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Which event happened after the Battle of Midway? A: The victory at Guadalcanal B: The battle of Coral Sea C: The strike on Pearl Harbor D: The U.S. lost the aircraft carrier, The Lexington

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The Battles of Lexington and Concord were the firstmilitary engagements of the American Revolutionary War. The battles were fought on April 19, 1775 in Middlesex County, Province of Massachusetts Bay, within the towns of Lexington, Concord, Lincoln, Menotomy (present-day Arlington), and Cambridge.

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What was the leading cause of the Pullman Strike? Pullman cut wages but did not cut the rent he charged. Pullman forced workers into horrible living and working conditions. Pullman locked workers out of the factory. Pullman used only child labor.

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Answer:

The answer is C. In order to carefully control conditions and confirm or disconfirm a hypothesis about the causes of behavior, one must perform an experiment.

Explanation:

Experimental research allows the researcher to control all the variables in order to create the conditions that can confirm or disconfirm a hypothesis. This method aimes to establish a relation of causality between two variables, which means that one variable is generated and determined by the other; this is posible because all of the other variables that can influence it have been controlled.

When a researcher conducts a survey or engages in naturalistic observation, he can’t control the variables, therefore, he can only establish a correlation between two variables, but not of causality.

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How did president reagan finally resolve the air traffic controllers’ strike? he caved in to their demands. he sent the matter to arbitration. he fired all striking controllers. he stopped domestic aviation?

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1- The correct answer is B, as one result of the Great Society was that the lives of many underprivileged Americans improved.

The Great Society was a set of US national reform programs announced by President Lyndon B. Johnson for the first time in a speech at Ohio University on May 7, 1964 and more fully illustrated on May 22, 1964 at the University of Michigan. These reform programs were subsequently presented to the Congress of the United States and largely approved during the 1960s, thanks to the consent of its supporters of the Democratic Party.

Two main goals of social reforms were the elimination of poverty and racial injustice. During this period new large spending programs were launched in the fields of education, medical care, urban problems and transport. Johnson’s “Great Society” was linked, in its objectives and policies, to President Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s New Deal program.

Some proposals of the Great Society resumed initiatives contained in the New Frontier program, interrupted by the tragic death of President John F. Kennedy. Johnson’s success in promoting and endorsing his reforms depended on his considerable congressional political influence, his persuasion, and the favorable historical circumstances resulting from the 1964 presidential elections, which allowed the Democratic Party to dominate Congress and to elect the House of Representatives with the largest number of exponents of the liberal current since 1938.

The evolution of the Vietnam war and the massive involvement of the American military machine in the conflict, however, partly undermined the success of the “Great Society” program. Growing, huge expenditures for the continuation of the war made more difficult to finance the reform programs. Representatives of the Democratic Party against the war in Vietnam complained that military spending decisively stifled the Great Society program. On the whole, however, despite growing political and economic difficulties, which forced the administration to eliminate or reduce the financing of some projects, President Johnson managed to activate a series of programs of great importance, including Medicare, Medicaid, the Older Americans Act and the federal education funding, which are still active.

2- The correct answer is C, as the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 was necessary because the previous existing American immigration policies were discriminatory.

On October 3, 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the law into effect, saying: “The [old] system violates the basic principle of American democracy, the principle according to which the valuation and reward of each man should be established on the basis of his merits as a man. It has been anti-American in the highest sense, because it has been unfaithful to the faith that led thousands to these shores, even before we were a country. ”

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Against which industry did the congress of industrial organizations’ (cio’s) newly formed union stage a successful sit-down strike in 1936?

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1- The correct answer is B, as one result of the Great Society was that the lives of many underprivileged Americans improved.

The Great Society was a set of US national reform programs announced by President Lyndon B. Johnson for the first time in a speech at Ohio University on May 7, 1964 and more fully illustrated on May 22, 1964 at the University of Michigan. These reform programs were subsequently presented to the Congress of the United States and largely approved during the 1960s, thanks to the consent of its supporters of the Democratic Party.

Two main goals of social reforms were the elimination of poverty and racial injustice. During this period new large spending programs were launched in the fields of education, medical care, urban problems and transport. Johnson’s “Great Society” was linked, in its objectives and policies, to President Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s New Deal program.

Some proposals of the Great Society resumed initiatives contained in the New Frontier program, interrupted by the tragic death of President John F. Kennedy. Johnson’s success in promoting and endorsing his reforms depended on his considerable congressional political influence, his persuasion, and the favorable historical circumstances resulting from the 1964 presidential elections, which allowed the Democratic Party to dominate Congress and to elect the House of Representatives with the largest number of exponents of the liberal current since 1938.

