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In Book 9 of the Odyssey, Ulysses saves himself and his men by blinding Polyphemus. Which lines reflect the Cyclops's disappointment at being defeated by guile and not by strength? Oh heavens! oh faith of ancient prophecies! This, Telemus Eurymedes foretold (The mighty seer who on these hills grew old; Skill'd the dark fates of mortals to declare, And learn'd in all wing'd omens of the air); Long since he menaced, such was Fate's command; And named Ulysses as the destined hand. I deem'd some godlike giant to behold, Or lofty hero, haughty, brave, and bold; Not this weak pigmy wretch, of mean design, Who, not by strength subdued me, but by wine. But come, accept our gifts, and join to pray Great Neptune's blessing on the watery way; For his I am, and I the lineage own; The immortal father no less boasts the son.



In Book 9 of the Odyssey, Ulysses saves himself and his men by blinding Polyphemus. Which lines reflect the Cyclops’s disappointment at being defeated by guile and not by strength? Oh heavens! oh faith of ancient prophecies! This, Telemus Eurymedes foretold (The mighty seer who on these hills grew old; Skill’d the dark fates of mortals to declare, And learn’d in all wing’d omens of the air); Long since he menaced, such was Fate’s command; And named Ulysses as the destined hand. I deem’d some godlike giant to behold, Or lofty hero, haughty, brave, and bold; Not this weak pigmy wretch, of mean design, Who, not by strength subdued me, but by wine. But come, accept our gifts, and join to pray Great Neptune’s blessing on the watery way; For his I am, and I the lineage own; The immortal father no less boasts the son.

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PLEASE HELP Mr. Utterson the lawyer was a man of a rugged countenance, that was never lighted by a smile; cold, scanty and embarrassed in discourse; backward in sentiment; lean, long, dusty, dreary, and yet somehow lovable. At friendly meetings, and when the wine was to his taste, something eminently human beaconed from his eye; something indeed which never found its way into his talk, but which spoke not only in these silent symbols of the after-dinner face, but more often and loudly in the acts of his life. He was austere with himself; drank gin when he was alone, to mortify a taste for vintages; and though he enjoyed the theatre, had not crossed the doors of one for twenty years. But he had an approved tolerance for others; sometimes wondering, almost with envy, at the high pressure of spirits involved in their misdeeds; and in any extremity inclined to help rather than to reprove. "I incline to, Cain's heresy*," he used to say. "I let my brother go to the devil in his quaintly 'own way.'" In this character, it was frequently his fortune to be the last reputable acquaintance and the last good influence in the lives of down-going men. And to such as these, so long as they came about his chambers, he never marked a shade of change in his demeanour. No doubt the feat was easy to Mr. Utterson; for he was undemonstrative at the best, and even his friendship seemed to be founded in a similar catholicity of good-nature. It is the mark of a modest man to accept his friendly circle ready-made from the hands of opportunity; and that was the lawyer's way. His friends were those of his own blood or those whom he had known the longest; his affections, like ivy, were the growth of time, they implied no aptness in the object. Hence, no doubt, the bond that united him to Mr. Richard Enfield, his distant kinsman, the well-known man about town. It was a nut to crack for many, what these two could see in each other, or what subject they could find in common. It was reported by those who encountered them in their Sunday walks, that they said nothing, looked singularly dull, and would hail with obvious relief the appearance of a friend. For all that, the two men put the greatest store by these excursions, counted them the chief jewel of each week, and not only set aside occasions of pleasure, but even resisted the calls of business, that they might enjoy them uninterrupted. *The biblical story of Cain and Abel is a story about two brothers who gave offerings to God. Abel’s offering was accepted by God, but Cain’s was not. Jealous, Cain killed his brother. When God asked Cain where Abel was, Cain said, “Am I my brother’s keeper?” By saying this, Cain implied that what his brother did was his own business. (Genesis 4:1-16) What is significant about “Cain’s heresy” in this passage? A.It shows that Mr. Utterson is a deeply religious and righteous person. B.It shows that Mr. Utterson tries not to judge others or get in their business. C.It shows the Mr. Utterson wants to steal from other people’s businesses. D.It shows that Mr. Utterson does not believe in any kind of religion at all.



