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The fossil record clearly shows that ________. the fossil record clearly shows that ________. large complex organisms evolved long before simple. nearly all species that have existed in the past still exist today. all species evolve from pre-existing species. new species appear suddenly and fully differentiated, without an ancestral species. several different species can hybridize to produce a single new species

Answered by answersmine AT 22/10/2019 – 02:35 AM I think the answer is all species evolve from pre-existing species. This was based on Charles Darwin’s Theory of Evolution which he learned during his expeditions.He identified that some fossils have similarities with other existing animals, in which he believed were a part of …

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What would be an example of spectral evidence in the Salem witch trialsa. a sudden operation visible only to the victim b. a victim feeling a deep cleaner suddenly overtake her body c. voices Whispering into the victims ear d.all of the above

What would be an example of spectral evidence in the Salem witch trialsa. a sudden operation visible only to the victim b. a victim feeling a deep cleaner suddenly overtake her body c. voices Whispering into the victims ear d.all of the above

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"And one day those men came again, and said, now for the test, and they took the puppy to the laboratory, and I limped three-leggedly along, too, feeling proud, for any attention shown to the puppy was a pleasure to me, of course. They discussed and experimented, and then suddenly the puppy shrieked, and they set him on the floor, and he went staggering around, with his head all bloody, and the master clapped his hand and shouted: 'There, I've won–confess it! He's blind as a bat!'" "A Dog's Tale." Mark Twain, 1904. This illustrates the ________ in the story. A. style B. allusion C. conflict D. foreshadowing

“And one day those men came again, and said, now for the test, and they took the puppy to the laboratory, and I limped three-leggedly along, too, feeling proud, for any attention shown to the puppy was a pleasure to me, of course. They discussed and experimented, and then suddenly …

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Which sentences in this excerpt from Leo Tolstoy’s The Death of Ivan Ilyich show Ivan Ilyich’s struggle with his life and his inability to let go of his past? For three whole days, during which time did not exist for him, he struggled in that black sack into which he was being thrust by an invisible, resistless force. He struggled as a man condemned to death struggles in the hands of the executioner, knowing that he cannot save himself. And every moment he felt that despite all his efforts he was drawing nearer and nearer to what terrified him. He felt that his agony was due to his being thrust into that black hole and still more to his not being able to get right into it. He was hindered from getting into it by his conviction that his life had been a good one. That very justification of his life held him fast and prevented his moving forward, and it caused him most torment of all. Suddenly some force struck him in the chest and side, making it still harder to breathe, and he fell through the hole and there at the bottom was a light. What had happened to him was like the sensation one sometimes experiences in a railway carriage when one thinks one is going backwards while one is really going forwards and suddenly becomes aware of the real direction. “Yes, it was not the right thing,” he said to himself, “but that’s no matter. It can be done. But what is the right thing? he asked himself, and suddenly grew quiet.

Hey there! Correct answer is D. Comma or Period Inside Rule A. Question mark or exclamation point inside: those are not really necessary. B. Colon or semicolon: not, a semicolon would divide the whole sentence and it would be shorten; a colon would work but after requested, when there is …

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A tennis ball traveling horizontally at 22.0 m/s suddenly hits a vertical brick wall and bounces back with a horizontal velocity of 18.0 m/s

Answer: a) The time the police officer required to reach the motorist was 15 s. b) The speed of the officer at the moment she overtakes the motorist is 30 m/s c) The total distance traveled by the officer was 225 m. Explanation: The equations for the position and velocity …

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(Informational Response) Review the excerpt above. Answer the following question in a well-developed paragraph. How does the excerpt prepare the reader for the last line? What details and descriptions prepare the reader for the change in tone and mood in that final line? **Be sure to re-state the question in your topic sentence and use specific examples and details from the story to support your answers. Proofread your work before submitting. Chapter I, The Beginning of Things They were not railway children to begin with. I don’t suppose they had ever thought about railways except as a means of getting to Maskelyne and Cook’s, the Pantomime, Zoological Gardens, and Madame Tussaud’s. They were just ordinary suburban children, and they lived with their Father and Mother in an ordinary red-brick-fronted villa, with coloured glass in the front door, a tiled passage that was called a hall, a bath-room with hot and cold water, electric bells, French windows, and a good deal of white paint, and ‘every modern convenience’, as the house-agents say. There were three of them. Roberta was the eldest. Of course, Mothers never have favourites, but if their Mother HAD had a favourite, it might have been Roberta. Next came Peter, who wished to be an Engineer when he grew up; and the youngest was Phyllis, who meant extremely well. Mother did not spend all her time in paying dull calls to dull ladies, and sitting dully at home waiting for dull ladies to pay calls to her. She was almost always there, ready to play with the children, and read to them, and help them to do their home-lessons. Besides this she used to write stories for them while they were at school, and read them aloud after tea, and she always made up funny pieces of poetry for their birthdays and for other great occasions, such as the christening of the new kittens, or the refurnishing of the doll’s house, or the time when they were getting over the mumps. These three lucky children always had everything they needed: pretty clothes, good fires, a lovely nursery with heaps of toys, and a Mother Goose wall-paper. They had a kind and merry nursemaid, and a dog who was called James, and who was their very own. They also had a Father who was just perfect—never cross, never unjust, and always ready for a game—at least, if at any time he was NOT ready, he always had an excellent reason for it, and explained the reason to the children so interestingly and funnily that they felt sure he couldn’t help himself. You will think that they ought to have been very happy. And so they were, but they did not know HOW happy till the pretty life in the Red Villa was over and done with, and they had to live a very different life indeed. The dreadful change came quite suddenly.

