Categories
Assignment Help

Your baby is driving you crazy because he turns the light switch on and off for hours. what would piaget say about this behavior?

[ad_1]

Answer:

The answer is C. In order to carefully control conditions and confirm or disconfirm a hypothesis about the causes of behavior, one must perform an experiment.

Explanation:

Experimental research allows the researcher to control all the variables in order to create the conditions that can confirm or disconfirm a hypothesis. This method aimes to establish a relation of causality between two variables, which means that one variable is generated and determined by the other; this is posible because all of the other variables that can influence it have been controlled.

When a researcher conducts a survey or engages in naturalistic observation, he can’t control the variables, therefore, he can only establish a correlation between two variables, but not of causality.

[ad_2]

Categories
Assignment Help

. The toasting cycle of an automatic toaster is started by A. pushing the bread rack down. B. pushing the start button. C. turning on the built-in switch. D. setting the thermostat knob.

[ad_1]

A machine cycle is the term used to the basic operations that the central processing unit, or CPU, of your computer does. These operations include the instruction and execution cycle. You instruct the computer by clicking, for example, and through programming, the CPU executes the work.

[ad_2]

Categories
Assignment Help

Which clue can be used to identify a chemical reaction as a replacement reaction? The reaction has two reactants with ions that seem to switch places. The reaction has a single reactant that changes into two or more products. The reaction involves oxygen reacting with a hydrocarbon and giving off heat. The reaction involves a single product forming from two or more reactants.

[ad_1]

Answer: Option (a) is the correct answer.

Explanation:

A replacement reaction is a chemical reaction in which a more reactive atom or ion displaces least reaction atom or ion.

For example, NaCl + H_{2}O rightarrow NaOH + HCl

Here, Na gets replaced by H atom and Cl ion gets replaced by OH ion.

Whereas when teo or more reactants combine to forms a single product then that reaction is a synthesis reaction and not a displacement reaction because two different ions or atoms combine together to form a single product.

For example, Na^{+} + Cl^{-} rightarrow NaCl is a synthesis reaction.

Thus, we can conclude that the reaction has two reactants with ions that seem to switch places is a clue that can be used to identify a chemical reaction as a replacement reaction.

[ad_2]

Categories
Assignment Help

The fact that if the price of milk, butter, or cab rides increases, people might switch to soy milk, margarine, or the bus, is an example of what factor that shifts demand? A. income B. consumer tastes C. prices of related goods D. consumer expectations

[ad_1]

More than half of the world’s population lives in urban areas. Due to the ongoing urbanisation and growth of the world’s population, there will be about 2.5 billion more people added to the urban population by 2050, mainly in Africa and Asia. The world’s urban areas are highly varied, but many cities and towns are facing problems such as a lack of jobs, homelessness and expanding squatter settlements, inadequate services and infrastructure, poor health and educational services and high levels of pollution.

In this study session, you will learn about the trends in urbanisation and the causes of urban growth. You will also learn about the demographic, health, environmental and social consequences of urbanisation.

Learning Outcomes for Study Session 5

When you have studied this session, you should be able to:

5.1  Define and use correctly all of the key words printed in bold. (SAQs 5.1 and 5.2)

5.2  Describe the global and local trends in urbanisation. (SAQ 5.3)

5.3  Explain the main causes of urban growth. (SAQs 5.1 and 5.2)

5.4  Describe the main positive and negative impacts of urbanisation. (SAQ 5.4)

5.1  Urbanisation trends

In Study Session 2 you learned about the overall trend in global population growth. Most of this increase is taking place in urban areas. Urbanisation is an increase in the number of people living in towns and cities. Urbanisation occurs mainly because people move from rural areas to urban areas and it results in growth in the size of the urban population and the extent of urban areas. These changes in population lead to other changes in land use, economic activity and culture. Historically, urbanisation has been associated with significant economic and social transformations. For example, urban living is linked with higher levels of literacy and education, better health, lower fertility and a longer life expectancy, greater access to social services and enhanced opportunities for cultural and political participation (UNDESA, 2014). However, urbanisation also has disadvantages caused by rapid and unplanned urban growth resulting in poor infrastructures such as inadequate housing, water and sanitation, transport and health care services.

5.1.1  Global trends in urbanisation

In 1960, the global urban population was 34% of the total; however, by 2014 the urban population accounted for 54% of the total and continues to grow. By 2050 the proportion living in urban areas is expected to reach 66% (UNDESA, 2014). Figure 5.1 shows the change in the rural and urban populations of the world from 1950 through to projected figures up to the year 2050.

Figure 5.1  Urban and rural population of the world, 1950–2050. (UNDESA, 2014)From Figure 5.1, in which year did the number of people living in urban areas first exceed the number living in rural areas?The two lines cross at about 2007 or 2008. This is when urban first 

[ad_2]

Categories
Assignment Help

Which of these statements illustrates how Britain exerted sociocultural imperialism in India? A.English became one of the most widely spoken languages in India. B.Christianity took over as the main religion in India. C.Fish and chips became the national dish of India. D.Indian women were required to switch from ethnic clothes to English attire.

[ad_1]

In the basin of a half-billion souls, purification and pollution swim together in unholy wedlock. According to Hindu mythology, the Ganges river of India – the goddess Ganga – came down to the earth from the skies. The descent was precipitated when Vishnu, the preserver of worlds, took three giant strides across the Underworld, the Earth, and the Heavens, and his last step tore a crack in the heavens. As the river rushed through the crack, Shiva, the god of destruction, stood waiting on the peaks of the Himalayas to catch it in his matted locks. From his hair, it began its journey across the Indian subcontinent. Whatever one makes of this myth, the Ganges does, in fact, carry extraordinary powers of both creation and destruction in its long descent from the Himalayas. At its source, it springs as melted ice from an immense glacial cave lined with icicles that do look like long strands of hair. From an altitude of nearly 14,000 feet, it falls south and east through the Himalayan foothills, across the plains of northern India, and down to the storm-lashed Indo-Bangladesh delta, where it empties out into the Indian Ocean. Another version of the myth tells us that Ganga descended to earth to purify the souls of the 60,000 sons of an ancient ruler, King Sagara, who had been burnt to ashes by an enraged ascetic.