The evolution of the Vietnam war and the massive involvement of the American military machine in the conflict, however, partly undermined the success of the “Great Society” program. Growing, huge expenditures for the continuation of the war made more difficult to finance the reform programs. Representatives of the Democratic Party against the war in Vietnam complained that military spending decisively stifled the Great Society program. On the whole, however, despite growing political and economic difficulties, which forced the administration to eliminate or reduce the financing of some projects, President Johnson managed to activate a series of programs of great importance, including Medicare, Medicaid, the Older Americans Act and the federal education funding, which are still active.

2- The correct answer is C, as the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 was necessary because the previous existing American immigration policies were discriminatory.

On October 3, 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the law into effect, saying: “The [old] system violates the basic principle of American democracy, the principle according to which the valuation and reward of each man should be established on the basis of his merits as a man. It has been anti-American in the highest sense, because it has been unfaithful to the faith that led thousands to these shores, even before we were a country. ”

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Robert's coworkers have decided to organize a strike against their employer. they say they won't report to work until they receive a pay increase. robert doesn't really feel this is fair because he knows the budget has been cut, and the employer is trying to discuss other ideas with the workers. robert decides to participate in the strike anyway. robert's actions can best be explained by:

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Robert’s coworkers have decided to organize a strike against their employer. they say they won’t report to work until they receive a pay increase. robert doesn’t really feel this is fair because he knows the budget has been cut, and the employer is trying to discuss other ideas with the workers. robert decides to participate in the strike anyway. robert’s actions can best be explained by:

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Taken together, what did president roosevelt’s actions in the anthracite coal strike of 1902 and the dissolution of northern securities in 1904 demonstrate about the u.s. government?

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Here are the following effects of loose money and tight
money policies on the actions being listed.

A. A loose money policy
is usually implemented as an effort to encourage economic growth.
This can lead to inflation when uncontrolled. The effects are:

1. Borrowing becomes easy

2. Consumer buys more

3. Since more people are willing to buy,
businesses expand

4. Employment rate increases due to
expansion of businesses

5. Since more people are employed, thus
production also increases

 

B. A tight money policy is a course of action to restrict spending
in an economy that is growing too quickly or to hold back inflation when it is
rising too fast. This can lead to recession when uncontrolled. The
effects are:

1. Borrowing becomes difficult

2. Consumer buys less

3. Since people don’t have a lot of
money, business don’t expand

4. Unemployment rate increases due to businesses
slowing down

5. Production decreases

 

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Which of the following factors is NOT essential to being able to properly strike an object? tracking an object with the eyes intercepting an object swinging with force eye-hand coordination

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Which of the following factors is NOT essential to being able to properly strike an object? tracking an object with the eyes intercepting an object swinging with force eye-hand coordination

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Pennsylvania coal miners went on strike in 1902. How did Thoedore Roosevelt’s response illustrate a change in the governments role?

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A. they gained increased economic independence by working in factories

The Industrial Revolution that took place between the late 18th century and mid-19th century in Europe, gave women new opportunities to increased her economic independence and gain a sense of pride by not relying completely on a man’s financial support.

However, there were various difficulties. During this time, the majority of women who started to work did it out of necessity. The industrial revolution forced families to move from rural areas to the big cities, and the working-class, who were in a disadvantageous position, received low-pay, therefore women needed to work in order to support the family.

They became a major workforce of textile industries and coal mines mainly. Though their work conditions weren’t good enough, having a paid job contributed change their role in society, showed them their abilities to be economically independent and later gave them the drive to push more for their rights as citizens.

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PLEASE HELP !!Read this part of rudyard kipling’s “rikki-tikki-tavi” from the jungle book. “teddy and his mother and father were at early breakfast, but rikki-tikki-tavi saw that they were not eating anything. They sat stone-still, and their faces were white.. [nagaina] was swaying to and fro, singing a son triumph, son of the big man who killed nag, ‘ she hissed, ‘ stay still. I am not ready yet. wait a little. Keep very still, all you three! if you move i strike…” This part represents which form of conflict? A. character versus character B. character versus society C. character versus supernatural force D. character versus himself

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The correct answer is A. I, II, III

Explanation:

“Character vs. nature”, which is also called, “Man vs. nature” is a type of conflict in literature or stories, this conflict is about a struggle between one character who is most of the times a person or has the features of a human and nature, including any elements of it, this means due to some force that originated in nature the character is unable to complete certain actions or achieved goals.

