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Natural Forces Affecting the Driver In one or more complete sentences, explain how natural laws apply to the following scenarios: How does inertia affect a person who is not wearing a seatbelt during a collision? How does kinetic energy affect the stopping distance of a vehicle traveling at 30 mph compared to the same vehicle traveling at 60 mph? How does kinetic energy affect the stopping distance of a small vehicle compared to a large vehicle? Keeping in mind the kinetic energy of a moving vehicle, how can a driver best prepare to enter sharp curves in the roadway? Using information about natural laws, explain why some car crashes produce minor injuries and others produce catastrophic injuries. Signs, Signals, and Pavement Markings Imagine you are taking a road trip! Select a destination and navigate the trip. Answer the following questions in one or more complete sentences: Where will you go on your trip? You approach a railroad crossing with a cross buck sign that has no lights or gates. What should you do? You arrive at an intersection with traffic lights that are not working because of a power outage. What do you do? There is a flashing yellow light at the intersection you are approaching. What does the flashing yellow light indicate, and what should you do to safely navigate this intersection? On the road you are traveling, the pavement markings change from broken white lines to solid white lines between the lanes of traffic. What does the line change mean? After an hour on the expressway, your passengers need to use the restroom and they want to get some food. As you approach the next exit, what color sign will you look for, and what type of information would you expect to see on that sign? When you take the exit ramp off the expressway and merge onto the next road, you see yellow lines dividing the roadway. What do the yellow lines tell you about the traffic flow?

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Natural Forces Affecting the Driver:

1. While the car stops, the person continues moving the way that the car were moving and then hits the obstacle in the car or the person can be thrown out of the vehicle. If the person wears belt, he will stop moving with the vehicle and won’t hit the obstacle.

2. We count approximate kinetic energy using the formula K = v^2. So the vehicle which is moving at 30 mph will have four times less kinetic energy than vehicle which is moving at 60 mph. If they have the same road conditions, the breaking distance will be four times as great for the car moving twice as fast.

3. Kinetic energy depends on object’s mass and velocity and it has direct relationship with the stopping distance. The lesser mass of the vehicle = the lesser kinetic energy and lesser stopping distance. => If both vehicles have the same velocity, then small vehicle has lesser kinetic energy than large vehicle.

4. We know that kinetic energy has this relationship with velocity K = v^2. So the best way to prepare to enter sharp curves in the roadway is to lower the speed. The most appropriate speed is 20-30 mph, but it depends on road conditions and car’s breaks condition.

5. Car crashes can happen with everyone so the best way is to be prepared. First the driver should wear a seatbelt while he’s driving. He should check his tires and breaks condition regularly. And also it’s important to slow down the vehicle while entering sharp curves. Without following these rules, the driver can get catastrophic injuries in a car crash.

Signs, Signals, and Pavement Markings: 

1. It doesn’t matter where you go. All you need is to learn highway code. It’s very different to know the meanings of every road sign. Also, it’s necessary to check your car’s conditions and you should take some spare parts for your car in case of accidents. So wherever you go, it’s important to be prepared.

2. You should stop before crossing and take few minutes to make sure there is no train approaching. If there is no train approaching, you can pass a railroad crossing. If you see approaching train, you should wait until it will pass a railroad crossing.

3. You should stop before the lights and wait to check the traffic movement and signs. Make sure that everything is safe and pass the intersection. Don’t move fast to avoid accidents.

4. Flashing yellow light means that it’s not necessary to stop but you should to pay attention on the traffic movement. So it would be better to yield before the lights and make sure if it’s safe to move. After that you can cross the intersection.

5. The line change means that the lane changes and you can’t cross solid lines. Pay more attention on road marking because it shows how you should behave on the road or highway.

6. As you approach the next exit and  your passengers need to use the restroom and get some food, you should look for green signs which indicate food and rest stops. You should to slow down if you don’t want to skip the sign.

7. When you take the exit ramp off the expressway and merge onto the next road, you see yellow lines dividing the roadway which indicates that there is oncoming traffic and this is a two-way highway. 

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Read the question thoroughly. Answer the question in a full and complete manner. Use complete sentences and proper spelling and grammar. You got a ride to a football game with some friends. As it is time to go home, you realize that the driver has been drinking alcohol. Name three steps you can take to arrive home safely.

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The statement “Role schema can affect the way people perceive themselves,” is true.

Role schemas refers to how the norms and expected behaviours of specific roles in society are structured. Role schemas cover both achieved roles – including occupational and professional roles, such as police or dentist – and ascribed roles; to put it simply, those roles over which we have little or not control,  including age, gender and race.

The roles and expectations related to these categories are well known as stereotypes.

