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Read this excerpt from Edgar Allan Poe’s poem “The Raven”: And his eyes have all the seeming of a demon’s that is dreaming, Which of these poetic devices is used here? A. Repetition B. Slant Rhyme C. Personification D. Simile

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Answer:

Personification

Explanation:

Personification can be described as a figure of language in which an object or living being is personified, while attributing human characteristics and qualities to it. In other words, whenever emotions, desires, sensations, physical gestures and speech are presented in the context of an inanimate being, the personification is said to have occurred. This is what happens in the Poe text shown above.

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Read the excerpt from The Odyssey. Then, his chores being all dispatched, he caught another brace of men to make his breakfast, and whisked away his great door slab to let his sheep go through—but he, behind, reset the stone as one would cap a quiver. What two things are being compared in this epic simile?

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Answer:

Dogs can be strong companions, but they also have needs that many people forget to address.

Explanation:

The author’s claim is that many people forget to address the needs of their dogs. The author continues to talk about some of those needs, like regular washing and grooming to avoid becoming matted and sick. The author is not simply talking about washing and grooming, but other needs the dogs might have as well. These could include things like walking, a proper diet, or brushing their teeth.

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Victor is reading a narrative poem about the deeds of gods and heroes. In this work, the author makes long and involved comparisons. Which figure of speech is the author using in the poem? personification direct metaphor simile epic simile

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Answer:

1). Try

2). Mythological—Thor

3). Historical—Paul Revere

Explanation:

1). The word that is required to change its ‘y’ into ‘i’ before adding the suffix -ed that converts it into past would be ‘try’ which would become ‘tried’ after the addition.

2). In the second question, the statement proposes a mythological allusion as it involves a mythological character ‘Thor’. Thus, it alludes to mythology.

3). This excerpt displays a historical allusion to ‘Paul Revere’ who was a patriot in the American Revolution. Since he is a famous historical character and known for his role in the American revolution, thus, option B is the correct answer.

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The answer is: apostrophe and simile

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Leonardo Davinci was a truly incredible man, far ahead of his time. A true example of what the Italian Renesance stood for, Davinci was an accomplished architect, designing and constructing the Milan Cathedral,  a talented musician, who not on playing, but constructed and designed new instruments, and even a scientist, who dabbled in chemistry, biology, and physics. Davinci is most acclaimed for his art and inventions. The famed and mysterious Mona-Lisa has become the face of the resistance itself, and Leonardo’s inventions and ideas have and will inspire investors for years to come. Davinci created designs for the first parachute, first helicopter, first airplane, first automatic rifle, swinging bridge, paddle boat and first motorized car. Unfortunately, he was unable to realize the vast majority of his creations, due to the limitations of existing technology at the time. While Leonardo Davinci professional life seems amazingly brilliant and almost divine, it is important to remember and commemorate that he was a man, a person, just like all of us. Leonardo had his own beliefs, love interests, friends, and enemies. And yet even in his private venture’s Leonardo was nothing short of remarkable; He was a vegetarian and debated the morality of killing animals, something unheard of at the time. Unfortunately, Leonardo died at Clos Lucé, France, on May 2, 1519, and a great man was lost to the world.

Side note; I actually visited his grave while in France. Also, make sure you don’t copy and paste directly, that’s easy to catch. To make your essay smoother, insert some of your main points into the conclusion.

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Marissa flopped onto the raft and lay on her little island, warming her back in the sun. Which figure of speech, or literary device, does the author use in the sentence? implied metaphor simile personification allusion

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Marissa flopped onto the raft and lay on her little island, warming her back in the sun. Which figure of speech, or literary device, does the author use in the sentence? implied metaphor simile personification allusion

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Based on the epic simile, the reader should envision Penelope as a queen who is

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Answer:

B. John Wayne as the tough cowboy Duke

Explanation:

Archetype is the term used by C.J. Jung to refer to the innate models present in the collective unconscious that underlie the development of the human psyche. These models are born from the constant repetition of a certain experience for many generations, so the archetypes would not develop individually but would be inherited and could manifest differently from one generation to another. Archetypes would function as “primordial images”, universal symbols, present in all cultures, which tend to produce, in each generation, the repetition and elaboration of these same experiences.

