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Read the poem below and answer the question that follows. “Blazon” by Cecilia Woloch —after Breton My love with his hair of nightingales With his chest of pigeon flutter, of gray doves preening themselves at dawn With his shoulders of tender balconies half in shadow, half in sun My love with his long-boned thighs the map of Paris of my tongue With his ink-stained tongue, his tongue the tip of a steeple plunged into milky sky My love with his wishing teeth With his fingers of nervous whispering, his fingers of a boy whose toys were cheap and broken easily My love with his silent thumbs With his eyes of a window smudged of a train that passes in the night With his nape of an empty rain coat hung by the collar, sweetly bowed My love with his laughter of an empty stairwell, rain all afternoon With his mouth the deepest flower to which I have ever put my mouth Source: Woloch, Cecilia. “Blazon.” Blogalicious. Diane Lockward, 17 Jan. 2010. Web. 17 May 2011. How does this poem represent a modern version of the blazon? A. The poet selects less expected features and comparisons. B. The poet uses the conventions of the blazon structure. C. The poet uses parody and omission to emphasize her love. D. The poet uses rhyme and iambic pentameter to exaggerate the subject’s beauty.

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Answered by answersmine AT 22/10/2019 – 02:46 AM

The poem represent a modern version of the Blazon by Cecilia Woloch with The poet uses rhyme and iambic pentameter to exaggerate the subject’s beauty. The answer is letter D. The story shows how Cecilia loved his husband by implicitly describing how and what she felt with comparisons of nature and things.

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Read this excerpt from “A Horseman in the Sky” by Ambrose Bierce. Which sentence or phrase in the passage reveals how the father feels about his son’s decision to join the Union army?

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Well, go, sir, and whatever may occur do what you conceive to be your duty. Virginia, to which you are a traitor, must get on without you. Should we both live to the end of the war, we will speak further of the matter. Your mother, as the physician has informed you, is in a most critical condition; at the best she cannot be with us longer than a few weeks, but that time is precious. It would be better not to disturb her.”  

So Carter Druse, bowing reverently to his father, who returned the salute with a stately courtesy that masked a breaking heart, left the home of his childhood to go soldiering. By conscience and courage, by deeds of devotion and daring, he soon commended himself to his fellows and his officers; and it was to these qualities and to some knowledge of the country that he owed his selection for his present perilous duty at the extreme outpost.

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Read the passage from “The Caged Bird.” A free bird leaps on the back of the wind and floats downstream till the current ends and dips his wing in the orange sun rays and dares to claim the sky. How does the figurative language in this stanza work as part of the extended metaphor? It creates images of freedom. It creates images of oppression. It emphasizes a sense of fantasy. It emphasizes a sense of arrogance.

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Answer: A) It creates images of freedom.

Explanation: figurative language is the use of words or expressions to convey a meaning that is different from the literal interpretation. It can be expressed through metaphors, similes, personifications, allusions, etc. In the given passage from “The Caged Bird” we can see examples of figurative language like “dips his wing in the orange sun rays and dares to claim the sky” that creates images of freedom.

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I can blame the darkness on my own parents. Rangi, my father, and Papa, my mother, loved each other so much that they lived in a perpetual embrace. The sky was pressed against the Earth, and there was no space for anything, not even light. When my brothers and I were created, we were trapped between our parents. My brothers loved our parents, but the embrace was so tight that they felt constricted and unhappy in the darkness. What does the “perpetual embrace” of Rangi and Papa symbolize?

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I can blame the darkness on my own parents. Rangi, my father, and Papa, my mother, loved each other so much that they lived in a perpetual embrace. The sky was pressed against the Earth, and there was no space for anything, not even light. When my brothers and I were created, we were trapped between our parents. My brothers loved our parents, but the embrace was so tight that they felt constricted and unhappy in the darkness. What does the “perpetual embrace” of Rangi and Papa symbolize?

