s dad requested must be in between commas as it is a vocative.

Hope this helps

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Veins returning to the heart can close to prevent the backflow of blood. Which component in the veins contributes to this process?

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Veins returning to the heart can close to prevent the backflow of blood. Which component in the veins contributes to this process?

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Khubilai discouraged the Mongols in China from doing what? Returning to Mongolia Harming Chinese citizens Marrying the Chinese Learning to read Chinese

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The Great Wall of China is the longest man-made structure in the world, stretching 21,196.18km (13,170.6956 miles) long. It was built to keep out raiding parties of nomadic tribes, such as the Mongol, Turic and Xiongnu, from modern-day Mongolia and Manchuria.

The first Emperor of China, Qin Shi Huang, is often considered the father of the Great Wall, but even before he united the nation in 221BC, individual states built walls to keep out invaders as early as the 7th Century. Qin connected, lengthened and fortified the walls to protect the northern border between 221-206BC. Subsequent dynasties, most notably the Ming, maintained and rebuilt it.

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Geoffery went on a trip across South America. He took 1,750 US dollars (USD) with him. In Chile, he traded his money for Chilean pesos (CLP) at a rate of USD:CLP = 1:496.5000. He spent 217,513 pesos before he went to Venezuela. In Venezuela, he traded his Chilean pesos for Venezuelan bolivars (VEF) at a rate of CLP:VEF = 1:0.1283. During his time in Venezuela, he spent 38,422.19 bolivars. At his next stop, Paraguay, he traded his Venezuelan bolivars for Paraguayan guarani (PYG) at a rate of VEF:PYG = 1:1063.9500. He spent 12,857,441.39 guarani before returning to the United States, where he traded his Paraguayan guarani for US dollars at a rate of PYG:USD = 1:0.00002186. How much money did Geoffery have remaining, in US dollars? Round all currency values to two decimal places.

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Answer:

$768.98

Step-by-step explanation:

Converting $1750 USD to Chilean pesos, we have

1750(496.5) = 868,875 CLP.

Spending 217,513 pesos gives us

868,875 – 217,513 = 651,362

Converting CLP to VEF, we have

651362*0.1283 = 83569.74

Spending 38,422.19 bolivars leaves us with

83,569.74 – 38,422.19 = 45,147.55

Converting VEF to PYG, we have

45147.55(1063.95) = 48,034,735.82

Spending 12,857,441.39 guarani leaves us with

48,034,735.82-12,857,441.39 = 35,177,294.43

Converting these PYG back to USD gives us

35,177,294.43(0.00002186) = 768.98

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When the romans first began constructing arches like the one above, they were _________________ a. intended to be the gateway to the city. b. designed to be used only by the emperor as he entered and exited his palace. c. suppose to display roman power and intelligence to any possible enemy. d. positioned so the emperor could lead his men through the arch upon returning from a successful battle or war.?

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The Mughal–Persian Wars were a series of wars fought in the 17th and 18th centuries between the Safavids and Afsharid Empires of Persia, and the Mughal Empire, over what is now Afghanistan. The Mughals consolidated their control of what is today India and Pakistan in the 16th century, and gradually came into conflict with the powerful Safavids and Afsharids, led by Ismail I and Nader Shah respectively. Aside from Nader Shah’s invasion of the Mughal Empire, most of the conflict between the two powers were limited to battles for control over Kandahar.[1]

Contents  [hide] 1War of 1622–232War of 1649–533Nadir Shah’s invasion of India4Battle of Karnal5See also6References and notesWar of 1622–23[edit]Main article: Mughal–Safavid War (1622–23)

The Mughal–Safavid War of 1622–23 was fought over the important fortress city of Kandahar, in Afghanistan, between the Safavid empire of Persia and the Mughal empire of India. It resulted in a clear Persian victory.

Muhammad Ali Beg was the Persianambassador sent to the Mughal court of Jahangir by Abbas I of Persia, arriving in time for Muharram in March 1631. He remained there until October 1632, thus negotiating an end to the conflict between the Mughals and the Safavids.

Having secured crushing victories against the Ottomans, Shah Abbas desired to capture the strategic fortress on Kandahar since he had lost it in 1595.[2] In 1605 the governor of Herat, Hosayn Khan, besieged the city but the tenacious defense of the Mughal governor, Shah Beg Khan, and the arrival in the next year of a relieving Mughal army to Kandahar forced the Safavids to retreat.[3][4] With the conclusion of the Ottoman-Safavid War (1603-1618), Shah Abbas was secure enough for a war on his eastern frontier,[2] so in 1621 he ordered an army to gather at Nishapur.[2] After celebrating the new year at Tabas Gilaki in southern Khorasan, Abbas joined with his army and marched on Kandahar where he arrived on 20 May and immediately began the siege.[2] Though Jahangir had information of the Persian’s movements he was too slow to respond,[2] and without reinforcements the small garrison of 3,000 men could not hold for long against the superior Persian army.[5]

The Emperor asked his son and heir apparent Khurram who was at Mandu in the Deccan to lead the campaign, but Khurram evaded the assignment fearing to lose his political power while he was away from court.[6] The relief force the Mughal’s could assembled proved too small to raise the siege,[4] so after a 45-day siege the city fell on 22 June followed shortly after by Zamindawar.[7] After fortifying the city and appointing Ganj Ali Khan as governor of the city,[3] Abbas returned to Khorasan via Ghur, subduing on the way troubling emirs in Chaghcharan and Gharjistan.[8] The rebellion of Khurram absorbed the Mughal’s attention, so in the spring of 1623 a Mughal envoy arrived at the Shah’s camp with a letter from the Emperor accepting the loss of Kandahar and putting an end to the conflict.[9]

War of 1649–53[edit]Main article: Mughal–Safavid War (1649–53)

The Mughal–Safavid War of 1649-53 was fought between the Mughal and Safavid empires in the territory of modern Afghanistan. The war began after a Persian army, while the Mughals were at war with the Janid Uzbeks, captured the fortress city of Kandahar and other strategic cities that controlled the region. The Mughals attempted unsuccessfully to regain the city from the Persians,What links hereRelated changesUpload fileSpecial pagesPermanent linkPage informationWikidata itemCite this page

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