In literature, characters are commonly based on archetypes, as they can be interpreted as symbols representing a universal idea of man. The use of archetypal characters makes the story more acceptable, as the characters personify images already present in the reader’s psyche. An example of an archetypal character is represented by John Wayne as the tough cowboy Duke.

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The far and the near, the home counties and the back, the rich and the poor, will suffer or rejoice alike. The above statement is an example of Thomas Paine using which rhetorical technique? simile metaphor parallelism personification

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Answer: C. As I pleaded my case, I imagined the blue haze that hung over the mountains, the breathtaking overlooks, and the smell of the pine-scented air.

Sensory language is that which intends to create images by appealing to our five senses. In this case, option A and B use sensory language. However, they do not use it in order to describe the setting. Option D, on the other hand, does address the setting, but does not use sensory language. Finally, Option C describes “the breathtaking looks” and “the smell of the pine-scented air” of Tennessee. This option describes the setting while using sensory language.

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Read these lines from the poem “Facing It” by Yusef Komunyakaa: My clouded reflection eyes melike a bird of prey, the profile of nightslanted against morning. I turnthis way—the stone lets me go.I turn this way—I’m insidethe Vietnam Veterans Memorial again, depending on the lightto make a difference. Which best describes one effect of the poet’s use of simile in this excerpt? A.It links two different things that prey on innocent lives: a bad memory and an undeclared war. B.It depicts the Vietnam War as a stone that heavily weighs on the speaker’s conscience. C.It gives a bird of prey the qualities of a soldier who goes to war to defend his country. D.It compares the speaker’s reflection to a predatory bird that haunts the speaker.

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The options of the question are, A) by explaining that world leaders are doing all they can to tackle climate change now. B) by quoting Winston Churchill to show that he also believes that climate change is a serious issue. C) by comparing the inaction of the world leaders of today to the inaction of leaders in the past. D) by showing the differences in the effects of climate change and World War II.  

The correct answers are C) by comparing the inaction of the world leaders of today to the inaction of leaders in the past.

The excerpt that develops Gore’s theme that climate change is a problem that must be addressed is “by comparing the inaction of the world leaders of today to the inaction of leaders in the past.”

Al Gore develops the urgency of attending the issues that climate change brings when in the excerpt he makes reference to the comparison made by Winston Churchill to Hitler’s threat: “They go on in strange paradox,, decided only to be undecided, resolved to be irresolute, adamant for drift, solid for fluidity, all-powerful to be impotent”.  This way, Al Gore is comparing the inaction of the world leaders of today to the inaction of leaders in the past.  

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ENGLISH HELP Read the poem below and then answer questions 1-7. Because I could not stop for Death – (479) by EMILY DICKINSON Because I could not stop for Death – He kindly stopped for me – The Carriage held but just Ourselves – And Immortality. We slowly drove – He knew no haste And I had put away My labor and my leisure too, For His Civility – We passed the School, where Children strove At Recess – in the Ring – We passed the Fields of Gazing Grain – We passed the Setting Sun – Or rather – He passed Us – The Dews drew quivering and Chill – For only Gossamer, my Gown – My Tippet – only Tulle – We paused before a House that seemed A Swelling of the Ground – The Roof was scarcely visible – The Cornice – in the Ground – Since then – ’tis Centuries – and yet Feels shorter than the Day I first surmised the Horses’ Heads Were toward Eternity – Question 1 (2 points) Question 1 Unsaved What is the rhyme scheme of the first stanza? Question 1 options: ABAB ABCB ABBA ABCA Save Question 2 (2 points) Question 2 Unsaved How many stanzas does this poem have? Question 2 options: 24 6 1 5 Save Question 3 (2 points) Question 3 Unsaved Re-read the second stanza: We slowly drove – He knew no haste And I had put away My labor and my leisure too, For His Civility – The second and fourth lines show an example of Question 3 options: metaphor slant rhyme simile irony Save Question 4 (2 points) Question 4 Unsaved In the third stanza: We passed the School, where Children strove At Recess – in the Ring – We passed the Fields of Gazing Grain – We passed the Setting Sun – There are three examples of ____________. Question 4 options: similes juxtaposition personification alliteration Save Question 5 (2 points) Question 5 Unsaved Because I could not stop for Death – He kindly stopped for me – These lines show an example of __________. Question 5 options: end rhyme simile personification metaphor Save Question 6 (2 points) Question 6 Unsaved The rhythm of a poem is written in ___________. Question 6 options: feet inches symbols notes Save Question 7 (2 points) Question 7 Unsaved The slant rhyme in the fourth stanza (second and fourth lines) relies on what sound type? Or rather – He passed Us – The Dews drew quivering and Chill – For only Gossamer, my Gown – My Tippet – only Tulle – Question 7 options: meter consonance assonance pizzacato

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A counterclaim, in my own words, is a rebuttle to any comments one might have against your Claim and one of it’s reasons.