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Ead the passage from “The Caged Bird.” The free bird thinks of another breeze and the trade winds soft through the sighing trees and the fat worms waiting on a dawn bright lawn and he names the sky his own What are the connotative meanings of sighing, as used in the poem? Check all that apply. longing sadness relaxation exhaling peacefulness breathing

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Ead the passage from “The Caged Bird.” The free bird thinks of another breeze and the trade winds soft through the sighing trees and the fat worms waiting on a dawn bright lawn and he names the sky his own What are the connotative meanings of sighing, as used in the poem? Check all that apply. longing sadness relaxation exhaling peacefulness breathing

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Read the summary of “The Beginnings of the Maasai.” In “The Beginnings of the Maasai,” the daughter of the Maasai explains the relationship between the Maasai and their sky god Enkai. She explains how a volcanic eruption sent Enkai and the cattle into the sky. In order to save the cattle, Enkai created a giant tree that allowed them to walk back to earth. Then, Enkai entrusted Neiterkob, the narrator’s father, and his tribe to care for the cattle. As a result, the cattle are sacred to the Maasai, and the Maasai maintain a close connection with Enkai. Is this an effective summary of the story? Yes, because it includes key ideas from the beginning, middle, and end, and it explains the conflict and the resolution. Yes, because it focuses on the details from the beginning, the obstacles from the middle, and the resolution from the end. No, because it is uses too many specific names from the beginning, middle, and end, and it has a vague resolution. No, because it leaves out details from the beginning, the obstacles from the middle, and the resolution from the end.

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Read the summary of “The Beginnings of the Maasai.” In “The Beginnings of the Maasai,” the daughter of the Maasai explains the relationship between the Maasai and their sky god Enkai. She explains how a volcanic eruption sent Enkai and the cattle into the sky. In order to save the cattle, Enkai created a giant tree that allowed them to walk back to earth. Then, Enkai entrusted Neiterkob, the narrator’s father, and his tribe to care for the cattle. As a result, the cattle are sacred to the Maasai, and the Maasai maintain a close connection with Enkai. Is this an effective summary of the story? Yes, because it includes key ideas from the beginning, middle, and end, and it explains the conflict and the resolution. Yes, because it focuses on the details from the beginning, the obstacles from the middle, and the resolution from the end. No, because it is uses too many specific names from the beginning, middle, and end, and it has a vague resolution. No, because it leaves out details from the beginning, the obstacles from the middle, and the resolution from the end.

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Clouds of inferiority begin to form in her little mental sky creates what tone and mood?

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Clouds of inferiority begin to form in her little mental sky

Creates what tone and mood?

  • The tone of the narrator is negative. It is derogatory when he uses the words “little mental” it means small mind, with little perception; it shows a sense of superiority in the narrator. Although, when the narrator uses the word “sky”, he or she means something positive. The word “sky” by itself means something beautiful and enormous, but again with the adjective “little” shows even more superiority. If for the person descripted the narrator uses de word “sky” perhaps for himself uses the word “universe”. Regarding the mood, the narrator is merciless; he or she has no impediment to misjudge a person. The narrator also gives a melancholic mood to the person described by using the words “clouds of inferiority”. Melancholy gives us a much low range of emotions, as emotions that cannot go any upper.

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Which of the following is an example of a scientific question that is not testable? Why is the sky blue? How moist should soil be for a tomato seed to sprout? Is the strength of steel related to the amount of carbon in it? Does the rate of cooling of a liquid depend upon its initial temperature?

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Which of the following is an example of a scientific question that is not testable? Why is the sky blue? How moist should soil be for a tomato seed to sprout? Is the strength of steel related to the amount of carbon in it? Does the rate of cooling of a liquid depend upon its initial temperature?

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Which line best illustrates imagism? A. The pink sky sank into wet night. B. His mind remained clear but bereft of images. C. Yesterday lasted forever; tomorrow will never come. D. Those heroes of noble blood can sleep, but never can they rest.

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The correct answer is
A. The pink sky sank into wet night

Imagism is about depicting vivid images usually by describing using vivid colors or things that are felt by senses. Presenting someone’s mind or concepts like yesterday and tomorrow is not imagism because it’s too abstract to imagine vividly. Same with the final sentence where it’s not very vivid.

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Sulfur dioxide: a. creates a reddish-brown haze in the sky b. is a secondary air pollutant c. has an irritating odor and is colorless d. is relatively harmless to the environment

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Answer:

Helicases unwind the two parental DNA’s strands and creates the replication fork; single strand binding proteins keep the single strand from joining.


Further information:

• DNA replication: a biological method occurring in all living organisms that is the basis for biological inheritance

Helicase: It is an enzyme that may unwinds the DNA helix ahead of the replication machinery.

Origin of replication: a specific sequence in a genome at which replication is started.


