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The following graph shows the demand curve for a group of consumers in the U.S. market (blue line) for Blu-ray players. The market price of a Blu-ray player is shown by the black horizontal line at $150. Each rectangle you can place on the following graph corresponds to a particular buyer in this market: orange (square symbols) for Antonio, green (triangle symbols) for Caroline, purple (diamond symbols) for Dmitri, tan (dash symbols) for Frances, and blue (circle symbols) for Jake. Use the rectangles to shade the areas representing consumer surplus for each person who is willing and able to purchase a Blu-ray player at a market price of $150. (Note: If a person will not purchase a Blu-ray player at the market price, indicate this by leaving his or her rectangle in its original position on the palette.

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On December 15, 1791, the Bill of Rights (the first ten amendments to the United States Constitution) were ratified by the states.

The Bill of Rights were added to the Constitution to address fears raised by the Anti-Federalists during the ratification of the Constitution that the Constitution did not provide sufficient protection against abuses of power by the federal government. 

James Madison, the Father of the Constitution, originally did not think a Bill of Rights was necessary. He thought the Constitution gave no power to the federal government that would allow for a violation of the rights of the people.

Madison later changed his position, persuaded mainly by Thomas Jefferson, and, with the help of others, drafted twenty amendments that were proposed to the first United States Congress in 1789.

Twelve of the proposed amendments were accepted by Congress and were then sent to the states for ratification. Only ten were ratified.

These ten amendments list our basic rights and place limits on the federal government. They include the freedoms of speech and religion, the right to bear arms, the right to be free from unreasonable searches and seizures, and an assurance that the powers not delegated to the federal government in the Constitution are reserved to the states and the people. Many of these provisions were based upon similar protections provided by state constitutions that limited the power of state and local government authorities.

Of the remaining amendments that were not ratified in 1791, one was later adopted in 1992 as the twenty-seventh amendment to the Constitution. That amendment prevents changes in the compensation for senators and representatives until after a subsequent election of representatives. The other proposed amendment has never been adopted.

The Bill of Rights illustrates that our Founders understood that for personal freedoms to be broad, the power of the federal government must be limited.

Our nation, however, has moved away from its founding principles, especially during recent decades. Our ever-growing federal government is intervening into more and more aspects of our lives, especially through bureaucratic regulations, and is reducing our personal freedoms in the process.

Government at all levels is doing more and more things that were once left to private individuals and groups, and the federal government is doing more and more things that were once the province of state and local governments, where greater accountability to the public is often possible.

One need only look at the HHS mandate—forcing employers to violate their religious beliefs, under pain of penalty, by paying for and providing abortion pill insurance coverage—to see the harm caused by an overreaching government.

The preservation of our liberties is a daily battle, something our Founders understood. The process of scaling back the size and role of government and returning limits to it is a long one. But, since the federal government is supposed to be our servant and not our master, no one should doubt the importance of this endeavor.

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PLEASE HELP Mr. Utterson the lawyer was a man of a rugged countenance, that was never lighted by a smile; cold, scanty and embarrassed in discourse; backward in sentiment; lean, long, dusty, dreary, and yet somehow lovable. At friendly meetings, and when the wine was to his taste, something eminently human beaconed from his eye; something indeed which never found its way into his talk, but which spoke not only in these silent symbols of the after-dinner face, but more often and loudly in the acts of his life. He was austere with himself; drank gin when he was alone, to mortify a taste for vintages; and though he enjoyed the theatre, had not crossed the doors of one for twenty years. But he had an approved tolerance for others; sometimes wondering, almost with envy, at the high pressure of spirits involved in their misdeeds; and in any extremity inclined to help rather than to reprove. "I incline to, Cain's heresy*," he used to say. "I let my brother go to the devil in his quaintly 'own way.'" In this character, it was frequently his fortune to be the last reputable acquaintance and the last good influence in the lives of down-going men. And to such as these, so long as they came about his chambers, he never marked a shade of change in his demeanour. No doubt the feat was easy to Mr. Utterson; for he was undemonstrative at the best, and even his friendship seemed to be founded in a similar catholicity of good-nature. It is the mark of a modest man to accept his friendly circle ready-made from the hands of opportunity; and that was the lawyer's way. His friends were those of his own blood or those whom he had known the longest; his affections, like ivy, were the growth of time, they implied no aptness in the object. Hence, no doubt, the bond that united him to Mr. Richard Enfield, his distant kinsman, the well-known man about town. It was a nut to crack for many, what these two could see in each other, or what subject they could find in common. It was reported by those who encountered them in their Sunday walks, that they said nothing, looked singularly dull, and would hail with obvious relief the appearance of a friend. For all that, the two men put the greatest store by these excursions, counted them the chief jewel of each week, and not only set aside occasions of pleasure, but even resisted the calls of business, that they might enjoy them uninterrupted. *The biblical story of Cain and Abel is a story about two brothers who gave offerings to God. Abel’s offering was accepted by God, but Cain’s was not. Jealous, Cain killed his brother. When God asked Cain where Abel was, Cain said, “Am I my brother’s keeper?” By saying this, Cain implied that what his brother did was his own business. (Genesis 4:1-16) What is significant about “Cain’s heresy” in this passage? A.It shows that Mr. Utterson is a deeply religious and righteous person. B.It shows that Mr. Utterson tries not to judge others or get in their business. C.It shows the Mr. Utterson wants to steal from other people’s businesses. D.It shows that Mr. Utterson does not believe in any kind of religion at all.