Answer: D) I drove them, all three wailing, to the ships, Explanation: Odysseus chooses to do battle with the Greeks despite the fact that he wouldn’t like to leave his wife and child. Being a decent pioneer he will be, he sets aside his own wants and unselfishly offers himself …

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“A ship lost at sea for many days suddenly sighted a friendly vessel. From the mast of the unfortunate vessel was seen a signal, “Water, water; we die of thirst!” The answer from the friendly vessel at once came back, “Cast down your bucket where you are.” A second time the signal, “Water, water; send us water!” ran up from the distressed vessel, and was answered, “Cast down your bucket where you are.” And a third and fourth signal for water was answered, “Cast down your bucket where you are.” The captain of the distressed vessel, at last heeding the injunction, cast down his bucket, and it came up full of fresh, sparkling water from the mouth of the Amazon River. To those of my race who depend on bettering their condition in a foreign land or who underestimate the importance of cultivating friendly relations with the Southern white man, who is their next-door neighbor, I would say: “Cast down your bucket where you are”— cast it down in making friends in every manly way of the people of all races by whom we are surrounded.” Booker T. Washington, 1895 In this passage, Washington is urging African Americans to A) start a new life in South America. B) work more closely with whites in the South. C) start a revolution against the United States. D) form groups to fight against the Ku Klux Klan.

1. Free trade 2. Competition 3. Domestic Free trade agreements allow for easy trade between countries and can lower prices, but can create a loss of jobs for one country while the other gains employment. The US has a free trade agreement with Mexico and Canada called the North American …

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Reread Lines 146 to 203 and check three questions Everyman asks Death to answer. May he come back from his pilgrimage? What judgment awaits him? May he have someone to go with him? Where can he go to escape endless sorrow? For Adam’s sin must die of nature. 145 EVERYMAN. Death, if I should this pilgrimage take, And my reckoning surely make, Show me, for saint charity, Should I not come again shortly? DEATH. No, Everyman; and thou be once there, 150 Thou mayest never more come here, Trust me verily. EVERYMAN. O gracious God, in the high seat celestial, Have mercy on me in this most need! Shall I have no company from this vale terrestrial Of mine acquaintance that way me to lead? 155 DEATH. Yea, if any be so hardy, That would go with thee and bear thee company. Hie thee that thou were gone to God’s magnificence, Thy reckoning to give before his presence. What! weenest ° thou thy life is given thee, 160 °think And thy worldly goods also? EVERYMAN. I had weened so, verily. DEATH. Nay, nay; it was but lent thee; For, as soon as thou art gone, Another a while shall have it, and then go therefrom 165 Even as thou hast done. Everyman, thou art mad! Thou hast thy wits five, And here on earth will not amend thy life; For suddenly I do come. EVERYMAN. O wretched caitiff! whither shall I flee, 170 That I might ‘scape endless sorrow? Now, gentle Death, spare me till tomorrow, That I may amend me With good advisement. ° °warning DEATH. Nay, thereto I will not consent, 175 Nor no man will I respite, But to the heart suddenly I shall smite Without any advisement. And now out of thy sight I will me hie; See thou make thee ready shortly, 180 For thou mayst say this is the day That no man living may ‘scape away. (Exit DEATH.) EVERYMAN. Alas! I may well weep with sighs deep. Now have I no manner of company To help me in my journey and me to keep; 185 And also my writing is full unready. How shall I do now for to excuse me? I would to God I had never been get! To my soul a full great profit it had be, For now I fear pains huge and great. 190 The time passeth; Lord, help, that all wrought. For though I mourn it availeth naught. The day passeth, and is almost a-go; I wot ° not well what for to do. °know To whom were I best my complaint to make? 195 What if I to Fellowship thereof spake, And showed him of this sudden chance? For in him is all mine affiance, ° °trust We have in the world so many a day Been good friends in sport and play. 200 I see him yonder, certainly: I trust that he will bear me company; Therefore to him will I speak to ease my sorrow.

Answer: 3. There is within me (and with sadness I have watched it in others) a knot of cruelty borne by the stream of love, much as our blood sometimes bears the seed of our destruction, and at times I was mean to Doodle. Explanation: This is the statement that …

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