Steps of DNA replication:

• During initiation, proteins fix to the source of replication while helicase unwinds the DNA helix and two replication forks are formed at the source of replication.

• During elongation, a primer sequence is added with complementary RNA nucleotides, which are then substituted by DNA nucleotides.

• During elongation the leading strand is made constantly, while the lagging strand is made in portions called Okazaki fragments.

• During termination, primers are detached and substituted with new DNA nucleotides and the backbone is stuck down by DNA ligase.

Purpose of DNA replication:

The purpose of DNA replication is to produce two duplicate copies of a DNA molecule. This is essential for cell division during development or repair of damaged tissues. DNA replication ensures that each new cell receives its own replica of the DNA.

Answer details:

Subject: Biology

Level: High school

Keywords:

• DNA replication

• Helicase

• Origin of replication

• Steps of DNA replication

Learn more to evaluate:

brainly.com/question/9434044

brainly.com/question/5939912

brainly.com/question/10654641

brainly.com/question/10652950

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Read the summary of “The Beginnings of the Maasai.” In “The Beginnings of the Maasai,” the daughter of the Maasai explains the relationship between the Maasai and their sky god Enkai. She explains how a volcanic eruption sent Enkai and the cattle into the sky. In order to save the cattle, Enkai created a giant tree that allowed them to walk back to earth. Then, Enkai entrusted Neiterkob, the narrator’s father, and his tribe to care for the cattle. As a result, the cattle are sacred to the Maasai, and the Maasai maintain a close connection with Enkai. Is this an effective summary of the story? Yes, because it includes key ideas from the beginning, middle, and end, and it explains the conflict and the resolution. Yes, because it focuses on the details from the beginning, the obstacles from the middle, and the resolution from the end. No, because it is uses too many specific names from the beginning, middle, and end, and it has a vague resolution. No, because it leaves out details from the beginning, the obstacles from the middle, and the resolution from the end.

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Answer:

Henri Rousseau’s Portrait of a Woman

Explanation:

Magical Realism finds precedent in eighteenth-century Gothic novels, but also connects with sixteenth-century Baroque or Surrealism, almost contemporary in the early twentieth century.

Among the most striking features of this movement, we find the blend of realism with pure unreality that is observed as normal, with the integration of magical elements without seeming extraordinary.

These works do not explain the supernatural elements and are narrated as something natural, with characters unaware of their transcendent dimension. In addition, death has paramount value in the relativistic discourse of truth, with a metaphysical focus on space and time and an intimate atmosphere that blends characters with myths, legends, and natural cultures.

Henri Rousseau’s Portrait of a Woman is considered one of the first magical realistic stories.

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How far is the sky from the earth

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October 4, 1957 – Sputnik I was launched into space

Sputnik I, launched on October 4, 1957 by the Soviet Union, was the first artificial satellite in history.

January 31, 1958 – Explorer I was launched

Explorer I was the first artificial satellite placed in Earth orbit by the United States. It was launched on January 31, 1958 in response to the launching of Sputnik I and Sputnik II by the Soviet Union, thus giving way to the space race, closely related to the Cold War.

April 12, 1961 – Humans orbited Earth

On April 12, 1961, aboard the ship Vostok I, the Soviet Yuri Gagarin was launched into outer space being the first human being to reach it and travel through it.

July 20, 1969 – The first human stepped onto the Moon

In July of 1969, as part of the Apollo 11 mission, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin descended to the surface of the Moon and walked through it for two and a half hours.