Examples of “Character vs. nature” conflicts includes earthquakes or tsunamis, but animals, as they are part of nature, can also be part of this type of conflict. This means, the monkey presented in the excerpt that stops Gulliver represents a “Character vs. nature” conflict and as point (I) presents the monkey and point (II) and (III) explained how this situation became a struggle for the character all I, II and III represent a “Character vs. nature” conflict as they all are about the struggle between one character (Gulliver) and nature (the monkey).

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4. [01.03] Which is the best example of Newton’s Second Law of Motion? A student has on roller skates and she decides to push against the railing. She immediately begins to roll backwards. A small, lightweight ball and a large, heavy ball are dropped off of a roof. They both strike the ground at the same time. A baseball player hits a baseball that is pitched to him. The ball immediately soars back in the direction of the pitcher. You are riding in a car that makes a quick right turn. You immediately slide across the back seat.

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The net force acting on the refrigerator is fbox{400,{text{N}}}.

Further Explanation:

The net force acting on a body is the sum of all the force that are acted on the body considering the direction of action of the force. In other words, the net force acting on a body is the vector sum of all the forces acting on the body.

Given:

The mass of the refrigerator is 200,{text{kg}}.

The force acting on the refrigerator is 400,{text{N}}.

The friction on the surface is turned off.

Concept:

The refrigerator is kept on the floor and the friction on the floor is turned off. It means that there is no force opposing the motion of the refrigerator on the floor.

The different forces acting on the refrigerator areas shown in the figure attached.

There are the forces acting on the refrigerator in the vertical as well as in the horizontal direction. So, the net force acting on the refrigerator will be in horizontal as well as in the vertical direction.

Net force in vertical direction:

The forces acting on the refrigerator in the vertical direction are the weight of refrigerator acting vertically downward and the normal reaction on the refrigerator acting in the vertically upward direction.

The weight of the refrigerator is given by:

fbox{bf W = mg}

Here, W is the weight of the refrigerator, m is the mass of the refrigerator and g is the acceleration due to gravity.

Consider the value of Acceleration due to gravity to be 9.8,{{text{ m}}mathord{left/{vphantom{{text{m}}{{{text{s}}^{text{2}}}}}} right.kern-nulldelimiterspace}{{{text{s}}^{text{2}}}}}.

Substitute 200,{text{kg}} for m and 9.8,{{text{ m}}mathord{left/{vphantom{{text{m}}{{{text{s}}^{text{2}}}}}}right.kern-nulldelimiterspace}{{{text{s}}^{text{2}}}}} for g in above expression.

begin{aligned}W&=left({200,{text{kg}}}right)left({9.8,{{text{m}}mathord{left/{vphantom{{text{m}}{{{text{s}}^{text{2}}}}}}right.kern-nulldelimiterspace}{{{text{s}}^{text{2}}}}}}right)\&=1960,{text{N}}\end{aligned}

The normal reaction on the refrigerator is the reaction force of the ground acting on the refrigerator. It is equal to the amount of force applied by the refrigerator on the ground. Therefore, the normal reaction acting on the refrigerator in the vertically upward direction is equal to the weight of the refrigerator but acting in opposite direction.

The net force on the refrigerator acting in the vertical direction is:

{F_v} = W - N

Here, {F_v} is the net force acting in vertical direction and N is the normal reaction on the refrigerator.

Substitute the value of W and N in above expression.

begin{aligned}{F_v}&=1960,{text{N}}-1960,{text{N}}\&=0,{text{N}}\end{aligned}

So, the net force acting on the refrigerator in vertical direction is 0 N.

Net force in horizontal direction:

Since the friction on the surface is turned off, there will be no opposing force to stop the motion of the refrigerator. The opposing force of friction acting on the refrigerator will be zero.

Friction force f=0,{text{N}}

The force acting on the refrigerator is acting to make the refrigerator move. The applied force on the refrigerator is 400,{text{N}}.

Applied force F=400,{text{N}}

The net horizontal force acting on the refrigerator is:

begin{aligned}{F_h}&=400,{text{N}}-0,{text{N}}\&=4{text{00}},{text{N}}\end{aligned}

Therefore, there is no net force on the refrigerator in the vertical direction and the net force on the refrigerator in the horizontal direction is fbox{400,{text{N}}}.

Learn More:

1.  Acceleration of a box under friction brainly.com/question/7031524

2.  A ball falling under the acceleration due to gravity brainly.com/question/10934170

3. Stress developed in a wire brainly.com/question/12985068

Answer Details:

Grade: High School

Subject: Physics

Chapter: Force

Keywords:

Force, horizontal, vertical, weight, normal reaction, direction, net force, refrigerator, 400 N, 400N, applied force, normal, friction, gravity, acceleration.