So! in order to fit this into your dilemma, you’re going to want to ask yourself
“What might someone have to say against my reason? (Pick one)” 

Then you should start the draft of your counter off by putting *If my readers where to question with “well what if___?” then i’d simply give them a reason / solution like—[COUNTER CLAIM]*

Now, onto my ideas for a good counter / rebuttle..

If they we’re to question your claim… (your choice!) …
along the lines of; why stop the use of pesticides? They prevent produce waste. Simply put: “Remember the ultimate goal of having a honey bee farm, to harvest honey, not to kill off pests with detrimental pesticides.
So if investment into pesticides is so important to the extent of having to use such risky methods. Why not invest in a more beneficial method? Such as sheltering the bee’s with an insect proof structure? Or do away with the whole idea of outdoor honey farms, and make a systematic facility with flowers, bees, sunlight, etc.”

Just did that by simply asking myself those questions above, you got this.
And you have my permission to use this work if need be, but you’ve made it this far. Like you said & im sure of it as well after reading your work; you can finish this on your own. GL

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Which technique is the author using in this stanza? Ten thousand eyes were on him as he rubbed his hands with dirt; Five thousand tongues applauded when he wiped them on his shirt. Then while the writhing pitcher ground the ball into his hip, Defiance gleamed in Casey’s eye, a sneer curled Casey’s lip. simile alliteration imagery onomatopoeia

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Answer:

The correct answer to the question: What is the moral dilemma that the author faces in “Dairy 33”, from The Freedom Writers Diary, by Erin Gruwell and the Freedom Writers, would be: She must decide between remaining loyal to her family and telling the truth.

Explanation:

“The Freedom Writers Diary” and the “Freedom Writers”, are both a teaching strategy turned to literature, and a literary movement, that was started by educator Erin Gruwell, after she faced the terrible ordeal of ethnical and racial hatred in the U.S in 1992-1994. As a new teacher at Wilson High School, in Long Beach, California, she faces a group of students who are victims of the terror of ethnic segregation and discrimination, and gang violence. She also faces a group of students who, given their social and economical circumstances, are fulfilling their own prophecies of academic failure. But Ms. Gruwell does not give up and starts a project by exposing her students to the horrors of ethnic and racial hatred  through the stories of others who have experienced them, especially Anne Frank, and Zlata Filipovic. She also encourages her students to start a writing project through which these students are able to start making sense of their lives, and become empowered to change and find better chances. The project has grown, and became famous, and now they are known as the “Freedom Writers” and the writing project became a series of journal entries, known as “Freedom Writers Diary”.

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Then, his chores being all dispatched, he caught another brace of men to make his breakfast, and whisked away his great door slab to let his sheep go through—but he, behind, reset the stone as one would cap a quiver. The use of the epic simile in this excerpt helps readers understand that the Cyclops has eaten another bunch of Odysseus’s men. Odysseus and his men are still trapped inside the cave. the enormous stone is easily and routinely moved by the giant Cyclops. the Cyclops takes his sheep out to pasture with him in the mornings

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Answer:

The prince is his close relative and unlikely to punish him with death.

Explanation:

The scene of “Romeo and Juliet” by William Shakespeare opens with a quarrel between Tybalt, a Capulet and Mercutio, a very good friend of Romeo Montague and also a relative of the Prince. The two families of Capulet and Montague had been at loggerheads for a long time.

Later, in Act 3 scene i, we find Mercutio and Tybalt fighting, eventually killing Mercutio. The Prince had given the decree in Act I scene i of no public duels which was emphasized again by Romeo in Act 3 scene i when he tried to break up their fight. But he knows that since he is a relative of the Prince, he might be saved from the decree. So, Mercutio wasn’t afraid to fight Tybalt when the latter abused Romeo.