PLEASE HELP Mr. Utterson the lawyer was a man of a rugged countenance, that was never lighted by a smile; cold, scanty and embarrassed in discourse; backward in sentiment; lean, long, dusty, dreary, and yet somehow lovable. At friendly meetings, and when the wine was to his taste, something eminently human beaconed from his eye; something indeed which never found its way into his talk, but which spoke not only in these silent symbols of the after-dinner face, but more often and loudly in the acts of his life. He was austere with himself; drank gin when he was alone, to mortify a taste for vintages; and though he enjoyed the theatre, had not crossed the doors of one for twenty years. But he had an approved tolerance for others; sometimes wondering, almost with envy, at the high pressure of spirits involved in their misdeeds; and in any extremity inclined to help rather than to reprove. “I incline to, Cain’s heresy*,” he used to say. “I let my brother go to the devil in his quaintly ‘own way.'” In this character, it was frequently his fortune to be the last reputable acquaintance and the last good influence in the lives of down-going men. And to such as these, so long as they came about his chambers, he never marked a shade of change in his demeanour. No doubt the feat was easy to Mr. Utterson; for he was undemonstrative at the best, and even his friendship seemed to be founded in a similar catholicity of good-nature. It is the mark of a modest man to accept his friendly circle ready-made from the hands of opportunity; and that was the lawyer’s way. His friends were those of his own blood or those whom he had known the longest; his affections, like ivy, were the growth of time, they implied no aptness in the object. Hence, no doubt, the bond that united him to Mr. Richard Enfield, his distant kinsman, the well-known man about town. It was a nut to crack for many, what these two could see in each other, or what subject they could find in common. It was reported by those who encountered them in their Sunday walks, that they said nothing, looked singularly dull, and would hail with obvious relief the appearance of a friend. For all that, the two men put the greatest store by these excursions, counted them the chief jewel of each week, and not only set aside occasions of pleasure, but even resisted the calls of business, that they might enjoy them uninterrupted. *The biblical story of Cain and Abel is a story about two brothers who gave offerings to God. Abel’s offering was accepted by God, but Cain’s was not. Jealous, Cain killed his brother. When God asked Cain where Abel was, Cain said, “Am I my brother’s keeper?” By saying this, Cain implied that what his brother did was his own business. (Genesis 4:1-16) What is significant about “Cain’s heresy” in this passage? A.It shows that Mr. Utterson is a deeply religious and righteous person. B.It shows that Mr. Utterson tries not to judge others or get in their business. C.It shows the Mr. Utterson wants to steal from other people’s businesses. D.It shows that Mr. Utterson does not believe in any kind of religion at all.

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What is the optimal level or humidity for storing wine


Answer:

The correct is: B. build a strong foundation by satisfying the lower level needs.

Explanation:

Abraham Maslow (20th century) was an American psychologist known for his theory of needs. According to his hierarchy, there is an established order of priority when it comes to human necessities.

1. PHYSIOLOGICAL NEEDS (sleep, eat, breathe, etc.)

2. SAFETY NEEDS (feel secure, out of danger and instability)

3. LOVE NEEDS (to love and to be loved, to belong to someone, etc.)

4. ESTEEM NEEDS (to fulfill our goals, have a good career, feel recognized, etc.)

5. SELF-ACTUALIZATION (the need to achieve our maximum potential, be the best we can, develop our creativity, etc.)

This is usually presented in the form of a pyramid and it clearly shows that there are needs to be fulfilled in order to reach the next level. Maslow claims that we cannot expect someone to chase self-actualization if he can’t satisfy his basic needs (for example, if has issues with eating properly).

A. rise above daily problems by improving one’s emotional health

It is important to say that later on, Maslow admitted that there can be exceptions to his theory. Let us think of the people who achieved the state of mindfulness and we can conclude that it is possible to reach the higher levels skipping the lower ones.

C. free oneself of relationships that tend to cause complications in life

This is not the only condition to get to the top of the pyramid. In fact, freeing ourselves of something unpleasant without trying to resolve it instead can lead us to another kind of problem.

D. separate oneself from others who have problems

The explanation for this one is the same as for C.

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The price of a certain type of wine depends on its age described by the function price age

Answer:

The vertex is (2, 4), the domain is all real numbers, and the range is y ≥ 4.

Step-by-step explanation:

The equation of the parabola is f(x)=(x-2)^2+4

The vertex form of the parabola is given by

f(x)=a(x-h)^2+k, here (h,k) is the vertex.

Comparing given equation with the vertex form of the parabola, we get

h = 2, k = 4

Hence, the vertex of the parabola is (h,k) = (2,4)

Now, domain is the set of x values for which the function is defined. The given function is defined for all real values of x.

Hence, domain is all real numbers.

Range is the set of y values for which the function is defined.

Since, here a = 1>0 hence it is a upward parabola and the vertex is the minimum point of this parabola.

Since, vertex is (2,4) hence, y values never less than 4.

Hence, range is y ≥ 4.

D is the correct options.

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Instructions:Select the correct text in the passage. Which lines in the poem are examples of alliteration? Song: To Celia by Ben Jonson Drink to me only with thine eyes, And I will pledge with mine; Or leave a kiss but in the cup, And I’ll not look for wine. The thirst that from the soul doth rise Doth ask a drink divine; But might I of Jove’s nectar sup, I would not change for thine. I sent thee late a rosy wreath, Not so much honouring thee As giving it a hope, that there It could not withered be. But thou thereon didst only breathe, And sent’st it back to me; Since when it grows, and smells, I swear, Not of itself, but thee.


“The Raven” is a poem written by the American writer Edgar Allan Poe. It was first published in January 1845. The poem is often well-known for its musicality, stylized language, and supernatural atmosphere. It tells of a talking raven’s mysterious visit to a troubled lover, sketching the man’s fall into madness. The lover, often identified as being a student, is lamenting the loss of his love, Lenore. The raven seems to further distress the protagonist with its constant repetition of the word “Nevermore”. The poem makes use of folk, mythological, religious, and classical references. In his Poem The Raven, like in most of his work, Poe depicts horror and a sense of schizophrenia, but his short story deals primarily with the psychology of guilt.

In the first two stanzas of “The Raven” by Edgar Allan Poe, the author reveals important information about the speaker. The speaker is reading so late at night because:

He is trying to find relief from his sorrow”

Here we have the evidence from the poem for such an answer:

“Eagerly I wished the morrow;—vainly I had sought to borrow

 From my books surcease of sorrow—sorrow for the lost Lenore—”