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PLEASE HELP Mr. Utterson the lawyer was a man of a rugged countenance, that was never lighted by a smile; cold, scanty and embarrassed in discourse; backward in sentiment; lean, long, dusty, dreary, and yet somehow lovable. At friendly meetings, and when the wine was to his taste, something eminently human beaconed from his eye; something indeed which never found its way into his talk, but which spoke not only in these silent symbols of the after-dinner face, but more often and loudly in the acts of his life. He was austere with himself; drank gin when he was alone, to mortify a taste for vintages; and though he enjoyed the theatre, had not crossed the doors of one for twenty years. But he had an approved tolerance for others; sometimes wondering, almost with envy, at the high pressure of spirits involved in their misdeeds; and in any extremity inclined to help rather than to reprove. “I incline to, Cain’s heresy*,” he used to say. “I let my brother go to the devil in his quaintly ‘own way.'” In this character, it was frequently his fortune to be the last reputable acquaintance and the last good influence in the lives of down-going men. And to such as these, so long as they came about his chambers, he never marked a shade of change in his demeanour. No doubt the feat was easy to Mr. Utterson; for he was undemonstrative at the best, and even his friendship seemed to be founded in a similar catholicity of good-nature. It is the mark of a modest man to accept his friendly circle ready-made from the hands of opportunity; and that was the lawyer’s way. His friends were those of his own blood or those whom he had known the longest; his affections, like ivy, were the growth of time, they implied no aptness in the object. Hence, no doubt, the bond that united him to Mr. Richard Enfield, his distant kinsman, the well-known man about town. It was a nut to crack for many, what these two could see in each other, or what subject they could find in common. It was reported by those who encountered them in their Sunday walks, that they said nothing, looked singularly dull, and would hail with obvious relief the appearance of a friend. For all that, the two men put the greatest store by these excursions, counted them the chief jewel of each week, and not only set aside occasions of pleasure, but even resisted the calls of business, that they might enjoy them uninterrupted. *The biblical story of Cain and Abel is a story about two brothers who gave offerings to God. Abel’s offering was accepted by God, but Cain’s was not. Jealous, Cain killed his brother. When God asked Cain where Abel was, Cain said, “Am I my brother’s keeper?” By saying this, Cain implied that what his brother did was his own business. (Genesis 4:1-16) What is significant about “Cain’s heresy” in this passage? A.It shows that Mr. Utterson is a deeply religious and righteous person. B.It shows that Mr. Utterson tries not to judge others or get in their business. C.It shows the Mr. Utterson wants to steal from other people’s businesses. D.It shows that Mr. Utterson does not believe in any kind of religion at all.

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Read the passage. (1) The umbrella dates back more than 3,000 years to Mesopotamia. (2) That ancient land was located in the Middle East. (3) The Middle East is a hot and sunny part of the world. (4) Royalty there demanded protection from the sun. (5) People developed the umbrella for this purpose. (6) Use of the umbrella as a sunshade then spread to ancient Europe. (7) In fact, if you analyze the origin of the word umbrella,you will see that it reflects the umbrella’s original purpose. (8) Umbrella comes from the Latin word umbra. (9) Umbra means “shade.” (10) Eventually, the Romans used the umbrella to protect themselves from the rain. (11) They used the umbrella to protect themselves from the sun as well. (12) Today, umbrellas are used mainly as raingear. Which is the most effective way to combine sentences 4 and 5? Royalty there demanded protection from the sun, and people developed the umbrella for this purpose. People developed the umbrella for this purpose, royalty having had demanded protection from the sun. People developed the umbrella for the purpose of protection from the sun, which royalty demanded. Royalty there, demanding protection from the sun, so people developed the umbrella for this purpose.

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Hey there!

Correct answer is D. Comma or Period Inside Rule

A. Question mark or exclamation point inside: those are not really necessary.

B. Colon or semicolon: not, a semicolon would divide the whole sentence and it would be shorten; a colon would work but after requested, when there is already a comma.

C. Question mark or Exclamation Point Outside Rule: would not work, becase it is an very polite and affirmative sentence.

D: A comma or period inside rule: actually, just a comma would work. Please, Cooper’s dad requested, go… Cooper’s dad requested must be in between commas as it is a vocative.

Hope this helps

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A shade of feeling rippled the wind-tanned skin to which sense does the imagery in these lines appeal? a.touch only b. sight only c. touch and taste d. sight and touch

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Since a tiny tender child of four,
There’s nothing that I dreamt of more,
Than to jump aboard a great big ship,
A telescope, a map, a sword, by my hip,
To feel the sea breeze in my hair,
To stroke my parrot on the wood chair,
To be bold and brave and happy as can be,
To trek and travel and sail the seven seas.

8 lines. Rhyme scheme aabbccdd. If I managed to write that in about 4 minutes, you could write something much better and longer in like 30 minutes. You can use my rubbish poem as inspiration lol. Good luck X

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