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Alexandra drops an egg from 30 m above the ground to hit Vanessa on the head. If Vanessa stands 3.5 meters tall. How fast is the egg moving when it strike her head? (Hint: Draw a picture and you will see why you have to consider her height and find the time first!)

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Angular momentum is given by the length of the arm to the object, multiplied by the momentum of the object, times the cosine of the angle that the momentum vector makes with the arm. From your illustration, that will be: 
L = R * m * vi * cos(90 – theta) 

cos(90 – theta) is just sin(theta) 
and R is the distance the projectile traveled, which is vi^2 * sin(2*theta) / g 

so, we have: L = vi^2 * sin(2*theta) * m * vi * sin(theta) / g 

We can combine the two vi terms and get: 

L = vi^3 * m * sin(theta) * sin(2*theta) / g 

What’s interesting is that angular momentum varies with the *cube* of the initial velocity. This is because, not only does increased velocity increase the translational momentum of the projectile, but it increase the *moment arm*, too. Also note that there might be a trig identity which lets you combine the two sin() terms, but nothing jumps out at me right at the moment. 

Now, for the first part… 

There are a few ways to attack this. Basically, you have to find the angle from the origin to the apogee (highest point) in the arc. Once we have that, we’ll know what angle the momentum vector makes with the moment-arm because, at the apogee, we know that all of the motion is *horizontal*. 

Okay, so let’s get back to what we know: 

L = d * m * v * cos(phi) 

where d is the distance (length to the arm), m is mass, v is velocity, and phi is the angle the velocity vector makes with the arm. Let’s take these one by one… 

m is still m. 
v is going to be the *hoizontal* component of the initial velocity (all the vertical component got eliminated by the acceleration of gravity). So, v = vi * cos(theta) 
d is going to be half of our distance R in part two (because, ignoring friction, the path of the projectile is a perfect parabola). So, d = vi^2 * sin(2*theta) / 2g 

That leaves us with phi, the angle the horizontal velocity vector makes with the moment arm. To find *that*, we need to know what the angle from the origin to the apogee is. We can find *that* by taking the arc-tangent of the slope, if we know that. Well, we know the “run” part of the slope (it’s our “d” term), but not the rise. 

The easy way to get the rise is by using conservation of energy. At the apogee, all of the *vertical* kinetic energy at the time of launch (1/2 * m * (vi * sin(theta))^2 ) has been turned into gravitational potential energy ( m * g * h ). Setting these equal, diving out the “m” and dividing “g” to the other side, we get: 

h = 1/2 * (vi * sin(theta))^2 / g 

So, there’s the rise. So, our *slope* is rise/run, so 

slope = [ 1/2 * (vi * sin(theta))^2 / g ] / [ vi^2 * sin(2*theta) / g ] 

The “g”s cancel. Astoundingly the “vi”s cancel, too. So, we get: 

slope = [ 1/2 * sin(theta)^2 ] / [ sin(2*theta) ] 

(It’s not too alarming that slope-at-apogee doesn’t depend upon vi, since that only determines the “magnitude” of the arc, but not it’s shape. Whether the overall flight of this thing is an inch or a mile, the arc “looks” the same). 

Okay, so… using our double-angle trig identities, we know that sin(2*theta) = 2*sin(theta)*cos(theta), so… 

slope = [ 1/2 * sin(theta)^2 ] / [ 2*sin(theta)*cos(theta) ] = tan(theta)/4 

Okay, so the *angle* (which I’ll call “alpha”) that this slope makes with the x-axis is just: arctan(slope), so… 

alpha = arctan( tan(theta) / 4 ) 

Alright… last bit. We need “phi”, the angle the (now-horizontal) momentum vector makes with that slope. Draw it on paper and you’ll see that phi = 180 – alpha 

so, phi = 180 – arctan( tan(theta) / 4 ) 

Now, we go back to our original formula and plug it ALL in… 

L = d * m * v * cos(phi) 

becomes… 

L = [ vi^2 * sin(2*theta) / 2g ] * m * [ vi * cos(theta) ] * [ cos( 180 – arctan( tan(theta) / 4 ) ) ] 

Now, cos(180 – something) = cos(something), so we can simplify a little bit… 

L = [ vi^2 * sin(2*theta) / 2g ] * m * [ vi * cos(theta) ] * [ cos( arctan( tan(theta) / 4 ) ) ] 

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