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In “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud,” the speaker is a human, who experiences the startling beauty of nature through the unexpected discovery of an entire sea of daffodils by the water. This poem is pensive and calm, using light, frivolous vocabulary: the daffodils are “fluttering and dancing in the breeze,” and “tossing their heads in sprightly dance.” The waves in the bay, as well, dance and sparkle, and yet the daffodils are more captivating even than the ocean, multitudinous as they are, as the stars in the sky. In Wordsworth’s poem nature is powerful and inviting, exhibiting forces of healing in the form of bright colors and gentle vibes. It is recounted from a comfortable, safe perspective; when the speaker is resting on his safe, warm couch, the memories of his solo walk along the bay …flash upon that inward eye Which is the bliss of solitude; And then my heart with pleasure fills, And dances with the daffodils. These recollections serve as a comfort and pleasure to him, even when he is comfortable in a pleasant environment. Such was the power of the scene. De la Mare’s poem also presents nature as a powerful force, but an impersonal, destructive one. The poem is told from the perspective of sea birds in a storm, and the vocabulary is a violent as Wordsworth’s is serene: “And the wind rose, and the sea rose,/To the angry billows’ roar,” and in the second verse, And the yeasty surf curdled over the sands, The gaunt grey rocks between; And the tempest raved, and the lightning’s fire Struck blue on the spindrift hoar – Here the birds have lost control, and the storm is forcing them onto the shore, waves tossing and wind howling, a wholly different scene than Wordsworth’s happy spring day. Even in the end, when the storm breaks and the sun comes out, we see the lingering effects of the chaos – “the bright green headlands shone/As they’d never shone before,” and yet within this setting we have vast hoards of sea birds breaking this lovely post-storm calm with their “screeching, scolding, [and] scrabbling.” But in the final two lines of the poem, we see also “A snowy, silent, sun-washed drift/Of sea-birds on the shore.” And herein lies the true destruction: while a whole host of birds are tumbling through the sky, another host of birds has been killed by the violence of the storm. Both poems depict the unpredictability of nature, and yet because Wordsworth’s poem is from the point of view of a man, on a bright spring day, his poem is more domestic and simple than that of de la Mare. The latter presents the point of view of nature itself, only to switch to a third person, withdrawn perspective at the end of the poem; humans have no role in the events that unfold. Any humans that exist in the area would have been safely indoors during the storm, away from any danger. We therefore get the rawness of nature where we would normally escape it for our fires and our beds; here is the flip-side of natural beauty – natural destruction. This poem is no walk in the garden, but a story of the wildness of natural processes. I NEED HELP WRITING THIS IN MY OWN WORDS PLEASE HELP

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In “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud,” the speaker is a human, who experiences the startling beauty of nature through the unexpected discovery of an entire sea of daffodils by the water. This poem is pensive and calm, using light, frivolous vocabulary: the daffodils are “fluttering and dancing in the breeze,” and “tossing their heads in sprightly dance.” The waves in the bay, as well, dance and sparkle, and yet the daffodils are more captivating even than the ocean, multitudinous as they are, as the stars in the sky.

In Wordsworth’s poem nature is powerful and inviting, exhibiting forces of healing in the form of bright colors and gentle vibes. It is recounted from a comfortable, safe perspective; when the speaker is resting on his safe, warm couch, the memories of his solo walk along the bay

…flash upon that inward eye
Which is the bliss of solitude;
And then my heart with pleasure fills,
And dances with the daffodils.

These recollections serve as a comfort and pleasure to him, even when he is comfortable in a pleasant environment. Such was the power of the scene.

De la Mare’s poem also presents nature as a powerful force, but an impersonal, destructive one. The poem is told from the perspective of sea birds in a storm, and the vocabulary is a violent as Wordsworth’s is serene: “And the wind rose, and the sea rose,/To the angry billows’ roar,” and in the second verse,

And the yeasty surf curdled over the sands,
The gaunt grey rocks between;
And the tempest raved, and the lightning’s fire
Struck blue on the spindrift hoar –

Here the birds have lost control, and the storm is forcing them onto the shore, waves tossing and wind howling, a wholly different scene than Wordsworth’s happy spring day. Even in the end, when the storm breaks and the sun comes out, we see the lingering effects of the chaos – “the bright green headlands shone/As they’d never shone before,” and yet within this setting we have vast hoards of sea birds breaking this lovely post-storm calm with their “screeching, scolding, [and] scrabbling.” But in the final two lines of the poem, we see also “A snowy, silent, sun-washed drift/Of sea-birds on the shore.” And herein lies the true destruction: while a whole host of birds are tumbling through the sky, another host of birds has been killed by the violence of the storm.

Both poems depict the unpredictability of nature, and yet because Wordsworth’s poem is from the point of view of a man, on a bright spring day, his poem is more domestic and simple than that of de la Mare. The latter presents the point of view of nature itself, only to switch to a third person, withdrawn perspective at the end of the poem; humans have no role in the events that unfold. Any humans that exist in the area would have been safely indoors during the storm, away from any danger. We therefore get the rawness of nature where we would normally escape it for our fires and our beds; here is the flip-side of natural beauty – natural destruction. This poem is no walk in the garden, but a story of the wildness of natural processes.

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