[ad_2]

Categories
Assignment Help

In “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud,” the speaker is a human, who experiences the startling beauty of nature through the unexpected discovery of an entire sea of daffodils by the water. This poem is pensive and calm, using light, frivolous vocabulary: the daffodils are “fluttering and dancing in the breeze,” and “tossing their heads in sprightly dance.” The waves in the bay, as well, dance and sparkle, and yet the daffodils are more captivating even than the ocean, multitudinous as they are, as the stars in the sky. In Wordsworth’s poem nature is powerful and inviting, exhibiting forces of healing in the form of bright colors and gentle vibes. It is recounted from a comfortable, safe perspective; when the speaker is resting on his safe, warm couch, the memories of his solo walk along the bay …flash upon that inward eye Which is the bliss of solitude; And then my heart with pleasure fills, And dances with the daffodils. These recollections serve as a comfort and pleasure to him, even when he is comfortable in a pleasant environment. Such was the power of the scene. De la Mare’s poem also presents nature as a powerful force, but an impersonal, destructive one. The poem is told from the perspective of sea birds in a storm, and the vocabulary is a violent as Wordsworth’s is serene: “And the wind rose, and the sea rose,/To the angry billows’ roar,” and in the second verse, And the yeasty surf curdled over the sands, The gaunt grey rocks between; And the tempest raved, and the lightning’s fire Struck blue on the spindrift hoar – Here the birds have lost control, and the storm is forcing them onto the shore, waves tossing and wind howling, a wholly different scene than Wordsworth’s happy spring day. Even in the end, when the storm breaks and the sun comes out, we see the lingering effects of the chaos – “the bright green headlands shone/As they’d never shone before,” and yet within this setting we have vast hoards of sea birds breaking this lovely post-storm calm with their “screeching, scolding, [and] scrabbling.” But in the final two lines of the poem, we see also “A snowy, silent, sun-washed drift/Of sea-birds on the shore.” And herein lies the true destruction: while a whole host of birds are tumbling through the sky, another host of birds has been killed by the violence of the storm. Both poems depict the unpredictability of nature, and yet because Wordsworth’s poem is from the point of view of a man, on a bright spring day, his poem is more domestic and simple than that of de la Mare. The latter presents the point of view of nature itself, only to switch to a third person, withdrawn perspective at the end of the poem; humans have no role in the events that unfold. Any humans that exist in the area would have been safely indoors during the storm, away from any danger. We therefore get the rawness of nature where we would normally escape it for our fires and our beds; here is the flip-side of natural beauty – natural destruction. This poem is no walk in the garden, but a story of the wildness of natural processes. I NEED HELP WRITING THIS IN MY OWN WORDS PLEASE HELP

[ad_1]

In “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud,” the speaker is a human, who experiences the startling beauty of nature through the unexpected discovery of an entire sea of daffodils by the water. This poem is pensive and calm, using light, frivolous vocabulary: the daffodils are “fluttering and dancing in the breeze,” and “tossing their heads in sprightly dance.” The waves in the bay, as well, dance and sparkle, and yet the daffodils are more captivating even than the ocean, multitudinous as they are, as the stars in the sky.

In Wordsworth’s poem nature is powerful and inviting, exhibiting forces of healing in the form of bright colors and gentle vibes. It is recounted from a comfortable, safe perspective; when the speaker is resting on his safe, warm couch, the memories of his solo walk along the bay

…flash upon that inward eye
Which is the bliss of solitude;
And then my heart with pleasure fills,
And dances with the daffodils.

These recollections serve as a comfort and pleasure to him, even when he is comfortable in a pleasant environment. Such was the power of the scene.

De la Mare’s poem also presents nature as a powerful force, but an impersonal, destructive one. The poem is told from the perspective of sea birds in a storm, and the vocabulary is a violent as Wordsworth’s is serene: “And the wind rose, and the sea rose,/To the angry billows’ roar,” and in the second verse,

And the yeasty surf curdled over the sands,
The gaunt grey rocks between;
And the tempest raved, and the lightning’s fire
Struck blue on the spindrift hoar –

Here the birds have lost control, and the storm is forcing them onto the shore, waves tossing and wind howling, a wholly different scene than Wordsworth’s happy spring day. Even in the end, when the storm breaks and the sun comes out, we see the lingering effects of the chaos – “the bright green headlands shone/As they’d never shone before,” and yet within this setting we have vast hoards of sea birds breaking this lovely post-storm calm with their “screeching, scolding, [and] scrabbling.” But in the final two lines of the poem, we see also “A snowy, silent, sun-washed drift/Of sea-birds on the shore.” And herein lies the true destruction: while a whole host of birds are tumbling through the sky, another host of birds has been killed by the violence of the storm.

Both poems depict the unpredictability of nature, and yet because Wordsworth’s poem is from the point of view of a man, on a bright spring day, his poem is more domestic and simple than that of de la Mare. The latter presents the point of view of nature itself, only to switch to a third person, withdrawn perspective at the end of the poem; humans have no role in the events that unfold. Any humans that exist in the area would have been safely indoors during the storm, away from any danger. We therefore get the rawness of nature where we would normally escape it for our fires and our beds; here is the flip-side of natural beauty – natural destruction. This poem is no walk in the garden, but a story of the wildness of natural processes.

[ad_2]