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“Simile” by N. Scott Momaday What did we say to each other that now we are as the deer who walk in single file with heads high with ears forward with eyes watchful with hooves always placed on firm ground in whose limbs there is latent flight Source: Momaday, N. Scott. “Simile.” The Language of Literature. New York: McDougal Littell, 2006. 265. Print. Which of the following techniques does this poem use? I. simile II. sensory imagery III. allusion I and II I and III II and III I only[i and ii ] is the answer just doing this so people know that answer when they are looked up

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|Q| Why did people trust Bernie Madoff? |A| Our research suggests that Madoff may have deliberately or inadvertently taken advantage of the automatic trust process regardless of whether his family members and business associates were victims or confederates. Even if he didn’t seem trustworthy, the fact that his closest relatives and associates invested with him could have provided a subtle, non-conscious signal that he was actually trustworthy. After all, foxes never prey near their dens, and thieves only steal far from their homes. Additionally, the constant associations of Madoff’s name with all sorts of philanthropic works, and other subtle cues, may also have encouraged people to trust when they shouldn’t have.

To explore trust, we did an experiment that used common cues naturally associated with people’s previous trusting or distrusting relationships–the names of their friends. We used the names of our research participants’ friends (or enemies) to subliminally prime them before they had a chance to trust or not trust someone they had never met.

In our simulation, the participants saw their friends’ names repeatedly, for fractions of a second, so briefly that they could not recognize them, before they played the classic Trust Game. In the game, they each started with $5 and could send any part of it, from nothing to all $5, to another participant whom they would never meet. The ”receiver” (who didn’t actually exist) would have full knowledge of the sender’s endowment and the amount the sender had sent.

The participants understood that the receiver would be getting three times the amount they sent and would then freely choose how much of the tripled amount to return to the senders. The receiver could send back anything from nothing to the entire tripled amount. In this boiled-down interaction, sending money was risky but increased joint gain; this accorded with the common definition of trusting behavior–a willingness to accept vulnerability based on positive expectations of another’s intention or behavior that is not under one’s control.

The results were stunning. After seeing subliminal presentations of names of people they liked or people they trusted, our participants trusted anonymous strangers by sending them an average of nearly 50% more than people who saw similar presentations of names of people they didn’t like.

In addition, nearly 50% of the participants who saw–albeit unconsciously–names they liked or trusted sent their entire endowments to strangers, compared with 15% of the participants who were subliminally primed with names of people they distrusted. These subliminal cues also increased their expectations that the stranger would reciprocate their trust by responding in ways that would best serve their interest.

The automatic trust process that this reveals has important implications for investors, consumers and business executives. Business relationships form at an increasingly rapid pace, and trust-related choices, such as financial investment decisions, can be made with the click of a mouse. People who can gain financially from others’ trust can deliberately or inadvertently take advantage of this process.

This same process can also increase expectations of reciprocity. People in our studies who were subliminally primed by trust-related cues also expected that their interaction partners would be more trusting in return. Thus if you take advantage of the automatic trust process, you may be penalized in the future if you don’t meet the higher, subliminally induced expectations of those who trust you. It seems clear, even without addressing the potential moral issues that arise, that people who try to stimulate automatic trust for their own benefit should ensure that they have the means and the desire to reciprocate if they want to enjoy long-term success.In some situations, everyone can benefit from an automatic trust. When subliminally activated trust is not intentionally exploited, it can lead to an increase in the likelihood of mutually beneficial trust, much like a self-fulfilling prophecy. In a classic 1977 experiment conducted by the social psychologist Mark Snyder and his colleagues, participants behaved in a more friendly and trustworthy manner after they interacted with others who had been led to believe that they were friendly and trustworthy. Thus, the subliminally activated trust may help boost the mutual trust development process and lead to mutual benefits that wouldn’t be attained without it. Put simply, our findings suggest that trust may not always develop via an incremental, evaluative process. Social and relational cues may have a strong but subtle impact on people’s important financial and management choices. Understanding the non-conscious nature of this process can help you take advantage of its benefits while avoiding its downsides–and avoiding the next Bernie Madoff, too.

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