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In “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud,” the speaker is a human, who experiences the startling beauty of nature through the unexpected discovery of an entire sea of daffodils by the water. This poem is pensive and calm, using light, frivolous vocabulary: the daffodils are “fluttering and dancing in the breeze,” and “tossing their heads in sprightly dance.” The waves in the bay, as well, dance and sparkle, and yet the daffodils are more captivating even than the ocean, multitudinous as they are, as the stars in the sky. In Wordsworth’s poem nature is powerful and inviting, exhibiting forces of healing in the form of bright colors and gentle vibes. It is recounted from a comfortable, safe perspective; when the speaker is resting on his safe, warm couch, the memories of his solo walk along the bay …flash upon that inward eye Which is the bliss of solitude; And then my heart with pleasure fills, And dances with the daffodils. These recollections serve as a comfort and pleasure to him, even when he is comfortable in a pleasant environment. Such was the power of the scene. De la Mare’s poem also presents nature as a powerful force, but an impersonal, destructive one. The poem is told from the perspective of sea birds in a storm, and the vocabulary is a violent as Wordsworth’s is serene: “And the wind rose, and the sea rose,/To the angry billows’ roar,” and in the second verse, And the yeasty surf curdled over the sands, The gaunt grey rocks between; And the tempest raved, and the lightning’s fire Struck blue on the spindrift hoar – Here the birds have lost control, and the storm is forcing them onto the shore, waves tossing and wind howling, a wholly different scene than Wordsworth’s happy spring day. Even in the end, when the storm breaks and the sun comes out, we see the lingering effects of the chaos – “the bright green headlands shone/As they’d never shone before,” and yet within this setting we have vast hoards of sea birds breaking this lovely post-storm calm with their “screeching, scolding, [and] scrabbling.” But in the final two lines of the poem, we see also “A snowy, silent, sun-washed drift/Of sea-birds on the shore.” And herein lies the true destruction: while a whole host of birds are tumbling through the sky, another host of birds has been killed by the violence of the storm. Both poems depict the unpredictability of nature, and yet because Wordsworth’s poem is from the point of view of a man, on a bright spring day, his poem is more domestic and simple than that of de la Mare. The latter presents the point of view of nature itself, only to switch to a third person, withdrawn perspective at the end of the poem; humans have no role in the events that unfold. Any humans that exist in the area would have been safely indoors during the storm, away from any danger. We therefore get the rawness of nature where we would normally escape it for our fires and our beds; here is the flip-side of natural beauty – natural destruction. This poem is no walk in the garden, but a story of the wildness of natural processes. I NEED HELP WRITING THIS IN MY OWN WORDS PLEASE HELP

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In “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud,” the speaker is a human, who experiences the startling beauty of nature through the unexpected discovery of an entire sea of daffodils by the water. This poem is pensive and calm, using light, frivolous vocabulary: the daffodils are “fluttering and dancing in the breeze,” and “tossing their heads in sprightly dance.” The waves in the bay, as well, dance and sparkle, and yet the daffodils are more captivating even than the ocean, multitudinous as they are, as the stars in the sky.

In Wordsworth’s poem nature is powerful and inviting, exhibiting forces of healing in the form of bright colors and gentle vibes. It is recounted from a comfortable, safe perspective; when the speaker is resting on his safe, warm couch, the memories of his solo walk along the bay

…flash upon that inward eye
Which is the bliss of solitude;
And then my heart with pleasure fills,
And dances with the daffodils.

These recollections serve as a comfort and pleasure to him, even when he is comfortable in a pleasant environment. Such was the power of the scene.

De la Mare’s poem also presents nature as a powerful force, but an impersonal, destructive one. The poem is told from the perspective of sea birds in a storm, and the vocabulary is a violent as Wordsworth’s is serene: “And the wind rose, and the sea rose,/To the angry billows’ roar,” and in the second verse,

And the yeasty surf curdled over the sands,
The gaunt grey rocks between;
And the tempest raved, and the lightning’s fire
Struck blue on the spindrift hoar –

Here the birds have lost control, and the storm is forcing them onto the shore, waves tossing and wind howling, a wholly different scene than Wordsworth’s happy spring day. Even in the end, when the storm breaks and the sun comes out, we see the lingering effects of the chaos – “the bright green headlands shone/As they’d never shone before,” and yet within this setting we have vast hoards of sea birds breaking this lovely post-storm calm with their “screeching, scolding, [and] scrabbling.” But in the final two lines of the poem, we see also “A snowy, silent, sun-washed drift/Of sea-birds on the shore.” And herein lies the true destruction: while a whole host of birds are tumbling through the sky, another host of birds has been killed by the violence of the storm.

Both poems depict the unpredictability of nature, and yet because Wordsworth’s poem is from the point of view of a man, on a bright spring day, his poem is more domestic and simple than that of de la Mare. The latter presents the point of view of nature itself, only to switch to a third person, withdrawn perspective at the end of the poem; humans have no role in the events that unfold. Any humans that exist in the area would have been safely indoors during the storm, away from any danger. We therefore get the rawness of nature where we would normally escape it for our fires and our beds; here is the flip-side of natural beauty – natural destruction. This poem is no walk in the garden, but a story of the wildness of natural processes.

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